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NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD - 1 APRIL 2009 VOL. 35 NO. 28

PARLIAMENT OF ZIMBABWE

Wednesday, 1st April, 2009

The House of Assembly met at a Quarter-past Two O'clock p.m.

PRAYERS

(MR. SPEAKER in the Chair)

ANNOUNCEMENTS BY MR. SPEAKER

POSTPONEMENT OF THE

WOMEN'S CAUCUS MEETING AND THE EMPOWERMENT WORKSHOP

MR. SPEAKER: I have to inform the House that the Parliamentary Women's Caucus meeting scheduled for tomorrow Thursday 2nd April, 2009 and the Empowerment Workshop that had been scheduled for 3 to 6 April 2009 have been postponed to later dates to be advised. These activities were clashing with the rescheduled Cabinet retreat.

MOTION

LEAVE TO SUSPEND STANDING ORDER NOS. 105 AND 106

THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER (PROF. MUTAMBARA): Mr. Speaker Sir, I seek leave of the House to move that the provisions of Standing Order Nos. 105 and 106 relating to the referral of Bills to Portfolio Committees and reports from the Parliamentary Legal Committee respectively be suspended in respect of the Appropriation (2008)(Additional Bill) (H.B. 1, 2009).

Motion put and agreed to.

MOTION

SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDER NOS. 105 AND 106

THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER (PROF. MUTAMBARA): Mr. Speaker Sir, I move that the provisions of Standing Order Nos. 105 and 106 relating to the referral of Bills to Portfolio Committees and reports from the Parliamentary Legal Committee respectively be suspended in respect of the Appropriation (2008)(Additional Bill) (H.B. 1, 2009).

Motion put and agreed to.

ANNOUNCEMENT BY MR. SPEAKER

NON-ADVERSE REPORT RECEIVED FROM THE

PARLIAMENTARY LEGAL COMMITTEE

MR. SPEAKER: I have received a non-adverse report from the Parliamentary Legal Committee on the Appropriation (2008) (Additional) 2009 Bill (H.B.1, 2009).

Second Reading: With leave, forthwith.

SECOND READING

APPROPRIATION (2008) (ADDITIONAL) 2009 BILL

THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER (PROF. MUTAMBARA): I move that the Bill be now read a second time.

Motion put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Third Reading: With leave; forthwith.

THIRD READING

APPROPRIATION (2008) (ADDITIONAL) 2009 BILL

THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER (PROF. MUTAMBARA): I move that the Bill be now read the third time.

Motion put and agreed to.

Bill read the third time.

ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS

WITHOUT NOTICE

MR. MADZIMURE: In the GPA there was a provision of the creation of ministries in the President's and the Prime Minister's offices whose ministers were going to deal with issues of reconciliation. It is now more than a month since the inclusive government was formed. Can the Deputy Prime Minister in the absence of the relevant Ministers to explain the programme that is being put in place to make sure that the healing process after which should see that people do not take the law into their hands to solve some of the problems.

THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER (PROF. A. MUTAMBARA): We have set up an inclusive government in this country. The mandate of that government includes among other things, to carry out a national healing programme, encountering and holding a people driven democratic constitution. Those two activities are meant to achieve in our country, a situation where we can say, never and never again are Zimbabweans is going to brutalize and attack each other because of political affiliations. Never again in this country are we going to deny each other an opportunity to express freely and vote for who we want.

What we have done as a government is to have three ministers from the three political parties in charge of this programme of national healing. What we have done so far is to conduct an all stakeholders arrangement where they seek to understand from outside government what agenda and terms of reference should be and the modus operandi of their work as a committee. They will be coming to Parliament with their findings so that Parliament will have input in terms of what needs to be done.

Of particular importance to this committee, to this government is the restoration of justice, victim based justice where victims have been failed in what happened to their circumstances and to the transactions committed in the past. Also of importance is no revenge, no retribution but building a unified people. We are saying that there should be rehabilitation of communities and victims within the scope of the work of the three ministers. I would not pre empty the work of this committee, the committee will come to Parliament, present the terms of reference, they will come with their input in terms of what they will have done and also in terms of the timeline of the activities of that committee.

That is what I can say for the moment but I want to emphasize that, unless and until we resolve matters around national healing, unless and until we create a new culture where we say, it is okay to belong to different political parties, we will not be able to conduct a free and fair election, which means this inclusive government will not have delivered its agenda of creating conditions in our country of free and fair elections.

MR. MADZIMURE : Can you tell us what you are doing to make sure that you take the people along with you?

MR. SPEAKER : I am sure the Minister has explained that they are currently doing consultations.

*MR. GARANDI: Speech not recorded due to technical fault.

MR. SPEAKER : Order, order, order hon. members please allow the hon. member to pose the question in a language of his choice. It is up to the Minister to see to it that he understands the question.

*MR. GARANDI: Speech not recorded due to technical fault.

THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, SPORTS, ARTS AND CULTURE (SENATOR COLTART): I am grateful that this question has been raised. There is a similar question placed in the order paper. As you may be aware on the 5th of March, I announced on behalf of the government a new government policy in regard of payment of school fees. I need to emphasise to hon. members that this policy was reached after a wide consultation especially within the government and respects that agreement of the three political parties.

I appreciate that the policy as announced in view of the fact that some parents find it hard to pay some of these fees that where announced. I am not quite sure that I appreciate the hon. members' question that is in regard of the follow up. I have conducted several meetings with the civil society organizations from the grass roots to understand how they can make applications. May I take this opportunity to emphasise to hon. members that the press has emphasized on the announcements of the fees and does not pay sufficient attention on my review regarding the instincts; for instance paragraph 3 of 3 of the policy announcement made on the 5th of March which states that those parents or guardians of vulnerable children should submit application to their school heads. The school will determine whether those applications qualify to get assistance. We need to ensure that, as many children as possible are able to attend school. Hon. members should note that this is an interim policy that has only been designed for a short term, for the first and second term of 2009. We will be reviewing the policy and see if we need to adjust it. We said we are faced with a crisis situation in our educational sector and we needed to implement a policy that will ensure that we have as much money back to the education system but we also have to consider the plight of those parents who can not afford to pay the fees.

Turning to the second aspect of your question that of goats, cattle and chicken, it is a serious question and I have no doubt hon. member that it arises from a clause which is found in the Ministry's application form. Let me explain to you hon. members. This application form has to be signed by any parent or guardian or orphan who cannot pay fees to be submitted to the school heads. On the first page of the form, we ask what the income of the parent is and we also ask what their assets are, and included in the asset statement of the form, there is a question which asks how many cattle or goats and chicken do you own because we need to assess the networth of the assets. But, that does not mean that we will accept payment in goats, cattle or chicken.

That will give us the opportunity to assess whether the fees should be revised or reduced. Let me finally make this point that government has directed all schools to open foreign currency accounts and the directorate that we have sent out to schools says that parents should pay fees in hard currency. And those fees should be paid directly into the FCA's. We are aware of reports where money is paid and put into drawers and that is not an accountable system that we are satisfied with.

