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NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD - 13 JUNE 2012 VOL. 38 NO. 40

Wednesday, 13th June, 2012.

The House of Assembly met at a Quarter-past Two o'clock p.m.

 

PRAYERS

(MR. SPEAKER in the Chair)

ANNOUNCEMENT BY MR. SPEAKER

ERROR ON THE ORDER PAPER

MR. SPEAKER: Hon. members should take note of the error on page 509 of the Order Paper on the Second Reading of the National Incomes and Pricing Commission to be number 28 and the rest of the Orders be numbered accordingly.

ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

MR. CHIMHINI: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir, in the absence of the Minister of Finance, I will direct my question to the Deputy Prime Minister. - In the absence of inflows into the fiscus and the subsequent failure by the Minister of Finance to disburse funds to various ministries…-[AN HON. MEMBER: Inaudible interjections]- can you confirm that the Zimbabwean Government is broke?

MR. SPEAKER: Order! Hon. member, what is your question?

MR. CHIMHINI: Thank you Mr. Speaker. When we look at disbursements from the Ministry of Finance, at least 25 percent per quarter could have been disbursed to various ministries. What is Government policy?

THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER (PROF. MUTAMBARA: Mr. Speaker Sir, fine details can be provided by from the Minister of Finance. As a Government, we stick to our rules and regulations. I would like to say that, saying the Government is broke, is a very strong statement. We are experiencing some major challenges with respect to our public finances to the extent that we are going to have a special Cabinet meeting tomorrow to deliberate on our public finances in four areas. The first area is the issue of expenditure. How we can cut down on expenditure. Government expenses are too high and unsustainable. Secondly, it will be on how we can drive up revenue from platinum, gold, diamonds and from all the sectors of the economy. The third one is to reform our financial systems of revenue collection such as ZIMRA and procurement processes. The idea is to improve efficiency and effectiveness of revenue collection and that of our procurement processes to avoid leakages. The fourth area is about improving general economic performance and growth by improving the business climate in our country. This we seek to do by improving the attractiveness and competitiveness of our country with respect to investment.

The state of our public finances is a cause of concern to Cabinet. This is why we are going to have a special Cabinet tomorrow, Thursday at 9.00 a.m. to address the four areas I have outlined above. I would like to thank the hon. member for that question.

*MRS. ZINYEMBA: I wanted to direct my question to the Minister of Finance but since he is not present, I will direct it to the Deputy Prime Minister. The question has to do with the farmers. This year experienced drought in this country. At least two or two and a half provinces got maize yields. Therefore, farmers have withheld their yields up to 2013-2014. If they sell their yields outside, will the country have enough stocks? What is Government position on ensuring that the nation is not starved?

THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER (PROF. MUTAMBARA): Thank you very much, that is a very important question. We are trying as much as we can, in the short run, to make sure that no Zimbabwean will starve. We are identifying areas of plenty and areas of shortage so that we can get a mechanism to move grain from the former to the later. We are also pushing for a grain loan scheme which will ensure that people will be able to borrow and then pay back when they have grain. We are also expanding the programme for the vulnerable so that in cases where people have no capacity to pay back, they will have access to food. We are developing a holistic mechanism as Government to provide grain to the people.

These are just short time measures. We are looking for long time solutions. We are working towards what we call a three year rolling agricultural policy so that we plan for 2014 and 2015 now and avoid fire fighting. This policy is rooted in a 30 year vision for agriculture. A funding and financing framework corresponding to this policy will then be developed. Agriculture should be understood as a business. Government funding is not enough. What we are doing now is fire fighting. This is not right. We need planning ahead in particular, in terms of inputs and finance. Our Government should put enough money into agriculture. We are also saying agriculture is a business and we should find ways to encourage the private sector to put money into agriculture. The banks and financial institutions must support agriculture. We are working on this policy of three year rolling plan for agriculture and that policy will be backed up by a sound financing model for agriculture. This framework will be funded by Government, private sector and our international partners.

We are also learning globally from Agra, the Agriculture green revolution in Africa being spearheaded by Kofi Annan and Strive Masiiwa. We also have a programme called 'Grow Africa' which is championed by the World Economic Forum and the Africa Union. We should borrow ideas from this programme as we seek to achieve food security, self sufficiency and may be even feed other nations.

There is also another programme called 'Feed the Future'. It is a global strategy around agriculture and food security. Let us learn from it. There is also another programme called Powering Agriculture - there is a link between energy and agriculture. How do we ensure that there is enough clean energy to power agriculture so that we can do such things as irrigation? So, we are going to have short and long term measures to address the concerns of the hon. member so that we can say never again should we have fire fighting in agriculture in this country.

MR. GWIYO: My question is directed to the Minister of Constitutional and Parliamentary Affairs. Under what circumstances can a member of the Executive or the Executive take the Legislature to court and how secure is the doctrine of separation of powers, even the fact that the courts are now interfering with the matters of Parliamentary process?

MR. SPEAKER: Order.Hon Gwiyo, what is the policy aspect of the question?

MR. GWIYO: The policy question is - is the Executive or members of the Executive at liberty to take the legislature to courts?

THE MINISTER OF CONSTITUTIONAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (ADV. MATINENGA): Thank you hon. member for seeking legal advice on this issue. Mr. Speaker, I believe that Zimbabwe is a normal country and if it is a normal country, it means that anyone who is aggrieved is free to take up any grievance he or she has to the courts. Yes, there is separation of powers but at the end of the day, the conduct of any arm of Government must be in accordance with the Constitution. We cannot have a blanket position to say members of the Executive can conduct or not conduct themselves in a particular manner. Whenever an issue arises, any aggrieved party must be able to go before the courts and seek resolution of the issue. In terms of the Constitution, the courts must have the final say.

MS. A. NDHLOVU: My question is directed to the Deputy Minister of Health and Child Welfare. How is Government prepared to curb the resurfacing of Cholera outbreaks reported in Mashonaland Central and Masvingo so that we do not have a repeat of what happened in 2008?

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HEALTH AND CHILD WELFARE (DR. MOMBESHORA): Thank you very much for asking a very important question. I think all of us know that we had a serious outbreak of cholera two years ago. Currently, we do not have an outbreak of cholera but we have cases that were detected in Chiredzi. Government has a reaction team in place which was stationed at Parirenyatwa, but we have since moved it to our Headquarters at Kaguvi Building. When cases are reported, the initial response is done by local authorities or provincial teams, who then report to us. So far, everything is in control, we do not have any cases reported in the past week. We have everything in place to take care of any outbreak at the moment. I would like to mention that at the present moment that we are also worried about certain areas, especially in Harare, where there are erratic water supplies as this may lead to outbreaks of diseases.

Those are some of the things which are very important but we hope that we will be in control soon since we are working with the relevant authorities.

MR. MATIBE: Thank you Mr. Speaker. My question is directed to the Minister of Home Affairs. Is it true that every Zimbabwean motorist must pay a spot fine for a traffic offence?

THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MR. MOHADI): Thank you Mr. Speaker. It is the law of this country that if you commit an offence, you are liable to a fine. If then you have committed an offence as a motorist and then you are stopped and they find that you have breached a traffic law, you are asked to pay a spot fine. You pay on the spot - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections]-.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, order. Hon. Minister address the Chair.

MR. MOHADI: Thank you Mr. Speaker. You are supposed to pay a spot fine. If you cannot pay there, you have to fill an admission of guilty form so that you can pay later.

MR. MADZIMURE: Minister, are you saying that the police have become the arresting authority and also the same authority that judges, because when you commit an offence, you are liable to have committed the offence and you may then contest that particular charge. So, are you saying that the people of Zimbabwe have no option but simply to pay the fine?

MR. MOHADI: First and foremost, I am an honourable Minister. The stipulation to pay a fine is done by the Minister of Justice. We only implement what the Ministry of Justice has in their statutes.

MS. T. KHUMALO: Mr. Speaker, my question is still on the spot fine. Are you saying that most motorists in this country are guilty? Secondly, our understanding is that you are supposed to be innocent until you are proven guilty.

MR. MOHADI: Thank you for the question you have asked. If you commit an offence, a traffic offence and it is stipulated in the law that this offence that you have committed is such and such, then you have to pay a spot fine. - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections]-

MR. SPEAKER: Order, order! Order in the House. Hon. Minister, order. May you respond to the question and refrain from discussions with members on that side of the House.

MR. MOHADI: I thought that I had indicated in my earlier response that if you do not have the money there, you fill a form -[ MR. BITI): Inaudible interjections]-. I think the hon. Minister wants to be a back bencher. If you do not have the requisite fine, you can then fill an admission of guilty form so that you can appear in court and defend yourself.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, order.

THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER (PROF. MUTAMBARA): In support of my colleague from Cabinet, the Co-Minister of Home Affairs, I want to say to the hon. member to put that in writing so that we get a proper response. It is a very tough question so, what I want to do to help the House is to have that question put in writing. The minister will research and give a detailed answer so that we do not create unnecessary problems in the House. -[HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections]-.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, order. There is no supplementary question. The Deputy Prime Minister has indicated it is his wish that the question be put in writing in order for the Minister to give a detailed and comprehensive response to the question.

MRS. SHIRICHENA: Thank you Mr. Speaker. My question is directed to the Deputy Minister of Women's Affairs. What measures are you going to take to talk to those women who are failing to pay back loans to the Women Development Fund which date back to 2008?

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF WOMEN'S AFFAIRS, GENDER AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (MS. MAJOME): I wish to thank the hon. member for posing that question. Carefully constructed contractual arrangements are done between borrowers of the fund whereby members of the group of women borrowers proffer themselves as guarantors of each other's loan. Each member of a group binds herself jointly and individually liable for her own loan and the others. Legal proceedings will be brought against the defaulters for the recovery of the loan in order for the recovered amounts to be loaned forward to more and other deserving applicants.

MR. JEMBERE: My question is directed to the Minister of Finance. Minister, I understand that because of fiscal constraints, you ordered that Government ministries to stop recruiting new staff. Was any permission granted to the Ministry of Defence since they are recruiting?

THE MINISTER OF FINANCE (MR. BITI): Thank you very much hon. member, for that question. Hon. Speaker, it is true that there is a Treasury circular which makes it clear that all recruitment in the public service is frozen and that also includes recruitment in the other employment agencies like the Defence Forces Commission, Police Services Commission and Prisons. However, there is an exception. In exceptional circumstances, permission can be sought from Treasury to recruit employees. We have exercised our discretion in favour of the exception in respect of about 24 000 temporary teachers, so we gave an exception. We have also given an exception in respect of employees covered by the Health Services Board. I want to say to hon. members, in respect of the Health Services, there actually has been a net loss of staff of about 527 members of staff up to May 2012. However, between January and May 2012, there has been an increase, an unlawful increase of about 10 000 employees in the Public Service Commission, unsanctioned. In fact tomorrow, we have a special Cabinet meeting on the economy and this is one of the issues that will be discussed.

There are two chief culprits, the Ministry of Defence which has recruited without Treasury authority, 4 600 personnel since January 2012 and the Ministry of Home Affairs, which has recruited 1 200 personnel without Treasury approval. The net effect of this is that, it has created dislocations from a budgetary point of view. Our wage bill has increased to US$190 million at a time where we are receiving about US$230 million a month. So, over 70% of our income is going to one budget head, mainly wages. As a result, this is the multiplier effect, even soldiers who are in barracks, we have been unable to feed them. Even meeting of Government salaries, we have been unable to meet Government salaries. We have just struggled to meet Government salaries. Even this august House, we owe hotel bills in respect of MPs in excess of US$700 000 because of the non performance of the budget arising out of, among other things, these unlawful recruitments.

With the army one, I want to give further details. The lawful army budget per month is about US$15 million. In January, February, March and April, we were paying US$15 million. What happened now is that because of these 4 600 people, the institution itself, the army was now taking money meant for NSSA and ZIMRA to pay for these extra people. So we suddenly are accumulating arrears and because these soldiers had been paid, a contract had already been done between the Government and the employees, so it was fait accompli. So in May, we had to adopt the fact that the 4 600, even though illegally appointed, are now part of the workforce because they had already been paid and that is very very unfortunate.

Hon. Speaker, the money we spent is approved by Parliament through the Budget, the Consolidated Revenue Fund. So to have these unlawful expenditures which are outside Parliament, I think it is as unfortunate as it is unacceptable. I thank you Hon. Speaker.

MR. KANZAMA: In view of what you are saying, given that you had made proposals on the budget, particularly on the Blue Book, can you assure the nation that you will meet the targets that you have proposed.

MR. BITI: I am going to present the Mid Term Statement on Thursday, 12th July 2012. The leadership of Government has agreed with this. There is going to be a major revision of the Budget of US$4 billion. Part of the major revision arises out of the under performance of the revenue targets. I can tell you that between January and May 2012, we have failed to meet our revenue target by US$194 million, almost close to US$200 million. Therefore, the figure of US$4 billion is going to be revised downwards.

I also want to tell you Hon. Speaker, that the main reason why we have failed to meet our revenue target is the gross under performance of diamond revenue. Between January to May, we have only received US$30 million, when we were supposed to receive about US$240 million. So as a result of that, we are going to revise the budget downward. As a result of the drought we had, the drought we had has resulted in us losing 33% of our projected maize output. So, where we were targeting around 1.4 million metric tonnes, we are going to harvest about 900 000 metric tonnes. So, agricultural growth this year will be about -5%. In tobacco, our target was 150 million kgs that have been reduced to 130 million kilogrammes. So, as a result of the shrinkage in agricultural output, we are also going to revise downward our GDP figures, we have got the figures, but wait until the 12th of July 2012, and I will tell you the figures, and it is a reduction by a factor of more than 3%.

So to summarise Hon. Kanzama, the economy, in the first five months of the year, has been in comatose and we have to take drastic measures starting with the meeting that is going to take place tomorrow to ensure that we redirect the economy on the growth path. There will be austerity, there will be living within our means, there will be expenditure retrenchment and there will be selling of silverware, there will be reform of the mining sector, there will be reform of the supply side of the economy and tomorrow we are going to have an intense discussion. Thank you.

MRS. CHADEROPA: My question is directed to the Deputy Minister of Health. Is he aware that there are some major hospitals which cover big areas, which do not have doctors? At Sanyati Hospital, there is an erratic supply of electricity and it is affecting especially the maternity ward. Is he aware of the shortages of electricity?

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HEALTH AND CHILD WELFARE (DR. MOMBESHORA): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. Firstly, I would like to admit that we are aware that there are some hospitals with no doctors but we cannot actually say there are no doctors, but there is a shortage of doctors. This is very difficult for us because the doctors are few. We hope that as time goes on and as we are training them, we will have enough doctors in a few years to come. We are working flat out to ensure that after houseman-ship, we deploy them to hospitals outside towns which are the most affected. We have around 57 hospitals countrywide and we are producing around 100 doctors per year. So we are hoping a few will remain in town and the rest will be deployed in the rural areas. If we can only look after our doctors well, then we can curb the brain drain, but as long as we do not pay them well, they will leave us after their bonding, for they also need a good living.

What we have talked about Mr. Speaker is so painful to us as the Ministry of Health, because this is beyond our control. The shortage of electricity is a national problem; it is also affecting industries and farmers as well. Our wish is that all the hospitals could acquire generators which are not only used when there is no electricity but in areas like theatres and labour wards so that no operations will be done in darkness. Most of our hospitals are equipped with generators but the problem that we are facing are fuel shortages. So, we are aware of the challenges and we hope that in the future we will be able to rectify the problems. Thank you.

MR. NCUBE: Is it lawful for the police not to place the "Police Ahead Sign"?

THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MR. MOHADI): It is not lawful, not to place the police ahead sign.

