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NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD 08 MAY 2019 VOL 45 NO 47

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PARLIAMENT OF ZIMBABWE

Wednesday, 8th May, 2019

The National Assembly met at a Quarter-past Two O’clock p.m.

PRAYERS

(THE HON. SPEAKER in the Chair)

ANNOUNCEMENTS BY THE HON. SPEAKER

VISITORS IN THE SPEAKER’S GALLERY

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order.  I recognise the presence in the Speaker’s Gallery of delegates from the Ugandan Parliament Budget Office undertaking a study visit to the Zimbabwean Parliament Budget Office.  They are led by the Assistant Director Mr. William Lubowa, accompanied by Mr. Kimule Sulait, Mrs. Janet Mataka, Mr. Moses Nabaasa, Mr. Samvim Wadikinyi and Mr. Sam Mwekwatse.  You are welcome – [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.]

APOLOGIES RECEIVED FROM MINISTERS

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  The following Hon. Ministers have tendered their apologies;

          Hon. M. Mutsvangwa – The Minster of Information, Publicity and Broadcasting Services,

          Hon. Dr. S. G. G. Nyoni       - The Minister of Women’s Affairs, Community, Small and Medium Enterprises Development,

          Hon. P. Mupfumira  -The Minister of Environment, Tourism and Hospitality Industry and

          Hon. C. Mathema -Minister of Home Affairs and Cultural Development

CHANGES TO PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIPS

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  I have to inform the House of the following assignments to various Portfolio Committees as follows;

          Hon. Nduna to serve on the Committees on Public Accounts and Justice and Legal Affairs;

          Hon. Madhuku to serve on the Committee on Mines and Mining Development;

          Hon. Dr. Musabayana to serve on the Committee on Mines and Mining Development;

          Hon. Mugweni to serve on the Committee on Mines and Mining Development;

          Hon. Mawire to serve on the Committee on Justice and Legal Affairs;

          Hon. Mashonganyika to serve on the Committee on Environment and Tourism;

          Hon. Raidza to serve on the Committee on Justice, Legal Affairs and Hon. S. Sithole to serve on the Committee on Public Accounts.

PETITION RECEIVED

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  I wish to advise the House that on the 23rd March, 2019, Parliament of Zimbabwe received a petition from Hatcliffe Extension residents regarding the transfer of Hatcliffe Extension from the Ministry of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing to the Harare City Council. 

          The petition has since been referred to the Portfolio Committee on Local Government, Public Works and National Housing.

MANAGEMENT OF ITEMS ON THE ORDER PAPER

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  I wish to advise Hon. Members that the Clerks-at-the-Table, these ones here sitting in front of me, have been directed to strictly manage the items on the Order Paper in liaison with the Business of the House Committee.  As part of that process, Members are advised to take charge of their motions or questions.  Any Member who is absent to move their notices of motions or to adjourn debate on their motions will have their notices of motions struck off the Order Paper without reference to the Members concerned.  In respect of questions where the Member is absent and the Minister is present, the Minister will be required to table a written response in line with Standing Order No. 64 (8) (b).  Members are also further reminded in terms of Standing Order No. 103 that a motion will only remain on the Order Paper for 21 days. Members should liaise with the Whips to ensure that the debate on their motions is concluded within the specified time framework.  Any motions that reach the 21 days without being concluded will automatically be dropped from the Order Paper without reference to the Members concerned.  Members should therefore religiously attend to their motions. 

          I also wish to express my concern at the apparent lack of preparedness for the business of the day by Members when there are several platforms for the Members to access information on the business of the House before the sitting.  These include the Order Paper itself, the Parliament website www.parlzim.gov.zw, the Veritas and Open Parly websites.  Members are reminded to take their work seriously by being always ready to debate on all items on the Order Paper.  The apathy that obtained during yesterday’s sitting is totally unacceptable as it is anathema to the taxpayer and the people of Zimbabwe from whom we draw authority to be in this august House and receive some remuneration which we must deserve. 

          HON. CHIKWINYA:  On a point of order ...

          THE HON SPEAKER:  There is no debate that has ensued so the point of order does not arise.  It does not arise as a point of order.  No debate has ensued, please follow the Standing Orders.

          HON. GONESE: Point of clarification Mr. Speaker on your ruling.  You made a ruling when Hon. Chikwinya rose on a point of order and before he could indicate what ...

          THE HON SPEAKER:  Take your seat and I will explain it.  A point of order arises when a debate has ensued.  Unless Hon. Chikwinya wanted to raise a point of privilege, that is acceptable.  That is not a point of order.  Do you want to revise your question?

          HON. CHIKWINYA:  Thank you Hon. Speaker.  I will abide by your ruling and use the privilege clause as read out in Section 68 and 69 (d).  My address to yourself was about our dressing and that is why I thought it was a point of order.  I had seen Hon. Nduna was putting on a flag yet there is a ruling in the High Court in the matter which was taken by Hon. Saruwaka to the High Court, where the High Court ruled that it is correct for the Speaker to make his discretion in rejecting scarves and anything with Zimbabwean colours as part of dressing for Members of Parliament.  So this is what I wanted to bring to your attention.  I want to thank you for making me bring that as a point of privilege.

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Where is the Hon Member?

          HON. CHIKWINYA:  He has removed it.

          THE HON SPEAKER:  Order, order.  First, I did not recognise the Hon. Member in a scarf.  If he was dressed in that fashion, he was out of order in terms of the previous ruling which must be abided with.

          HON. P.D SIBANDA:  On a point of privilege Hon. Speaker.  My point of privilege arises out of the provisions of Section 140 (3) of the Constitution of Zimbabwe 2013, which provides that the President may attend Parliament to answer questions on any issue as may be provided in the Standing Orders.  I believe that there are questions that have arisen which might necessitate the implementation of this section, for the President to appear in the House and answer those questions.  Which are those questions?  The first question that has arisen is the..

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, you do not go to the substance of the matter.  The substance of the matter is whether or not the President can, in terms of that section appear.  So a request should be made accordingly.

          HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  He did Hon. Speaker, that is why I raised this point of privilege to make a request.

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  I do not want to drag that issue, the point is heard.  So ...

          HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  I wanted to simply state the questions that have arisen.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  No, they cannot arise.  The most important issue is to ask His Excellency to come to the House and answer questions, which I will ask the Hon. Members to put in writing.  Thank you.

HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  I appreciate Hon. Speaker.

          HON. SIKHALA:  Mr. Speaker Sir, my point of privilege arises from the provisions of Section 51 of our national Constitution where it says every person has inherent dignity in their private and public life and the right to have that dignity respected and protected.  We know and understand in terms of the Standing Orders and rules of Parliament that the discretion is with the Speaker for him to make any decision against any Member who could have bleached the rules. Hon. Speaker Sir, I am concerned with the Member who was expelled from this Parliament by the Chair before the beginning of business.  Firstly, Mr. Speaker Sir, Hon. Members of Parliament have inherent dignity to be protected both in their private and public life.

          THE HON. SPEAKER:   Order, order.  Can you sit down please?  Thank you, I recognise your quotation from the National Constitution.  That dignity does not give a Member a right not to behave in the manner expected of them.  The Member was making noise and was tweeting as well.  In terms of Section 206 of the Standing Orders, my decision is final. 

          Hon. Sikhala having stood up wanting to object.

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Can you sit down?  Can you kindly sit down?  Thank you. 

ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

          HON. MUTAMBISI: My question is directed to the Minister of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs.  In view of the pre-trial diversion programme for juvenile offenders, what is the Government’s policy with regards to its regulation and when it is going to spread nationwide?  I thank you.

          THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI):  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I want to thank the Hon. Member for the question which is a very important question regarding the programme for pre-trial diversion. 

Indeed, we have plans to ensure that it is spread across the country.  What we have at the moment are resource concerns but we have plans to ensure that it is expanded to cover all areas of the country just like we have plans to ensure that we decentralise our courts – the High Court and the regional court to all our regions.  So, that is a matter that is within our plans and will be attended to in due course.  I thank you. 

          *HON. NYABANI: Thank you Hon. Speaker Sir. My question is directed to the Leader of the House.  What measures does the Government have in place since we now have our own currency, the RTGS dollar?

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Hon. Member, can you speak up? 

          *HON. NYABANI:  My question is directed to the Leader of the House.  I would want to find out what measures Government has in place concerning the multi-currency system that we used to have and now we have our local currency, the RTGS dollar.  I thank you.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Hon. Member, can you come forward?  Ask your question.

          *HON. NYABANI:  My question is directed to the Leader of the House in the absence of the Minister of Finance and Economic Development.  What plans does the Government have in terms of the multi-currency system that we had before since now we are making use of the RTGS dollar?  – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] - 

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, order.

          THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  The way I understood the question is that the Hon. Member is saying we had a multiple currency regime that we were using but now we have the RTGS and he wants to understand the current position at the moment. - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] -

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, order.  The Chair sometimes must be elastic in trying to understand what an Hon. Member is trying to say that they are new and they are in the learning process so I need to indulge such members so that they can learn, hopefully,  the processes accordingly.

          *HON. ZIYAMBI: The way I understood the question from the member was that we used to have a basket of multi-currencies; the Rand, US$ and Pula. Now, that we have brought the RTGs what is the position of our currency. My response is that when we brought the RTGs, we came up with a Statutory Instrument that recognises the RTGs as a currency and it is part of the basket of currencies and they are all the same with other currencies such as the Rand. We furthermore make provision that when we gazetted that Statutory Instrument, the RTGs rate would also be determined by the price of the US$. The RTGs is also a currency that we are using in the multi-currency basket.

          *HON. NYABANI: I am happy that although people laughed at first but they are interested in the question as well. My supplementary question …

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, Hon. Member what you are supposed to do is to pose a question that will complement your first question.

          *HON. NYABANI: Since all these currencies are working, do you not realise that some of these currencies are the ones causing the price increases and unstable prices of goods that we are facing in the country?

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Yah, unfortunately Hon. Member, the question does not arise.

          *HON. WADYAJENA: Thank you Mr. Speaker. I want to pose a question that he said RTGs is now a currency. I want clarification as to whether the Bond is now the RTGs or it is also another currency. I need that clarification.

          *HON. ZIYAMBI: I want to thank Hon. Wadyajena for that question. Technically, it is different according to the Statutory Instrument. That is, the Bond and RTGs. In our law, they are all listed as trading currencies but practically it is the same thing. I thank you.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: For the benefit of Members, can you refer to Statutory Instrument No. 133 of 2018 so that you can understand the background of what the Hon. Minister is saying.

HON. GONESE: My supplementary question to the Minister is that, in light of the explanation that he has given to the effect that we now have RTGs$ currency which has got an interbank or exchange rate with the US$. What is the impact, for instance, on the budget which on presentation was presented in US$ and now we have got the RTGs$ which is now trading on the basis of a floating exchange rate on the interbank market? What does it mean in terms of the figures in our Budget Statement and also on persons who deposited actual US$ in their bank accounts before that introduction of that interbank rate? What happens to their money which was in the bank prior to the introduction of that exchange rate? Minister, can you clarify on that?

HON. ZIYAMBI: I want to thank Hon. Gonese for the question which is in two parts. The first part really when the RTGs$ was introduced, what happened was that all the balances or even the budget was then converted into RTGs – [HON. ZWIZWAI: At what rate Mr. Speaker?] – What it means is that if there was a budget that was denominated in US$ as $10 million, it became RTGs$10 million – [HON. MEMBERS: Ah!]. Secondly, prior to the launch of the RTGs$ there was a separation of accounts that happened. We had Nostro and RTGs accounts. When the RTGs$ was introduced, the Statutory Instrument clearly states that at the opening of trading, the RTGs$ would be equivalent to US$1 and the rate would be determined by the market. So, whatever happened when the market opened was determined by market forces. If you had $10 000 hypothetically Hon. Speaker and trading when trading started the US$ was weaker, it means that you would have more money. These are forces that would come into play – [HON. MEMBERS: Ah!] – but if you go into the Statutory Instrument, it is very specific to say that upon promulgation of that Instrument, the USD and the RTGS is 1:1.  When trading starts then market forces would come into play.

          HON. GONESE: My point of clarification relates to money which was deposited into the banks prior to the separation of the accounts between Nostro and RTGS$ accounts.  We have got a situation where people actually deposited USD in their accounts before that separation.  What then happened to the money which was deposited at that time as USD?