MR. KANZAMA: My question is directed to Hon. Chamisa. In view of being a Member of Parliament for my constituency Mutare South, I also represent the nation. So after the announcement of ZESA bills by the Minister of Energy, Hon. Mudzuri, I started receiving many calls from people residing particularly in Manicaland relating to the bills being charged by TelOne. The bills for customers, individuals, companies complaining that the rates are too high for them to be able to pay. What is your Ministry doing to address this concern?

THE MINISTER OF INFORMATION COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY (MR. CHAMISA): I am sure the hon. member wanted to ask the Minister of Energy Hon. Mudzuri.

MR. SPEAKER: Order Hon. Chamisa. - (laughter) -

MR. CHAMISA: Thank you Mr. Speaker. I am aware as Minister that there is a challenge with the issue of the billing system. Your question hon. member is in two parts. The first question has to do with the tariff regime that we had to make people pay and that tariff regime has been excessively high because we use what we call the COSIT Model that is the one that is used by POTRAZ. It has a scientific renegation of trying mechanism, but they chose a higher act of fighting that mechanism and we have since instructed POTRAZ to in turn advise Tel One to reduce and revise their tariff regime.

It was sitting at 30 cents per unit or 10 cents per minute. So what we have done is, we have reduced the tariffs by 30% at least in the interim, but we are further reviewing that price regime to make sure that the tariffs are maintained in terms of what is in the Region. But, there is a different element, the element of billing. The bills that have been sent out to people, I have advised Net One not to disconnect customers until we finalise on how we are going to rationalize on the issues of the billing because the bills that have been sent out are excessively high and they are inimical and poisonous. So until that is resolved, nobody should be disconnected. The tariff issue, we have addressed in the interim, but in the short term nobody should be disconnected.

MR. KANZAMA: But, from what I know is happening now, I do not have the statistics, but it seems almost three quarters of the whole town in Mutare has been disconnected. So I do not know whether your department has send the circular or it is still within the ministry?

MR. CHAMISA: Besides being specific I am going to try and answer that questionWhat we have tried to do is to trigger happy individuals particularly in Manicaland. There are other people who are zealous and adventurous, we have said that they should be calm and respect the decision of the Minister. Thank you.

MR. D. SIBANDA: My question is directed to the Minister of Education. Are you aware that some school Heads are turning away those children who cannot afford or who have not paid school fees. What is the government position regarding this?

THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, SPORTS, ARTS AND CULTURE (SENATOR COLTART): Thank you, Mr. Speaker, we are aware that some school heads are turning away those who have not paid fees but the policy of excluding children from school, I have spoken about it publicly. Unfortunately, because of the fact that teachers are not being paid a viable wage until the Minister of Finance announced the payment of allowances in hard currency, the teachers were given the ability to work with SDC to find alternative ways of ensuring that teachers are paid allowances to go back to school. Unfortunately that policy has crept into our system and it is going to take some time to stop. It will only stop when we are able to pay the teachers a viable salary. It is an unsatisfactory situation Mr. Speaker, if we continue like this but we continue to say no children should be expelled from school, so I urge hon. members to report to my office where this is being done.

MR. CHIMBETETE: My question is directed to the Minister of Education. I have been to my constituency over the weekend and happen to move around about three schools, particularly Nyarukowa. The situation at Nyarukowa is pathetic in the sense that there is a primary school with grade 1 to 7 and a secondary school with form one to form four, but there are no buildings for secondary. However, they are sharing the buildings that are at the primary side. The most disturbing issue is; the headmaster is taking instructions from the ministry. The parents from the primary side are not paying school fees, but the bottom line now is, the teachers do not have chalk, stationery and the parents are not able to pay the levy, so how can the parents help the ministry?

THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, SPORTS, ARTS AND CULTURE (SENATOR COLTART: Mr Speaker Sir, the question illustrates the catastrophic side of the relations. When I took office on the 15th of February Mr Speaker, I found the situation terrible. About 90 percent of our schools were closed and some 80 000 teachers were on strike. Mr Speaker, the Ministry of Education has been affected by economic collapse in exactly the same way every other sector has been affected. Let me just illustrate in terms of the budget; as you are aware, when the first budget was announced by the Hon. Minister Chinamasa an amount of US$284 million dollars was allocated to the Ministry of Education. When Finance Minister Hon. Biti announced his budget two weeks ago he allocated the ministry US$177 million dollars, so to put that in the context Mr Speaker - after taking up office Mr Speaker we have realized a higher figure of US480 million dollars that is immediate.

We have catastrophic hands. We cannot pay our teachers enough money, we do not have chalk, exercise books and all other teaching materials. We found that many of our schools have been vandalized,roofs of classrooms have been removed and this is the problem we have to confront together as an inclusive government. What I need to stress to the hon. member is that there is no easy solution to this, there is no short solution to this because as we know, our government revenues are very law and there are not sufficient to restore the education sector for the mean time and that is the reason why we all need to work together to get our industry functioning again in all sectors so that we can generate sufficient revenues to restore our education system to where it was in 1980 and 1990s.

MR. CHIBAYA: Mr Speaker Sir, my question is directed to the Minister of Energy, Eng. E. Mudzuri. The country is experiencing a shortage of electricity and farmers are now preparing for the winter crop and they would need electricity. What is your ministry doing to address this problem?

THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (ENG. MUDZURI): Mr. Speaker it is true that the country has serious power problems we are delivering an average of 1180 megawatts at any one time, that is an average maximum we cannot deliver and the expected amount to be delivered this month is around 1400 megawatts this deficit is quiet outstanding because the actual projected demand, if we are fully utilizing the industry, the demand would be 2800 megawatts. We have had serious consultations with the ministry of agriculture and they have indicated that they need about 200 megawatts three days a week and we shall deliberately direct power towards those farmers who are going to reduce wheat and there are areas which have benefited through the Ministry of Agriculture where we are going to deliver as well, which will mean the country will experience several power cuts which will deliberately be done through ZESA so that we take out the 200 megawatts for the time being.

We have to apologize to the country and all consumers that there is not much we can do to make sure that there is full power at an one time, but we are trying to institute discipline within ZESA so that any power cuts are managed and people are informed well in advance. It is not simple but we have to do that so that we can manage the winter crop but otherwise the energy supply is quite restricted.

MR. MUSUMBU: Mr Speaker Sir, I would want to find out from the Minister of I.C.T what measures have been in place to Tel One rural consumers who have had their services disconnected throughout the country. Some have not been working for the past 40 years.

THE MINISTER OF INFORMATION COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY (MR CHAMISA): Thank you Mr Speaker, I am sure 40 years ago I was not yet born, but I just want to say in terms of the speed of technology obviously the equipment that was there is no longer supposed to be working by now. We are trying to work on a comprehensive response to the issue of telephones in the rural areas. It is not just supposed to be confined fixed network facilities, in fact there is a comprehensive government programme of STERP to make sure that we also allow people in the rural areas to be able to communicate any where any time. We are going to take the advantage of new technology for example the C.D.M.A where you are able to effectively deal with telephone areas in the rural areas. In fact we have already agreed with Tel One that we should have people before Christmas on the phones, speaking and sharing news with their loved ones. That is an assurance that we are going to deal with this together with the providers and we are also trying to make sure we have a base station through a number of policy mix perspective so that we are able to have base stations for 091, 011 and 023 so that people in the rural area are also able to have access to cellphones so that while they are herding cattle and they lose their black beast, they can use their cellphone to ask their counterparts if they saw their beasts. So hon. member this is what the ministry is doing.