MR. CHIMBETETE: Mr. Speaker Sir, my quest ion is directed to the Minister of Water Resources and Development. Minister, may I know the reason why Nyanga residents pay their water bill to ZINWA when ZINWA should only be paid for bulky water and residents should pay to the Nyanga District Council for its own development? Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: Order hon. member, that is not a policy question. This segment is specifically for policy questions.

MR. MATONGA: Thank you Mr. Speaker. My question is directed to the Minister of Education, Sport, Arts and Culture. Zimbabwe lost to little Burundi 2-1, about a month ago. We lost to Guinea at home, we drew against Mozambique. ZIFA does not have a permanent coach and a sponsor, coaches have not been paid, and we have also seen the harassment of our footballers, Knowledge Musona and Kalulu by ZIFA. I would like the Minister to explain to the House what is happening with ZIFA because sport is very important and you have seen the participation of members of this House being curtain raisers for international matches.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, order. Because of the importance of this particular question to do with the National Team, the Minister may respond to those issues.

THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, SPORT, ARTS AND CULTURE (SENATOR COLTART): Thank you Mr. Speaker, this is a very important question. I am sure it is on the lips of many hon. members. I think in many respects, football is a demonstration of Zimbabwean culture in microcosm, in that we have such enormous potential as a nation and yet for many, many years we have not realized that potential. I think it is true to say that football in our nation has been poisoned and it has not happened overnight. It seems to me that the root of the problem is the fact that we have lost our passion, we have lost a sense of patriotism in Zimbabwe football. We put so many other things ahead of Zimbabwe. I think many of us have to answer this question, what comes first? Should Zimbabwe come first or should ZANU PF come first? Should Zimbabwe come first or should the MDC come first? Tragically, we all need a sense of introspection and the same applies to Zimbabwe football. We are not going to achieve what we should in football until we address this question regarding patriotism and where our priorities lie.

Mr. Speaker Sir, it seems to me that there are four things that need to happen in football. The first is that we need to respect the rule of law in football. We need to respect the laws of Zimbabwe and the FIFA statutes in football. To that extent, I absolutely support ZIFA's goal of trying to cleanse the sport. But the only concern that I have regarding ZIFA's investigations, is that justice delayed is justice denied and we have many players and many coaches who do not know where they stand. Whilst I encourage ZIFA to proceed with these investigations, they must do so with greater haste so that we all, as a nation, know where we stand regarding particular players and particular coaches. If we find that particular players and coaches are involved in match fixing, clearly they have no role to play in future in Zimbabwean football. To this extent, we need the cooperation of the Police and the Attorney General. I am not going to delve into matters which are before the courts but suffice it to say that I was concerned about charges being dropped recently so quickly without adequate information being forwarded to me why they had to be dropped. I certainly, as Minister, have no explanation why some of these charges have been dropped. But Mr. Speaker, this is the first point, we need to respect the rule of law in football - [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear] - if we do not cleanse this mess, the rot will remain.

Secondly, we need great wisdom in handling both coaches and players. If you look at a team like Manchester United, and I am not a Manchester United fan, but I have to respect Alec Ferguson's handling of players for many years and I think that is why he has built up a strong team. He demonstrates great wisdom in handling his fellow coaches, his subordinates and most importantly his players. This does not just apply to football, it applies to other disciplines. If we take for example cricket and the handling of Vusi Sibanda last year, that was not handled properly - that we took a highly talented player, Vusi Sibanda and treated him in a way that prevented him from going to New Zealand and this had disastrous consequences for the team.

Mr. Speaker, even today if you look in today's papers, you have someone like Knowledge Musona, being treated poorly in the front page of our newspapers. That is not a way to treat a young player, a player who is highly talented. He may have done something silly by having lunch yesterday with the disreputable character, I do not know what the facts are but what I do know is that his name should not be in the press today. If we are treating our players well, we need to speak to them one to one basis, understand the correct facts and explanation before we rush to the press. Tied to that is that chopping and changing of coaches. We need to stick with players and stick with coaches who have a commendable track record. The second point is simply that we need wisdom in handling our subordinates and players, we need to demonstrate that we respect them. We must start nurturing players and coaches if we are going to get much better results in the field.

The third point and in this regard, I want to make is a point made by coach Mr. Gumbo, that there is far too much politics in Zimbabwe football and this has been a problem in our football for many years - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections] ….

MR. SPEAKER: Order, order, hon. members. Hon. Minister continue.

SENATOR COLTART: Obviously if we are to take this to heart, we will not perform well on the football field until we achieve removing politics from sport. All political parties must just stand back from ZIFA and then I think we will start to see better performance.

The fourth point is clearly the need within ZIFA, for more transparency and accountability. I want to give the current ZIFA Board the opportunity to demonstrate a commitment to achieving this. They have taken measures to address this corruption and they must be encouraged to see that process through. But there is much that ZIFA has to work on. When these four unique principles are honoured, I have absolutely no doubt that we will start performing better on the field.

MS. A. NDHLOVU: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir, based on the importance of sport, as raised by the Minister, may you please tell us Government policy with regards to the professionalisation of sport as a career.

SENATOR COLTART: Mr. Speaker, this question actually requires a very detailed response which I am sure hon. members do not have the patience for today.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, hon. Minister, take your time, respond to it.

SENATOR COLTART: Mr. Speaker, at its core, the professionalisation of sport is dependent of the revitalisation of the economy. Any country which has a disastrous economy and companies which are not making profits, companies which do not have large marketing budgets witness under performance of sport. So, we need to focus on creating a conducive environment that is going to ensure that the companies make profits and can then put those profits into sport.

The second thing that we need is apply the four points that I have referred to earlier today regarding ZIFA to professionalism in sport. We need to ensure that rule of law is always respected; we need to clean up sports administrations to make sure that they are not governed by politics or politicians or subverted by corruption and we also need to have an objective means of identifying and nurturing players.

Let me, in conclusion, just use one sport as an example of what we have to do and that concerns the sport of rugby. If one analyses rugby in Zimbabwe, we will observe for example, the Prince Edward Festival held every April. That Festival demonstrates that we are one of the strongest nations in terms of school boy rugby in the world, but we have never been, most certainly not in the last twenty years or so, a world power at senior level. We have not been able to convert that strength in rugby at school boy level into a professional adult game as we see in South Africa and elsewhere. The reason for that is because we are unable to retain that talent and that is why we lose that talent - people like, 'the Beast' Tendai Mtawarira who has gone to South Africa because he never was able to play the game professionally in our country.

The reason he was unable to play rugby professionally here is because rugby as an institution, it is under-funded. There are no big commercial sponsors that can make the Rugby Union of Zimbabwe viable from a financial perspective. So, you will see, hon. member, that the professionalism in sport is very closely linked to the overall economy. Thank you.

+ MR. R. MOYO: Thank you Mr. Speaker. My question is directed to the Minister of Water, I would like the Minister to inform this House as to how they will avail water to Bulawayo as there is only two months supply of water left?

+THE MINISTER OF WATER RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT (MR. S. NKOMO): Thank you Hon. Speaker. I would like to thank Hon. Moyo for his question on the water situation in Bulawayo. Efforts that are in place are first, to complete the pipes from Mtshabezi to Mzingwane Dam as I said earlier, the laying of pipes is complete, the pump house is complete. What is left is the installation of the pumps and motors in the pump house. As for the power line, the State Procurement Board has awarded the tender and they have started installing polls for the power line. I believe that by the end of this month or mid next month, we will be pumping water from Mtshabezi into Mzingwane to Ncema.

Efforts are being made again to put a pipeline from Insiza to Ncema. There is 85% water in Insiza, so there is plenty of water but the pipe is small, so it can only disperse small amounts of water for treatment. So, if we install a duplicate pipeline, a large amount of water will then be distributed to Bulawayo, but the challenge is that we do not have money to install the duplicate pipe line. Efforts are being made by the Government and the Bulawayo City Council to avail the money, maybe fromthe Africa Development Bank or the Development Bank of South Africa.

I had a meeting today on the issue, if things go well, I will talk to Minister Biti. Oh, he has gone, I will talk to him so that maybe we could get the money from those banks. I appreciate Hon. Speaker that Bulawayo is actually in a critical situation in terms of water supply and if nothing is done and we do not connect Mtshabezi as quickly as possible, that city will be without water in the next two months and so we as Government, doing everything possible to make sure that water is available to the City of Bulawayo by connecting the pipe line from Mtshabezi. I thank you Hon. Speaker.

+MR. F. M. SIBANDA: I would like to congratulate the Hon. Minister for going to China because now we will get water from Kariba. Is there a policy that when Engineers fail to do their work, they blame it on mermaids/njuzu, spiritualism? How is science connected to superstition? I would like the Minister to explain that policy because we do not want a repeat of the Chinhoyi diesel story because that story was embarrassing for the whole nation. What is Government policy on that? I thank you.

MR. S. NKOMO: Thank you very much Hon. Speaker. I would like to thank Hon. Sibanda for that supplementary question. I want to state here and state very clearly that first of all, I do not and I have said this again; I do not believe in that, I do not believe in njuzu you are talking about - I do not believe in them but let me say this, that the Hon. House will agree that whether the Minister likes it or not, it is not the issue. The dam in Gokwe had difficulty for my engineers pumping water into that town. That is the fact. Open the engine, the engine will actually break and the people finally refused to operate that because some of them were pelted by stones and injured.

Therefore, the matter was then referred to the traditional leadership and then the traditional leaders indicated that they needed some certain resource supplies for them to actually appease those spirits. The Hon. Member of Parliament for that area is here. Four chiefs went to that dam and they did not want any of our officials, any from the council and even the Hon. Member of Parliament was not supposed to be there, only four chiefs in the region were there. They slept there and the following morning they called our staff and said switch on the engines and it worked. It does not matter Mr. Speaker, whether I believe in it or I do not believe in it. Therefore, to me, upfront I do not believe in those things but those who believe in them, I have a respect for them. I have to respect those human beings who believe in that thing. The chiefs there believe in it and they actually did that and all I am interested in, is the water supply deliverance to our citizens. If the devils can come and provide water, I will not be bothered by it.

Oral Answers to Questions without notice interrupted by MR. SPEAKER in terms of Standing Order No.34.

ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS WITH NOTICE

INCREASE IN RATE OF RAIDS ON LIVE STOCK

1. MR. BALOYI asked the Co-Ministers of Home Affairs to state:

(i) the measures the Ministry is taking to curb the increasing rate of raids on livestock along the Sango and Chikwalakwala border line in Chiredzi; and

(ii) the Ministry's plans in finding a lasting solution to cross border cattle rustling in the Sengwe and Matibi II communal lands.

THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MRS. T. MAKONE): I would like to thank the hon. member for raising the question I am going to respond to. The Ministry has put in place measures to curb stock theft in the country as a whole and more so on the country's borders including Sango and Chikwalakwala.

The Zimbabwe Republic Police carries out regular patrols along the border using arctic cat four wheeled bikes as well as two wheeled bikes. In the less accessible areas, the ZRP has deployed Police Patrols on horse back assisted by armed support unit.

The Zimbabwe Republic Police together with other stakeholders, such as local authorities, have established anti-stock theft committees to embark on extensive awareness campaigns to conscientise communities of the need to account for their livestock on a daily basis. This accounting for livestock on a daily basisenables speedy detection and tracking of any livestock that would have been stolen or gone astray.

Communities are also being encouraged to brand their cattle for easy of identification as the brands are recognised by all countries in the Southern Region of Africa through their various registrars of brands. This so far has indeed been a successful exercise as the majority of the populace is adopting the idea.

In order to recover livestock outside our borders, the ZRP holds bilateral meetings with neighbouring countries. The bilateral meetings enable cooperation and have made it possible to intercept and recover livestock. The bilateral meetings are also held every month and provide a platform to develop a joint effort to curb stock theft between Zimbabwe and neighbouring countries.

ii. The Ministry's plans in finding a lasting solution to cross border cattle rustling have already been alluded to in my response to the first question from the hon. MP. However, I would like to reiterate that the efforts that the Ministry, through the ZRP has put in place, are there to ensure that we nip the problem of stock theft in the bud. The efforts begin locally with empowering livestock owners with the necessary information such as hints and tips on how to safeguard their livestock, to the procedures they need to follow in the event that their livestock is stolen or has gone astray. Regionally and internationally, we are an active participant in the well co-ordinated stock theft management system of Interpol and SARPCCO.

DISRUPTION OF APPROVED PUBLIC GATHERINGS

2. MR. SULULU asked the Co-Ministers of Home Affairs to explain to the House the action that has been taken by the police to arrest violent and rowdy people who disrupted the following approved public gatherings;

a) the meeting addressed by the United States Ambassador Charles Ray on 20th July 2011 in Kwekwe, where youths, journalists and the public were assaulted in full view of the police force;

b) the public hearing in the Government Caucus on the Human Rights Commission Bill on 23rd July 2011, where some Members of Parliament, journalists and the public were assaulted again, in full view of the police force;

c) the measures the Ministry has put in place to avoid such embarrassing actions from recurring.

THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MRS. T. MAKONE): I know that this question has been awaited by the House for a long time and the reason for not coming back on time is not because there was no willingness to answer this question but because it is a very difficult one for the ZRP to answer and we have had various meetings concerning this particular question which culminated in a meeting in our offices with the Commissioner General. So, I will answer it as much as I can and hopefully the members will be satisfied with the response that we have finally brought to the House. I want to thank the hon. member for the question.

For the purpose of my answer, I shall put the first two together, firstly, because they were committed so close to each other on the 20th and 23 rd July 2011 and they both point to the action or inaction of the ZRP. So I shall treat them as one for the purpose of this answer.

Mr. Speaker Sir, there has been increased number of complaints against the actions or inactions of the ZRP from members of the public, civic society, non-governmental organisations, Cabinet Ministers and now from members of the legislature. Rightly, the ZRP prides itself of its high level of professionalism and there are many instances of professionalism that we can point towards and we all know how they can quell violence where it rears its ugly head. We also know where they can forestall violence before it even occurs. Unfortunately, lately there has been an increase in the crescendo of complaints against the same ZRP. The successes in the reduction of hijackings, high mortalities on our roads and other crimes are being dented by the fast disappearance of trust in the force by those that they purport to serve, which is the Zimbabwean public. In particular, complaints by the travelling public, both passengers and drivers, organisers of civic meetings as well as private functions at private properties.

The question that was asked here should not be treated in isolation, because all the complaints are centred around the commission or omission of action by the ZRP. The law is very clear on public gatherings. The ZRP, in terms of the Public Order and Security Act, when an application is made to a regulating authority of an area, in this case, the Officer Commanding the District, the ZRP is required by law to safeguard those people that they would have recognised as being the lawful gatherers. Once clearance has been granted, the police must provide the necessary number of officers to ensure that peace prevails. If people are assaulted at such gatherings, police should move swiftly to quell the violence by apprehending those seeking to disturb an approved gathering. It is wrong for the police to stand by while an offence is being committed, but let me assure the hon. member that, ZRP is not shy to deal with errant members who are reported as having been negligent and complicit with wrongdoers.

May all hon. members be advised to educate their constituents on the need to make prompt reports where there is an act of commission or omission by the ZRP. It would be a sad day for Zimbabwe if the public lost faith and trust in the operations of the police in maintaining law and order. During and after-gatherings of this nature, the police are expected to always put in place mechanisms that will see order prevailing.