          HON. ZIYAMBI: I believe the Statutory Instrument is a public document and if you go and read it, it clearly states that when it came into effect, the USD and the RTGS would be 1:1.  So, the general assumption was all the money when the Statutory Instrument came into play and the separation happened, was 1:1.  Then when trading started, that is when the differentials would then happen.  So, it does not matter whether you deposited USD or whatever it was into your account prior to the introduction by that Statutory Instrument of an RTGS$.  The effect was upon introduction, the USD and RTGS$ was 1:1, when trading started, market forces would then come into play.  So, I believe I have tackled that bit.  I thank you.

          HON. MADZIMURE: Can I be protected, Hon. Speaker? Hon. Chinotimba cannot talk to the same Minister, I am asking a question.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Hon. Minister, if you could follow the questions.  Hon. Chinotimba, you are disturbing the Minister, can you take your seat.

          HON. MADZIMURE: Mr. Speaker, morally, the Government was aware that it was going to introduce RTGS$ which technically means Real Time Gross Settlement which cannot be said to be a currency.  It is a form of payment, financially and it is known internationally.  So, when someone deposited his USD10 000, that money was subjected to a trade.  So, was it correct morally that the Government was aware it was going to introduce what it calls RTGS$ to allow people to continue depositing their United States Dollars and then give them no option to withdraw their money in order to make an independent decision.

          HON. ZIYAMBI: Issues of law and morality are different.  I have explained what the Statutory Instrument that governs the trading of our currencies says.  Whether he wants to look at it from the moral side or not, I am stating what the law says.  I thank you.

          *HON. CHIKWINYA: Thank you Mr. Speaker.  My question is directed to the Minister of Energy and Power Development, Hon. Gumbo and I believe he is in the House today.  However, before I pose my question, allow me together with this august House to recognise and congratulate Hon. Kirsty Coventry for giving birth to a baby on Friday.  It is not a new issue that people give birth but I have never seen a pregnant Minister before, that is why I have seen it as pertinent to congratulate her.  I have also been continuously seeing her duties until she gave birth.   I also hope that Hon. Nzenza by the end of the year would have addressed that issue as well.

          My question to the Minister of Energy is that since January, we have been experiencing unending long fuel queues.  Therefore, I am requesting that the Hon. Minister explains to the House Government’s measures and when these long unwinding fuel queues will come to an end. 

          THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. GUMBO): Thank you Mr. Speaker.  I would like to thank Hon. Chikwinya for the question he raised.  Although it is not in relation to policy, in which policy says that people should be able to access fuel.  What he has requested is that he wants to understand what the Government is doing to ensure that we have fuel that is accessible.  I think that on that matter, I would have required a Ministerial Statement but despite that, let me say that the Ministry of Energy and Power Development’s main mandate is to engage companies outside the country that produce oil so that it can be brought into the country.  Once the oil is within the country, there would be need of foreign currency that should be used by companies such as Total, Zuva and Engen to go and then buy that oil because they would have been brought into the country in RTGS$.  So, that is the duty of Ministry of Finance and Economic Development; it has nothing to do with my Ministry but it is my hope once the economic situation improves, the foreign currency will be available – [HON. SIKHALA: Inaudible interjections.] –

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, Hon. Sikhala! If you have got an issue, why not wait for a supplementary question.

          HON. SIKHALA: Understood Mr. Speaker Sir. I think the Minister is diverting the question from the Hon. Member.  The Hon. Member is talking about mitigating the situation of today and he is saying what he hopes, we do not want to hear about that but how to mitigate these measures today.

*THE HON. SPEAKER:  Hon. Sikhala, what you mentioned is supposed to be said by the Chair.  I am here as the Chair and still in control.  Let the Hon. Minister complete his statement.  If you are not satisfied with his response, you can pose supplementary questions.

* THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. GUMBO):  Mr. Speaker Sir, I had explained that the question raised by Hon. Chikwinya is important and is a good question but it a question that has been raised since January.  If he had requested me to explain what is happening today, I would have explained that.  I had to give the historical background because he mentioned the period from January.  If I understood Shona so well, he said, since January, we have been witnessing long winding queues which are still there and his question was, when will this come to an end.  I gave a back ground that all of us as Hon. Members should know what is happening because any one of us can become a Minister tomorrow and they should know the mandate of my Ministry in terms of fuel and oil.  I said our mandate is to procure oil and fuel from outside the country.  Once it comes into the country, forex which is needed by oil companies to access the fuel that will be stored in the bond warehouse for it to be available in filling stations, that is what I do.  Concerning what Hon. Chikwinya, assisted by Hon. Sikhala have said why we are still seeing winding queues today – before I came into the august House Mr. Speaker, I talked to the Reserve Bank Governor.  He informed me that he had released funds and the five big companies in the country such as ZUVA, Engen and Sakhunda which is Puma have started procuring oils.  The ACs have begun transporting fuel to service stations.  We are hoping that by the end of the day, tomorrow and the following days, fuel will be available in the country.  I thank you.

*HON. MAUSWA:  My supplementary question is that the Hon. Minister has said his Ministry is responsible for securing oil from other countries, how much fuel do we have currently which his Ministry has managed to secure for Zimbabwe?

*HON. DR. GUMBO:   I thank the Hon. Member for the question.  We have a month’s supply of petrol in the country.  We have about two million in Mabvuku and Msasa.  We have diesel in bond warehouse that can last for 23 days.  We also have the pipeline in Beira pumping fuel into the country.  Therefore, what we are facing are not challenges of fuel in the country but the shortage of foreign currency that is affecting the fuel situation to enable service stations to continue getting forex from the RBZ in order to feed the service stations.  I thank you.

HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  In his response, the Hon. Minister indicated that his Ministry simply deals with importing fuel that will be under bond warehouse.  My supplementary question is, which department is responsible for purchasing of ethanol which is compulsorily or mandatorily blended in our fuel in this country?  What is the mischief of mandatorily blending ethanol which you are buying from a private player, imposing it upon the whole nation?  Thank you Mr. Speaker.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  That is a very good question Hon. Member but it does not arise – [HON. P. D. SIBANDA: Inaudible interjection.] – I have ruled.  You can ask that question.

HON. GONESE:  In his response, the Hon. Minister indicated that the crux of the problem emanates from our lack of foreign currency and I will beg your indulgence to redirect that supplementary question to the Leader of Government Business to clarify for us and to the nation.  We have had this perennial problem for quite a long time.  What is Government policy to holistically deal with the issue in sustainable way so that we do not continuously have these intermittent shortages and problems which are recurring from time to time?

THE HON. SPEAKER:  I am afraid again, that is not a supplementary question.  It is a totally comprehensive new question altogether.

HON. T. MOYO:  My question is directed to the Minister of Information, Communication Technology, Postal and Courier Services.  In his absence, I will direct it to the Leader of the House.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  The Deputy Minister is here; proceed with to your question.

HON. T. MOYO:  What is Government policy regarding internet connectivity and accessibility in rural institutions such as schools and vocational training centres?

DEPUTY MINISTER OF INFORMATION, PUBLICITY AND BROADCASTING SERVICES (HON. MUTODI):  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I am not the Minister of ICT, I am the Deputy Minister of Information, Publicity and Broadcasting Services.  I am sure Deputy Minister of ICT, Hon. Muswere would be the best to answer that one if he was here.

THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI):  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. Government already has a policy to ensure that our schools have internet connectivity and we have programmes to roll out that programme but the problem that we have sometimes is that the budget for the Primary and Secondary Education sometimes is not adequate to cover for that but the Hon. Member I am sure is aware that several of our rural schools have internet connectivity already. I thank you.

          HON. S. SITHOLE: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. What measures are being put in place to reduce the high internet charges because according to the Zimbabwe Council for Higher Education, a university in Zimbabwe pays on average plus or minus $200 000.00 a month. So, what measures are being put in place to reduce the high charges of internet in our institutions? Thank you.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: You mean for schools? Your question is not related to the original question.

          HON. S. SITHOLE: It is related Mr. Speaker Sir.

          HON. S. BANDA: My supplementary question in terms of connectivity is that the charges being brought forward for the schools for the bandwidth, the charges are too high. So, what is the Ministry doing to try and reduce the charges? Thank you.

          THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. My take is that that is a new question and that is not related to the original question. The original question was the policy as regards to spreading the availability of internet across our schools and that question is a new question, so I stand guided.

          THE HON. SPEAKER; I have not responded to the Hon. Minister.

          HON. SIKHALA: Mr. Speaker Sir, when the Chair listens to the question from a member, he makes a discretion and determination whether that question is in sync with the original question. So the moment the Chair makes a ruling, may you please give induction to your Ministers for them to understand that when the Chair says answer the question, you would have already made your discretion whether that question is in sync with the initial question or not. This is embarrassing from our Ministers Mr. Speaker Sir. – [Laughter.]-

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Order Hon. Members. Hon. Minister, I think the import of the supplementary question was in spite of Government policy spread the question of accessibility by the schools is problematic because the fees are high. That is the question that arises.

          THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): Mr. Speaker Sir, I want to respectfully beg with you a little bit. Internet charges and connectivity charges went up a week or so ago. This question if I am to answer it the way you are saying, over the last week there was a sudden surge in schools seeking internet connectivity and they suddenly realised that the charges were high. Charges were very reasonable a week going backwards and charges were raised by service providers a week or so ago. So I respectfully submitted that this does not arise from the original question, even though my colleague became very animated and thought that Ministers do not know what they are saying.

          Charges were only raised a week ago and the original question was schools are failing to access internet and what is the policy as regards connectivity. Schools were having access to internet depending on how they were applying. Over the last week, charges became exorbitant and that is admitted. The Government has been addressing that - the Minister of ICT met with service providers with a view of ensuring that they negotiate for charges to come down, but coming back to the original question - I respectfully submit Mr., Speaker that my earlier assertain was correct. I thank you.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, Ironically Hon. Minister you have answered the question comprehensively, in spite of your misgivings.

          HON. MUSIKAVANHU: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. My question is directed to the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing. I would like to understand what the Government policy is in developing a cost-effective and durable house plan for the rural areas in view of the devastation caused by Cyclone Idai. Thank you.

          THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO): I want to thank the Hon. Member. We have a lot of lessons to learn from the effects of Cyclone Idai. We have engaged a number of experts, including geophysical experts who are looking at the places in our country that are susceptible to floods as well as earthquakes. Going forward, there has always been a demand for us to build houses which can withstand the effects of flooding in some cases, and or the effects of tremors that are now becoming more and more prevalent in our country.

          During this time we assessed the number of cyclones that we have had in Zimbabwe and we are studying their effects so that we can see what impact it will have on our housing stock. Certainly, we are looking at the housing stock both in urban and rural areas and the President has said can we find ways of making sure that we build durable housing stock and our Department of Public Works in consultation with those who are in the construction and the built environment are working at proposals that we will be able to share once they are ready. I thank you Mr. Speaker.

          HON. NDUNA: Mr. Speaker Sir, I applaud the answer from the Hon. Minister. I ask as a supplementary as to how the Minister hopes to deal with infrastructure.  How does he hope to deal with the backlog that currently obtains in particular in the urban areas that he touched on pertaining to the housing systems?

          *HON. CHINOTIMBA: My question is directed to the Minister of Local Government, Public works and National Housing.  Is the Minister aware that local government employees especially those in Harare have not been paid for the past eight months?  If he is aware of it, what is Government policy concerning local authorities that do not pay their employees but still expect them to come to work?  Will that not result in those employees becoming thieves?  We are not getting clean water because the employees are no longer attending to their work on time.  What is Government policy regarding non-payment of remuneration to employees.

          *THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO):  Thank you Mr Speaker Sir.  Government expects those working for local authorities to be paid on time.  However, this august House is aware that our local authorities are unable to pay their employees on time.  So currently, we are engaging the local authorities in an effort to consider how they are getting their revenue and what they use it for.  Yesterday, I had a meeting with all the treasurers of all urban local authorities, 32 of them.  What we realised is that the councillors – and we know what the councillors are like, they do not understand where the money that they use should come from.  I also realised that the treasurers were also not implementing the policy concerning money that should be used by local authorities and used in what way.  So, we are in the processing of trying to come to an understanding as to how sources of revenue should be used.  That is what will enable them to pay their workers on time.  Currently, most of the local authorities, Harare included, are behind in terms of payment of salaries to employees.  We want all of them to revisit their budgets and if they see it as a challenge they should come up with supplementary budgets to ensure that the employees are remunerated timeously.  I thank you.

          *HON. CHINOTIMBA:  As Government, if the situation has come to this, is there no way that Government can come in to assist the local authorities with money to bail them out so they can pay their employees as they try to come up with a supplementary budget?