MR. MUDIWA: My question is directed to the Core-Ministers of Home Affairs. We have noticed with dismay the disregard of the rule of law with regards to the Anglican Church saga. What is the Minister doing to ensure that the rule of law is upheld? There has been a ruling already that they should share the church premises. We have noticed that policemen are favouring the other side.

MR. SPEAKER: Order. I made a ruling on that issue last week but however I will allow the Minister to shade light on that.

THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MR MUTSEKWA): let me take this opportunity to thank the hon. member for asking this question. It gives me an opportunity to explain to the House and the nation what we are doing on that particular problem. Mr Speaker the ministry and indeed government is aware that there is this disagreement which has been going on for a very long time within the Anglican church. Particularly so because it has involved the police who we are in charge of. As you are aware Mr Speaker the tendency is that the image of the police is tarnished.

This morning my colleague and I had to summon both Bishop Kunonga and Bishop Padare to our offices and we had detailed discussion on why this saga should not be allowed to continue especially the incidence of disturbances of church services. There have been court appeals and different interpretations of these appeals by the two sides. Therefore as of today we could not make a definite conclusion on the matter. We have however referred the issue to the government Chief Law Officer, the Attorney General, to give us his interpretation of what that court order means. Our police officers are apparently in a dilemma where their interpretation was that because of the appeal that was made by the other party it therefore meant that the status quo remained. We are hoping that once the A.G gives us guidance on what that interpretation is, we will give a directive to the police to act accordingly. In the meantime we have instructed the police to restrain themselves in as far as using violence on the people attending church services.

MR DAMBAKUWA: My question is directed to the Co-Ministers of Home Affairs. Are you aware in your ministry of what is happening in the roads concerning police officers taking bribes from motorists. Are you aware of what is happening at night especially in my constituency, that there are prostitutes who are moving with their spare clothes in their handbags. They get into hotels and change their clothes. When they get out they are arrested, but they always bribe the police force. This is happening even here in Harare.

MR. SPEAKER: I was going to rule that it is not a policy question, but because you are still new I will allow the Minister to give a response.

MR. MUTSEKWA: As you have correctly observed this becomes a question that needs detailed research and therefore adequate answers. I will ask the hon. member to put it in writing so that investigations are made and we give appropriate answers. However, as anybody else in this House has been reading reports of corrupt practices from the police, we do not condone that, but what we encourage is, if there are any incidents that can be proved to us they should be reported so we can take appropriate action.

MR. MUZULU: I would like the Minister of Education to inform this House on the progress made so far in the marking of public examinations written last year and what is the position of the Minister concerning the writing and marking of this year's June examinations.

THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, SPORTS, ARTS AND CULTURE (SENATOR COLTART): This is another sector of the education ministry that was severely affected by the economic collapse. As you may be aware the examinations written in November last year were not marked by the time the inclusive government was formed. We managed to secure US$67000 to enable us to recommence the marking exercise. We have made substantial progress in that regard. My understanding from ZIMSEC is that we have almost completed all the marking of the grade seven papers, O level papers and A level papers. With regards to the A level papers everything has been marked except for Geography. So we can say 99% of the marking has been completed. However, the story does not end there because these papers now have to be graded and the various marks collated, put into computer database and the results printed into the relevant certificates. Unfortunately we have encountered very severe financial constraints and I am in the midst of trying to find donor support to complete this exercise. On the assumption that we get the necessary funding

our hope is that these examination results will be released by the end of the school holiday, it is subject to funding being secured.

Regarding the position pertaining to the June examinations coming up this year, that in fact is a subject of an intense debate which took place this morning at theeducation summit. There are very strong views on either side with some advocating that we do not have sufficient resources and that the June examinations should be dispensed with . Others were saying we cannot simply afford to drop the examination. I think ultimately the answer is going to be determined on whetherwe are going to raise sufficient resources. We need to try to get the June examinations going but we are not in a position today to make a final decision in that regard.

MRS MANGAMI: My question is directed to the Minister of Education. We have teachers who have left the service, they have either resigned or absconded. When they come back to the ministry, do they assume the same post they held before or do we have a cut off date? What is your ruling on their contribution, are you going to pay them their benefits?

MR. SPEAKER: I will suggest you put that question in writing because that is a fundamental question we may benefit if the Minister is given sufficient time to look at the policy issues. I therefore propose that we defer that question with your permission and put it in writing.

MR. ZHANDA: My question is directed to the Minister of Water Resources Development and Management. Is the Minister aware that one of his departments, ZINWA is short-changing people? For example in my constituency, Juru growth point, they provide water and at one point they could not repair the borehole. I actually repaired the borehole and yet ZINWA is collecting levies from people when they cannot afford to repair the borehole.

THE MINISTER OF WATER RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT (MR. S. S. NKOMO): I understand the question to say that ZINWA is short-changing people. I do not believe that that authority was created to short-change people, I think it was created to service people not short-change them. I am unaware of the circumstances you are referring to and if you give me details, I will investigate it and come back to you.

MR. SPEAKER: May the hon. member put his question in writing for further details.

MR. SHOKO: My question is directed to the Co-Ministers of Home Affairs. Are you are aware that in urban areas particularly Chitungwiza, people have no jobs and yet over the past two or three days, there has been an operation by police where people were rounded up and their goods confiscated. Auctions were held at police stations around 10 p.m.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, that is a specific question. I will request you for the benefit of the residents of Chitungwiza to put your question in writing for the purposes of the Minister to get enough time to investigate the allegations that you are raising.

MR. MUTOMBA: My question is directed to the leader of the House who happens to be the Deputy Prime Minister. I do not know whether you are aware that some banks are no longer accepting vouchers that were paid as allowances to civil servants. Is the Deputy Prime Minister aware that it was a directive from the government to inform the banks not to accept the voucher. A lot of our people in the rural areas were not able to access banks in time.

THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER (PROF. A. MUTAMBARA): Mr Speaker Sir, we are a people's government and our duty and obligation is to ensure that our people are not victimised by any kind of system be it the banking sector or any other sector for that matter.

Secondly, the government will ensure that whoever has a voucher will be protected in terms of what they deserve and what is owed to them. However, it is a technical question and the Minister of Finance is going to address it. We are aware of the problem and as government we are going to address it to protect our people.

MR. BALOYI: My question is directed to the Minister of Education. I would like to know how the Minister plans to finance the education sector after his announcement that schools in rural areas are not going to pay school fees?

THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, SPORT, ARTS AND CULTURE (SENATOR COLTART): My understanding of the question was how do I plan to develop education in the rural sector knowing that no fees are charged in the rural sector.