In the case of the incident of 23 July 2011, I have no excuse to profer except to apologise to the hon. members for the gross dereliction of duty by members of the force on duty on that day. I can only assume that they were equally taken by surprise and were outnumbered by the unruly mob. Mr. Speaker Sir, I want to assure hon. members that such an event will never occur again in the hallowed chambers, where elected representatives of the people should enjoy privileges and immunity according to the laws of this country. I am assured by the police that there will be zero tolerance of any kind of violence, be it criminally or politically motivated anywhere in Zimbabwe, and especially in the House, where the laws of Zimbabwe are made. Once again, Mr. Speaker, as the Minister of Home Affairs, I want to apologise to this House for the failure by the police to protect the hon. Legislators and journalists on the 23 rd of July 2011, when they were assaulted during the public hearing at the Government Caucus on the Human Rights Commission Bill. Thank you.

INCIDENT INVOLVING BORDER JUMBERS IN CHIKWALAKWALA

3. MR. BALOYI asked the Co-Ministers of Home Affairs;

a) whether they are aware of the incident involving ZRP details that resulted in the death of a border jumper at the Bubi River Bank in Chikwalakwala; and to;

b) explain what measures have been taken to bring the culprits to book to prevent recurrence of such incidents.

THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MRS. MAKONE): Mr. Speaker Sir, I would like to thank the hon. member for raising the questions. The Ministry is aware of the circumstances pertaining to the death of Mathias Mashaya of Machopa village under Chief Mupungu in Chipinge in March 2012. The death of Mathias was dealt with in terms of the law pursuant to such cases. However, allegations of improper performance of duty by one police officer raised by the hon. member are true and indeed action was taken against the police officer.

Facts of the matter are that, the now deceased was part of a 14-member group of suspected border jumpers who were crossing Bubi River Bridge at around 2100 hours on their way to South Africa through an illegal entry point. Whilst crossing the bridge, the suspected border jumpers saw two men approaching them from behind.

Suspecting that the men could be members of the army who are deployed at the bridge, the group made their escape but Mathias fell off the bridge into the river where he hit a rock and died instantly. One of the group members realized that one of them had slipped into the bridge. He advised others and they returned to make out what had transpired. As they searched for the deceased, a police officer based at ZRP Davata arrived in a South African registered car whereupon the suspected border jumpers asked for help. The police officer instead arrested the suspected border jumpers. Admittedly, the police officer did not even try to locate the now deceased or offer help. The body of the now deceased was only located the following day.

The official report of what had transpired was made the following day and investigations were immediately instituted. It is through these investigations that it was established that the now deceased had fallen into the river whilst escaping from the two men believed to be soldiers on patrol. The police officer was dealt with in terms of the Police Act. The now deceased was not murdered by anyone, let alone the police as alleged but met his death whilst escaping from the perceived soldiers on patrol.

Corrective measures against members of the police force are guided by the Police Act (Chapter 11.10) where, after an investigation into the conduct of a member of the force, disciplinary action is taken if necessary against the member concerned. Criminal charges can also be instituted when circumstances clearly show that a criminal offence was committed. The two; disciplinary and criminal proceedings can run concurrently.

In the case referred to above, investigations were instituted and it was established that the police officer concerned had improperly carried out his duties, hence, he was charged under the Police Act, (Chapter 11.10). Even the relative of the deceased who was among the group exonerated the police officer on any allegations of murdering the now deceased.

The Zimbabwe Republic Police has always and will continue to carry out awareness campaigns as a way of conscientising the general public of the dangers of using illegal crossing points when going to neighbouring countries. Even police officers themselves are often reminded by way of training of the need to observe the tenets of policing and good corporate governance.

GOVERNMENT POLICY ON STRAY OR LOST CATTLE

4. MR. MAKAMURE asked the Co-Minister of Home Affairs to explain to the House;

a) Government's Policy or the procedures regarding the sale of stray or lost cattle;

b) Measures which have been put in place to assist the rural people who have no access to the Media to be informed about such auctions of stray cattle.

THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MRS. MAKONE): Mr. Speaker Sir, the question of livestock including cattle that would have strayed is guided by the statutes of our country. As you might be aware, the policy is clearly spelt in the Stock Trespass Act.

The law stipulates that stray livestock is kept for three months before being auctioned. During this period, the police carry out investigations to establish whether the livestock indeed strayed or could have been stolen. Effort will be made to establish the owner. Awareness of the stray livestock is done through such fora as public meetings, schools, dip tanks gatherings and of course the media. In the event that the stray livestock have brand marks, the police would through the Registrar of brand marks locate the owners of the stray livestock since all registered brand marks are known.

However, let me make it clear that the mandate of auctioning stray livestock rests with local authorities. When the stray livestock are ready for auctioning, the local authorities advertise the auction, giving the dates, times and venues of the sales. The local authorities also have to include the types of livestock that will be on sale. Advertising is done for fourteen continuous days before the sale is undertaken.

On (b) Mr. Speaker Sir, it is apparent to us that all the rural community is rather disadvantaged in terms of communication and information dissemination.

The Zimbabwe Republic Police together with other stakeholders such as local authorities embark on extensive awareness campaigns to alert communities of stray livestock that would be due for auction. This has indeed been a successful exercise as the majority of the populace is reached.

The sales are also carried out in public places such as schools, dip tanks or at the place the stray livestock would have been kept. Effort is also made to make use of traditional leaders, veterinary officers, schools and notices in public areas such as beer halls, growth points and other public gatherings.

*MR. VARANDENI: Hon. Minister, what if a person loses his cattle and police do not take action and then the owner of the cattle sees his cattle being auctioned. What should be done in this case?

* THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MRS. MAKONE): Hon. Varandeni, if you have a specific incident where one could not find the cattle and reported to the police who did nothing about it please bring it forward because it is an offence. The police will have broken the law and the trust entrusted to them by the public or people.

COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF POLICE'S POST

5. MR. MUCHAURAYA asked the Co-Minister of Home Affairs to explain the position regarding the Commissioner General of Police's post.

THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MRS. MAKONE): The hon. member's question is vague. I am not sure if the hon. member is asking about how the Commissioner General of Police is appointed or his duties in terms of the Zimbabwe Constitution.

The Constitution of Zimbabwe provides for a broad administrative set up of the police force. Section 93 (Amendment 18) of the Constitution states that, "there shall be a police force, which together with such other bodies as may be established by law for the purposes, shall have a function of preserving the internal security and maintain law and order in Zimbabwe."

Subject to the Provisions of an Act of Parliament, the police force shall be under the command of the Commissioner General of Police, who shall be appointed by the President after consultation with such person or authority as my be prescribed by or under an Act of Parliament. In terms of Part (ii), Section 5 of the Police Act (Chapter 11:10) the Police Service Board recommends to His Excellency the President such appointments.

Pursuant to these provisions of the law, the post of Commissioner General Police is currently filled by Commissioner General Augustine Chihuri. I am not sure Mr. Speaker Sir, if the hon. member was asking for or whether he wanted to be specific about something - if so he is free to ask now.

MR. MUCHAURAYA: Hon. Minister, this is with regards to media reports about the status of the Police Commissioner's position whether his contract expired he was now in acting capacity or it has been renewed. It is in the best interest of this nation to know the current correct position of the Commissioner General.

THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MRS. MAKONE): Thank you Hon. Muchauraya, now you have been more specific. There was controversy I think sometime at the beginning of the year as to what the real status was and my understanding was is that the question was dealt with by the Principals in government namely, the President of the Republic of Zimbabwe and the right Hon. Prime Minister of the Republic of Zimbabwe. As Minister together with my co-Minister and colleague Hon. Mohadi, we have not been advised that he is no longer the Commissioner General of the ZRP. So we take it that between them they have agreed that he is duly appointed and until at such time as we are told otherwise, we leave it right there.

MR. MUCHAURAYA: It is on record that after that meeting at State House the Hon. Deputy Prime Minister and his counterpart addressed a press conference and issued a statement that he was in acting capacity. Are we having an Acting Police Commissioner or we are having someone in retirement?

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order Hon. Minister. Hon. Muchauraya, I think the Minister has given you the position of the two Co-Ministers. I advise you to direct that question to the Principals.

CHIADZWA DIAMOND FIELDS

14. MR. MUSHONGA asked the Minister of Mines and Mining Development to:

1. Explain the Ministry's policy regarding the release of information on Chiadzwa Diamond Mines in view of the conflicting figures given by the chairperson of the Minerals Marketing Corporation of Zimbabwe and the Deputy Minister of Mines and Mining Development on diamond production;

2. Explain the Ministry's policy in reporting to Parliament regarding the following mining companies operating at Chiadzwa Diamond Fields in view of the fact that only three companies are usually mentioned:

· Mbada Diamonds which is run by MMCZ and Reclamation Company of South Africa.

· CANADILE run by ZMDC and retired Zimbabwe National Army Commanders.

· ANJIN run by the Chinese and Zimbabwe National Army.

· Central Intelligence Organisation and Partners.

· Zimbabwe Republic Police and Partners.

· Zimbabwe Prison Services and Partners

· Marange resources.

· Block Wood Mining

· Condurango Investments

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF MINES AND MINING DEVELOPMENT (MR. CHIMANIKIRE): Thank you Mr. Speaker. I would like to thank the hon. member for posing the questions that are on the order paper. The first question refers to an explanation that is being sought on policy regarding the release of information on Chiadzwa Diamond Mines. In view of the conflicting views given by the chairperson of the Minerals Marketing Corporations of Zimbabwe and Deputy Minister of Mines and Mining Development in Diamond Production. This question is rather personal but I will respond to it.

The whole ministry operates such that the Permanent Secretary is in charge of the various administrative duties and therefore he is accountable for whatever happens in the Ministry. The Ministry of Mines and Mining Development is the only authority responsible for releasing information on Chiadzwa Diamond Mines and therefore when the Deputy Minister stands up to give responses those responses are based on the advice that comes from the Permanent Secretary of the Ministry and is undisputed by any junior including any member of the MMCZ or ZMDC. Therefore the authority with which a minister issues a statement in this House is based on solid information as supplied by the Permanent Secretary.

The second question, Mr. Speaker, there is a request to explain the ministry's policy reporting to Parliament regarding the following mining companies operating at Chiadzwa Diamond Fields in view of the fact that only three companies are usually mentioned. There is a list of companies that are mentioned, that is, nine of them. The response is as follows:

Mbada Diamonds is a joint mining venture between ZMDC, which is Government and Reclamation Company of South Africa MM. That is the company that has a joint venture with ZMDC. MMCZ does not own any shares in Mbada Diamonds, in fact, the Minerals Marketing Corporation of Zimbabwe is a marketing corporation, a parastatal of the ministry or a parastatal that falls under the ministry which is responsible for the marketing of diamonds. Secondly, Canadile was actually replaced by Marange Resources Limited, which is 100% owned by ZMDC and therefore owned by government.

Anjin is owned by the Chinese and the Government of Zimbabwe where ZMDC owns 10% and Zimbabwe Defence Industries owns 40% shareholding. Hon. Members of Parliament should be alert and be abreast with matters of national interest. It is imperative that hon. members of Parliament understand how Defence Industries are run. Defence Industries are a common practice world over and there is nothing peculiar about it in Zimbabwe because Anjin itself is a defence industry company that is owned by the Chinese, which is in a joint venture with Zimbabwe Defence Industries.

Thirdly, there is a company listed here as Central Intelligence Organisation and Partners. From a ministry point of view, Central Intelligence Organisation and Partners, Zimbabwe Republic Police and Partners and Zimbabwe Prisons and Partners do not have any companies operating in Chiadzwa Diamond Fields. I would advise members that if they have any information contrary to what the ministry is providing to approach the Ministry of Anti Corruption because it can only be a corrupt practice that the ministry is not aware of.

There is the issue of Block Wood Mining. Block Wood Mining, Mr. Speaker, Sir and Condurango, which is the last one on the list, they do not operate at Chiadzwa Diamond Fields, in fact, the ministry is not aware of the existence of such companies. Those are the facts that I have been provided by the Permanent Secretary. It is important to note that there are five operating companies in Chiadzwa Mining Fields, that is Marange Resources (100% Government), Mbada Diamonds (joint venture between Government and a private investor), Anjin (joint venture between Government and a private investor), Diamond Mining Corporation (joint venture between Government and a private investor and Sino Zimbabwe (100% Government).

REMITTANCE BY DIAMOND MINERS

15. MR. MUSHONGA asked the Minister of Mines and Mining Development to disclose all the companies mining diamonds at Chiadzwa Diamond Fields, the total quantities that are mined per month and remittances to the Consolidated Revenue Fund in terms of taxes, royalties and the Government's share of dividends.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF MINES AND MINING DEVELOPMENT (MR. CHIDARIKIRE): I have the following table Mr. Speaker which I will read out to the House.

Month (2012)

Production/carat

Dividends (US$)

January

956,415.56

14,516,960.00

February

800,231.80

5,060,594.00

March

787,790.91

9,472,204.31

Total

3,001,464.48

29,049,758.31

Mr. Speaker, let me point out that the question did not specify what total period they wanted us to cover in terms of specific figures on production, it was just said per month. If you had indicated that you wanted the full figures for 2012 or 2011, we could have provided those figures. These figures are all for Chiadzwa diamond mining companies, we have not made mention of the other mining companies outside Chiadzwa.

Mr. Speaker Sir, may I also underline, that hon. members must understand the operations of the diamond industry the world over. The industry closes between December and February of each year and sales are negligible under this particular period. The country as you are aware is under restrictive measures. I must say when I mention this close, we have a party policy and I am a Deputy Minister coming from the other side. Those restrictive measures therefore in the trade of diamonds also affect some of the operations and sales processes. So the restrictive measures have a negative impact on the prices and buyers who bid for our diamonds. The majority of our buyers are from Europe and America and some of them are afraid of being blacklisted when they are seen to be openly buying Zimbabwe diamonds.

EFFECTIVENESS OF OPERATION HAKUDZOKWI

16. MR. MUSHONGA asked the Minister of Mines and Mining Development to:

(i) inform the House whether it is true that after Operation Hakudzokwi, there is theft and pilfering of diamonds which are sold in Mozambican markets and;

(ii) state the measures the Ministry is taking to stop the leakages.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF MINES AND MINING DEVELOPMENT (MR. CHIDARIKIRE): It is not true that after Operation Hakudzokwi there was theft and pilfering of diamonds which were sold on the Mozambican markets. However, one can not deny that there may be operations of a small scale nature where diamonds are being produced but not within the designated areas that fall under the joint venture between ZMDC and those companies operating in Chiadzwa and Marange. They may be responsible to a certain extent of smuggling diamonds to Mozambique. However, four weeks ago, I was in Mozambique and I had a meeting with the Mozambican Minister of Mines who indicated that most of the smuggling in that area is not of diamonds but gold. As a Ministry we can state that, measures that are being taken in terms of security or otherwise are such that there is very little or negligible or not noticeable smuggling of diamonds after Operation Hakudzokwi. All diamond mining companies at Chiadzwa meet the KPCS minimum standards and have the best security systems in the world throughout the entire diamond value chain. That is as a matter of record and as stated by the KPCS report at their last inspection in November 2011. I thank you Mr. Speaker.

MR. MUSHONGA: Taking into account that Zimbabwe is now a member of KPCS and that on the world market, a carat of diamond is selling between US$200 and US$800. The prices which the Minister has referred to indicate that our diamonds are selling for about US$9 per carat when we are members, we are now allowed in the international community of diamond mines to sell our diamonds. Is it profitable how the Ministry is disposing of our diamonds?

MR. CHIDARIKIRE: That question is specific and I am sure the hon. member would want us to do the figure crunching. It is not correct that I have presented figures that reflect that we are selling a carat of diamond for US$9, it has never sold at US$9. What we had by the end of last year was that, in January, it was indicative that a carat was selling at an average price of US$100. There was a drop in the price to about US$40 around June, July last year. That figure improved to an average of US$100. So figure crunching can be done and if the member wants specific figures that we are getting from the sale of each carat, that can be provided but I dispute the statement that I have issued a statement that averages the sale price at US$9.