          *HON. J. MOYO:  If Government had money it could assist local authorities that would be struggling but currently Government does not have finances, so it cannot give the local authorities that assistance.  That is why I said the only assistance we can give them is to make use of what is in the Constitution and see how they can make use of their sources of revenue.  We realised that they do not use their sources of revenue that should enable them to get money to remunerate their employees.

          *HON. CHIMBAIRA: My question is also directed to the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing.  Seeing that Government also owes the local authorities, what measures are in place for Government to pay these debts because that also is affecting the local authorities in paying employees?

*THE HON. SPEAKER:  We have challenges in posing our questions in a clear manner.

*HON. NDUNA:  What measures have you put in place in terms of dealing with local authorities that can acquire state of the art vehicles without paying its employees?  What course of action have you put in place to address such behaviour, for example in Chegutu?

          THE HON. SPEAKER: My understanding is that the local authorities are failing but they are bringing profligate in some expenditure.  I think that is the import of the question. 

          *THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO):  I had understood Hon. Speaker.  I think that this question requires that it be put in writing so that we can investigate because we cannot say that if all councils buy cars, we then ask them to say why have you bought cars?  But, there are some local authorities that we can question as to why they have bought cars yet there are other important issues.  I thank you. 

          *HON. CHINYANGANYA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  My question is directed to the Hon. Minister of Energy and Power Development.  What is Government policy concerning the blending of fuel?  Thank you. 

          THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. J. M. GUMBO): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir and thank you for your very important question Hon. Member.  Government policy on blending of fuel is meant to save forex on the use of forex because then we will increase the fuel by adulteration of the original fuel with the ethanol to make it more so that we can have more of the fuel in the country.  So, that is the Government policy.  I thank you. 

          HON. CHINYANGANYA:  Thank you Hon. Minister for your response.  Recently, the Government said that there was no increase in fuel prices but at the same time, it increases fuel blending from 5% to 10%.  It has indirectly increased the fuel price because if I was going to use 80 litres to cover a distance of 800 km, it means that with the 10% blending, I will have to travel 600 km or less.  So, is it not an indirect way of increasing the fuel price? 

          HON. DR. J. M. GUMBO: Thank you Mr. Speaker.  On the contrary, the assertion is not true and the issue is that when we do the blending or the adulteration of that fuel, what we are actually doing is that we are using what we call renewable energy in order to enhance or increase the fuel that is in the country.  It does not affect the use of that fuel.  So I am sorry, your thinking is not correct. 

          HON. GABBUZA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  Based on what the Minister of Energy and Power Development has answered that we are reducing foreign currency by blending, is the Minister confirming that the only supplier of ethanol in this country is being paid in RTGS and there is no foreign currency that is being used? 

          HON. DR. J. M. GUMBO: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  The questioner has brought in a very good answer and he is correct.  I thank you. 

          HON. MAHLANGU: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  My question is directed to the Minister of Public Service, Labour and Social Welfare.  What is the Government policy regarding food distribution in the rural and urban places? 

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, order.  That question has been asked several times and I will not allow repetition.  Thank you. 

          *HON. SHAVA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker.  My question is directed to the Minister of Public Service, Labour and Social Welfare.  What is Government policy concerning pensioners who when they die, their pensions are actually cut to the extent that they cannot even pay for the fees of their children?  I thank you.

          THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE, LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE (HON. DR. NZENZA):  I want to thank the Hon. Member of Parliament who posed the question.  There are schedules that are available when one is deceased.  Once a person dies, it does not mean that the amount remains the same.  It is reduced but you do not get to the extent that you get nothing to look after your family once you become deceased. 

          *HON. SHAVA: My supplementary question is that the deceased’s children are not able to pay school fees because it is cut from maybe $120 to $15. 

          *HON. DR. NZENZA: Mr. Speaker Sir, our policy concerning children is that once you attain the age of 18, the pension is reduced but if one is below 18 years, the child is entitled to that pension.  However, if the Hon. Member of Parliament has a specific case that she is aware of, she can put it in writing and we will take it up.  I thank you. 

          *HON. CHIKWINYA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  My supplementary question is on the acceptance by the Hon. Minister that yes, the family can get money but it is very little.  My challenge is that when civil servants get an increase, that amount is not increased hence, he/she is no longer able to pay the fees for the children as that money has not been increased in line with the increases that the civil servants are getting. 

          *HON. DR. NZENZA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  Our policy is that when the civil servants …

           THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, order! I think the Hon Minister was generous enough to say if there are cases; as Hon. Members, please bring them to the Hon. Minister’s attention so that she can deal with the matter accordingly.

HON. MUTSEYAMI: This thing is not centred in one area. It is a national issue. It is not something which is a minority. It is happening all over the country. It is everywhere.

THE HON. SPEAKER: Hon. Minister. There is an allegation that the problem is pervasive throughout the country. It is not isolated. Would you like to comment?

HON. DR. NZENZA: If as the Hon. Member of Parliament says, the problem is pervasive throughout the country, that is a matter that I should investigate and I will do so Mr. Speaker Sir.

*HON. CHIKUKWA: In the absence of the Minister of Home Affairs, I will direct my question to the Leader of the House. What is Government policy for those children who are 13 years old and have gone missing? After how long should the police inform the public of the missing child?

THE HON. SPEAKER: I am agonising. Hon. Minister, would you like to indulge the Hon. Member?

*THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): I need clarification on whether she is saying a 13 year old child or when someone has just gone missing?

*HON. CHIKUKWA: What I mean is that if a minor goes missing, kushaika - when they become missing persons.

HON. ZIYAMBI: We have legislation that informs as to what should be done once a person goes missing. I am sure she can look at the law. If you Google on the computer, you can see what the policy says.

THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, there is a constitutional provision. We were trying to clarify the question and I think the Hon. Minister will answer accordingly.

HON. ZIYAMBI: Thank you Mr. Speaker. Perhaps, if the understanding that I now have is correct is if a child is missing and is found roaming in the streets; the law says that child must be taken by social welfare until the nationality of that child is proven; otherwise the child is deemed to be a Zimbabwean but over and above that, any child that is found without any parents must be taken by social welfare until they identify who the parents are.

THE HON. SPEAKER: If someone is missing, whether a child or not, the law is very clear. You report to the police, yes – [HON. ZWIZWAI: That is the answer we wanted Mr. Speaker. Thank you very much.]

*HON. MATAMBANADZO: My question is directed to the Minister of Local Government. Minister, I wanted to ask what Government policy is concerning people who have debts and owe the local authorities money in terms of reducing the debts and cutting them by half as what has happened in other towns and cities. It did not happen in all the towns and cities. People want to know why it has happened in some towns and cities and not others. Why was the process not extended to other towns as well?

THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO): Hon. Member, policy as to what local authorities can do to ensure that their debtors pay – the local authority has the authority to find measures that will enhance their debtors to pay. Others have engaged debt collectors and some have cut the debts but that is done by the council. When the council sits as a council, they can come up with measures on their own, not because there is Government policy that mandates them to do that.

*HON. ZWIZWAI: I want to thank the Hon. Minister for his response to the nation that Government does not have a policy which enables local authorities to reduce the debts of debtors. So, I want to ask the Hon. Minister that are you saying that what the then President of the Republic of Zimbabwe and the former local Government Minister did was not in tandem with the law?

           HON. J. MOYO: The Minister has the authority whether it is under Urban Councils Act or Rural Urban Act to give directions in the National Interest.  So, for me to say the national interests at that time was not good or bad is not right.  It was deemed fit by those who were there during that period.

          HON. MUDARIKWA: My question is directed to the Minister of Industry and Commerce.  What is the policy of your Ministry with regards to increases of basic commodities in all wholesalers and supermarkets?

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (HON. MODI): Please can I have the question in writing – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.]- Because the question is on the Order Paper.

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order! Do not invite me to take you out of this House.  When I say order, you must respect that order.  If it is in the Order Paper, the question asked by Hon. Mudarikwa cannot arise until the question in the Order Paper is responded to. 

          *HON. NKANI: Thank you Mr. Speaker. My question is directed to the Leader of the House.  Is it Government policy that the President’s speech is written and read in English yet most people in the rural areas do not understand English or even read English?  It is also not interpreted or translated for them to understand what is in the speech – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.]-

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, order! Hon. Mutseyami, your people are making a lot of noise. Hon. Member can you kindly repeat your question?

          HON. NKANI: Is it Government policy that the President’s speech is written and read in English yet most people in the rural areas do not understand English or even read English? 

           (HON. ZIYAMBI: Thank you Mr. Speaker.  I want to thank the Hon. Member for that question.  If the Presidential Speech is in English and is taken to the rural areas where people do not understand English, there will always be an interpreter translating it into vernacular.

          *HON. ZEMURA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  My question is directed to the Minister of Labour and Social Welfare, Hon. Nzenza.  When will people living with disabilities, the elderly as well as the orphans start receiving allowances? Right now, they are living in poverty. Even when it comes to food distributed by the Ministry of Social Welfare, those who get that food are people who are able bodied. I thank you.

*THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE, LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE (HON. DR. NZENZA):  I would like to thank the Hon. Member for the question.  The question is in line with what we term the most vulnerable in our society.  We have the Zimbabwe vulnerability assessment where we will be considering those that the Hon. Member mentioned, the people with disabilities, the elderly, the aged, the orphans and the sick.  Working together with the provincial social worker, the district social worker and the Drought Relief Committee, we come up with a database.  They inform us of the vulnerable groups in their areas.  If the Hon. Member is having a challenge in her area with this issue, she can put it in writing and I will investigate.

*HON. MADZIMURE:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  Why is it that every time, when there is distribution of food relief the Ministry comes up with a new distribution list when they already have a database.  Why do they not make use of the database that is available because some of the beneficiaries on the initial database list may end up not receiving the relief?

*HON. DR. NZENZA:  Mr. Speaker Sir, our database does not remain constant; the ZIMVAC report guides us.  If we use the same database, there will be no transparency because some people will have died.  We continue to update the database and we look at poverty assessment at each household.  I thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.

*HON. P. MOYO:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  My question is directed to the Minister of Labour and Social Services.  There are people who lost their homes through natural disasters, what is Government doing concerning the livelihood of these people?  Homes were destroyed by the wind and currently children have gone back to school.  What is being done to assist these groups?

*THE HON. SPEAKER:  The Hon. Minister of Local Government came and gave us a Ministerial Statement as to what the Government is doing in terms of the destruction that was caused by the cyclone.  We cannot go back to the same question again.

*HON. P. MOYO:  My apologies Mr. Speaker Sir, I was not available when this issue was debated.

*THE HON. SPEAKER:  Now I realise you do not read the Hansard.  Hon. Members, if you are not available - when you come back, read the Hansard to find out what happened in your absence.

*HON. BANDA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  My question is to the Minister of Public Service, Labour and Social Welfare.  What is Government policy concerning domestic workers regarding loan schemes so that they are able to build their own houses?

*THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE, LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE (HON. DR. NZENZA):  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I think I can respond to that question after looking at the work that the National Building Society (NBS) is doing.  The NBS is there to assist people in the category of domestic workers and those who are the least paid including Members of Parliament.  I thank you.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  That statement is with cheek in tongue.  Hon. Members are not domestic workers. 

HON. DZUMA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  My question is directed to the Minister of Transport.  If he is not available, I will direct it to the Leader of the House

THE HON. SPEAKER:  The Minister of Transport is available.

HON. DZUMA:  Mr. Speaker Sir, kombi operators and mushikashika have raised their fares yet fuel has gone down.  What measures are being taken by the Government to serve the passengers?  I thank you.

HON. SIKHALA:  On a point of order Mr. Speaker Sir – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order.  I have not ruled on the question.  Acting Chief Whip, please you are the one to put order here and you are busy talking.  I will not call the Leader of Government Business or the Minister concerned because the question is very vexatious.

HON. KASHIRI:  Order Sikhala!  Thank you.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Hon. Member, can you address the Chair please, time is running out.

HON. KASHIRI:  Thank you Mr. Speaker.  My question is directed to the Minister of Local Government.  Most DDF depots are visibly under capacitated as witnessed by lack of spares in their depots.  What is the policy regards funding these DDF depots?

THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO):  Mr. Speaker Sir, unfortunately, DDF does not fall under my Ministry.

          THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. I want to thank the Hon. Member for the question. A few months ago, in this august House the budget was presented for Hon. Members to debate and raise those concerns regarding DDF and the budget was passed, a budget which may not be adequate and my view was that the Hon. Member was supposed to have raised it at that particular juncture so that we could have debated and implored upon the relevant Minister to increase the budget. I thank you.

          Hon. Kashiri having stood up to make a supplementary question.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: There is no supplementary. The answer is very clear. The onus is on this august House to advocate for a better budget. Order Sikhala, hold fire. The Leader of Government business was very correct in saying it is the responsibility of this august House to ensure that DDF is properly resourced so that it can carry out its responsibilities and functions out there in the rural areas. Order! Hon. Kashiri, zvibatei.

          Questions without Notice were interrupted by THE HON. SPEAKER in terms of Standing Order Number 64.

ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS WITH NOTICE

An Hon Member having been carrying his bag to leave the House.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Just a moment. Hon. Mutseyami. Murikuenda kupi Hon. Member? I can see you are carrying your katundu away. –[AN HON. MEMBER: My father is waiting for me outside]-

          HON. MUTSEYAMI: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. My issue is to the attention of the Hon. Minister July Moyo if he can furnish this House with a Ministerial Statement to do with the donations that we got from those who helped as a result of Cyclone Idai and the accountability of the money that we got from all over the world, the goods that we got so that we will have a ministerial statement though I know that the task is so big. We appeal, for the sack of accountability and just to show our transparency to the international community and to the local community of those who helped the nation so that they appreciate what they donated and how it was disbursed. Thank you.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Hon. Minister would you indulge to give a progress report in that direction next week if possible?

          THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO): Mr. Speaker, I accept to give the august House that statement, but not next week because I will be away.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: When do you think you could be ready Hon. Minister?

           HON. MOYO: Give me two weeks from now, I will be back.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: It is alright, accepted - thank you.

STATISTICS OF GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS AND EMPLOYEES CONVICTED FOR CORRUPTION

          1.   HON. CHIKUDO asked the Minister of Justice, Legal and including former employees, who were implicated, convicted and sentenced for corruption or abuse of office on an annual basis during the last ten years and to state measures being taken to prevent such occurrences.

          THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): Mr. Speaker Sir, the police received a total of 2 644 corruption cases involving Government employees and former employees in the last 10 years. The accused were convicted in 589 of the cases, signifying 22% of the total figure. Cases of Criminal Abuse of Office dominated the list, signifying 62% of the total.

          The table below indicates the number of Government officials, including former employees who were implicated, convicted and sentenced for Corruption or Abuse of Office in the last ten years.

CRIME NAME

COUNTS

CONVICTIONS

Bribery

923

271

Corruptly concealing a transaction from a Principal

  56

   10

Corruptly concealing from a Principal a personal interest in a transaction

  21

     7

Criminal Abuse of duty as a Public Officer

1 644

301

TOTAL

2 644

589

          Mr. Speaker Sir, fighting corruption is one of the key pillars of the Second Republic and President Mnangagwa has stated that his administration’s goal is to build a new Zimbabwe based on transparency, accountability and hard work. Therefore, Government has already taken the initiative and established institutions to deal with corruption. This has seen the establishment of the Special Anti-Corruption Courts. In addition, the Zimbabwe Republic Police has since formed the Police Anti-Corruption Unit under the Criminal Investigations Department to deal with these cases.

          Mr. Speaker Sir, the Government is also capacitating the Zimbabwe Judicial Commission, the National Prosecution Authority, the Zimbabwe Republic Police and the Anti-Corruption Commission, with the requisite skills to investigate and prosecute crimes related to corruption. Similarly, Government is expediting the establishment of a Commercial Crimes Court to fast-track the prosecution of such offenders. I thank you.

MOTION

          BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

          THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): Mr. Speaker Sir, the other Ministers are not around. With your indulgence, can we move to Question No. 71? I thank you Mr. Speaker.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Hon. Leader of Government Business please be seated. There are 25 Questions that relate to this Ministry and they have been deferred from the period 21st November, 2018, 5 December, 2018 and the latest ones 30th January, 2019 and the others 20th March, 2019.  We cannot as this august House accept this level of dereliction of duty.  It is unacceptable – [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] – totally unacceptable.  We cannot have a situation where questions are not answered right back from November, 2018 to March, 2019 and the Hon. Minister was engaged as the Hon. Minister.  Not only that, there is a Deputy Minister who in terms of Section 107 (2) of the Constitution can act and respond on behalf of the Minister and the Ministry.  So, this is totally unacceptable and through you Hon. Minister and Leader of Government Business, we want these questions answered in full, otherwise the Hon. Minister risks contempt of Parliament.  – [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] - Thank you. 

          THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): Thank you Mr. Speaker.  The Hon. Minister of Transport is not here, so I seek your indulgence …

THE HON. SPEAKER: He has got a deputy, Hon. Adv Chasi, again there is no excuse.

HON. ZIYAMBI: The deputy is out of the country on Government business Mr. Speaker.

THE HON. SPEAKER: What about Hon. Matiza?

HON. ZIYAMBI: He was not here today.  I will relay the message; apologies Mr. Speaker but the Minister of Health has promised to bring the responses next week.  I seek your indulgence so that we proceed – the Minister of Finance again is out of the country, so we can proceed to Question 71.

NETWORK COVERAGE IN MATOPO HILLS AREA

          71.   HON. MAYIHLOME asked the Minister of Information, Publicity and Broadcasting Services to inform the House when the Matopo Hills area would receive cellular, radio and television network coverage?

          THE MINISTER OF INFORMATION, PUBLICITY AND BROACASTING SERVICES (HON. MUTODI): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I would like to thank the Hon. Member for raising this very pertinent question. The issue to do with cellular connectivity is dealt with not by my Ministry but by the Ministry of ICT.  So, I would like the first part of this question to be referred to the Ministry of ICT in terms of cellular network connectivity. 

          However, on the part of radio and television network connectivity, the provision of such network is in progress in Matopos and other areas which have been mentioned in this House as requiring such services.  We have given a provisional date of January 2020 for Matopos and those areas that were mentioned to have received radio and television network coverage.  I thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.

          HON. GABBUZA: Thank you Mr. Speaker.  Can the Minister indicate to us why in those areas where transmitters for radio services are complete and digitalised, have not been able to start off whilst we wait for the completion of the project in other areas?

          HON. MUTODI: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I would like to thank the Hon. Member for asking that question.  The issue that is militating against the provision of radio and television coverage is the work in progress that we are carrying out in the digitalisation programme.  The programme has actually suffered constraint of shortage of foreign currency.  Much of the equipment is imported and we have engaged a Chinese company called Huawei, which is providing the technology to ensure that we provide television and radio systems across the country.  Now, we are facing a challenge of foreign currency and as soon as foreign currency is availed to our Ministry by the Ministry of Finance, we will be able to guarantee the nation that the systems will be working on full capacity.  I thank you.

          HON. GABBUZA: Mr. Speaker, my concern is, we have sites that are complete like Kenmore which would cover Tsholotsho and many other places; Kamativi and Binga are complete and transmission is possible.  The Minister had confirmed previously that those sites are complete; they have been inspected and have been on television that they are complete. Why do we have to wait for the others that are not complete? That is my question.

          HON. MUTODI: Thank you Mr. Speaker.  I am sure this question which is arising is on operational issues.  I am sure it was not covered in the original question that was written.  Therefore, we might need to investigate on those areas that are still outstanding to receive radio and television network yet the infrastructure has already been put in place.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: So Hon. Minister, you commit yourself to further investigate as to why?

          HON. MUTODI: Exactly.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Thank you, will you update us next week?

TRANSITIONAL STABILISATION PROGRAMME

          72.    HON. MUSIKAVANHU asked the Minister of Information, Publicity and Broadcasting Services to state plans in place to conscientise the public about Transitional Stabilisation Programme that was announced by the Minister of Finance and Economic Development on 5th October, 2018.

          THE MINISTER OF INFORMATION, PUBLICITY AND BROADCASTING SERVICES (HON. MUTODI): Thank you Mr. Speaker.  With regards to Question 72, the Government has taken a position such that Cabinet deliberations and resolutions are publicised in the mainstream media every Tuesday and Wednesday.  So, the Minister of Information, Publicity and Broadcasting Services addresses the media on all issues including the Transitional Stabilisation Programme (TSP).  The TSP is a building block towards economic prosperity of Zimbabwe which focuses on the stabilisation of economic fundamentals, key among them being cutting and controlling Government expenditure as shown by the Government insistence and commitment to the operationalisation of austerity measures.  Secondly, eradicating Government deficit again contained in the austerity measures by ensuring that Government departments do not exceed on their allocated budgets, forcing Government to borrow from the domestic market through Treasury Bills (TBs). 

The third point is the promotion of accountability and transparency as well as dealing decisively with corruption in the public sector.  The fourth issue is the improvement on the ease of doing business and promoting investment.  Fifth point is the creation of an enabling environment that promotes good governance and the respect of human rights such as the repeal of AIPPA and POSA that was announced by the President in his inaugural State of the Nation Address.  The sixth issue is the creation of an exchange rate that was announced by the Governor of the Reserve Bank in his mid-term monetary policy where he first of all separated into two accounts – the foreign currency account and the RTGs account and that preceded the introduction of an exchange rate that we are currently experiencing in the financial market. So, the Transitional Stabilisation Programme has a life span until 2020 when a new and successive economic development programme will be launched and this will ensure that we achieve what we have designated as an upper middle class economy by 2030.

These issues also include a devolutional programme that will allow regional states to contribute to national GDP with the current GDP at 25 billion.  These are the issues that are contained in the Transitional Stabilisation Programme and we are saying it is a building block.  There is another successive programme that is coming that will ensure that we achieve an upper middle income economy by 2030.  I thank you.

HON. MUSIKAVANHU:  With due respect Mr. Speaker Sir, I was not requesting the Minister to take us through what the Transitional Stabilisation Programme (TSP) contents are.  My question is with respect to what measures are being put in place to ensure that the generality of our public appreciate what TSP stands for.  A lot of our people do not have access to television.  If I go to the constituencies where I hail from, Chiredzi West; I bet you, the appreciation of what TSP stands for is less than 50%.  It is not enough with due respect Mr. Speaker Sir, to depend on just a television.  We are looking for small pamphlets that can be circulated. 

HON. MUTODI:  I am sure I have indicated in my statement that as the Ministry of Information, Publicity and Broadcasting Services, we are disseminating information all the time after Cabinet.  It is in Cabinet that the TSP in terms of its successes or failure is discussed.  These discussions and resolutions can give an idea to the public as to what Government is doing in terms of fulfilling its promises contained in the TSP and of course the television and radio networks are our key broadcasting channels that we use to ensure that we use to ensure that we reach out to the public in all corners of the country and if there are any additions to the medium of communication that the Hon. Member would like to advise the Ministry to do, we would be very much willing to take on board such advice and implement it if financial resources permit.

ESTABLISHMENT OF A FRUIT PROCESSING PLANT IN HONDE VALLEY

          78.  HON. MUDIWA asked the Minister of Industry and Commerce whether there are plans to establish a fruit processing plant in Honde Valley area in Manicaland Province to minimise losses incurred during transportation of fruits to Harare and ensure increased profits due to value addition.

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (HON. MODI):  Hon. Speaker, let me inform the House that investing or setting up of a processing plant in any part of the country using local resources is a private sector initiative.  However, Government can facilitate such projects by identifying potential partners or coming up with appropriate policies to encourage such investments.

          My Ministry is coming up with a programme to tap into the devolution agenda so that provinces can promote the beneficiation of local products.  In line with this programme, the Ministry is studying various models to enable it to promote the development of industries in each of the country’s districts.  It is therefore important for provinces to assess the available raw materials for processing.

          These projects will be implemented in conjunction with the Ministry of Women Affairs, Community, Small and Medium Enterprise Development that is already assisting small to medium enterprises (SMEs) through the India-Africa Incubation Centre in Harare. I thank you.

          HON. MUDIWA:  Thank you very much Hon. Minister for the answer but last week we lost lives when farmers were transporting their fruits – bananas and avocados to Harare.  This project that the Hon. Minister is talking about has been on the cards for the past two years.  I know it has been funded by Africa Development Bank but nothing has been done.  I do not know what you can do to expedite the process because every month we are losing farmers ferrying fruits using lorries when these can be processed in the areas they are produced. 

HON. MODI: May I have some time to investigate so that I can give some more information with regards to this.