May I first correct the hon. member in that the policy announced was that with only regards to primary schools there are no fees charged, there are in fact fees charged regarding secondary education. In answering the question as to how we can develop the education in the rural areas? It is obvious that education costs money; teachers need to be paid, textbooks need to be purchased and that all costs money.

The money comes from 3 different sectors; firstly the Treasury, secondly the parents and thirdly the donor community. We are trying to have a policy where we have adequate cost recovery. That is why we have raised the fees in the low-density areas to $150.00. It is that many parents who leave in the low-density areas can afford to pay that.

However, we acknowledge that in high-density areas and certainly in rural areas people across the board are much poorer than those who leave in low-density areas. That is why in primary schools in rural areas we have charged no fees what so ever. But, that does not mean to say there is not going to be development of education in those areas. What it means is that the government has to pick up the entire costs of the development education in the rural areas.

So as regards our policy what we are trying to do is that in low-density areas, we are trying to get as much money from parents as possible so as to release government/treasury money so that we can direct that money into rural areas, which are obviously disadvantaged. In that way we seem to bring equity on our education system.

Questions without notice were interrupted by MR. SPEAKER in terms of Standing Order Number 34.

ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS WITH NOTICE

SUPPLY OF ELECTRICITY IN THE TAFARA-MABVULKU CONSTITUENCY

8. MR. MADAMOMBE asked the Minister of Energy and Power Development to inform the House what the government policy on the supply of electricity is and if the ministry is aware that there has been no electricity in the Tafara-Mabvuku constituency for the past three years?

THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (ENG. MUDZURI): Honourable member, it is government's policy to provide reliable and adequate supplies of electricity throughout the nation. However the current electricity availability position is heavily constrained across all sectors of the economy as electricity demand outstrips supply. The projected maximum demand currently stands at 1400 megawatts against total available supply of 1180 megawatts. The power supply situation has been further exacerbated by the status of the Distribution Network which is now aged and in need of rehabilitation, as overloads are now the order of the day.

Hon. member, I am aware that there are some parts of the Tafara-Mabvuku constituency that have had no power for quite some time now. The problem is that the constituency is symptomatic of the general network challenges being experienced throughout the country. Over the past few years, there has been a marked increase in cases of vandalism of ZESA equipment especially sub-stations whereby the transformers and ring main units are being drained of oil resulting in the whole sub-stations in question being burnt beyond repair. There are currently 1 483 distribution transformers and 56 power transformers that have been affected nation wide requiring about US$38.5 million to replace these transformers.

In Harare alone a total of 300 transformers need replacement in all suburbs including Mabvuku and Tafara. In Tafara ZESA identified 8 transformers out of the 39 transformers that serve Mabvuku and 7 out of the 30 that serve Tafara which were vandalized. Some of these faulted as early as 2007 whilst the remainder continue to fault on a weekly basis. Under normal circumstances the affected customers would be put on back feed where they are temporarily connected to working transformers whilst those that serve them are being worked on.

However, because of the current situation whereby transformers are overloaded, the affected customers cannot be accommodated. The situation in Tafara is not peculiar to that area alone. There are similar cases of vandalized transformers resulting in loss of power supply in various parts of the country including Budiriro, Chitungwiza, Warren Park, Hatfield to mention but a few. Hatfield for example has 13 fault transformers out of the 40 that serve the area.

I would like to assure the hon. member that the power situation is set to improve as Government is embarking on a number of measures that would ensure viability of the sector, opening up of the electricity sector to more players to ensure increased capacity, introduction of stiffer and deterrent penalties to offenders that vandalise equipment.

A short-term recovery program focusing on Harare has been put in place to replace faulty transformers. A transformer in Harare serves more customers compared to those serving in outlying areas. Under the programme in question ZESA has secured US$10 million per month from a local financial institution and will access $2million per month starting mid April 2009, to replace vandalized transformers. Mabvuku-Tafara customers are going to benefit from this proramme, which will run for about seven months starting in June. It is expected that the 15 transformers that are currently down would have been replace by end of August 2009 so will most of the 300 that are currently affected in Harare.

This is my written response I just wanted to expand a bit. It is the mandate of every hon. member, the problem which we are facing with ZESA, there is serious vandalism in your constituencies. It is incumbent upon us hon. members and probably their councilors to police their areas or working hand in hand with the police force to ensure that these people are caught. Some of the material sold in town we should be able to trace their source so that we protect the infrastructure. If we allow people to vandalise, someone is saying we are all going to pay. We also have areas like Mabvuku and rural areas where they have taken completely all the wire cables. It is important that hon. members realize that ZESA is not just a government company. ZESA is an institution that needs your co-operation. It is yours, you are part of government, it is your company and it needs to be well policed by yourself. So help me to police it to ensure service delivery is reached.

While we are going through this growing programme we should brace ourselves for the better time in the next 6 months or so when we do increase supply at Hwange and then we increase our imports internationally so that we have reasonable supply in the industrial sector. I urge you hon. members that we are doing our best. You do your best and I will do my best to ensure that you get your energy supply.

GOVERNMENT POLICY CONCERNING THE YOUTH

 

10. MR MLAMBO asked the Minister of Youth Development, Indigenisation and Development to explain:

i) Government Policy concerning the youth who were employed by government during the run off elections for campaign purposes; and

ii) Whether the youth are on government payroll

THE MINISTER OF YOUTH DEVELOPMENT, INDIGENISATION AND DEVELOPMENT (MR. KASUKUWERE) : I thank the hon. member for his question.

I wish to respond to Hon. Mlambo concerning Government policy on youths who were employed during the election season last year and also whether these youths are on payroll.

Let me first assure the hon. member that there were no youths employed for campaign purposes, but that the Ministry has and continues to fill such vacancies as and when they fall vacant.

In our Ministry a Youth Officer is not necessarily a young person. In fact we have much of our staff being adults who no longer fit in the category of youths, and I personally feel this is something we have to review as a Ministry. For the avoidance of doubt I brought with me a copy of the job description of a Youth Officer in our Ministry.

To govern a Ministry in our view is not to sit in government offices and spend time and resources drawing programmes and doing meetings. We believe the upliftment of previously marginalized groups such as youths needs the ministry to coordinate Ministry programmes at grassroots level where the youths themselves reside. This explains why the Public Service Commission approved the recruitment of officers operating at ward level.

When we recruit government employees we do not do this in isolation. The hon. member may be aware that all our staff recruitment is approved by the Public Service Commission and I would like to reassert that this procedure was followed in the recruitment of our Youth Coordinating Officers who are based at Ward Level.

I also wish to put it on record that we are not making any new recruitments as we are conducting a Ministry wide Human Resources Audit to ascertain who is actually at work and who is not.

May I also say that the effectiveness of our Youth Officers is severely undermined by our budgetary constraints and yet we still feel that our programmes need to be best coordinated at ward level to ensure that our target group I terms of the mandate of our Ministry is catered for.

Currently, the Ministry has approximately 9 000 youth officers employed at Ward level. These are government employees and they do not conduct any business for any party.