ACTIVITIES OF CHINESE AT MUPEDZAPASI IN MBIRE DISTRICT

17. MR. NYAUDE asked the Minister of Mines and Mining Development to shed light on the activities of the Chinese at Mupedzapasi in Mbire District.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF MINES AND MINING DEVELOPMENT (MR. CHIMANIKIRE): Afri-Sino Mineral Resources is the company that is operating in the Mupedzapasi area. The company was issued with a Special Grant 4888 to prospect for Uranium on 26 September 2008, which expired on 25 September 2011. The application for renewal is under consideration by the Ministry of Mines and Mining Development, hence the stoppage of exploration activities at the site. The conditions of the Special Grant were for exploration to quantify existing uranium deposits. Feasibility studies have to be completed to develop the uranium deposits to the production stage. Afri-Sino has met the requirements, despite having obstruction from the local hunting firm, with the Parks and Wild Life Management to agree on the operation of the field drill, which hindered the progress of the work to a larger extent. Uranium is radio-active and needs specialized mining. It can only be transported after the company has been issued with a permit with the Radiation Authority of Zimbabwe. This explains why the samples are being stored in cores and that they use the chemicals during drilling in order to contain minerals.

Afri-Sino Mineral has drilled 62 drill holes translating to 10 000 metres of drill depth to date since 2010. However, no work is being carried out at the moment and drill rigs are just parked inside fenced premises as work was suspended in November 2011. All cores recovered from core drilling are still in the shed. Four Chinese personnel and about eight employees are on site maintain equipment and guarding the fenced area. The area under prospecting at K1 is now bushy indicating that it was worked before the rainy season.

Prospecting done on site K1 confirmed a reserve base of 3000 tones and additional 7000 tones required for a viable project. The company needs three to four years in order to complete the exploration in search of the additional 7000 tonnes. Currently the company has discovered another at K2 which is about eight kilometers from K1 and is yet to evaluate the resource once renewal has been granted.

In conclusion, there are no mining operations as alleged are taking place in Mupedzapasi area in Mbire District. There is a road construction site nearby which has been contracted by the Mbire Rural District Council which is using dump trucks to ferry gravel. Afri-Sino Mining Resources is prospecting for uranium in the area and the core recovered from drilling is stored in the core shed. No movement of the core or any form of ore has taken place since the company started its drilling operations in 2010.

MINING ACTIVITIES AT TROJAN NICKEL MINING

18. MR. NYAUDE asked the Minister of Mines and Mining Development to explain to the House why Trojan Nickel Mine is not carrying out mining activities despite enunciation of the 'use it or lose it' principle provided for in the Medium Term Plan.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF MINES AND MINING DEVELOPMENT (MR. CHIMANIKIRE): Trojan Nickel Mine falls under Bindura Nickel Corporation and is an established mine with developed infrastructure which shows that it is in serious business of producing nickel. Trojan Nickel Mine is situated in Bindura and most if the mining locations were registered in 1956 and 1957. The company has been mining these claims since the date of registration. In 2008, the company made a submission to the Ministry of Mines and Mining Development to put the mine under care and maintenance and the Ministry allowed it because of the harsh macro-economic environment. The economic environment was characterised by hyper-inflation, skills flight and their recessionary effects. During the time in question, it was also expensive to mine as the price of producing it was higher than its selling price.

The 'use it or lose it' principle is applicable to mines that are held for speculative purposes; those that are situated on virgin ground that has been developed at all. Trojan Nickel Mine has contributed immensely to the society and has been producing since December 1956 to 2008. The parent company of Trojan Nickel Mine, Bindura Nickel's major shareholder, Mwana Africa PLC has managed to secure 21 million funding for the re-start of Trojan Nickel Mine from a Chinese investor. This amount of money is specifically targeted for the first year of Trojan restart.

MINING ACTIVITIES AT MUPEDZAPASI IN MBIRE DISTRICT

19. MR. NYAUDE asked the Minister of Mines to clarify whether the Chinese at Mupedzapasi in Mbire District are prospecting or mining uranium in view of the alleged loads of ore seen driven out of the area.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF MINES AND MINING DEVELOPMENT (MR. CHIMANIKIRE): Question answered under question 17.

MAINTANACE OF ZESA TRANSFORMERS

20. MR. SHOKO asked the Minister of Energy and Power Development to explain to the House:

i. The Ministry's policy regarding ZESA transformers which get damaged due to theft of transmission oil;

ii. The ownership of those boxes considering the contribution of the community towards the repair and maintenance of those transformers.

THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (MR. MANGOMA): ZESA is responsible for the replacement or repair of faulty transformers that get damaged due to the theft of transformer oil. Such work is carried out under fault maintenance in order to ensure the continuity of supply to customers. However, at the height of the country's economic challenges, ZESA had very little capacity to replace the damaged transformers owing to uneconomic tariffs. This resulted in customers waiting for long periods for replacement of transformers. However, some customers voluntarily

donated transformers in order to get supplies restored quickly. In an effort to manage theft and vandalism of infrastructure, ZESA engaged communities to safeguard transformers in their areas to avoid theft. Some communities employed neighbourhood watch committees to patrol transformers whilst some erected physical barriers in conjunction with ZESA.

The boxes and transformers belong to ZESA as part of the distribution infrastructure. The community's contribution was voluntary and it was a win-win situation that was meant to manage supply during the harsh economic climate.

It should be noted that this phase has since passed as ZESA now has the capacity to replace faulty distribution transformers following the award of a reasonable tariff. 2 500 transformers were replaced since February 2009 as up to 35 000 customers had gone for up to 3 years without electricity.

EXPLANATION OF HIGH ELECTRICITY BILLS

21. MR. SHOKO asked the Minister of Energy and Power Development to explain why electricity bills for ordinary citizens continue accumulating in light of continued power outages.

THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (MR. MANGOMA): Thank you Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the hon. member for the question. The main reason for the accumulation of arrears is the non-payment of electricity accounts by some domestic customers. In spite of power outages, most customers carry out their household chores once supply is restored after load shedding thus consuming energy. The consumed energy is billed and this is perceived negatively.

ZESA is now managing to read about 80% of meters. The 20% that are estimated are not estimated for more than two consecutive months. The estimates are based on historical consumption as captured in the billing system. However, when the meter is read, the bill will be adjusted.

Mr. Speaker Sir, I advised Cabinet yesterday that we are now starting on the pre-paid meter role out programme which will start at the end of this month and therefore, the issue of meter reading might be something of the past. We expect that this role out programme will be over the next ten months. I have also taken the opportunity to look at Hon. Shoko's bill itself, I am glad to say that it has been serviced well. I am sure that it has not been accumulating because there was no electricity going into his premises.

AVAILABILITY OF DRUGS IN MALARIA PRONE AREAS

25. MR. CHIMHINI asked the Minister of Health and Child Welfare to state the plans the Ministry has to ensure that Malaria drugs and testing kits are made available in malaria prone districts such as Mutasa District, in view of the serious shortage of Malaria drugs and testing kits in these districts.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HEALTH AND CHILD WELFARE (DR. MOMBESHORA): Thank you Mr. Speaker. Let me start by explaining how the system works. Mr. Speaker Sir, the health delivery system in Zimbabwe and in the Ministry of Health and Child Welfare in particular is decentralised from national, provincial, district up to the primary health facility level.

All the levels have competent personnel trained in all the various disciplines of health that are in tandem with the health problems they are likely to handle or face in the discharge of their duties. The referral procedures are clearly outlined, and have to be adhered to.

All health facilities have a minimum set of essential medicines in stock and have received training on the procedures to be followed when ordering stock from the National Pharmaceutical Stores (NATPHARM).

Drug-Medicine Distribution in Zimbabwe

The National Pharmaceutical Company of Zimbabwe is the Ministry's central medical stores. NATPHARM procures, stores and distributes most medicines used by the health facilities. Regional stores are located in Gweru, Harare, Chinhoyi, Bulawayo and Mutare. This arrangement ensures that medicines are stored as close as possible to the districts to ensure easy access and proximity to the recipient institutions. Every quarter, NATPHARM staff visit all health facilities checking on stock levels, as well as replenishing the stocks.

Institutions which experience high demands for any commodities resulting in stock outs and experience minimum stock level, place orders to NATPHARM even outside the NATPHARM scheduled visits. The Ministry of Health and Child Welfare has provincial pharmacists, who provide support to health facilities within their jurisdiction and ensure that institutions do not experience any stock outs.

National Stock Status For Anti Malarials

The Ministry has adequate stocks of both ACTs (coartemether), as well as RDTs (test kits). The Ministry procured an additional 600 000, ACTs, and 300 000 test kits a few weeks ago. Any health institution experiencing stock outs should place emergency orders with NATPHARM. Facilities have also been encouraged to use the pull system in which the institutions take the initiative to order direct from NATPHARM. It is admitted that some facilities face transport challenges, thus making it difficult to collect their medicines. The partners and stakeholders are encouraged to provide support to these institutions.

THE MINISTER OF CONSTITUTIONAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS: Mr. Speaker, we have noted that Ministers came in their numbers to respond to Questions With Notice. In terms of the Standing Orders, the time for responding to those questions has expired. I thought that let us give Ministers opportunities to respond to those questions .. -[MR BHASIKITI-CHUMA: Vaivepi, we want to debate our motions]- ..

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order, order, hon. members, hon. Minister continue.

THE MINISTER OF CONSTITUTIONAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS: Before I was rudely challenged by Hon. Bhasikiti-Chuma, I was seeking, Mr. Speaker, your indulgence that Questions with Notice be extended to enable Ministers who are present to respond to those questions.

Motion put and agreed to.

PROGRESS REGARDING CHIKOMBEDZI WATER SUPPLY PROJECTS

26. MR. BALOYI asked the Minister of Water Resources, Development and Management to inform the House on the progress made regarding the Chikombedzi water supply projects.

THE MINISTER OF WATER RESOURCES, DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT (MR. s. NKOMO): Thank you Mr. Speaker and I would like to thank Hon. Baloyi for the question.

Hon. Speaker, the Chikombedzi Water Supply Project is supported by the Zimbabwe National Water Authority [ZINWA] which is an arm of my Ministry. This centre is earmarked to be a growth point for the Chiredzi District and as such, it is home to the Chikombedzi hospital which is a referral hospital for the District, the Chikombedzi Police Station and two schools - that is a primary and a secondary school. The center has quite a number of shops, bottle-stores and beer-halls. There are some residential developments which are taking place as the Chiredzi District Council has contracted private developers to develop and service residential stands at the centre. Chikombedzi is a hub for travelers going out to Mozambique by road and by rail via Sango Border post. Travelers can reach it from Chiredzi and Rutenga by roads. In terms of tourism, it lies a few kilometers from the Gonarezhou Trans-frontier Park, and is therefore an ideal centre for refreshments for tourists visiting the park, who obviously would be looking for water after coming out of those hot wild forests.

ZINWA is currently supplying water to Chikombedzi from two boreholes which are yielding 140m3/day, against a peak demand of 300m3/day from the centre.

It is because of this ever increasing water demand at the centre that my ministry, over some ten years ago, started the Chikombedzi Water Upgrading Project to upgrade the water supply system in Chikombedzi.

To meet the present and projected water demand at Chikombedzi, my ministry completed the construction of Masukwe Dam in 2001 which has a capacity of 1.1 million cubic metres as a source of raw water to the planned new Chikombedzi Water Supply Station. ZINWA designed a 14 m3 per hour water treatment plant which is located some 1.7km from Masukwe Dam. The Treatment plant is approximately 17km to the south of the growth point. Having undergone purification at the treatment works, water will be pumped some 17.2km using the 250mm diameter pvc pipeline to the existing water storage reservoirs that are located on the northern side of the growth point.

Before I present to you the progress of works to date, let me hasten to say that the economic downturn which our country suffered the past ten years affected very much the progress of work at the new water supply station at Chikombedzi, otherwise the project could have been completed a long time ago. It is my hope and wish that during this coming financial year, the Ministry of Finance will avail the required funds which I will give below to bring this project to its fruitful conclusion.

The following table is a summary of progress of works to date;

Nature of Works

Proposed works

Progress to Date

Masukwe dam

Construction of an earth dam of capacity 1x106mto supply Chikombedzi with domestic water.

Dam construction was completed in 2001

Water Treatment Plant

Construction of:

· Raw water pump house equipped with 2 sets of pumps and motors [one to be on standby].

· 2.1km 250mm diameter pipeline from dam to treatment works

  • 2 by 70m3/hr sedimentation tank units
  • 3 units 50m3/hr rapid filter tanks
  • A 500m3 clear water tank

· Clear water pump house equipped with 2 sets of pumps and motors to deliver water to the 1000m3 reservoir.

Work not yet started.

0.2km of piping was purchased and laid.

1 sedimentation tank has been built.

Only one set of the filter units has been constructed

Only foundation excavations done

Work not yet started.

Clear water pumping main and storage works

· Trenching and laying 17.2km 250mm diameter pipeline from treatment works to the 1000mstorage reservoir.

  • Construction of the 1000mreinforced concrete reservoir

No work has commenced.

No work has commenced.

So, in short, what I can say is that ZINWA needs US$800 000 to complete the above outstanding works, which would be for the construction of the new water supply station and pumping main. My ministry has been bidding for funds every year from Treasury since the adoption of the multicurrency system to complete this project without success. I am hoping that money would be availed this coming financial year.

PROGRESS ON THE GWAYI SHANGANI DAM CONSTRUCTION

27. MR. MADUBEKO asked the Minister of Water Resources, Development and Management to inform the House on the progress made on the Gwayi Shangani Dam Construction and if he could make a statement.

THE MINISTER OF WATER RESOURCES, DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT (MR. S. NKOMO): Hon. members, the Gwayi-Tshangani Dam, just for the background for those of our Hon. Members who may not know, is located at the confluence of Gwayi and Tshangani rivers, 6km downstream of that confluence.

The dam is a concrete gravity arch dam, with a height of 71m. The capacity of the dam is 635 million mwith a yield of 10% per year. The dam forms the first phase of the National Matabeleland Zambezi Water Project.

The purpose of the dam is to augment water for Bulawayo as well as local communities and the provision of irrigation water along the route to Bulawayo.

The contract for the construction of the dam was awarded to China International and Electric Corporation by the Matabeleland Zambezi Water Trust for a bid price of US$40,898,288.77 in May 2003. The government took over the implementation of the project in 2011. The following is the work which was done by the Matabeleland Zambezi Water Trust before Government took over the project;

· The construction of the site access roads, excavations of the dam foundation and outlet works were completed,

· The plinth blinding concrete was placed in the river bed,

  • The overall dam project is 6% complete.

The State Procurement Board instructed that as part of the takeover of the project legal due diligence exercise on all contracts of the National Matabeleland Zambezi Water Project be carried out by the Attorney General. The legal due diligence was completed in 2011 and the State Procurement Board also instructed that a technical due diligence exercise of the Gwayi-Shangani Dam project be carried out by an independent engineer. A final report of the technical due diligence exercise was submitted by an independent engineer on 25 April 2012.

The legal due diligence and the technical due diligence exercises were completed as part of the process of the takeover of the project by Government. The due diligence reports are being submitted to the State Procurement Board. In fact, they have already been submitted to the State Procurement Board and a resolution has been done. This will unlock resumption of work on the project.

Financial Status

Ø The project was allocated US$4 million in the 2011 National Budget;

Ø The project was allocated US$8 million in the 2012 National Budget;

Ø The estimated cost for outstanding works on the dam is US$61 million;

Ø The estimated cost for 98km of tarred permanent access roads, four bridges, permanent houses of Water Bailiff team, dam office block, hydro-power station and pump station is US$70 million.

The contractor has now been authorized to move on to site and I believe he will be moving on to site this weekend.