MEASURES TO RESOLVE THREE TIER PRICING SYSTEM

          80.  HON. I. NYONI asked the Minister of Industry and Commerce to advise the House on measures being taken to resolve the three-tier pricing system currently prevailing on the market.

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (HON. MODI): Good afternoon Hon. Speaker.  Let me inform the House that the question on the three-tier pricing of commodities has been overtaken by events following the 20th February, 2019 Monetary Statement by the Governor of the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe during which he introduced an exchange rate between the RTGS$ and the US$.  I thank you.

          HON. I. NYONI: Thank you very much Mr. Speaker Sir.  Thank you very much Deputy Minister.  The situation prevailing outside is still there.  The three-tier pricing system is still in effect.  You will realise that if you are buying your items in US$, there is a price, if you are buying using Ecocash, even if you use the exchange rate that is prevailing in the interbank market, there are some distortions there, sort of overpricing.  If you buy using the RTGS$ cash, there is another rate of exchange.  So, definitely and practically, what is prevailing on the market is different from what the Minister explained.  So, I can safely say my question has not been answered.

          HON. MODI: Thank you Hon. Speaker.  I have already answered your question.  However, the way he is asking is different, the three-tier pricing used to have different prices but when we had the exchange rate, the prices are according to the exchange rate.  That is why the US$ price is different because of the exchange rate.  It is no longer like it was before.

          HON. CHIKWINYA: Thank you Hon. Speaker, This matter relates to the practicality of issues on the ground.  There is still a price distortion arising from the fact that the exchange rate as obtained at the bank is not the same as obtained even on the Old Mutual-implied rate.  This is what is making the three-tire pricing system to continue.  The question is, what policy measures are you putting in place to ensure that we eradicate the three-tier pricing system in cognisance of the reality on the ground?

          HON. MODI: Thank you Hon. Speaker.  As a Government, we do not have any policy on the prices.  We do not control the prices but we make the policies.  We are engaging the stakeholders, private sector and we are having dialogue with them regarding the prices.  That is what we are doing as a Government.  We cannot control the prices because it is the private sector which increases the prices.  Where does the black-market come from?  Who is encouraging the black market? The private sector; and that is what we are trying to avoid.  I think I have answered your question.

EXPORTATION OF UNPROCESSED TAR BY HWANGE COAL GASIFICATION COMPANY

          81.  HON. MUKAPIKO asked the Minister of Industry and Commerce to explain reasons for the exportation of unprocessed tar by Hwange Coal Gasification Company (HCGC) whilst there are other companies within the country which can process crude tar.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (HON. MODI): Thank you Hon. Speaker.  Let me inform the House that, in line with the National Trade Policy (NTP) and the National Export Strategy (NES), Government encourages exports but also ring-fences the export of strategic products that are raw materials to agriculture and other key sectors of the economy.  In line with this policy, only four products namely; sugar, gypsum, fertilizer and industrial equipment fall under the Export Permit Regime so as to protect the national interest.

Unprocessed tar is a raw material into the production process at ZIMCHEM.  HCGC also supplies unprocessed tar to customers such as SANHE, AFROCHINE, ZIMASCO ZIMALLOYS, NRZ, ECOVEST, Well Mining and Nelson Holdings which then further process it locally.

Government therefore calls for potential local clients to establish…

HON. CHIKWINYA: On a point of order, the Hon. Minister is away from the microphone, so, firstly, he cannot be heard by the Hansard and secondly, Members in the House cannot hear him.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Hon. Deputy Minister, can you speak aloud so that the House can hear you.

HON. MODI: Alright.  Thank you.  Hon. Speaker, the Government therefore calls for potential local clients to establish business linkages with the Hwange Coal Gasification Company in order to promote value addition and the creation of employment.  I thank you.

SHOOTING OF A RHINO IN HWANGE NATIONAL PARK

          84.  HON. WATSON asked the Minister of Environment, Tourism and Hospitality Industry to confirm whether one rhino was shot in Hwange National Park and if so, what happened to the rhino’s horn.

          THE MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY (HON. SEN. MUPFUMIRA): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. I want to thank the Hon. Member for the question.  Currently, Hwange National Park has 10 black rhinos.  These rhinos are restricted to the Sinamatella section of the park.  The last poaching incident happened in Detema area of Sinamatella on 4th January 2012 when one rhino was killed.  The horns were taken away by poachers. I thank you.

          HON. WATSON: I apologise to the Minister I did not realise she was back.  I think she has forgotten what question was originally. That is how the remainder of the question remained on the Order Paper of the rhinos that were captured; one was said to have been killed and what happened to the horn?  Was that in fact reality and what happened to the horn, it has no bearing on black rhinos or poachers?  I thank you. 

          HON. SEN. MUPFUMIRA: Thank you Mr. Speaker.  The question to ask the Minister of Environment, Tourism and Hospitality Industry to confirm whether one rhino was shot in Hwange National Park and if so, what happened to the rhino’s horn.  That is the question I have answered Mr. Speaker Sir.

          HON. WATSON: Sorry Mr. Speaker, I think that in all fairness to me, the earlier comment by the Speaker was that we should confirm with the Clerks the original question specifically related to rhinos that were captured, held in the Burma in Hwange National Park.  The balance yes, and the balance of the question was carried over because the Minister at the time did not have the answer. I will put the question back on the Order Paper but it is very unfair. I thank you.

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER (HON. MUTOMBA): Hon. Watson, according to the question that is on No. 84, it would appear that is the question that the Minister has actually answered to.  Now, if you are alleging that that question has been changed, like you rightly say, that it would be a matter of actually conferring with the Clerks, I think that will be another subject to be done.  I thank you very much.

INFANT ELEPHANTS CAPTURED AND EXPORTED

85.  HON. WATSON asked the Minister of Environment, Tourism and Hospitality to state:-

a) The number of infant elephants that have been captured and export and those that died along the way;

b) The amount paid for exports for infant elephants that the beneficiaries of such funds;

c) Whether the Wildlife Act allows capturing and exporting of infant elephants.

THE MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY (HON. SEN. MUPFUMIRA): Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority has not exported infant elephants to any other country.  The Authority exported a total of 97 sub-adult elephants to China and Dubai between 2012 and 1 January 2018.  Thus 93 elephants were exported to China and 4 were exported to Dubai.  The elephants were airlifted to Shanghai Wildlife Park, Jiangmeu-Hesham, Chimelong and Umurgi in China and to Dubai Safari Park, Dubai and United Arab Emirates.   There were no elephant deaths in transit.

On the second part of the question; the Authority received US$2 715 000.  The beneficiary of the revenue generated was the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority.  The funds were used to support elephant conservation activities as an umbrella species.  Other species of wildlife were also conserved in the major areas where elephants are found.  The major elephants range areas are the Hwange-Matetsi Complex, Sebungwe region, Mid-Zambezi Region and South East part of the country.  The major conservation activities supported included anti-poaching operations through purchase of patrol vehicles, fuel, protective field clothing.  Wildlife protection also included supporting intelligence and investigation units dotted throughout the country.  Other activities included research and monitoring of major wildlife species, as well as carrying conservation education and awareness campaigns in local communities living with wildlife, schools and general public.

On the third part of the question; the Parks and Wildlife Act Chapter 20:14 and its subsidiary legislation allows the capture and export of wildlife including elephants.  Also the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES) permits the export of Zimbabwe’s elephants because they are in Appendix II of this Convention which allows legal trade.

Annexure

Elephant sales.

4 elephants @US$13 500 = US$54 000

24 elephants $US$20 000 = 480 000

35 elephants @US$31 000 = 1 085 000

30 elephant @US$31 000 = 930 000

4 elephants @US$41 500 = 166 000

Total US$2 715 000.  I thank you.

HON. WATSON: I am sorry, if the Minister could just clarify the Wildlife Act is in relation to infant elephants only, does the Act allow that?

HON. SEN. MUPFUMIRA: I said it allows the capture and export; however, I did answer the first question that we have not traded in infant elephants.

HON. GABBUZA: Mr. Speaker, I thank you very much, the Minister is on record saying that the Parks and Wildlife needs to be supported.  My question is – because they wanted helicopters, drones – I saw that on television. Now the question is was that export limited, do they have capacity to export more because they are arguing that the areas are flooded with elephants, they are exceeding the carrying capacity.  Can they not export more so that they get those drowns and helicopters for the conservation of elephants?

          HON. SEN. MUPFUMIRA: I want to thank the Hon. Member for a very important current topical question.  The issue of our ability to export, we are restricted.  The carrying capacity of elephants for Zimbabwe is a population of 55 000, the moment our population is over 85 000; we have an excess of over 30 000 which we would want to sell but we are restricted under CITES and this is one of the issues we have been discussing at the Elephant Summit in Kasane.  We want to make sure that we are able to decide what to do with our animals.  Other countries do not have animals hence they are putting restrictions on us and as CAZA we are saying we must come up with our own policy.  Botswana for example have over 140 000 and they are also restricted. 

For your own information we even have ivory here worth over US$300 million but we are not allowed to sell.  So we would want to sell more but we are not allowed by CITES and we have to abide by those laws to which we subscribe.  Appendix 2 allows us to a certain extent a once off trade, at the moment we are fighting - the whole region, because we want to sell our elephants but we are restricted. 

We would want to sell more to enable us to capacitate our rangers with the equipment and the resources they want.  We also want to improve the livelihoods of people living with animals because at the moment the incidence of human-wild life conflict is on the increase with loss of lives, but we are restricted - hence the summit to ensure that we come up with a common position as CAZA and as SADC.

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  May the owner of a Mitsubushi Reg. No. AEV 490 go and remove it as it is blocking other motor vehicles.

          *HON. NDUNA:  I am grateful for the responses given by the Hon Minister of Environment, Tourism and Hospitality Industry.  What request can she make to this august House so that she can be assisted in an endevour to ensure that this country is allowed to sell its elephants and ivory?  What can we do to ensure that we carry out our three pronged mandate; Legislative, Oversight of the Executive and Representation so that they are able to use the national resources that they have?  What form of assistance does she want? Whenever one with problems calls out for help, this is what she is doing.  I thank you.

          *THE HON MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY:  (HON. SEN. MUPFUMIRA):  Thank you Mr Speaker, I would like to thank the Hon. Member for his utterances.  It is true that as a country with elephants we are being hurt.  The world over we have 400 000 elephants and out of those CAZA with a region that encompasses Namibia, Angola, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Botswana, we have 250 000 elephants out of the 400 000 elephant population worldwide.  Out of the 250 000, Zimbabwe and Botswana between them have almost 210 000 elephants which makes the majority of the elephants. 

Under the CITES there are European countries that bar us from selling our animals because they do not have such animals.  Some of them were unable to preserve their own animals.  Even in Africa, those that are in the North failed to conserve their wild life whereas we have been able to conserve it properly.  So, North Africa is ganging up with Europe to fight against us on the issue of CITES, that is why we sat down to have an elephant summit where we are trying to engage including Members of Parliament. 

We are going back to our Portfolio Committee and come back with what experiences we learnt.  Most importantly we must have a communication strategy to inform Parliamentarians so that they understand the issues at stake that involve natural resources where we are being barred from benefitting. Those in Namibia are treating it as neo-colonialism because we are being barred from selling what we have.  A country with six elephants says that trade in elephant should be banned worldwide and should be in Appendix 1, which means there is a total ban in trading in those animals and their trophies. 

          The nation at large needs to be educated on the issue of the elephants, what the issues are and that there is a summit.  This is the first wildlife summit that is going to be conducted by the UN and AU Environment jointly in Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe.  It is a good thing and we want to enlighten our Hon. Members so that they can speak with authority when the issue of elephants and trophies is being debated, so they can understand and appreciate why we are being barred from trading in ivory and elephants.  Elephants are now too many and they are destroying livestock.  There is now conflict between the elephants and the people.  I thank you.

ARRESTING POWERS FOR MUNICIPAL POLICE

95. HON. P. MASUKU asked the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing to explain why the Ministry is not considering giving municipal police arresting powers to complement efforts by the ZRP to curb high rates crimes in urban areas.

THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO):  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  The Hon. Member is asking me to explain why the Ministry is not considering giving municipal police arresting powers to complement efforts by the ZRP to curb high rates crime in urban areas. 

          Mr. Speaker Sir, may I inform this august House that the Ministry in consultation with local authorities has drafted a joint input to be considered in coming up with the Municipal Councils and Police Act which will empower them to have arresting powers.  This we will be doing in consultation obviously with the Ministry of Home Affairs and Cultural Heritage and the Ministry of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs but we are determined that we lessen the job of the ZRP in all urban areas.  I thank you. 