In conclusion, we as a Ministry are committed to ensuring that the participation of youths and their access to Ministry programmes, is enhanced by bringing it closer to them. We are however, working to ensure that there is no confusion between political parties and government departments. We hope at the end of our Human Resources Audit, will be able to train all our officers to ensure this separation and essentially to equip them handle youth affairs. Overall, I have asked my Deputy Minister to look at the issue.

*MR MLAMBO : Question not recorded due to technical fault.

*THE MINISTER OF YOUTH DEVELOPMENT, INDEGENISATION AND DEVELOPMENT (MR. KASUKUWERE): Answer not recorded due to technical fault.

MR. MUDZORA : Is the Hon. Minister aware that these youths were not recruited across the political divide?

THE MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (MR NHEMA): I thank the hon. member for showing interest in the development of the GLTP. Mr. Speaker Sir, Zimbabwe together with South Africa is currently involved in the Environmental Impact Assessment of the above-proposed bridge. This bridge is supposed to provide the much needed and vital direct linkage between Gonarezahou and Kruger National Parks as part of the Tourism Strategy of the GLTP.

It should be noted that Zimbabwe was the coordinating Party of the GLTP between 2005 and March 2007, after which South Africa took over. Since then, the TFCA has suffered leadership problems at international level as efforts by SAN Parks to set up a GLTP Secretariat have so far been in vain. This has resulted in the GLTP going for almost two years without a substantive International Co-ordinator. It has also led to the failure to conclude the EIA.

Some South African stakeholders are now strongly opposing he development of a bridge near Chikwarakwara (our preferred site) citing a number of reasons-

Interference with Military Training; The South African Department of Defence utilizes the Madimbo Corridor as a Military Training area, catering for specific training conditions to Strategic Requirements (Special Forces) and unexploded ordinances scattered in the area.

Transmission of disease; the study area is situated in the foot-and-mouth disease infected Zone. This may compromise South Africa's Department of Agriculture's ability to guarantee animal disease control and bio-security of agricultural products. South Africa is now proposing to move the bridge to one of two alternative sites west of Chikwarakwara. This is about 17 and 45 kilometers west of Chikwarakwara and towards Beitbridge. In view of these circumstances Zimbabwe is now proposing, as an interim measure, the investigation and development of a 4 x 4 crossing to facilitate an immediate direct link between Kruger and Gonarezhou National Parks, with the GLTP.

Zimbabwe still maintains that the bridge should be developed at Chikwarakwara in line with the primary objectives of the GLTP. Technically, from an engineering perspective, Chikwarakwara was found suitable. Final JMB recommendations to the GLTP Ministerial Committee are expected by the end of June 2009.

UN CONVENTION AGAINST TOURTURE RATIFICATION OF THE OBTAINING CONFESSIONS THROUGH TOURTURE

21. MR MADZIMURE asked the Co-Ministers of Home Affairs to explain why Zimbabwe has not ratified the UN Convention Against Torture.

THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MR MUTSEKWA): Mr. Speaker Sir, I did not immediately establish why the Convention on Torture was not ratified by Parliament as record in the Ministry indicate that the relevant documents for use by Parliament were approved by Cabinet on the 19th of January 1995. The documents were then sent to Parliament for consideration. My ministry is therefore looking into the matter to determine why is has not yet been ratified.

OBTAINING CONFESSIONS THROUGH TORTURE

22. MR MADZIMURE asked the Co-Ministers of Home Affairs whether the ministry has approved the alleged torture of suspects as a means of getting confessions if not why suspects are still being tortured and evidenced obtained through such means used in courts?

THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MR MUTSEKWA): Mr Speaker Sir, the Ministry of Home Affairs does not approve the alleged torture of suspects as a means of getting confessions because any evidence that is acquired through such extra-curial means is subject to scrutiny by the courts through a trial within a trial. Thus any confessions by a suspect or an accused person have to be confirmed by a magistrate before it becomes admissible. In the circumstances, it would be foolhardy for the Zimbabwe Republic Police to extract confessions from suspects, as these would be in admissible in court.

In terms of section 256 of the Criminal Procedures Act [Chapter 9:07], which deals with the admissibility of confessions and statements by accused persons, the confession or statement shall not be used as evidence against accused persons if he proves that the statement was not made freely and voluntarily without having been unduly influenced thereto.

MR. MADZIMURE: Mr Speaker, Sir, we have had several reports of the police torturing suspects including Hon Members of Parliament who seat in this House and there has been complaints to the police but we have not seen anything done. Why does not the police carry out investigations of these tortures?

MR MUTSEKWA: Again let me thank Hon. Madzimure for the supplementary question. Mr Speaker I cannot deny that people are tortured whilst they are in custody or have been tortured after being delivered to the police cells. The problems we are having Mr Speaker is that there are so many arresting agents so what we are not able to prove is whether the tortures happen before these suspects are brought to cells or when they are in the cells. What seems to be the practise in the country at the moment is that the police admit these suspects into their cells after torture has been carried out as the hon. member has said I am also a victim.

APPREHENSION OF GUNMEN WHO SHOT AND KILLED FARAI GAMBE

23. MR NYAMANDE asked the Core-Ministers of Home Affairs to inform the House whether there has been any progress made in apprehending the gunmen who shot and killed Farai Gambe in Vhengere township in Rusape during the run up to the June 2008 elections.

THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MR MUTSEKWA): Mr Speaker Sir, the murder case involving shooting Farai Gambe that took place on the night of 14 June 2008 is still under investigation by CID Rusape under Rusape CR120/06/08 and CID DR6/06/08.

PROCEDURE OF ARRESTING PEOPLE

24. MR. MUCHAURAYA asked the Co-Ministers of Home Affairs to explain why police in Zimbabwe arrest people in order to investigate while in other countries police investigate in order to arrest.

THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MR MUTSEKWA): Mr Speaker Sir, the Criminal Procedure and Evidence Act [Chapter 97] regulates police powers to arrest in terms of Section 25 of the Act, a police officer is empowered to arrest without a warrant:-

a) any person who commits any offence in his presence

b) any person whom he has reasonable grounds to suspect of having committed a serious offence

c) any person whom he finds attempting to commit any offence, or clearly manifesting an intention to do so.

In other situations a police officer may arrest a person without a warrant where he believes on reasonable grounds that a warrant would have been issued if he had applied for one.

Arrest with a warrant is straight forward because the police officer will make an application on oath to a magistrate or justice outlining the circumstances and nature of the crime committed. If the magistrate or justice is satisfied that a crime was committed, he or she will issue the police officer with a warrant of arrest.

It is therefore clear that the police in Zimbabwe can not operate outside the parameters of the law.

25. MR. GWIYO: I would like to ask the Co-Ministers of Home Affairs to inform the House when the documents and computers allegedly taken by the Police and the Anti-Corruption Commission from Chitungwiza Municipality last year would be returned to the Council and to disclose the outcome of that investigation.

THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MR. MUTSEKWA): Can I ask that this question be deferred to next week? We are still making investigations.

26 MR MUKANDURI: I would like to ask the Co-Ministers of Home Affairs to inform the House if all the people who destroyed people's property and livestock in Buhera during the funeral of the Prime Minister's late wife have been apprehended and what action has been taken against them?

THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MR MUTSEKWA): Mr Speaker Sir, fifteen people were arrested during following the attacks at Matsveru village in Buhera the period March 11 2009 to March 15 2009. They were arrested for malicious damage to property and extortion.

The fifteen appeared at Murambinda Magistrate Court on 16 March 2009 and were remanded in custody. However, Rindai Muchefa, one of the accused persons was granted bail of US$20 because she is breast feeding.

The Deputy Mayor of Mutare was arrested on 14 March 2009 and appeared before the Murambinda Magistrate Court on 18 March 2009. He was remanded out of custody on US$50 bail.

All the accused persons were remanded to March 30 2009 and they have since been remanded out of custody to 17 April 2009 on US$50 bail each. They are being investigated under Buhera crime register references 16,17,19 and 20/03/09.

MR. MATUTU: Can the Minister explain whether this efficiency by the police in arresting members of the MDC does not amount to selective prosecution taking into account that we have outstanding matters like that of Mwale, Gift Tandare and those who were brutalised during the June 27 elections, in particular people who were killed in Zaka. We have no record of investigations or their arrests.

MR. MUTSEKWA: I would like to thank hon. Matutu for raising that question which is pertinent. I am aware that there are issues that have been outstanding for a very long time in terms of bringing people to justice. The Hon. Matutu has raised the name of Mwale whom I think is a character known by members of this House because he has appeared in newspapers time and again. I would like to admit that this particular issue has not yet been satisfactorily brought to the courts in this country. But let me assure Hon. Matutu that the fact that a person has not been referred to court now does not therefore mean that we should not deal with issues that arise. I would also want to assure Hon. Matutu that the issues that he is concerned with are being investigated and we will make sure that everybody is brought to book.

*MR. MLAMBO: Question not recorded due to technical fault.

*MR. MUTSEKWA: Answer not recorded due to technical fault.

27. MR NYAUDE: I would like to ask the Co-Ministers of Home Affairs if they are aware that Matangira and Muzondo, ZANU PF officials in Bindura South have been threatening residents in the constituency each time they hold rallies and if they could inform the House what action would be taken to stop such intimidation.

THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MR MUTSEKWA): Can this question be deferred until next Wednesday because we are still making investigations.

31. MR MADZIMURE: I would like to ask the Minister of Information, Communication and Technology to explain

1) Why in this modern world it is still difficult to get sim cards when in other SADC countries sim cards can be bought in tuckshops?

2) Why sim cards are more expensive than air time?

3) Why the rates are more than five times higher than other countries?

THE MINISTER OF INFORMATION COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY (MR. CHAMISA): I want to start by thanking Hon. Madzimure for that very pertinent question. I am aware that it is a question being asked by most if not all Zimbabweans. In terms of why in this modern world it is still difficult to get sim cards when in other SADC countries sim cards can be bought in tuck shops. I must start by saying that one positive development that has emerged in this country is that for the first time, we have a stand alone ministry of ICT, Information Communication Technology. That is a very progressive step because what it does is that it helps the country, the government to streamline on the information communication technology.

Mr Speaker, we have for a long time suffered from an ICT deficiency syndrome because we were not dealing in an integrated and consolidated approach to ICT. I must say that the availability of sim cards is something that depends on the capabilities and capacities of the available network providers. Network capacities are defined in terms of the maximum volume of traffic that can be carried by a particular network through their base stations.

The network capacities for the three operators are as follows :

Econet 1 000 000

Netone 450 000

Telecel 250 000

Total 1 650 000

When you look at this, if you are to do your mathematics, it gives you 10% of people who have access to telephone lines. The supply side is actually constricted but the demand is huge.

Looking at the background we are now economically, we are having problems of failing to service and serve the market. So the little few lines that are available, when they come to the market, there is a lot of black market activities because there is a shortage. We are trying to enhance the capacity of these various networks by making sure that through STERP, we work on a capacity base stabilisation programme. What we are doing is to help the various players to access those international credit lines through what is already being done by the Minister of Finance so that we capitalise our various service providers. Once we capitalise them, we are going to be able to then provide lines in abundance, and they are going to be sold in tuck shops. Infact, I have given them a deadline that I need to see by a particular point in time, you should be able to buy one sim card, phone Maidei and buy another one. I think that is what is going to enhance the availability of sim cards. So in terms of what we are already doing, I can assure you that tuckshops are going to sell sim cards once we deal with the issues of capacity.

MR. BHASIKITI: Are you also dealing with the issue of monopoly? If you find out that it takes much longer to capacitate some of those operators, why do you not open up to those who are capable to do it in a shorter space of time because the main concern is to make communication easy and accessible to as many people to different parts of the country. I know VODACOM is ready for that but if we have a monopoly, we may continue to punish our people.

MR. CHAMISA: Thank you Hon. Bhasikiti for that brilliant question. I must say that you are right that we need to invite other players. What we are trying to do is to balance between the existing networks so that we also do not immediately abandon those networks that were servicing our country under very difficult times but equally we are alive to the desirability and even the profitability of bringing in new players. That is the option we are already pursuing but before we start inviting other players, we need to make sure that we are satisfied that there is no capacity handicap on the part of the existing players. As far as we are concerned, there is no issue of capacity handicap, if we feel that there is need, I would not have problems in inviting other players.

MR. MADZIMURE: The Minister did not answer the last part of the question on the issue of rates that are still prohibitive.

MR. CHAMISA: I think I had tried to address it on why the rates are five times higher than in other countries. Infact, like I have indicated that we have already reviewed the rates downward, I must concede that our rates were quite too high. We were using the COSIT model I was referring to. We were pushing ourselves out of the market. We feel that it makes more sense for us to get our money on the volume of subscribers than charging high prices on a few subscribers.

I have advised POTRAZ about that, that we need to move with speed to revise the prices of our tariffs. What we are trying to do is to balance between responding to the business sense of capacity utilisation on the existing network and trying to be alive to the concerns that are raised by consumers. What I can assure you is that the tariffs that we are going to pay are comparable when we look at our region. We need to make sure that we are competitive. That is why we have just done 30% decrease in terms of tariffs. We are continuing to have that done downwards so that we are at par with most of the players within the region.

WATER SUPPLY FOR DROUGHT STRICKEN MATABELELAND REGION

33. MR F.M. SIBANDA asked the Minister of Water Resources Development and Management to explain:-

i) what plan, strategies and resources the Ministry has put in place to develop a sustainable water supply for drought stricken Matabeleland Region;

ii) what strategic information the Ministry has on the Matabeleland Zambezi Water Project Trust which seems to have died a natural death after huge sums of money were collected from the province and other well-wishers in the form of donations and subscriptions;

iii) what action the Ministry would take to enforce the High Court order which compels the leadership of the Matabeleland Zambezi Water Project Trust to publish its accounts for the benefit of all people who subscribed or donated to the project; and

iv) how far ZINWA has responded to the government directive to hand over water and sewer management to the respective local government authorities, and in particular, Gokwe Town Council.