WATER BILLING BY ZINWA

28. MR. MUDARIKWA asked the Minister of Water Resources Development and Management to explain why the Zimbabwe National Water Authority has a fixed charge on its billing system yet there is no constant supply of water.

THE MINISTER OF WATER RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT (MR. S. NKOMO): The fixed charge is for the cost of maintaining records of a consumer's account irrespective of the actual consumption billed to the consumer on monthly basis. It also caters for the cost of servicing the infrastructure and keeps it in a sound position so that when water is then supplied there is no disruption due to breakdowns.

It is, however, unfortunate that due to the challenges we are currently experiencing, services are not always delivered as planned resulting in unavoidable deficiencies. When a consumer has a continuous full calendar month without water, fixed charge is dropped. So, there can be no fixed charge when a consumer has not received a full supply of water for a full calendar month. If you have not received any water or you have received supply half the time of the calendar then you are charged the fixed charged, please refer the issue to ZINWA because you are not supposed to be charged if they have not supplied you fully.

The fixed charge is currently being reviewed with a view to reduce the amount if not eliminating it altogether. My thoughts are whether to reduce it or to eliminate it altogether. This is not only for ZINWA but even for other water providers elsewhere. We are reviewing the fixed charge.

MR. MUDARIKWA: The fixed charge in question amount to $34 per month and this relates to people who earn say $200. So, we are saying $34 per month is working to a dollar per day for paying for a service which is not there. ZESA has dropped completely all the fixed charges because they realized there is no point in having fixed charges when there is no fixed supply. People can not part with $34. Just for argument's sake, if ZINWA is connected to one million clients, it is going to get $34 million without delivering a drop of water. So why would ZINWA have the need to supply water to the people?

MR. S. NKOMO: I would want to receive some specific information on that. If the hon. member has got that specific case, I would be very happy to follow it up but I must say that $34 as a fixed charge sounds to me to be very excessive and I can not accept that that should be what ZINWA will do. But apart from that I have already given an undertaking that I am reviewing the issue of the fixed charge with a view of either reducing or eliminating it altogether. You have my word that I am actually reviewing that and I will be making announcements immediately after we have launched the National Water Policy on that.

MR. KANZAMA: In view of the challenges the Ministry is facing of failing to supply enough water to the nation particularly basing on the issues that councils in towns and in rural areas with ZINWA, people have resorted to drilling their boreholes but it seems like soon after the realization by the Government that many people are now drilling boreholes, you have now resorted to charging them again and register their boreholes when in actual fact they are trying to solve a problem on their own and you have resorted to charging them fees again. Why has the Government come up with such a policy?

MR. S. NKOMO: I want to thank the hon. member for that supplementary question. It gives me an opportunity to clarify. First of all, the announcement that we have made that all boreholes should be registered between 2nd May to the 30th June 2012, is actually free. You do not actually pay anything. If there are some catchments that are asking anyone to pay, that is not correct, it is illegal. They should charge nothing because the intention of the Government is actually to manage water resources whether surface or underground. So, unless we know where a hole is dug - and you know if you dig a hole here and you dig a hole next, you might find that both holes do not have enough water because they are taking water from each other.

Apart from that there is say, seismic underground compulsion that can take place if we willy-nilly drill anywhere and we have a policy that you can not drill boreholes 200 metres apart and so all we are doing just now is to ask the nation to register all boreholes. We want to know the depth of the borehole, the level of the water and the yield (how much water comes out of the borehole) and once we know that it will gives us the ability and the capacity to manage our water resources wisely in this country. So, I would urge Zimbabweans to register their boreholes.

It is not a catch at all. It is an endeavor to manage our water resources but when you have a borehole and you drill it yourself and we have also said those companies who drill boreholes can not now drill a borehole unless they are registered with us. If you call them to drill a borehole and you have no permit for it, they will not drill a borehole. So, that is very important but once you drill a borehole yourself and you have paid for it, casing and the water comes out; I just want to let the nation know that the water in the borehole is not yours. That water belongs to the state and you have to pay a levy for the water that you take out of Zimbabwe. So, I think that we are going to be launching a major programme this month to rehabilitate almost 7 500 dysfunctional boreholes and sinking 1 500. That will then help in the augmentation of the availability of water particularly in the rural areas. However, in the towns, you must accept honourable member that since 2009 the water supply in the towns and cities has improved. I think that you must give us credit for making water available not necessarily every time, not necessarily everyday but some water to the nation. I thank you for asking that question - [HON. MEMBERS: But there is no water in our houses] -

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order, order honourable members.

OPERATIONS OF MPANDAWANA POST OFFICE

20. MR. MARAMWIDZE asked the Minister of Finance to explain to the House why pensioners who get their pay at Mpandawana Post Office are offered a fraction of their salaries instead of the whole amount and have to travel to Masvingo POSB for the rest of the amount.

THE MINISTER OF CONSTITUTINAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (ADV. MATINENGA) on behalf of THE MINISTER OF FINANCE (MR. BITI): The Post Office Savings Bank (POSB) operates through agencies in addition to their own branches. Currently they operate through 180 agencies which are mainly Post Offices.

Pensioners can get their payments from all the agencies up to a maximum of US$100, an amount which was deemed to be the average pension payments.

Where there are POS machines such as at Mpandawana, pensioners can withdraw up to a maximum US$1000. This can be done even if a pensioner does not have a pin card (ATM card). The pensioner punches in their account number and they are given their money.

Follow up is being made with Mpandawana Post Office on why pensioners are being given part payments when there is a POS machine where pensioners can access a maximum of US$ 1 000.

POLICY REGARDING THE PROVISION OF FOOD TO FAMILIES RESIDING IN MINING AREAS

30. MR. NYAUDE asked the Minister of Labour and Social Services to explain the Ministry's policy regarding the provisions of food and other welfare assistance to families residing in mining areas where operations have been suspended, for example Bindura Nickel Corporation at Tojan, Shangani in Bulawayo and Mwana Africa at Freda Rebecca Mine.

THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MRS. MAKONE) on behalf of THE MINISTER OF LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE (MS. MPARIWA): The social protection programmes that are run by the ministry have a national coverage and do not exclude anyone based on area of residence as long as they are eligible for assistance based on set parameters. The eligibility criteria has been put in place realising that with the limited resources at hand, the ministry will not be able to assist everyone but the most needy cases so that such households do not suffer irreversible welfare losses and live a dignified standard of living. Key programmes which are available to all communities are:

1. Basic Education Assistance Module Programme (BEAM)

The BEAM programme is one of the most successful programmes

in Zimbabwe and in the SADC region. It provides education to orphans and vulnerable children with access to school fees and examination fees. This year, the programme has a budget of $26 million both from government and donors and is set to assist 780 thousand children in Primary and Secondary Schools.

2. Food Deficit Mitigation through Public Works Programme

Another major programme that is implemented through the

Ministry of Labour and Social Services is the Food Deficit Mitigation Programme. The programme was designed to assist food insecure household with to food through distribution of 50kg bags of grain and US$10 per household per month.

3. Harmonised Social Cash Transfers

This programme is currently being administered in 10 districts,

one district per province. It will expand to cover 10 more districts this year until all districts are covered. The programme provides a monthly cash allowance to labour constrained households that include older persons, persons with disabilities, child headed households and households with a huge orphan care burden.

In all other districts, the ministry is still running the public assistance programme which targets the same category of households though targeting mechanisms are different. For the public assistance, individuals who feel that they qualify for the programme should approach the social services offices for means testing before they are enrolled into the programme.

Apart from cash transfers, a special attention has been given to the elderly and persons with disabilities.

  • The elderly:

The ministry also supported 1 166 elderly persons with

monthly maintenance allowances. At the same time, administrative grants were paid to 15 institutions caring for the elderly.

  • Persons living with disabilities

The ministry also supported persons with disabilities access

assistive technologies and also provide them with vocational training to acquire life skills.

4. Another major programme that is administered by the ministry

is health assistance. This programme gives support to indigent person so that they can access health referral system with bills accruing being paid by the ministry.

All these programmes are available in all districts and I would urge individuals who fall within the mentioned categories to approach the nearest social services office and seek assistance.

RESOLUTION OF LABOUR ISSUES AT TROJAN NICKEL CORPORATION

31. MR NYAUDE asked the Minister of Labour and Social Services to inform the House of its plans to resolve pending labour issues at Trojan Nickel Corporation and Mwana Africa as this has resulted in more than 4000 families suffering from a wide range of social ills especially food shortages.

THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MRS. MAKONE) on behalf of THE MINISTER OF LABOUR AND SOCIAL SERVICES (MS. MPARIWA): I would like to thank the hon. Member of Parliament for asking the question. Bindura Nickel Corporation applied to the Ministry of Labour and Social Services to retrench 1080 ordinary employees and managers. The Ministry, in consultation with stakeholders, has since determined the case. It was noted that Trojan, Shangani mines and the Nickel Refinery have been under care and maintenance since 2008.

With this in mind, the Ministry approved the retrenchment of the employees. The employees are to be retrenched in batches as the employer raises funding for the packages. The retrenchment packages are to be paid in cash and it is the Ministry's hope that the mines and the refinery will start operating soon. Thank you again hon. member for asking this question.

PRICE OF COTTON

34. MR. CROSS asked the Minister of Agriculture Mechanisation and irrigation Development to explain to the house measures that the Ministry has put in place to ensure that the price of cotton is at least more than 25 cents a kilogramme for the cotton deliveries currently offered by ginners this season.

THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, MECHANISATION AND IRRIGATION DEVELOPMENT (DR. MADE): I can only say that the Minister is seized with the issue and it is under consideration. An announcement of measures that will be put in place will be made soon. I thank you.

51% INDIGENISATION POLICY ON FOREIGN OWNED COMPANIES

35. MR. MARAMWIDZE asked the Minister of Youth Development and Indigenisation to inform the House whether the small scale industries owned by Nigerians and Chinese are included in the 51% Indigenisation policy on foreign owned companies considering that the majority of Zimbabweans cannot afford to buy the shares from big corporations.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF YOUTH DEVELOPMENT AND INDIGENISATION (MR. MATUTU): The Indigenisation and Economic Empowerment Act [Chapter 14:33] does not distinguish between types of businesses that must comply with the 51% indigenous shareholding requirement. Section 3(1)(a) of the Indigenisation and Economic Empowerment Act [Chapter 14:33] requires all businesses operating in the country to comply with the 51% indigenous shareholding requirement.

The Indigenisation and Economic (General) regulations 2010, as amended stipulate that companies whose net asset values are US$500,000.00 or above should comply with the 51% indigenous shareholding requirement. These regulations go on to make sector specific notices which may vary the net asset value for each sector. The mining and manufacturing sectors have had their sector specific frameworks published with net asset value thresholds of US$1 and US$100,000.00 respectively. The following conclusions can be drawn from the above:

· All businesses operating in the mining sector must comply with the 51% indigenous shareholding requirement.

· Businesses operating in the manufacturing sector with a net asset value of US100, 000.00 and above should comply with the 51% indigenous shareholding requirement.

· Businesses in all other sectors with net asset values which fall below the US$500,000.00 threshold will comply with the 51% indigenous shareholding requirement when the sector specific frameworks for the other sectors are published.

Section 9, of the Indigenisation and Economic Empowerment (General) Regulations of 2010, as amended, deals with the reserved sectors; some businesses operated by Nigerians, Chinese and other non indigenous investors are covered by this section. The Ministry noticed that Section 9 did not adequately cover or protect indigenous players operating in the reserved sectors as it is only forward looking. The Ministry then decided to come up with a legal instrument to rectify this anomaly. The reserved sectors are as follows:

· Agriculture primary production of food and cash crops.

· Transportation passenger buses, taxes and car hire services.

· Retail and wholesale trade.

· Barber shops, hairdressing and beauty salons.

· Employment agencies

· Estate agencies

· Valet services

· Grain milling

  • Bakeries

· Tobacco grading and packaging

· Tobacco processing

· Advertising agencies

· Milk processing

· Provision of local arts and craft, marketing and distribution.

Once the National Indigenisation and Economic Empowerment Fund is capitalized, the majority of indigenous Zimbabweans will be able to buy shares as the fund has the statutory responsibility to warehouse shares and finance indigenisation and economic empowerment transactions with a view to ensure broad based participation by the broad spectrum of indigenous Zimbabweans. The Indigenisation and Economic Empowerment Act [Chapter 14:33] allows Government to come up with programmes specifically targeted at the youth, women and disabled. It is hoped that once the Fund is adequately capitalized, such programmes will be designed by the National Indigenisation and economic Empowerment Fund. I thank you.

ENGAGEMENT OF SPORTS PERSONS IN ALL DISCIPLINES

36. MR. CHITANDO asked the Minister of Education, Sport, Arts and Culture to explain to the House:

a) The Ministry's Policy regarding the engagement of sports persons in all disciplines who are in the diaspora to represent Zimbabwe.

b) Whether the Ministry has an accurate database of soccer players who are playing in foreign leagues.

THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, SPORT, ARTS AND CULTURE (SENATOR COTART): Mr. Speaker, sport in Zimbabwe is primarily arranged in clubs for specific sporting disciplines and these disciplines, in terms of the law are organized under International Sports Associations. In Zimbabwe there are forty-eight national sports associations registered with the Sports Recreation Commission, which are in turn affiliated to the Zimbabwe Olympic Committee and the respective International Federations such as FIFA and the International Cricket Council. It is that arrangement which governs how sports persons in all disciplines are able to represent their respective countries.

In terms of sport and competition rules and regulations worldwide, only a citizen of a country can represent his or her country provided that athlete is a registered member of the particular national sports association. In a particular case for example, a member of ZIFA or Zimbabwe cricket cannot represent another country if they are part of ZIFA or Zimbabwe Cricket. That is also to say that athletes from their own arrangement are denied from playing sport whilst in the diaspora, and even to play in the diaspora, they must regularise their membership with their own country's National Sports Associations. To turn to the matter of the question Zimbabweans who reside in the diaspora and are Zimbabwean passport holders and are also registered members of Zimbabwean National Sports Associations are eligible for selection to represent a country. According to the SRC Act Chapter 25:15 of 1991 as revised in 1996 and S.I. promulgated in 1995. Athletes who are Zimbabweans residing in the diaspora and who have not been registered with Zimbabwe National Sports Association are entitled to regularise their membership with NSAs and they can be eligible to be released to represent players for Zimbabwe. This is an arrangement which is coming throughout the world and is acceptable at international levels.

Turning to the second aspect of the question on whether the Ministry has an accurate data base of soccer players. It is the responsibility of the National Sports Associations and in particular ZIFA to keep a database of their own members who are playing outside the country. The Ministry itself does not have a database of players but it encourages respective sports associations to develop such data bases. I thank you.

TARRING OF BINGA KAROI ROAD

37. MR P.N. SIBANDA asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to inform the House;

(a) the criteria for the selection of major roads to be tarred and upgraded considering that Binga-Karoi road, has not been given attention by the ministry and since Zimbabwe is hosting the UNWTO conference the Harare to Victoria Falls via this route could be cheaper and shorter.

SENATOR COLTART: I am sorry Hon. Speaker, my answers are on one sheet and I will hand them all in together if that is acceptable.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Sorry Hon. Minister, I am following the Order Paper and question number 37 is for the Minister of Transport.

THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (MR. MUSHOHWE): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir,the Hon. Member Mr. P.N.Sibanda wants me to inform the House on what criteria is used for selection of major roads to be tarred and upgraded considering that Binga-Karoi road has not been given attention by the Ministry and since Zimbabwe is hosting the UNWTO conference, the Harare to Victoria Falls via this route could be cheaper and shorter.