          HON. CHINYANGANYA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  If my memory serves me well, that position paper was drafted in 2017.  So when is it likely to come into effect, considering the high crime rate that is prevalent in local authorities and also the need to have municipal police having arresting powers?  I thank you.

          HON. J. MOYO: Thank you Mr. Speaker.  I have just indicated that we are in consultation and we base it on the consultation that was done earlier and we will bring it before the august House once it is ready. 

FIRE AND AMBULANCE EQUIPMENT FOR LOCAL AUTHORITIES

          96.  HON. P. MASUKU asked the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing to state whether the Ministry could consider assisting local authorities to acquire fire and ambulance equipment given that most local authorities are facing a number of challenges.

          THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO): Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the Hon. Member for the question posed. 

          Mr. Speaker Sir, let me start by thanking the Hon. Member for the question raised.  However, let me inform this august House that the Ministry has been and will continue to facilitate or assist local authorities to acquire fire and ambulance equipment as demand for this service continues to grow in all our councils. 

Let me start by emphasising that however, wherever local authorities receive donations of this kind, particularly from Operation Florin in the United Kingdom, the Ministry facilitates issuance of duty free certificates for the equipment since they will be earmarked for service delivery and not for resale.  In the event of direct purchase of either of the equipment, the Ministry engages the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe for prioritisation in foreign currency allocation for councils to meet other obligations such as shipment costs and payment of import duty. 

          Let me further add that given the 5% that has gone to mostly the urban councils, they have come up with a suggestion to buy equipment as a composite group so that they can import this much cheaply.  I thank you. 

          THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I seek leave for extension of time so that the two Ministers who are here can dispose of these questions. 

          Motion put and agreed to.

          HON. NDUNA: Thank you for your response Hon. Minister.  My supplementary question is as follows: there is a Joint Venture Act of 2016 that gave impetus to the establishment of Private Public Partnerships (PPP).  I am quite alive to offshore financing or people who are willing to finance local authorities in terms of carrying out their mandate by giving them finances in order that they revitalise their aging equipment, both for fire and ambulance and also for water and sewer reticulation. 

My question to you is, to what extent do you help them in terms of being a catalyst or fostering that coordination, co-operation and networking with those partners that are coming from outside to sign those agreements to capacitate them carrying out their mandate?

HON. ZIYAMBI: Thank you Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the Hon. Member for the supplementary question.  Yes, last year, all the local authorities held an investment conference in Bulawayo. We are receiving - some of them are receiving enquiries about joint venture.  Our job is to facilitate.  In any case, the Joint Venture Act allows the local authority to have joint venture, but they have to process it.  Whenever they have those joint venture proposals, we process them and now with the promulgation or the establishment of ZIDA, it has become much easier for joint venture operations to take place even at the local level.  I thank you. 

POLICY ON DISASTER AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE

          97.  HON. P. MASUKU asked the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing to state Government policy on disaster and emergency preparedness and response. 

          THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO):  I want to thank the Hon. Member again for asking this very topical question on Government’s policy on disaster and emergency preparedness and response.

          Mr. Speaker Sir, the national policy on disaster states that ‘every citizen of this country should assist where possible to avert or limit the effects of disaster’.  The policy speaks collective responsibility for society at large to be risk averse through actively taking steps for disaster prevention mitigation and to respond appropriately should disaster strike. 

Mr. Speaker Sir, Central Government has the primary role for the enabling institutional arrangements, service provision and programmes in support of disaster management.  The Government’s responsibility is with the Civil Protection and is an Act of Parliament, The Civil Protection Act of 1989.  Coordination structures transcend from the national level through sub-national structures at province, district, local authority and even at ward level.  Every effort is meant to enhance disaster management in the country and we must thank part of this preparedness for the response that has happened when we have had so many disasters either of Cyclone Idai or mining disasters.  I thank you.

          HON. NDUNA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  Hon. Minister, one time I was Chairman of the Committee on Transport and Infrastructural Development.  The disaster question you speak about speaks to the establishment of trauma centres or maybe accident victims’ stabilisation centres before the patients are transferred to definitive health care institutions.

My question therefore is, to what extent are you embedded with the local authorities in the establishment of these trauma centres because these trauma centres could be dotted all around the highways and the highways are the ones that are infested with your local authorities.  This is where your towns are.  To what extent are you actively involved in the establishment of accident victims stabilisation centres, aware that we have about five deaths per day from accidents and 70% of these people suffer death due to the fact that they have not been able to be transferred within the one hour which is called the golden hour to the primary health care institution and they could have first gone to that local authority. To what extent are you involved in the establishment of these trauma centres?

HON. J. MOYO: Mr. Speaker Sir, I chair a Cabinet Committee on Environment and Disaster Management where-in most of the Ministers that are responsible for prevention or mitigation are involved. There is the Minister of Health who is part of my Committee. He has been urging us to create trauma centres throughout our highways but these are not only trauma centres that can be built by local authorities. The local authorities, yes they are along the highways and they would help but Central Government also has a responsibility, so are the people who are coming to build our highways. In other jurisdictions, those who build highways also station trauma centres and ambulances so that if there are victims they can ferry them to the nearest hospitals. We are in discussion on this and we are alive to it and as Government, we think that it is an opportune time for us to implement these suggestions. I thank you.

HON. PHULU: Hon. Minister, in terms of the Traditional Leaders Act and particular in terms of the Rural Councils Act, traditional leaders are supposed to serve as an early warning system in as far as disaster is concerned. You can imagine with the recent disaster we have had where there have been reports that Government tried to warn people to move and direct people to do certain things. Maybe the response was not what you would have wanted. To what extent are traditional leaders capacitated and are you working with them in order to capacitate them to play that particular role or has that role been neglected?

HON. J. MOYO: I want to thank the Hon. Member for that question. We have not neglected the traditional leaders. If one wants, one of the best lessons that we got through Cyclone Idai is the ability of traditional leaders to transmit information to Civil Protection Units at the district level. If those traditional leaders were not in the places where they were marooned, we would not have got that information. When we went on the ground, in fact in some areas where we could only access by helicopter, the information that we got which was more accurate than anywhere we were getting information from was coming from village heads, herdsmen and traditional leaders in general. We work with them and they are part and parcel of what we believe is the civil protection system in the country.

Just as the Constitution says, we have national, provincial, local authorities and the community. The community is where the traditional leaders are and we have to rely on them to transmit information. In a place like Manicaland, the Minister of State for Manicaland has the number of every village head in Manicaland who has a cell phone and that is what we rely on. If we are able to do that, we think that the over 28 000 village heads can assist us as first line of warning or defence before we do any mitigation about civil disasters. So, I want to thank the Hon. Member. We must work with the traditional leadership.

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER (HON. MUTOMBA): Tomorrow, Thursday, 9th May, 2019 we will have the burial of the late national hero at the National Shrine, the late Cde. Ncube. Please take note.

MAINTENANCE OF SAFETY STANDARDS IN GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS

          98.   HON. MASUKU asked the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing to explain measures being taken to ensure that safety standards are being maintained in Government buildings.

          THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO): Mr. Speaker Sir, let me start by thanking the Hon. Member for asking the question. However, let me inform this august House that the need to ensure that safety is maintained in Government buildings at all times is of paramount importance. As Government, we make sure that there is safety for the occupants (human beings) as well as for the building itself and other assets within the building.

          This is achieved by the following practices:

v Conducting of fire drills on a yearly basis.

v Servicing of firefighting equipment on a yearly basis.

v Ensuring that emergency exit points are always clear of obstacles.

v Monthly servicing of lifts by NSSA licensed companies that are contracted annually on performance based contracts. There is no record of accidents due to lifts in Government buildings.

v Speed humps and speed limits as one drives into a Government premise.

v Annual building inspections are done before preparation of the annual maintenance budget. Aspects covered during the inspections include; structural, electrical and mechanical.

v Lightning protection for the building.

To ensure full compliance to existing building safety standards, the

Ministry is in constant liaison with institutions like NSSA and Harare City Council Fire Brigade.

          In addition, the Ministry monitors lift performance on a weekly basis through provincial structures. The Ministry is currently facing the following challenges:

v Inadequate funding of planned maintenance programmes that caters for safety issues.

v Delayed/late release of funds for payments of services rendered or goods.

Yes, this is a challenge and we are trying our best. We think that

with the assistance of the Ministry of Finance, we will be able to overcome some of these challenges. I thank you.

          HON. NDUNA: Thank you Hon. Minister for a well rounded response but my question is prefaced by the following; that some of these buildings have outlived their lifespan and they have gone past their sell by dates and are in a deplorable, disused and in a state that is quite disused. The safety standards are compromised by the size of some of these buildings. For instance, where I come from we have a hospital that is supposed to cater for 80 000 people …

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Hon. Nduna, may I remind you to put your question across and not to debate.

          HON. NDUNA: Thank you, I am zeroing in now. It is a place which is supposed to cater for 20 000 but now catering for 80 000. A small little court that is supposed to cater for so many people, in particular where I come from in Chegutu, just one little place is catering for 4 or 5 times the number that it is supposed to cater for.

          My question to you is, these local authorities, not only Chegutu Municipality but it is also Gweru and other entities, what land is available in terms of percentage quantum that is supposed to be allocated and given to Government departments in order to enable them to expand their places for service provision. It might not be their…

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Hon. Nduna, please can you go straight into your question please. If you are finished can you give the Minister the chance to respond?

HON. NDUNA: It might not be their own making to have the little buildings that they have got. What space is available for them to enhance their modus operandi by establishing robust, resilient and smart infrastructure?

          HON. J. MOYO: The Hon. Member’s question is extensive but I can say the President has ordered that we do a land audit around all our urban areas and that is being carried out.  Once it is out we will be able to see what expansion is needed by both Government institutions, local authority institutions and private sector institutions around our urban areas.  I am sure that any Ministry that needs expansion will be accommodated once that land audit has been done.

TRANSFORMER FOR MACHENA IRRIGATION SCHEME

108.   HON. KUMBWANDA asked the Minister of Energy and Power Development to state when a transformer at Machena Irrigation Scheme in Ward 31 Zaka East Constituency which was taken by the Zimbabwe Electricity Distribution Company (ZETDC) in October 2018 will be returned.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (HON. MUDYIWA): I would like to inform the House that the transformer for Machena Irrigation Scheme in Ward 31, Zaka East Constituency is a 100KVA transformer and was taken to ZENT for repairs.  I am not in a position to announce the actual date when the transformer is going to be returned since ZENT is facing challenges in acquiring the needed material which need foreign currency to purchase. 

HON. CHINYANGANYA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  Thank you Hon. Minister for the response. However, my question relates to the issue of transformers. The way ZETDC responds to replacement of transformers when they have been stolen or vandalised leaves a lot to be desired.  What is the Ministry doing to make sure that transformers are replaced as soon as possible because most of the locations are in darkness as we speak.

HON. MUDYIWA: In as much as we are also concerned with the rate at which the transformers are being replaced, there is not much that we can do as I have alluded earlier on that our challenge is on foreign currency to buy the much needed material, the copper wires which is quite a major component in the construction of the transformers.  I can give you a breakdown as to how much vandalism has affected the existing infrastructure particularly the transformers.  This year alone, 2019, by the 27th of March, there were 35 cases of vandalism that resulted in the theft of copper conductors on overhead lines in Bulawayo alone.  You can imagine the whole country how many transformers haves been vandalised.  The issue of vandalism is affecting ZENT capability to replace the much needed transformers.  So, the whole issue is on how we can manage the security of our transformers.  We are calling upon the community to be vigilant and assist in making sure that the transformers are not vandalised.

HON. GABBUZA: I want to appreciate the Minister’s response.  However, as a Ministry, do you have a policy on the replacement of transformers? You find one institution has no transformer for four years and another institution the transformer is replaced within a week.  A hospital has no transformer for two years yet a beer hall has its transformer replaced within a short space of time.  Is there a clear policy on how they prioritise replacements?

HON. MUDYIWA: Yes, there is a policy that transformers should be replaced as and when they are available.  However, there could be cases where they are urgent where, we prioritise hospitals, schools and other areas.  If there are cases where a beer hall had a transformer replaced earlier than a hospital, I think we need to investigate and find out what really happened.