THE MINISTER OF WATER RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT (MR. S. NKOMO): Let me first of all respond by saying there are plans for Matabeleland North Province. The government of Zimbabwe currently has in place short and medium term plans for the Matabeleland North region to ensure sustainable water supply for the present and the future. There is work in progress.

Government through ZINWA is currently constructing the Gwayi Shangani and Bubi Lupane dams. The two dams are high on the priority list of government projects earmarked for completion for the country to meet the Millennium Development Goals as well as attain food security and self-sustenance. Bubi Lupane dam which is almost complete, will supply water to Lupane, the provincial capital of Matabeland North. It is also capable of irrigating 150 hectares of land which has been identified downstream of the dam. Gwayi-Shangani dam which is set to supply water to the City of Bulawayo is part of the Matabeleland water project which is set to turn the region into a green belt. The dam will be connected to the Zambezi River and other dams such as Gwayi-Mguza and Gwayi-Khami.

ZINWA is also constructing the Mtshabezi dam pipeline for the benefit of Bulawayo. The pipeline will be connected to Mzingwane dam to bring an additional 79 000ml of water. Ground water which has been developed mainly in the Nyamandlovu area is capable of supplying more than 9 125ml per annum to the City of Bulawayo. For the rural communities in Binga, ZINWA is currently drilling boreholes in the area for the domestic water supply. The project involves siting, drilling, pumping test and head works construction of 120 boreholes in Binga. Twenty-five boreholes have been constructed and equipped to date.

Government has a number of medium and large dams, which have been identified in the province. These projects are capable of irrigating more than 2 000 hectares when completed. Below is a list of some of the planned dams with their yields and intended uses.

Name

Net FCS (ML)

10% yield (ML)

Dam Type

District

Use

Potential Irrigable Land (HA)

Chibila

25 000

8 000

Medium

Binga

IR

500

Chitombolombuzi

2 100

700

Medium

Lupane

IR

45

Gwayi-Mguza

195 000

30 000

Large

Tsholotsho

WS/IR

 

Lungokoni

10 000

3 099

Medium

Hwange

IR

100

Mahawana

6 400

2 000

Medium

Mguza

IR

30

Patalika ORS

1 700

600

Medium

Tsholotsho

IR

30

Sivalo

3 000

1 020

Medium

Nkayi

IR

40

Ziminya

94 000

20 000

Large

Nkayi

IR/WS

1 000

Gwayi-Khami

86 000

12 200

Large

Tsholotsho/Mguza

IR/WS

500

Sedgewick

120 000

11 000

Large

Tsholotsho/Mguza

IR/WS

700

Design reports for Ziminya and Gwayi-Mguza; Gwayi-Khami and Sedgewick dams have been completed. An environmental impact assessment for Ziminya was also done in 2005. Most of these dams only require funding for them to be constructed.

The second part of the question is about strategic information on the Zambezi water projects.

I would like to say that I have met with the leadership of that Trust and I have asked them to give the documentation as to what they have done, their constitution and the funding they have received so far. They had promised to give me that information some three weeks ago and I have not received it. I am still going to ask them to provide that information to the ministry because it is important for the ministry to know what they have done because they are also involved in the Gwayi Shangani dam.

The third part of the question is about a High Court order that was granted to Arnold Payne by the High Court of Bulawayo that the Trust provide audited accounts for what they have done or that an audit will be crossed on them. That order has not been followed because I think that Mr. Payne is a private individual and perhaps has no resources to enforce that order.

The order is there but to ask as to whether the ministry can actually help Mr. Payne to enforce that order - I believe that if a member of the public goes to court, the member of the public should also have the means of enforcing that order without resorting to the government to help him enforce the order. I think this will be important in that we carry out our own investigation without referring to the court order by Mr. Payne. So that is what we are doing.

On the final part of the question, ZINWA has responded with the expected urgency to the directive to hand over water and sewer management to the respective local government authorities back to the position as at 9 May 2005. The position for Gokwe was such that ZINWA was responsible for supply of clear water and not raw water from abstraction right down to the tape. That is what ZINWA was doing.

What ZINWA has taken over was only sewer system management and as such that system was handed back in totality to the Gokwe Town Council. Thus as far as Gokwe is concerned. The hand over process is now complete.

MR. F.M. SIBANDA: Is it not prudent now to completely forget about the Zambezi Matabeleland water project since it has been used as political gimmicks since 1912? This project has been used by colonial powers, post colonial and up to date, are we not pressing high expectations to our people because each time we go for elections people use this project but at the end of the day they have no money.

As you answered it was not very clear about this Matabeleland Zambezi water project.

MR. S. NKOMO: As I have explained, the Zambezi Water Trust is a private organization and I want to say to hon. Sibanda that it is such a huge project that it can not be left in private hands. Therefore, government has now a political will to see the project through.

Questions with notice interrupted by MR SPEAKERin terms of Standing Order No. 34,

ANNOUNCEMENTS BY THE SPEAKER

APPOINTMENT TO COMMITTEES

MR. SPEAKER: I have to inform the House that the Standing Rules and Orders Committee met and nominated Members in terms of Standing Order No. 151, to serve on the following Committees:

Agriculture, Water, Lands and Resettlement:

Hon. Chinomona

Hon. Denga

Hon. Dube P

Hon. Jiri

Hon. Katsande

Hon. Madamombe

Hon. Mahoka

Hon. Makuyana

Hon. Mkhosi E

Hon. Mlambo

Hon. Mlilo

Hon. Raradza

Hon. Varandeni

Hon. Zhanda

Hon. Jiri to be Chairperson of the Committee

Budget, Finance and Investment Promotion:

Hon. Beremauro

Hon. Bhebhe A

Hon. Chinyadza

Hon. Cross

Hon. Khumalo Martin

Hon. Madzimure

Hon. Mashakada

Hon. Matshalaga

Hon. Muguti

Hon. Mukanduri

Hon. Ndava

Hon. Nyaude

Hon. Mudiwa

Hon. Zhanda

Hon Zhanda to be Chairperson of the Committee

Education, Sports and Culture:

Hon. Bhasikiti

Hon. Chihota

Hon. Chimhini

Hon. Chitando

Hon. Haritatos

Hon. Kumalo Marvellous

Hon. Madubeko

Hon. Mangami

Hon. Mguni N

Hon. Mudzuri H

Hon. Muza

Hon. Nezi

Hon. Sibanda F.M

Hon. Mangami to be Chairperson of the Committee

Foreign Affairs, Regional Integration and International Trade:

Hon.Gumbo J.M

Hon. Chirongwe

Hon. Jembere

Hon. Maramwidze

Hon. Matutu T

Hon. Mukanduri

Hon. Ndlovu A

Hon. Ngwenya

Hon. Nyamande

Hon. Rutsvara

Hon. Sibanda D

Hon. Sindi

Hon. Tshuma

Hon. Mukanduri to be Chairperson of the Committee

Health And Child Welfare:

Hon. Chebundo

Hon. Chikava

Hon. Dube M

Hon. Kachepa

Hon. Karenyi

Hon. Makuyana

Hon. Maramba

Hon. Matshalaga

Hon. Mudavanhu

Hon. Munengami

Hon. Ndebele G

Hon. Nyamupinga

Hon. Parirenyatwa D

Hon. Shoko H

Hon. Parirenyatwa to be Chairperson of the Committee

Higher Education, Science And Technology:

Hon. Chanetsa

Hon. Chitando

Hon. Dumbu

Hon. Khumalo Martin

Hon. Kumalo Marvellous

Hon. Mafios

Hon. Maramwidze

Hon. Matamisa

Hon. Matibenga

Hon. Mguni N

Hon. Mpofu N

Hon. Muza

Hon. Ndhlovu A

Hon. Zhuwao

Hon. Mpofu N. to be Chairperson of the Committee

Home Affairs And Defence:

Hon. Huruba

Hon. Madzore

Hon. Mafios

Hon. Mutinhiri

Hon. Ziteya

Hon. Mangena

Hon. Mhandu (Rtd) Major C

Hon. Moyo R

Hon. Mutseyami

Hon. Mwonzora

Hon. Sibanda P N

Hon. Sululu

Hon. Madzore to be Chairperson of the Committee

Industry And Commerce:

Hon. Chihota

Hon. Chinyadza

Hon. Dube P

Hon. Hove

Hon. Kanzama

Hon. Madubeko

Hon. Masukume

Hon. Mavima

Hon. Mharadza

Hon. Mutomba

Hon. Mutseyami

Hon. Nyaude

Hon. Sansole

Hon.Mutomba to be Chairperson of the Committee

Justice, Legal Affairs, Constitutional and Parliamentary Affairs:

Hon. Gonese

Hon. Kapesa

Hon. Mangami

Hon. Mangwana

Hon. Matiza

Hon. Matutu

Hon. Mkandla T.Z

Hon. Mushonga S.L

Hon. Mutinhiri

Hon. Mwonzora

Hon. Parirenyatwa

Hon. Shoko M

Hon. Tshuma B

Hon. Matutu T. to be Chairperson of the Committee

Local Government, Rural And Urban Development:

Hon. Baloyi

Hon. Chambati

Hon. Chikwinya

Hon. Chinomona 
Hon. Dube M

Hon. Garandi

Hon. Kagurabadza

Hon. Kanzama

Hon. Karenyi

Hon. Kapesa

Hon. Matimba

Hon. Mkandla T.Z

Hon. Nyakudanga

Hon. Samkange

Hon. Karenyi to be Chairperson of the Committee

Media, Information And Communication Technology:

Hon. Chaderopa

Hon. Chimanikire

Hon. Chanetsa

Hon. Hlongwane

Hon. Mandebvu

Hon. Matonga

Hon. Mudarikwa

Hon. Pemhenayi

Hon. Jembere

Hon. Muchauraya

Hon. Mudiwa

Hon. Musumbu

Hon. Varandeni

Hon. Chimanikire to be Chairperson of the Committee

Mines And Energy:

Hon. Bhebhe A

Hon. Chindori-Chininga Hon. Dube C

Hon. Dzingirayi

Hon. Katsande

Hon. Kay

Hon. Makamure

Hon. Maposhere

Hon. Mare

Hon. Mudarikwa

Hon. Mungofa

Hon. Musvaire

Hon. Ncube

Hon. Nemadziva

Hon. Shoko H

Hon. Chindori- Chininga to be Chairperson of the Committee

Natural Resources, Environment And Tourism:

Hon. Bhasikiti

Hon. Bhebhe

Hon. Chitima

Hon. Machacha

Hon. Mahoka

Hon. Marima

Hon. Matienga

Hon. Mazikana

Hon. Mpofu N

Hon. Ndambakuwa

Hon. Nezi

Hon. Saruwaka

Hon. Shoko M

Hon. Sibanda

Hon Bhebhe to be Chairperson of the Committee

Public Accounts:

Hon. Chikava

Hon. Haritatos

Hon. Mangena

Hon. Mashakada

Hon. Matiza

Hon. Mbwembwe

Hon. Moyo S

Hon. Muguti

Hon. Musundire

Hon. Sai

Hon. Saruwaka

Hon. Sululu

Hon. Mashakada to be Chairperson of the Committee

Public Service, Labour And Social Welfare:

Hon. Chibaya

Hon. Chimanikire

Hon. Chirongwe

Hon. Chivamba

Hon. Goto

Hon. Gwiyo

Hon. Khumalo S.S

Hon. Madau

Hon. Matibenga

Hon. Sai

Hon. Sibanda F.M

Hon. Zinyemba

Hon.Zinyemba to be Chairperson of the Committee

Public Works And National Housing:

Hon. Chimhini

Hon. Jiri

Hon. Kachepa

Hon. Gonese

Hon. Mabhena

Hon. Mbwembwe

Hon. Mudzuri H

Hon. Mupukuta

Hon. Ndambakuwa

Hon. Ndebele G.

Hon. Ngwenya

Hon. Shirichena

Hon. Mupukuta to be Chairperson of the Committee

Small And Medium Enterprise Cooperative Development:

Hon. Chimbetete

Hon. Chirume

Hon. Masvaire

Hon. Matibe

Hon. Moyo R

Hon. Munjeya

Hon. Mutomba

Hon. Navaya

Hon. Nemadziva

Hon. Nyamudeza

Hon. Tazviona

Hon. Zhuwao

Hon. Zinyemba

Hon. Moyo R. to be Chairperson of the Committee

State Enterprises And Parastatals Management:

Hon. Chikwinya

Hon. Denga

Hon. Dube C

Hon. Kagurabadza

Hon. Makamure

Hon. Matibe

Hon. Mavima

Hon. Mkhosi E

Hon. Moyo S

Hon. Mushore

Hon. Ndava

Hon. Ngwenya

Hon. Ziteya

Hon. Ziyambi

Hon. Mavima to be Chairperson of the Committee

Transport And Infrastructure Development:

Hon. Baloyi

Hon. Chebundo

Hon. Dongo

Hon. Dzirutwe

Hon. Huruba

Hon. Machacha

Hon. Madamombe

Hon. Mandebvu

Hon. Mhlanga

Hon. Mupukuta

Hon. Mushore

Hon. Ncube S

Hon. Nyakudanga

Hon. Rutsvara

Hon. Chebundo to be Chairperson of the Committee

Women, Youth, Gender And Community Development:

Hon. Chibaya

Hon. Chirume

Hon. Chitima

Hon. Dumbu

Hon. Goto

Hon. Khumalo T

Hon. Matienga

Hon. Mharadza

Hon. Navaya

Hon. Nyamupinga

Hon. Shirichena

Hon. Sithole

Hon. Matienga to be Chairperson of the Committee

CAUCUS MEETING

MR. SPEAKER: I have to inform the House that next week on Wednesday all Caucuses are invited to come and sit.

On the motion of MR. GONESE , seconded by MR. KANZAMA, the House adjourned at Sixteen Minutes to Five o'clock pm until Tuesday, 12th May 2009.

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National Assembly Hansard Vol. 35 NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD - 1 APRIL 2009 VOL. 35 NO. 28