Mr. Speaker Sir, the criteria used to upgrade major roads certain standards obtain, which include traffic levels - existing and forecast, as well as the need to connect places of economic activities such as agriculture, tourism, mining etc.

In the case of the road in question, the Ministry of Finance has not been able to provide funding for its upgrading to safest standards. Mr. Speaker Sir, we are as a Ministry in agreement with the hon. member that the upgrading of the Karoi-Binga road provides a shorter route from Harare to Victoria Falls. It is for that reason that my department of roads has started upgrading this road. The construction of the work was suspended at the 51km peg in 2004 due to the unavailability of funding. As soon as funding is availed, work will resume.

However, hon. members may wish to note that the gravel section of the road is being attended to under the Rural Road Regrading Programme currently on-going. Currently we have gone beyond the 90km peg. I thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.

CLOSURE OF NYAMAKATE SECONDARY SCHOOL

38. MR CHITANDO asked the Minister of Education, Arts, Sport and Culture to explain to the House the circumstances which led to the temporary closure of Nyamakate Secondary School in Karoi and the action taken by the Ministry to protect the teachers affected.

THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, SPORT, ARTS AND CULTURE (SENATOR COLTART): Thank you Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, to the best of my knowledge there has not been a temporary closure at Nyamakate Secondary School in accordance with the question posed but what I am aware of is the temporary closure of Nyamakate Primary School in Hurungwe District, Mashonaland West which I believe the hon. member is probably referring to and so I will address the question making that assumption that it is the primary school.

The closure took place for one day on the 17th of January 2012 and then on another day on the 8th of May 2012 during the first and second terms respectively.

Relations between two teachers Ms. Farai Kaitano EC No. 0815521K and Simon Mupfurutsa EC No. 0856402W and the community of Nyamakate Primary School soured in 2009 when allegedly these two teachers taught two Grade 7 classes at the school. What I am informed Mr. Speaker is that the two teachers in question requested to teach during school holidays and requested parents to pay them an incentive for extra work. The parents agreed and made the payments but when the Grade 7 papers were written and the results published, both classes I am told scored zero percent pass rate. This angered the parents leading to a serious deterioration in relations.

On the 16th of January 2012, there was an AGM at the school parents' assembly. The School Head, I am informed had discussed with the teachers that they would all be introduced to the parents after they would meet the respective classes since the lessons were ongoing. However, Kaitano and Mupfurutsa rejoined the AGM and I am informed that the former began recording the proceedings on his mobile phone. Parents were angered and they abandoned the meeting. Parents then withdrew their children from the school on the 17th of January and said lessons could only be resumed after the two teachers were transferred from the school. As a result a report was made at the District Education Officer and the District Education Officers visited the school immediately and lessons resumed the next day.

As a result of this Kaitano and Mupfurutsa had charges preferred against them and they were suspended for three months. However, these teachers appealed to the Head of the Ministry and the charges were withdrawn on technical grounds and the suspension was lifted.

When the two teachers resumed duty on the opening day on the 8th of May 2012, parents were outraged and again protested. They locked the Head's offices as well as the classrooms demanding that the two teachers should leave the school. A team of Head Office and Provincial Office was dispatched and arrived the same day and convinced the parents that the lessons should resume whilst officials were given an opportunity to address the grievances and lessons resumed the following day.

Meanwhile the two teachers have been suspended again on the 30th of May 2012 to facilitate investigations which are ongoing. I would like to commend the parents for not issuing any physical threats to the teachers and I want to assure them that the due process of law will be followed in the best interest of the children at the school. I thank you.

VACANT TEACHING POSTS IN MASVINGO PROVINCE

39. MR. CHITANDO asked the Minister of Education, Sport, Arts and Culture to inform the House on the following:

(a) the number of vacant teaching posts in Masvingo Province, District by District.

(b) the number of those in acting capacity in the Province, District by District.

(c) the Ministry's Policy regarding filling of vacant teaching posts.

THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, SPORT, ARTS AND CULTURE (SENATOR COLTART): Thank you Mr. Speaker,the Hon. Member wishes to know the number of vacant teaching posts in Masvingo Province in each district. I am pleased to inform the hon. member and the august House of the following breakdown of the vacant teaching posts in Masvingo Province by District.

 

TEACHING VACANCIES

D/HEAD

HEAD

District

PRY

ECD

SEC

PRY

SEC

PRY

SEC

Bikita

0

94

42

39

18

37

12

Chiredzi

21

200

12

64

12

42

11

Chivi

0

95

22

64

21

39

15

Gutu

0

153

44

79

38

80

16

Masvingo

0

12

9

34

39

47

13

Mwenezi

32

69

37

7

3

22

15

Zaka

0

109

26

37

29

48

12

Total

53

732

192

324

160

315

94

Mr. Speaker Sir, the hon. member requests for the number of those in Acting capacity in Masvingo Province, in each District.

The hon. member and the august House should be informed of the following Acting posts in Masvingo Province, district by district as indicated in the table below;

STATION

POST

NUMBER OF VACANCIES

Provincial Office

Provincial Education Deputy Director

2

Bikita

D/Heads Primary

39

 

D/Heads Secondary

18

 

Heads Primary

37

 

Heads Secondary

12

Chiredzi

D/Heads Primary

64

 

D/Heads Secondary

12

 

Heads Primary

42

 

Heads Secondary

11

Chivi

D/Heads Primary

64

 

D/Heads Secondary

21

 

Heads Primary

39

 

Heads Secondary

15

Gutu

D/Heads Primary

79

 

D/Heads Secondary

38

 

Heads Primary

80

 

Heads Secondary

16

Masvingo

D/Heads Primary

34

 

D/Heads Secondary

39

 

Heads Primary

47

 

Heads Secondary

13

Mwenezi

D/Heads Primary

7

 

D/Heads Secondary

3

 

Heads Primary

22

 

Heads Secondary

15

ZAKA

D/Heads Primary

37

 

D/Heads Secondary

29

 

Heads Primary

48

 

Heads Secondary

12

TOTALS

Provincial Education Deputy Director

2

 

D/Heads Primary

324

 

D/Heads Secondary

160

 

Heads Primary

315

 

Heads Secondary

94

 

GRAND TOTAL

895

Mr. Speaker Sir, the hon. member requests for information about the ministry's policy regarding filling of vacant teaching posts. I wish to inform the hon. member and the august House that the Ministry is undertaking the following measures in filling of vacant teaching posts.

i) Deployment of teachers from Colleges and Universities;

ii) Through reappointments of those who had left service;

iii) Extension of service for retirees and;

iv) Renewal of contracts for those on annually renewable contracts.

Thank you.

HOLDING OF POLITICAL MEETINGS AT SCHOOLS

40. MR. CROSS asked the Minister of Education, Sport, Arts and Culture to explain:

a) the position regarding the holding of political meetings at schools and whose responsibility it is to report damages caused by the political violence at ZANU PF meeting at Shangara Primary School in May 2012.

b) The enforcement mechanisation, the ministry is devising to make sure repairs are done.

THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION SPORT, ARTS AND CULTURE (SENATOR COLTART): It is alleged that there was violence at a ZANU PF meeting at Shangara Primary School in May 2012. Our Ministry records show that there is no school by that name in all our 10 provinces. In the light of the above, it is not possible to discuss the repair of damages. Perhaps the Hon. Member of Parliament would like to verify the correct name of the school and state possibly the province since many school names are common to district and provinces.

On the position regarding the holding of political meetings at schools and whose responsibilities it is to repair the damages caused by the political violence; In terms of Circular Number P. 7 dated 11 June 1979, Circular Number P. 53 dated February 1981 and the Ministerial Statement of 1 July 2009, schools are meant to facilitate the promotion of effective learning and teaching. To that end, School Heads should vigorously implement ministerial policy not to entertain unauthorised persons in schools. Furthermore, no partisan political paraphernalia, including documents, pamphlets and posters should be displayed in schools. No school premises are to be used by any persons, groups or organisations without permission first being obtained in writing from the Permanent Secretary in compliance with Circular P7 and P53 mentioned above.

The core business of the school is teaching and learning. The school is the knowledge site for learners and there must be minimal disruption to the activities which go on there. Ministry regulations prohibit the use of school premises to further political objectives. The prohibition against use of school premises to further political objectives is as outlined in the following text;

· The responsible authority of every school, Government or non Government shall take whatever measures necessary to prevent any part of the school premises from being used to further a political objective.

· If any part of the school premises is used to further a political objective, the head of the school shall immediately report the matter to the police and to the Secretary and to the School Development Committee.

  • Any;

- Teacher or other member of staff of a school, or member of the responsible authority of a school, who knowingly permits any part of the school premises to be used to further a political objective; or

- Head of a school, who, without just cause, fails to report to the police or to the Secretary, the use of any part of the school premises to further a political objective; person who knowingly uses any part of school premises to further a political objective; shall be guilty of an offence and liable to a fine not exceeding level five or to imprisonment for a period not exceeding six months or to both such fine and such imprisonment for a period not exceeding six months or to both such fine and such imprisonment.

Without limiting the above, any of the following activities, when conducted in or on school premises, shall be regarded as using the school premises to further a political objective -

- the holding of a meeting to express support for a candidate for election to a local authority or Parliament or to the office of President;

- the holding of a meeting at which a member of a local authority or Parliament addresses persons in order to persuade them to support a particular political party;

However, the school premises shall not be regarded as being used to further a political objective when:

- school premises are used by electoral officers for polling in an election and election agents or candidates are present at the school on polling day for the purpose of the election or

- school hostel and any of the school's facilities are hired by a political party during school holidays to accommodate members of the party who are attending a party congress.

Under the above scenarios, costs for damages to school property while using the school premises as a venue for meeting, should be met by the organisers of the meeting in line with the agreement entered into between the party and the school prior to using the school facilities.

In conclusion Mr. Speaker, we have seen that where there has been political violence and political activities in schools, there is a correlation between that and the deterioration in results. We have demonstrated and we have seen in areas where there has been a high level of political violence that often qualified teachers have left schools resulting in unqualified teachers taking over. The inevitable result is a dramatic drop in the results of children attending that school. To that extend, I trust that all hon. members will fully support these new regulations which are designed not to further the objective of any one political party but to make schools havens of peace and non political activity.

RECEIVING OF PENSIONS

41. MR. CROSS asked the Minister of Public Service to explain to the House:

a) Why pensioners are not receiving their pensions from the Central

Payments Office;

b) Indicate when the audit of the pensions data base will be

undertaken to establish the number of active pensioners who are

still eligible for a state pension;

c) To confirm the status of the findings supported by the Governments

of Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe and U.K. for the purpose of federal

pensions.

THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS on behalf of THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE: On part (a), most payments from the Consolidated Revenue Fund are currently being made through the Public Finance Management System which replaced the old system that was being used by the Central Payments office. The Central Payments office, as an office, still exists but the payment system has changed.

Pensioners are being paid through the Public Finance Management System, which is the current system being used by Government for payments from the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

On part (b), the number of active pensioners in the database is known. Statistics of these pensioners are submitted to the Ministry of Finance every month together with the pension bill.

To ensure that deceased pensioners are not paid, the Pensions Office verifies electronically on a monthly basis records in its database against records in the Registrar General's dataset. All deceased pensioners are thus removed from the database monthly, using this verification method.

In addition to the above, Pensions Office is sending out life certificates to pensioners to confirm their existence. If life certificates are not returned, pension payments are immediately suspended. In the case of pensioners resident outside Zimbabwe, all remittances were suspended and reinstatements are done only after receipt of life certificates.

On part (c), federal pensions are paid by the British Government through Crown Agents. The Government of Zimbabwe is not paying federal pensions. Therefore, Crown Agents may be in a position to confirm the current status of that fund.

MOTION

ADJOURNMENT OF THE HOUSE

THE MINISTER OF CONSTITUTIONAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS: Mr. Speaker Sir, it has been a longish afternoon, I move that the House do now adjourn.

MR. CROSS: Mr. Speaker, there are two questions that I have asked today - question number 24 and 33. Question number 23 has been directed to the Minister of Industry. I think it is three months since I saw the Minister in this House and this question has been on the Order Paper for two and a half months. I really think it is an urgent matter. It is now 15 months since the ESSAR deal was signed and I think the Minister has not been able to keep this House informed of what is happening. This is probably the biggest business deal ever conducted in Zimbabwe. The fact that it is not being implemented is affecting hundreds of thousands of people in the Midlands and thousands of workers. I would really ask that the Clerk of Parliament write to the Minister and at least ask him to afford us the privilege of a working response. On the question of…

MR. BHASIKITI-CHUMA: On a point of order………

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: What is your point of order?

MR. BHASIKITI-CHUMA: My point of order is that the hon. member could have raised that issue at the point the question was being read and now the question is, it is not that question. So he is out of order.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order not sustained. Hon Cross, can you continue?

MR. CROSS: Thank you Mr. Speaker. The second question was in connection with the forthcoming conference at the Victoria Falls. I asked the Minister of Tourism to brief the House on the status of preparations for the conference.

It is fifteen months to go to this conference. In a period of time we have to build a conference centre for 5000 people and a five star hotel. There is no way we can be ready and I will again ask the Clerk of Parliament to make relevant arrangements to make the Minister brief the House either verbally or as soon as possible or to give us a written response.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Hon. Cross, the point of order was supposed to be on the motion moving adjournment of the House. However, your point of concern has been noted and we shall ask the Minister of Constitutional and Parliamentary Affairs to reason with the Ministers so that they come and provide the answers.

THE MINISTER OF CONSTITUTIONAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS: Every right thinking person is concerned when issues are not addressed timeously. A week ago, I read out in Cabinet the number of questions which are outstanding and the Ministers who were supposed to address those questions. Yesterday, a copy of the Order Paper was circulated to each and every Minister who was in Cabinet yesterday, again to remind Ministers of their responsibilities to come and respond to questions. I can confirm that the Minister of Industry was in Cabinet yesterday and he would have been aware of his responsibility in this regard. The Minister of Hospitality and Tourism Industry was not in Cabinet and I am therefore unable to say whether he is in the country or he is elsewhere, but I take the point which is made and we will make sure that the Ministers concerned are made alive of their responsibilities.

Motion put and agreed to.

The House adjourned at a Quarter to Six O'clock p.m.

 

 

 

Wednesday, 13th June, 2012.

The House of Assembly met at a Quarter-past Two o'clock p.m.

PRAYERS

(MR. SPEAKER in the Chair)

ANNOUNCEMENT BY MR. SPEAKER

ERROR ON THE ORDER PAPER

MR. SPEAKER: Hon. members should take note of the error on page 509 of the Order Paper on the Second Reading of the National Incomes and Pricing Commission to be number 28 and the rest of the Orders be numbered accordingly.

ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

MR. CHIMHINI: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir, in the absence of the Minister of Finance, I will direct my question to the Deputy Prime Minister. - In the absence of inflows into the fiscus and the subsequent failure by the Minister of Finance to disburse funds to various ministries…-[AN HON. MEMBER: Inaudible interjections]- can you confirm that the Zimbabwean Government is broke?

MR. SPEAKER: Order! Hon. member, what is your question?

MR. CHIMHINI: Thank you Mr. Speaker. When we look at disbursements from the Ministry of Finance, at least 25 percent per quarter could have been disbursed to various ministries. What is Government policy?

THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER (PROF. MUTAMBARA: Mr. Speaker Sir, fine details can be provided by from the Minister of Finance. As a Government, we stick to our rules and regulations. I would like to say that, saying the Government is broke, is a very strong statement. We are experiencing some major challenges with respect to our public finances to the extent that we are going to have a special Cabinet meeting tomorrow to deliberate on our public finances in four areas. The first area is the issue of expenditure. How we can cut down on expenditure. Government expenses are too high and unsustainable. Secondly, it will be on how we can drive up revenue from platinum, gold, diamonds and from all the sectors of the economy. The third one is to reform our financial systems of revenue collection such as ZIMRA and procurement processes. The idea is to improve efficiency and effectiveness of revenue collection and that of our procurement processes to avoid leakages. The fourth area is about improving general economic performance and growth by improving the business climate in our country. This we seek to do by improving the attractiveness and competitiveness of our country with respect to investment.