HON. MUTSEYAMI: My supplementary question is to do with the response that she gave to question 108 with regard to the timeframe for the irrigation scheme in Ward 31, in Zaka East.  The question is speaking to a situation which happened in 2018 and this is an irrigation scheme that the community is suffering.  It was so specific to the issues that needs to be addressed and the Hon. Minister, even though there are challenges which I know, is very clear that she has no clarity as to when the repair will be done and as to when that replacement will be done.  At this level, we are talking to the Hon. Minister on a specific question and to that specific question which needs specific answers and that is why this question had to be put in writing so that the Hon. Minister would do an indepth research and give us a clear response.  Now, the Hon. Member has to go back to the community to respond that the Minister has no answer.  How does the Hon. Minister qualify this? If she can move to give us a response with regards to specifics on this one – it is irrigation for a community. 

HON. MUDYIWA: I think I have been very clear as to why I cannot give a specific date.  If I give a specific date and ZENT fails to avail that transformer on that timeline because of the challenges that they are facing, then you would come back again and say the Minister was not factual in what she gave us.  So, it is anybody’s guess, the issue is about forex. Once the foreign currency becomes available to buy the much needed material that is used in the construction of the transformer then I can be able to give the exact date.  I thank you.

ALLOCATION OF TRANSFORMERS FOR THE WESTERN REGION

109.   HON. MAYIHLOME asked the Minister of Energy and Power Development to explain why ZENT allocates just seven transformers for a whole month for the Western region.

THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (HON. MUDYIWA): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I would like to inform the House that the output from ZENT has been generally low such that all regions have got a huge backlog of transformers.  ZETDC requires in excess of 3 000 distribution transformers countrywide.  The procurement process was completed more than two years ago but the suppliers could not source the required foreign currency to import the transformers.  The same applies to ZENT that is also awaiting delivery of kits for manufacture or new transformers.  The few that are being released are repaired transformers.  I thank you.

HON. MAYHLOME:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  What measures are being put in place to localise the production or development of transformers.  This technology has existed in other countries for more than fifty years.  What measures are being taken to localise this knowledge and ZENT produce these transformers locally instead of crying about foreign currency all the time.

HON. MUDYIWA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir and thank you Hon. Member for the question.  ZENT is looking at the modalities of coming up with transformers that are made up of aluminium wire instead of the copper wire.  Whilst that new invention is done and proved to be okay for the environment, I think we will move on to that and avoid using the copper wire in our transformers.  That will save most of our transformers from vandalism.  I thank you.

HON. CHIKWINYA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  We stand here as Members of Parliament representing our constituencies in terms of Section 117, deriving our powers from the people.  Our representatives in terms of decision-making and implementation are Cabinet Ministers.  This whole day, we have been receiving answers to the effect that this policy decision cannot be implemented because of lack of foreign currency.  We know that Cabinet Ministers sit as a collective being chaired by the President.  Why do they not put themselves to task rather than to be able to find comfort and tell Parliament that they cannot work because there is no foreign currency?  It is as if they are now trying to pile us on the Minister of Finance.  It is not our job.  It is their job to demand foreign currency from the Minister of Finance who is their colleague. 

The Hon. Speaker of Parliament said what kills Parliament power is inertia.  Parliament has power and has teeth but we are failing to exercise our power because of inertia.  I therefore plead Mr. Speaker, that reasons to do with implementation because of one of their own is not to be tolerated in this House.  We need policy implementation.  If they do not have an answer with regards to foreign currency, they must only come here after having been convinced by the Minister of Finance when that foreign currency is going to come.  The majority of answers have been, I do not have foreign currency and surprisingly, the Minister of Finance does not come to Parliament.  It renders us as Parliament useless.  Questions are being ticked away from the Order Paper but with no answers.  I beg for your ruling Mr. Speaker that we need answers from our colleagues who are representatives of us in Cabinet.  Thank you.

THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI):  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I want to thank the Hon. Member but I do not believe that his assessment of events is very correct to say that it is the Minister of Finance or that Cabinet is piling that on the Minister of Finance.  It is the macroeconomic environment that we live in.  The Hon. Member is aware that we have legacy issues that we have inherited.  Over twenty years of economic decline and when the President came in, he said, let us now speak about economy.  Let us open up the economy and ensure that we have industry working again.  These are the efforts Cabinet is doing.  When you plant a seed today, you do not harvest the same day.  When you hear Hon. Members alluding to the fact that we have this crisis, it is for you in your representative oversight role to beware of the macroeconomic environment that we are living in which we are trying to correct.  One of the issues that we are dealing with pertains to reengagement that we also urge the Members from the other side to say that we also need to speak with one voice in terms of sanctions. 

That is a reality.  Mr. Speaker Sir, any businessman in Zimbabwe will tell you that even the little foreign currency that we have, if we want to procure something out of the country, you are interrogated as if you have committed a crime.  Many a time, they will reject that transaction.  Whether we like it or not, we have legacy issues that from both sides we have contributed but the President has said, let us come together, let us look at issues and reengage.  Let us come together and reform our country both politically and economically.  That is the reason when you hear Hon. Members saying, this is the crisis that we have.  It is perhaps the time to tell the Hon. Member that it is time to sit down and relook the issue of sanctions because it is also a reality.  I thank you – [HON. MEMBERS:  Hear, hear.] 

HON. NDUNA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I want to thank the Hon. Minister for her answer.  I also want to ask her to take us to the fact that we had some macadamised or some long stretches of copper wire that have been vandalised, Dabuka to Bulawayo.  Before we have such scenario, ZESA has been having over 600 thousand subscribers on its books and it has replaced more than 600 thousand stolen copper wire and transformers which it could have gone up to 1.2 million subscribers.  My question to the Minister would be, could she not then consider Government to revoke the copper licences which copper we do not produce.  We used to have Mhangura Copper Mine but we do not have it anymore but we have copper licences crisscrossing the width and breath of Zimbabwe.  People are smuggling copper and selling it.  We are shooting ourselves in the foot.  Would it not be prudent that before we even install technological advancement in terms of ICT drones and other infrastructure in order to police the infrastructure at ZESA, is it not possible to take back those licences so that no one is selling copper to anyone who is licenced by us?  We are stealing from the left hand using the right hand.  It pains me to see Zimbabwe bleed in the manner that it is bleeding.

HON. MUDYIWA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I would like to thank the Hon. Member for the suggestion that he is bringing up.  We are in the process of considering amendments to the Electricity Act where we will take into consideration the copper issue.  We are going to take that aboard.  Sooner or later, that will be brought up into Parliament.  Thank you.

ELECTRIFICATION OF DETE GARIKAI/HLALANI KUHLE HOUSES

          110.   HON. M. MKANDLA asked the Minister of Energy and Power Development to state measures being taken to provide electricity to Dete Garikai/Hlalanikuhle houses, since it is now six years after the houses were built.

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (HON. MUDYIWA): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. I would like to thank the Hon. Member for the question on measures being taken to provide electricity to Dete Garikai/Hlalanikuhle houses. I would like to draw the attention of the House to the fact that the provision of electricity for the Garikai/Hlalanikuhle houses in Dete required transformers and line reticulation. The electrification progress has been hampered by shortage of material especially the conductors and transformers. The region has suffered from vandalism that has seen resources meant for new reticulation being channeled to restore vandalised networks. The beneficiaries will be approached to participate in the customer-supplied material schemes for backbone reticulation and customer supplied meters scheme so that there can be progress. Thank you.

          HON. MAYIHLOME: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. What criteria does ZETDC use in connecting electricity to build up areas? My question arises from the fact that you find that a fairly new suburb is electrified as compared to a suburb that would have been constructed three or four years before this one would have been constructed. Are there no under-hand dealings at ZETDC to make sure that happens? Thank you.

          HON. MUDYIWA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir and I would like to thank the Hon. Member for the question. The criteria that ZETDC uses in electrifying the localities or the areas that needs electricity is that once the area has been constructed, the poles are installed and we have the electric cables that are installed as well, electricity can be connected within an area, but where those irregularities have occurred, I think you can bring that to the attention of the Ministry and we can find out what really happened. Thank you.

WRITTEN SUBMISSIONS TO QUESTIONS WITH NOTICE

ZBC CODE OF ETHICS

73.   HON GONESE asked the Minister of Information, Publicity and Broadcasting Services to explain whether the Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation (ZBC) has a code of ethics which regulates the active participation in politics by its employees in view of the participation by one of its employees in the ZANU PF primary elections in Mashonaland Central and whether other employees can openly participate in political activities of other parties if they so wish.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF INFORMATION PUBLICITY AND BROADCASTING SERVICES (HON. MUTODI): The Constitution of Zimbabwe does not currently prohibit any citizen from seeking political office irrespective of whether they are civil servants or not.  The electoral law requires that one be 21 years old to be voted into office as a Member of Parliament, 40 years on election to be elected as President and 40 years to be a Senator.  There are no occupational requirements, hence as it stands anyone is eligible to vote and be voted into the office.

TELEVISION AND RADIO COVERAGE TO RUSITU VALLEY, MUTSAMVU AND CHIKUKWA AREAS

74.   HON. SACCO asked the Minister of Information, Media and

Broadcasting Services to state whether the Ministry has plans to provide

signal to areas such as Rusitu Valley, Mutsamvu and Chikukwa that

currently do not have television and radio coverage.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF INFORMATION PUBLICITY AND BROADCASTING SERVICES (HON. MUTODI): Government is working on a digitalisation programme and radio and television coverage must be guaranteed across all corners of the country when the programme is complete.  We are facing foreign currency challenges to complete the programme but efforts are being made to allow radio and television coverage nation-wide.

PLANS ON CLEARING SALARY ARREARS FOR ZIMGLASS WORKERS

76.   HON.  B. DUBE asked the Minister of Industry and

Commerce to state the Government’s plans regarding ZIMGLASS workers who are owed huge sums of money in salary arrears.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF INDUSTRY AND

COMMERCE (HON. MODI): ZIMGLASS, a wholly owned company of the Industrial Development Corporation of Zimbabwe (IDCZ) was placed under liquidation in 2015 before it was under judicial management since August 2014.

          IDCZ has managed to pay off the secured creditors and is currently seized with the payment of unsecured workers and utilities to the tune of US$17 million.

IDCZ is intending to resuscitate ZIMGLASS through the identification of an investor after taking the company out of liquidation.

ZIMGLASS was the sole producer of glass packaging and used to employ 282 workers.  I thank you. 

 

RESUSCITATION OF ZIM ALLOYS

77.   HON CHIBAYA asked the Minister of Industry and Commerce the Ministry’s plans to resuscitate companies such as Zim Alloys in Gweru in an effort to address unemployment in Mkoba Constituency.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF INDUSTRY AND

COMMERCE (HON. MODI):  Honourable Speaker, let me inform the House that in line with the Transitional Stabilisation Programme (TSP), the Ministry of Industry and Commerce is mandated to resuscitate ailing companies.

          Zim Alloys is currently under judicial management since 2013 due to a debt totalling $60 million.  The company has since 2018 been under the care of the judicial management making strides to rebuild one of its furnaces to resume smelting operations.

          A proposal to have an Indian investor inject US$100 million failed to take off and currently, the investor has submitted an appeal to the High Court to cancel the transaction. The company has however reported to be at 60% on target in re-building the furnace utilising its own resources. The company is also involved in a contract production arrangement and has managed to export 40 700 tonnes of chrome.  The company employs 650 workers. 

The Ministry is monitoring the process of ensuring that the company is removed from judicial management by offering the necessary policy support.  I thank you.

CONTROL OF PRICE INCREASES ON BASIC COMMODITIES

          79.   HON. MOLLY NKOMO asked the Minister of Industry and Commerce to state measures being taken to control the ever increasing prices of basic commodities.

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (HON. MODI):  Hon. Speaker, let me inform the House that Government acknowledges that the high level of inflation has brought untold suffering to our people but has also negatively affected business because of aggregate demand and hence capacity utilisation has gone down significantly.

          Government has no policy to control prices, but as a Ministry, we believe that the rising prices are a result of problems elsewhere in the economy and we have interrogated the causes of this phenomenon as the rising cost of raw materials, low industrial productivity, the existence of monopolies in the economy, the shortage of foreign currency and profiteering and over-charging by unscrupulous business people.

          May I inform the august House that whilst the Ministry does not control prices, we continue to engage business so that together we address the problems bedeviling the economy.  Government and business are making efforts to increase the production of raw materials through various initiatives such as Command Agriculture and contract farming.  Competition also helps in bringing down prices and therefore, efforts are underway to encourage competitive behaviour among our business people. 

          The prevailing prices do not reflect the cost of production but are more of a response to the shortages of foreign currency that has led to a spike in the rate of exchange between the US$ and the RTGS$.  May I however, inform Hon. Members that Government does not generate foreign currency but my Ministry is putting in place policies to encourage business to promote exports and therefore generate more foreign currency.  The Ministry is working closely with exporters and monetary authorities to address bottlenecks in the interbank foreign currency market so that the scarce resource is channelled to the productive sector.

          My Ministry will also empower consumers through the Consumer Protection Bill that will soon come for debate in the august House.  I thank you.

SETTING UP OF THE ZIMBABWE EXPORT COUNCIL

          82.  HON. A. MPOFU asked the Deputy Minister of Industry and Commerce whether the Ministry could consider setting up a Zimbabwe Export Council in line with international best practice.

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (HON. MODI): Thank you Hon. Speaker. I want to thank the Hon. Member for the question, as it is in line with what Government is doing to promote exports for the country.  Let me inform the House that cognizant of the role that exports play in generating foreign currency in the economy, Government set up Zimtrade, the national trade development and promotion organisation whose mandate is to energise Zimbabwe’s export growth.  Zimtrade provides a number of services to exporters, such as; market intelligence, export promotion, export development, capacity building and systemic competitiveness.

          Government has crafted the National Export Strategy (NES) which provides for the establishment of a National Export Advisory Council (NEAC) which is to serve an advocacy role for exporters and to provide a channel through which exporters can bring matters to the attention of the Government.  This institution will compliment the role that Zimtrade is currently playing.

          Let me also inform the House that the National Export Strategy is in its final draft and is awaiting the launch and subsequent implementation.  I thank you.

ALLOCATION OF RESIDENTIAL STANDS IN UNSERVICED AREAS

87.  HON. NKOMO asked the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing to explain Government policy regarding the allocation of residential stands in areas which have not been serviced.

THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING: (HON. MOYO):  What we have is a Government policy that covers the overall allocation of residential stands to individuals.  The Ministry encourages land developers, local authorities and housing cooperatives to allocate serviced land to beneficiaries.  However, unserviced land can be allocated to beneficiaries on paper after the approval of a layout plan by the Department of Physical Planning and pegging of the land by a registered land surveyor.  What is prohibited and unlawful is the occupation and development of unserviced land.  This therefore means that one can be allocated unserviced land that has no sewer, water, roads and other services and be made to pay and obtain documents of ownership over the land. However, the same individual will have to wait for the servicing of the land and issuance of a certificate of compliance by the relevant local authority before one can occupy and develop the stand.

          The general Government policy on the allocation of residential stands to individual beneficiaries is as follows:-

a.    Allocation of land is on a first come first served basis and allocations should be based on a properly maintained waiting list.

b.    An individual should benefit only once in any local authority area and those who already have registered properties in their names should not benefit on Government or Council land.

c.     If allocated land, an individual will only occupy and develop the land after it has been serviced with water, sewer, roads and other basic services.

CONSTRUCTION OF ROUNDABOUT AT INTERSECTION OF HIGH GLEN AND GLEN EAGLES ROADS

88.  HON. MACHINGAUTA asked the Minister of Local

Government, Public Works and National Housing to explain why it is taking long to complete the construction of the roundabout at the intersection of High Glen and Glen Eagles roads in Budiriro and to state when it will be completed.

THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. MOYO):  The

construction of the roundabout is being funded by City of Harare revenues but due to financial challenges there were delays in payments which have since been done.  Considering that we are in the rainy season, the project is expected to be completed by 31 January 2019.  The original completion was to be done by 30 November 2018.

REHABILITATION OF FEEDER ROADS IN ST. MARY’S CONSTITUENCY

89.  HON. TARUSENGA asked the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing to inform the House when rehabilitation of feeder roads in St Mary’s Constituency will commence.

THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO):  May I inform this august House that currently, ZINARA is only providing funding for surfaced primary and secondary arterial roads with the intent to move to feeder roads once the backlog of arterial roads in a council area have been attended to.   While waiting for the ZINARA funding to come through, local authorities have been encouraged to fund lower tier roads from other sources, including a road fund in the case of Chitungwiza where the revenue inflows have been slow and inadequate for the combined needs of even one ward.

TAP WATER FOR NYATSIME SUBURB

90.  HON. TARUSENGA asked the Minister of Local

Government, Public Works and National Housing to state when Nyatsime suburb would have tap water and when supply of safe water to other areas in St Mary’s constituency would improve, considering the recurrence of water borne diseases such as cholera.

THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO): Nyatsime area is undergoing a joint regularisation process to normalise and legalise the settlement under a MoU between Chitungwiza Municipality and Manyame RDC.  Upon completion and setting up a joint committee to manage the area normal municipal operations will commence.  The water supply situation is expected to stabilise within the water and sanitation project being undertaken by Chitungwiza Municipality and a public Private Partnership (PPP) with a project implementation period of 3 years.

SEWER BLOCKAGES IN ST. MARY’S CONSTITUENCY

91.  HON. TARUSENGA asked the Minister of Local

Government, Public Works and National Housing to explain measures being taken by the Ministry to deal with perennial sewer blockages in St Mary’s Constituency.

THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO):  The sanitation situation is expected to stabilise with the water and sanitation project being undertaken by Chitungwiza Municipality and a Public Private Partnership (PPP) with a project implementation period of 3 years.  However Council has made submissions for funding under PSIP with a major component of the funding going towards rehabilitation of the trunk sewers of Chitungwiza in the 2019 financial year.

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES IN ST. MARY’S CONSTITUENCY

92.    HON. TARUSENGA asked the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing when the Ministry will provide recreational  facilities in St Mary’s Constituency.

THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO):  The recreational facilities are being addressed with proposals underway with a Public Private Partnership.

CONSTRUCTION OF COMMUNITY LIBRARY IN BUDIRIRO CONSTITUENCY

93.    HON. MACHINGAUTA asked the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing when the construction of the proposed community library on stands number 686 in Ward 33, in Budiriro Constituency will commence.

THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO):  Let me inform this august House that the community library will be budgeted for in 2020.

CHALLENGE OF SEPTIC TANKS AND SHALLOW WELLS BEHIND PHASE 2 MANYAME PARK HIGH DENSITY SUBURB

94.    HON. TARUSENGA asked the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing to explain how the Ministry will deal with the challenge of septic tanks and shallow wells being constructed from stand number 9180 to 9640, Phase 2 Manyame Park High Density

THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO):  City Council has applied for PSIP funds under the 2019-2013 (PSIP) programme and part of the funds will be used to rectify the problem in Manyame Park High Density suburb.  However, according to the City Council:

a.     The area in question has a general plan approved by Physical Planning.

b.    Residents were allocated stands while awaiting servicing,

c.     Subsequently, residents applied for permission to build on their stands while awaiting servicing.

d.    During construction, development inspections were done on each stage except for plumbing and sewerage since these were not done.

e.     Residents subsequently moved into their houses without requisite occupation certificates since sewer and water are not provided.

f.      The Municipality has noted the illegal occupation and to mitigate against water borne diseases it has requested for funding.

MEASURES TO ENSURE CLEAN AND HEALTHY ENVIRONMENT IN MBARE

99.   HON. CHAMISA asked the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing to state measures being taken to ensure that safety standards are being maintained in Government buildings.

THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (HON. MUDYIWA): Mr. Speaker Sir, let me inform this august House that the Ministry is in the process of finalising modalities for the rolling out of the National Command Housing Delivery Programme.  Under the said programme, we shall identify vacant spaces in situ, and construct walk up flats and/or higher rise flats units (with lifts/elevators).

          This will lead to subsequent demolition of the old structures.  This urban regeneration agenda shall also entail upgrading of water and sewer reticulation, roads, social amenities and other ancillary social infrastructure that goes with sustainable human settlements development.  in Mbare, the Government, City of Harare and other stakeholders are in the process of identifying available open spaces to be for the construction of build modern walk up flats with the requisite sanitation facilities.  These will accommodate people who are currently in dilapidated bachelor quotas/flats and single storey structures that no longer meet modern expectations in terms of habitation.

ELECTRIFICATION OF EMGWANINI AND MBUNDANE AREAS

          107   HON. P. MASUKU asked the Minister of Energy and Power Development to state when Emgwanini and Mbundane are in Nketa Constituency will have electricity.

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (HON. MUDYIWA):  Mr. Speaker Sir, I would like to start by bringing the House’s attention to the scope of works for the electrification of Mbundane and Emganwini:

 

Mbundane

Emganwini (Masotsheni and Food-for-less sections)

No of customer stands outstanding

1 900

450

No. of transformers (315 kVA, 11/0.4kV)

23

5

Length of high voltage lines (km)

13

2

Length of low voltage lines (km) outstanding

5

7

         

          Mr. Speaker Sir, the major challenge hampering the fulfillment of the above outstanding scope of works has been the non-availability of transformers, shortage of line construction materials and vandalism of the existing electricity supply infrastructure.  Supply of transformers has been affected by shortage of foreign currency required to import transformers and/or kits used to manufacture transformers.

          Progress in the construction of the electricity supply network has been affected by vandalism of existing infrastructure.  This year alone, by 27 March 2019, there were 35 cases of vandalism that resulted in the theft of copper conductors on overhead lines in Bulawayo.  Such cases of vandalism have consumed in excess of 60km of aluminium conductors in replacements.  The effect is that ZETDC uses the conductors and other line materials that would have been used to electrify new areas like Mbundane and Emganwini to repair the vandalised sections and restore electricity supplies.

          Mr. Speaker Sir, in order to manage the project turn-around times, prospective clients in the affected areas have been approached and advised to contribute materials and get the low voltage reticulation constructed.  The beneficiaries under the customer-supplied materials scheme will get electricity tokens in return for their contributions.  Mbundane residents have responded and currently some sections in Phases 2 to 6 have constructed the Low Voltage (LV) network.  These will be attended to ahead of the sections requiring both low and high voltage works.  ZETDC will then concentrate on the construction of the high voltage network.  As a result of the foregoing, we are unable to give a definite date by which time the areas will have electricity but commit to electrification by the fourth quarter of 2019.

MOTION

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

          THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): I move that Orders of the Day, Numbers 1 to 28 be stood over until Order of the Day, Number 29 has been disposed of.

          HON. CHINYANGANYA: On a point of order Mr. Speaker Sir, it seems like we no longer have a quorum.

 [Bells rung]

          Notice having been taken that there being present fewer than 70 members, the bells were rung for Seven Minutes and a Quorum still not being present, THE ACTING SPEAKER adjourned the House without question put at Thirteen Minutes past Six O’clock p.m. pursuant to the provisions of Standing Order Number 56.

          NOTE: The following members were present when the House adjourned: Hon. Bushu B.; Hon. Chibagu G.; Hon. Chidakwa P.; Hon. Chikomba L.; Hon. Chikuni E.; Hon. Chikwama B.; Hon. Chingosho C.P; Hon. Chinyanganya M.; Hon. Chombo M.;  Hon. Dzuma S.; Hon. Gumbwanda K.R; Hon. Houghton J.R.; Hon. Kankuni W.; Hon. Kapuya F.;  Hon. Kashiri C.; Hon. Khumalo M.; Hon. Khumalo S.S.; Hon. Maboyi R. M.; Hon. Maronge C.; Hon. Masango C.P.; Hon. Matambanadzo M.; Hon. Mataranyika D.M.; Hon. Mayihlome L.; Hon. Mguni O.; Hon. Mguni S.K.; Hon. Mkhandla M.; Hon. Moyo Priscilla; Hon. Mpofu A.; Hon. Mpofu M.M.; Hon. Muchimwe P.T.; Hon. Mudarikwa S.; Hon. Mukuhlani  T.; Hon. Munetsi I.; Hon. Murambiwa O.; Hon. Mutambisi C.; Hon. Mutseyami C.P.; Hon. Ncube E.; Hon. Ndiweni D.; Hon. Nduna D.T.; Hon. Ngwenya S.; Hon. Nkani A.; Hon. Nyabote R.; Hon. Nyathi R.R.; Hon. Nyere C.; Hon. Raidza M. ; Hon. Rungani A.; Hon.Samson A.; Hon. Shava I. ; Hon. Shirichena E. ; Hon.Sibanda O.; Hon. Singo L.; Hon. Sithole Josiah.; Hon. Sithole S.; Hon. Svuure D.; Hon. Tsuura N.; Hon. Tungamirai T.; Hon. Zhou P. and  Hon. Ziyambi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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National Assembly Hansard NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD 08 MAY 2019 VOL 45 NO 47