The state of our public finances is a cause of concern to Cabinet. This is why we are going to have a special Cabinet tomorrow, Thursday at 9.00 a.m. to address the four areas I have outlined above. I would like to thank the hon. member for that question.

*MRS. ZINYEMBA: I wanted to direct my question to the Minister of Finance but since he is not present, I will direct it to the Deputy Prime Minister. The question has to do with the farmers. This year experienced drought in this country. At least two or two and a half provinces got maize yields. Therefore, farmers have withheld their yields up to 2013-2014. If they sell their yields outside, will the country have enough stocks? What is Government position on ensuring that the nation is not starved?

THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER (PROF. MUTAMBARA): Thank you very much, that is a very important question. We are trying as much as we can, in the short run, to make sure that no Zimbabwean will starve. We are identifying areas of plenty and areas of shortage so that we can get a mechanism to move grain from the former to the later. We are also pushing for a grain loan scheme which will ensure that people will be able to borrow and then pay back when they have grain. We are also expanding the programme for the vulnerable so that in cases where people have no capacity to pay back, they will have access to food. We are developing a holistic mechanism as Government to provide grain to the people.

These are just short time measures. We are looking for long time solutions. We are working towards what we call a three year rolling agricultural policy so that we plan for 2014 and 2015 now and avoid fire fighting. This policy is rooted in a 30 year vision for agriculture. A funding and financing framework corresponding to this policy will then be developed. Agriculture should be understood as a business. Government funding is not enough. What we are doing now is fire fighting. This is not right. We need planning ahead in particular, in terms of inputs and finance. Our Government should put enough money into agriculture. We are also saying agriculture is a business and we should find ways to encourage the private sector to put money into agriculture. The banks and financial institutions must support agriculture. We are working on this policy of three year rolling plan for agriculture and that policy will be backed up by a sound financing model for agriculture. This framework will be funded by Government, private sector and our international partners.

We are also learning globally from Agra, the Agriculture green revolution in Africa being spearheaded by Kofi Annan and Strive Masiiwa. We also have a programme called 'Grow Africa' which is championed by the World Economic Forum and the Africa Union. We should borrow ideas from this programme as we seek to achieve food security, self sufficiency and may be even feed other nations.

There is also another programme called 'Feed the Future'. It is a global strategy around agriculture and food security. Let us learn from it. There is also another programme called Powering Agriculture - there is a link between energy and agriculture. How do we ensure that there is enough clean energy to power agriculture so that we can do such things as irrigation? So, we are going to have short and long term measures to address the concerns of the hon. member so that we can say never again should we have fire fighting in agriculture in this country.

MR. GWIYO: My question is directed to the Minister of Constitutional and Parliamentary Affairs. Under what circumstances can a member of the Executive or the Executive take the Legislature to court and how secure is the doctrine of separation of powers, even the fact that the courts are now interfering with the matters of Parliamentary process?

MR. SPEAKER: Order.Hon Gwiyo, what is the policy aspect of the question?

MR. GWIYO: The policy question is - is the Executive or members of the Executive at liberty to take the legislature to courts?

THE MINISTER OF CONSTITUTIONAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (ADV. MATINENGA): Thank you hon. member for seeking legal advice on this issue. Mr. Speaker, I believe that Zimbabwe is a normal country and if it is a normal country, it means that anyone who is aggrieved is free to take up any grievance he or she has to the courts. Yes, there is separation of powers but at the end of the day, the conduct of any arm of Government must be in accordance with the Constitution. We cannot have a blanket position to say members of the Executive can conduct or not conduct themselves in a particular manner. Whenever an issue arises, any aggrieved party must be able to go before the courts and seek resolution of the issue. In terms of the Constitution, the courts must have the final say.

MS. A. NDHLOVU: My question is directed to the Deputy Minister of Health and Child Welfare. How is Government prepared to curb the resurfacing of Cholera outbreaks reported in Mashonaland Central and Masvingo so that we do not have a repeat of what happened in 2008?

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HEALTH AND CHILD WELFARE (DR. MOMBESHORA): Thank you very much for asking a very important question. I think all of us know that we had a serious outbreak of cholera two years ago. Currently, we do not have an outbreak of cholera but we have cases that were detected in Chiredzi. Government has a reaction team in place which was stationed at Parirenyatwa, but we have since moved it to our Headquarters at Kaguvi Building. When cases are reported, the initial response is done by local authorities or provincial teams, who then report to us. So far, everything is in control, we do not have any cases reported in the past week. We have everything in place to take care of any outbreak at the moment. I would like to mention that at the present moment that we are also worried about certain areas, especially in Harare, where there are erratic water supplies as this may lead to outbreaks of diseases.

Those are some of the things which are very important but we hope that we will be in control soon since we are working with the relevant authorities.

MR. MATIBE: Thank you Mr. Speaker. My question is directed to the Minister of Home Affairs. Is it true that every Zimbabwean motorist must pay a spot fine for a traffic offence?

THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MR. MOHADI): Thank you Mr. Speaker. It is the law of this country that if you commit an offence, you are liable to a fine. If then you have committed an offence as a motorist and then you are stopped and they find that you have breached a traffic law, you are asked to pay a spot fine. You pay on the spot - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections]-.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, order. Hon. Minister address the Chair.

MR. MOHADI: Thank you Mr. Speaker. You are supposed to pay a spot fine. If you cannot pay there, you have to fill an admission of guilty form so that you can pay later.

MR. MADZIMURE: Minister, are you saying that the police have become the arresting authority and also the same authority that judges, because when you commit an offence, you are liable to have committed the offence and you may then contest that particular charge. So, are you saying that the people of Zimbabwe have no option but simply to pay the fine?

MR. MOHADI: First and foremost, I am an honourable Minister. The stipulation to pay a fine is done by the Minister of Justice. We only implement what the Ministry of Justice has in their statutes.

MS. T. KHUMALO: Mr. Speaker, my question is still on the spot fine. Are you saying that most motorists in this country are guilty? Secondly, our understanding is that you are supposed to be innocent until you are proven guilty.

MR. MOHADI: Thank you for the question you have asked. If you commit an offence, a traffic offence and it is stipulated in the law that this offence that you have committed is such and such, then you have to pay a spot fine. - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections]-

MR. SPEAKER: Order, order! Order in the House. Hon. Minister, order. May you respond to the question and refrain from discussions with members on that side of the House.

MR. MOHADI: I thought that I had indicated in my earlier response that if you do not have the money there, you fill a form -[ MR. BITI): Inaudible interjections]-. I think the hon. Minister wants to be a back bencher. If you do not have the requisite fine, you can then fill an admission of guilty form so that you can appear in court and defend yourself.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, order.

THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER (PROF. MUTAMBARA): In support of my colleague from Cabinet, the Co-Minister of Home Affairs, I want to say to the hon. member to put that in writing so that we get a proper response. It is a very tough question so, what I want to do to help the House is to have that question put in writing. The minister will research and give a detailed answer so that we do not create unnecessary problems in the House. -[HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections]-.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, order. There is no supplementary question. The Deputy Prime Minister has indicated it is his wish that the question be put in writing in order for the Minister to give a detailed and comprehensive response to the question.

MRS. SHIRICHENA: Thank you Mr. Speaker. My question is directed to the Deputy Minister of Women's Affairs. What measures are you going to take to talk to those women who are failing to pay back loans to the Women Development Fund which date back to 2008?

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF WOMEN'S AFFAIRS, GENDER AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (MS. MAJOME): I wish to thank the hon. member for posing that question. Carefully constructed contractual arrangements are done between borrowers of the fund whereby members of the group of women borrowers proffer themselves as guarantors of each other's loan. Each member of a group binds herself jointly and individually liable for her own loan and the others. Legal proceedings will be brought against the defaulters for the recovery of the loan in order for the recovered amounts to be loaned forward to more and other deserving applicants.

MR. JEMBERE: My question is directed to the Minister of Finance. Minister, I understand that because of fiscal constraints, you ordered that Government ministries to stop recruiting new staff. Was any permission granted to the Ministry of Defence since they are recruiting?

THE MINISTER OF FINANCE (MR. BITI): Thank you very much hon. member, for that question. Hon. Speaker, it is true that there is a Treasury circular which makes it clear that all recruitment in the public service is frozen and that also includes recruitment in the other employment agencies like the Defence Forces Commission, Police Services Commission and Prisons. However, there is an exception. In exceptional circumstances, permission can be sought from Treasury to recruit employees. We have exercised our discretion in favour of the exception in respect of about 24 000 temporary teachers, so we gave an exception. We have also given an exception in respect of employees covered by the Health Services Board. I want to say to hon. members, in respect of the Health Services, there actually has been a net loss of staff of about 527 members of staff up to May 2012. However, between January and May 2012, there has been an increase, an unlawful increase of about 10 000 employees in the Public Service Commission, unsanctioned. In fact tomorrow, we have a special Cabinet meeting on the economy and this is one of the issues that will be discussed.

There are two chief culprits, the Ministry of Defence which has recruited without Treasury authority, 4 600 personnel since January 2012 and the Ministry of Home Affairs, which has recruited 1 200 personnel without Treasury approval. The net effect of this is that, it has created dislocations from a budgetary point of view. Our wage bill has increased to US$190 million at a time where we are receiving about US$230 million a month. So, over 70% of our income is going to one budget head, mainly wages. As a result, this is the multiplier effect, even soldiers who are in barracks, we have been unable to feed them. Even meeting of Government salaries, we have been unable to meet Government salaries. We have just struggled to meet Government salaries. Even this august House, we owe hotel bills in respect of MPs in excess of US$700 000 because of the non performance of the budget arising out of, among other things, these unlawful recruitments.

With the army one, I want to give further details. The lawful army budget per month is about US$15 million. In January, February, March and April, we were paying US$15 million. What happened now is that because of these 4 600 people, the institution itself, the army was now taking money meant for NSSA and ZIMRA to pay for these extra people. So we suddenly are accumulating arrears and because these soldiers had been paid, a contract had already been done between the Government and the employees, so it was fait accompli. So in May, we had to adopt the fact that the 4 600, even though illegally appointed, are now part of the workforce because they had already been paid and that is very very unfortunate.

Hon. Speaker, the money we spent is approved by Parliament through the Budget, the Consolidated Revenue Fund. So to have these unlawful expenditures which are outside Parliament, I think it is as unfortunate as it is unacceptable. I thank you Hon. Speaker.

MR. KANZAMA: In view of what you are saying, given that you had made proposals on the budget, particularly on the Blue Book, can you assure the nation that you will meet the targets that you have proposed.

MR. BITI: I am going to present the Mid Term Statement on Thursday, 12th July 2012. The leadership of Government has agreed with this. There is going to be a major revision of the Budget of US$4 billion. Part of the major revision arises out of the under performance of the revenue targets. I can tell you that between January and May 2012, we have failed to meet our revenue target by US$194 million, almost close to US$200 million. Therefore, the figure of US$4 billion is going to be revised downwards.

I also want to tell you Hon. Speaker, that the main reason why we have failed to meet our revenue target is the gross under performance of diamond revenue. Between January to May, we have only received US$30 million, when we were supposed to receive about US$240 million. So as a result of that, we are going to revise the budget downward. As a result of the drought we had, the drought we had has resulted in us losing 33% of our projected maize output. So, where we were targeting around 1.4 million metric tonnes, we are going to harvest about 900 000 metric tonnes. So, agricultural growth this year will be about -5%. In tobacco, our target was 150 million kgs that have been reduced to 130 million kilogrammes. So, as a result of the shrinkage in agricultural output, we are also going to revise downward our GDP figures, we have got the figures, but wait until the 12th of July 2012, and I will tell you the figures, and it is a reduction by a factor of more than 3%.

So to summarise Hon. Kanzama, the economy, in the first five months of the year, has been in comatose and we have to take drastic measures starting with the meeting that is going to take place tomorrow to ensure that we redirect the economy on the growth path. There will be austerity, there will be living within our means, there will be expenditure retrenchment and there will be selling of silverware, there will be reform of the mining sector, there will be reform of the supply side of the economy and tomorrow we are going to have an intense discussion. Thank you.

MRS. CHADEROPA: My question is directed to the Deputy Minister of Health. Is he aware that there are some major hospitals which cover big areas, which do not have doctors? At Sanyati Hospital, there is an erratic supply of electricity and it is affecting especially the maternity ward. Is he aware of the shortages of electricity?

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HEALTH AND CHILD WELFARE (DR. MOMBESHORA): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. Firstly, I would like to admit that we are aware that there are some hospitals with no doctors but we cannot actually say there are no doctors, but there is a shortage of doctors. This is very difficult for us because the doctors are few. We hope that as time goes on and as we are training them, we will have enough doctors in a few years to come. We are working flat out to ensure that after houseman-ship, we deploy them to hospitals outside towns which are the most affected. We have around 57 hospitals countrywide and we are producing around 100 doctors per year. So we are hoping a few will remain in town and the rest will be deployed in the rural areas. If we can only look after our doctors well, then we can curb the brain drain, but as long as we do not pay them well, they will leave us after their bonding, for they also need a good living.

What we have talked about Mr. Speaker is so painful to us as the Ministry of Health, because this is beyond our control. The shortage of electricity is a national problem; it is also affecting industries and farmers as well. Our wish is that all the hospitals could acquire generators which are not only used when there is no electricity but in areas like theatres and labour wards so that no operations will be done in darkness. Most of our hospitals are equipped with generators but the problem that we are facing are fuel shortages. So, we are aware of the challenges and we hope that in the future we will be able to rectify the problems. Thank you.

MR. NCUBE: Is it lawful for the police not to place the "Police Ahead Sign"?

THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MR. MOHADI): It is not lawful, not to place the police ahead sign.

MR. CHIMBETETE: Mr. Speaker Sir, my quest ion is directed to the Minister of Water Resources and Development. Minister, may I know the reason why Nyanga residents pay their water bill to ZINWA when ZINWA should only be paid for bulky water and residents should pay to the Nyanga District Council for its own development? Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: Order hon. member, that is not a policy question. This segment is specifically for policy questions.

MR. MATONGA: Thank you Mr. Speaker. My question is directed to the Minister of Education, Sport, Arts and Culture. Zimbabwe lost to little Burundi 2-1, about a month ago. We lost to Guinea at home, we drew against Mozambique. ZIFA does not have a permanent coach and a sponsor, coaches have not been paid, and we have also seen the harassment of our footballers, Knowledge Musona and Kalulu by ZIFA. I would like the Minister to explain to the House what is happening with ZIFA because sport is very important and you have seen the participation of members of this House being curtain raisers for international matches.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, order. Because of the importance of this particular question to do with the National Team, the Minister may respond to those issues.

THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, SPORT, ARTS AND CULTURE (SENATOR COLTART): Thank you Mr. Speaker, this is a very important question. I am sure it is on the lips of many hon. members. I think in many respects, football is a demonstration of Zimbabwean culture in microcosm, in that we have such enormous potential as a nation and yet for many, many years we have not realized that potential. I think it is true to say that football in our nation has been poisoned and it has not happened overnight. It seems to me that the root of the problem is the fact that we have lost our passion, we have lost a sense of patriotism in Zimbabwe football. We put so many other things ahead of Zimbabwe. I think many of us have to answer this question, what comes first? Should Zimbabwe come first or should ZANU PF come first? Should Zimbabwe come first or should the MDC come first? Tragically, we all need a sense of introspection and the same applies to Zimbabwe football. We are not going to achieve what we should in football until we address this question regarding patriotism and where our priorities lie.

Mr. Speaker Sir, it seems to me that there are four things that need to happen in football. The first is that we need to respect the rule of law in football. We need to respect the laws of Zimbabwe and the FIFA statutes in football. To that extent, I absolutely support ZIFA's goal of trying to cleanse the sport. But the only concern that I have regarding ZIFA's investigations, is that justice delayed is justice denied and we have many players and many coaches who do not know where they stand. Whilst I encourage ZIFA to proceed with these investigations, they must do so with greater haste so that we all, as a nation, know where we stand regarding particular players and particular coaches. If we find that particular players and coaches are involved in match fixing, clearly they have no role to play in future in Zimbabwean football. To this extent, we need the cooperation of the Police and the Attorney General. I am not going to delve into matters which are before the courts but suffice it to say that I was concerned about charges being dropped recently so quickly without adequate information being forwarded to me why they had to be dropped. I certainly, as Minister, have no explanation why some of these charges have been dropped. But Mr. Speaker, this is the first point, we need to respect the rule of law in football - [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear] - if we do not cleanse this mess, the rot will remain.

Secondly, we need great wisdom in handling both coaches and players. If you look at a team like Manchester United, and I am not a Manchester United fan, but I have to respect Alec Ferguson's handling of players for many years and I think that is why he has built up a strong team. He demonstrates great wisdom in handling his fellow coaches, his subordinates and most importantly his players. This does not just apply to football, it applies to other disciplines. If we take for example cricket and the handling of Vusi Sibanda last year, that was not handled properly - that we took a highly talented player, Vusi Sibanda and treated him in a way that prevented him from going to New Zealand and this had disastrous consequences for the team.

Mr. Speaker, even today if you look in today's papers, you have someone like Knowledge Musona, being treated poorly in the front page of our newspapers. That is not a way to treat a young player, a player who is highly talented. He may have done something silly by having lunch yesterday with the disreputable character, I do not know what the facts are but what I do know is that his name should not be in the press today. If we are treating our players well, we need to speak to them one to one basis, understand the correct facts and explanation before we rush to the press. Tied to that is that chopping and changing of coaches. We need to stick with players and stick with coaches who have a commendable track record. The second point is simply that we need wisdom in handling our subordinates and players, we need to demonstrate that we respect them. We must start nurturing players and coaches if we are going to get much better results in the field.

The third point and in this regard, I want to make is a point made by coach Mr. Gumbo, that there is far too much politics in Zimbabwe football and this has been a problem in our football for many years - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections] ….

MR. SPEAKER: Order, order, hon. members. Hon. Minister continue.

SENATOR COLTART: Obviously if we are to take this to heart, we will not perform well on the football field until we achieve removing politics from sport. All political parties must just stand back from ZIFA and then I think we will start to see better performance.

The fourth point is clearly the need within ZIFA, for more transparency and accountability. I want to give the current ZIFA Board the opportunity to demonstrate a commitment to achieving this. They have taken measures to address this corruption and they must be encouraged to see that process through. But there is much that ZIFA has to work on. When these four unique principles are honoured, I have absolutely no doubt that we will start performing better on the field.

MS. A. NDHLOVU: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir, based on the importance of sport, as raised by the Minister, may you please tell us Government policy with regards to the professionalisation of sport as a career.

SENATOR COLTART: Mr. Speaker, this question actually requires a very detailed response which I am sure hon. members do not have the patience for today.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, hon. Minister, take your time, respond to it.

SENATOR COLTART: Mr. Speaker, at its core, the professionalisation of sport is dependent of the revitalisation of the economy. Any country which has a disastrous economy and companies which are not making profits, companies which do not have large marketing budgets witness under performance of sport. So, we need to focus on creating a conducive environment that is going to ensure that the companies make profits and can then put those profits into sport.

The second thing that we need is apply the four points that I have referred to earlier today regarding ZIFA to professionalism in sport. We need to ensure that rule of law is always respected; we need to clean up sports administrations to make sure that they are not governed by politics or politicians or subverted by corruption and we also need to have an objective means of identifying and nurturing players.

Let me, in conclusion, just use one sport as an example of what we have to do and that concerns the sport of rugby. If one analyses rugby in Zimbabwe, we will observe for example, the Prince Edward Festival held every April. That Festival demonstrates that we are one of the strongest nations in terms of school boy rugby in the world, but we have never been, most certainly not in the last twenty years or so, a world power at senior level. We have not been able to convert that strength in rugby at school boy level into a professional adult game as we see in South Africa and elsewhere. The reason for that is because we are unable to retain that talent and that is why we lose that talent - people like, 'the Beast' Tendai Mtawarira who has gone to South Africa because he never was able to play the game professionally in our country.

The reason he was unable to play rugby professionally here is because rugby as an institution, it is under-funded. There are no big commercial sponsors that can make the Rugby Union of Zimbabwe viable from a financial perspective. So, you will see, hon. member, that the professionalism in sport is very closely linked to the overall economy. Thank you.

+ MR. R. MOYO: Thank you Mr. Speaker. My question is directed to the Minister of Water, I would like the Minister to inform this House as to how they will avail water to Bulawayo as there is only two months supply of water left?

+THE MINISTER OF WATER RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT (MR. S. NKOMO): Thank you Hon. Speaker. I would like to thank Hon. Moyo for his question on the water situation in Bulawayo. Efforts that are in place are first, to complete the pipes from Mtshabezi to Mzingwane Dam as I said earlier, the laying of pipes is complete, the pump house is complete. What is left is the installation of the pumps and motors in the pump house. As for the power line, the State Procurement Board has awarded the tender and they have started installing polls for the power line. I believe that by the end of this month or mid next month, we will be pumping water from Mtshabezi into Mzingwane to Ncema.

Efforts are being made again to put a pipeline from Insiza to Ncema. There is 85% water in Insiza, so there is plenty of water but the pipe is small, so it can only disperse small amounts of water for treatment. So, if we install a duplicate pipeline, a large amount of water will then be distributed to Bulawayo, but the challenge is that we do not have money to install the duplicate pipe line. Efforts are being made by the Government and the Bulawayo City Council to avail the money, maybe fromthe Africa Development Bank or the Development Bank of South Africa.

I had a meeting today on the issue, if things go well, I will talk to Minister Biti. Oh, he has gone, I will talk to him so that maybe we could get the money from those banks. I appreciate Hon. Speaker that Bulawayo is actually in a critical situation in terms of water supply and if nothing is done and we do not connect Mtshabezi as quickly as possible, that city will be without water in the next two months and so we as Government, doing everything possible to make sure that water is available to the City of Bulawayo by connecting the pipe line from Mtshabezi. I thank you Hon. Speaker.

+MR. F. M. SIBANDA: I would like to congratulate the Hon. Minister for going to China because now we will get water from Kariba. Is there a policy that when Engineers fail to do their work, they blame it on mermaids/njuzu, spiritualism? How is science connected to superstition? I would like the Minister to explain that policy because we do not want a repeat of the Chinhoyi diesel story because that story was embarrassing for the whole nation. What is Government policy on that? I thank you.

MR. S. NKOMO: Thank you very much Hon. Speaker. I would like to thank Hon. Sibanda for that supplementary question. I want to state here and state very clearly that first of all, I do not and I have said this again; I do not believe in that, I do not believe in njuzu you are talking about - I do not believe in them but let me say this, that the Hon. House will agree that whether the Minister likes it or not, it is not the issue. The dam in Gokwe had difficulty for my engineers pumping water into that town. That is the fact. Open the engine, the engine will actually break and the people finally refused to operate that because some of them were pelted by stones and injured.

Therefore, the matter was then referred to the traditional leadership and then the traditional leaders indicated that they needed some certain resource supplies for them to actually appease those spirits. The Hon. Member of Parliament for that area is here. Four chiefs went to that dam and they did not want any of our officials, any from the council and even the Hon. Member of Parliament was not supposed to be there, only four chiefs in the region were there. They slept there and the following morning they called our staff and said switch on the engines and it worked. It does not matter Mr. Speaker, whether I believe in it or I do not believe in it. Therefore, to me, upfront I do not believe in those things but those who believe in them, I have a respect for them. I have to respect those human beings who believe in that thing. The chiefs there believe in it and they actually did that and all I am interested in, is the water supply deliverance to our citizens. If the devils can come and provide water, I will not be bothered by it.

Oral Answers to Questions without notice interrupted by MR. SPEAKER in terms of Standing Order No.34.

ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS WITH NOTICE

INCREASE IN RATE OF RAIDS ON LIVE STOCK

1. MR. BALOYI asked the Co-Ministers of Home Affairs to state:

(i) the measures the Ministry is taking to curb the increasing rate of raids on livestock along the Sango and Chikwalakwala border line in Chiredzi; and

(ii) the Ministry's plans in finding a lasting solution to cross border cattle rustling in the Sengwe and Matibi II communal lands.

THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MRS. T. MAKONE): I would like to thank the hon. member for raising the question I am going to respond to. The Ministry has put in place measures to curb stock theft in the country as a whole and more so on the country's borders including Sango and Chikwalakwala.

The Zimbabwe Republic Police carries out regular patrols along the border using arctic cat four wheeled bikes as well as two wheeled bikes. In the less accessible areas, the ZRP has deployed Police Patrols on horse back assisted by armed support unit.

The Zimbabwe Republic Police together with other stakeholders, such as local authorities, have established anti-stock theft committees to embark on extensive awareness campaigns to conscientise communities of the need to account for their livestock on a daily basis. This accounting for livestock on a daily basisenables speedy detection and tracking of any livestock that would have been stolen or gone astray.

Communities are also being encouraged to brand their cattle for easy of identification as the brands are recognised by all countries in the Southern Region of Africa through their various registrars of brands. This so far has indeed been a successful exercise as the majority of the populace is adopting the idea.

In order to recover livestock outside our borders, the ZRP holds bilateral meetings with neighbouring countries. The bilateral meetings enable cooperation and have made it possible to intercept and recover livestock. The bilateral meetings are also held every month and provide a platform to develop a joint effort to curb stock theft between Zimbabwe and neighbouring countries.

ii. The Ministry's plans in finding a lasting solution to cross border cattle rustling have already been alluded to in my response to the first question from the hon. MP. However, I would like to reiterate that the efforts that the Ministry, through the ZRP has put in place, are there to ensure that we nip the problem of stock theft in the bud. The efforts begin locally with empowering livestock owners with the necessary information such as hints and tips on how to safeguard their livestock, to the procedures they need to follow in the event that their livestock is stolen or has gone astray. Regionally and internationally, we are an active participant in the well co-ordinated stock theft management system of Interpol and SARPCCO.

DISRUPTION OF APPROVED PUBLIC GATHERINGS

2. MR. SULULU asked the Co-Ministers of Home Affairs to explain to the House the action that has been taken by the police to arrest violent and rowdy people who disrupted the following approved public gatherings;

a) the meeting addressed by the United States Ambassador Charles Ray on 20th July 2011 in Kwekwe, where youths, journalists and the public were assaulted in full view of the police force;

b) the public hearing in the Government Caucus on the Human Rights Commission Bill on 23rd July 2011, where some Members of Parliament, journalists and the public were assaulted again, in full view of the police force;

c) the measures the Ministry has put in place to avoid such embarrassing actions from recurring.

THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MRS. T. MAKONE): I know that this question has been awaited by the House for a long time and the reason for not coming back on time is not because there was no willingness to answer this question but because it is a very difficult one for the ZRP to answer and we have had various meetings concerning this particular question which culminated in a meeting in our offices with the Commissioner General. So, I will answer it as much as I can and hopefully the members will be satisfied with the response that we have finally brought to the House. I want to thank the hon. member for the question.

For the purpose of my answer, I shall put the first two together, firstly, because they were committed so close to each other on the 20th and 23 rd July 2011 and they both point to the action or inaction of the ZRP. So I shall treat them as one for the purpose of this answer.

Mr. Speaker Sir, there has been increased number of complaints against the actions or inactions of the ZRP from members of the public, civic society, non-governmental organisations, Cabinet Ministers and now from members of the legislature. Rightly, the ZRP prides itself of its high level of professionalism and there are many instances of professionalism that we can point towards and we all know how they can quell violence where it rears its ugly head. We also know where they can forestall violence before it even occurs. Unfortunately, lately there has been an increase in the crescendo of complaints against the same ZRP. The successes in the reduction of hijackings, high mortalities on our roads and other crimes are being dented by the fast disappearance of trust in the force by those that they purport to serve, which is the Zimbabwean public. In particular, complaints by the travelling public, both passengers and drivers, organisers of civic meetings as well as private functions at private properties.

The question that was asked here should not be treated in isolation, because all the complaints are centred around the commission or omission of action by the ZRP. The law is very clear on public gatherings. The ZRP, in terms of the Public Order and Security Act, when an application is made to a regulating authority of an area, in this case, the Officer Commanding the District, the ZRP is required by law to safeguard those people that they would have recognised as being the lawful gatherers. Once clearance has been granted, the police must provide the necessary number of officers to ensure that peace prevails. If people are assaulted at such gatherings, police should move swiftly to quell the violence by apprehending those seeking to disturb an approved gathering. It is wrong for the police to stand by while an offence is being committed, but let me assure the hon. member that, ZRP is not shy to deal with errant members who are reported as having been negligent and complicit with wrongdoers.

May all hon. members be advised to educate their constituents on the need to make prompt reports where there is an act of commission or omission by the ZRP. It would be a sad day for Zimbabwe if the public lost faith and trust in the operations of the police in maintaining law and order. During and after-gatherings of this nature, the police are expected to always put in place mechanisms that will see order prevailing.

In the case of the incident of 23 July 2011, I have no excuse to profer except to apologise to the hon. members for the gross dereliction of duty by members of the force on duty on that day. I can only assume that they were equally taken by surprise and were outnumbered by the unruly mob. Mr. Speaker Sir, I want to assure hon. members that such an event will never occur again in the hallowed chambers, where elected representatives of the people should enjoy privileges and immunity according to the laws of this country. I am assured by the police that there will be zero tolerance of any kind of violence, be it criminally or politically motivated anywhere in Zimbabwe, and especially in the House, where the laws of Zimbabwe are made. Once again, Mr. Speaker, as the Minister of Home Affairs, I want to apologise to this House for the failure by the police to protect the hon. Legislators and journalists on the 23 rd of July 2011, when they were assaulted during the public hearing at the Government Caucus on the Human Rights Commission Bill. Thank you.

INCIDENT INVOLVING BORDER JUMBERS IN CHIKWALAKWALA

3. MR. BALOYI asked the Co-Ministers of Home Affairs;

a) whether they are aware of the incident involving ZRP details that resulted in the death of a border jumper at the Bubi River Bank in Chikwalakwala; and to;

b) explain what measures have been taken to bring the culprits to book to prevent recurrence of such incidents.

THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MRS. MAKONE): Mr. Speaker Sir, I would like to thank the hon. member for raising the questions. The Ministry is aware of the circumstances pertaining to the death of Mathias Mashaya of Machopa village under Chief Mupungu in Chipinge in March 2012. The death of Mathias was dealt with in terms of the law pursuant to such cases. However, allegations of improper performance of duty by one police officer raised by the hon. member are true and indeed action was taken against the police officer.

Facts of the matter are that, the now deceased was part of a 14-member group of suspected border jumpers who were crossing Bubi River Bridge at around 2100 hours on their way to South Africa through an illegal entry point. Whilst crossing the bridge, the suspected border jumpers saw two men approaching them from behind.

Suspecting that the men could be members of the army who are deployed at the bridge, the group made their escape but Mathias fell off the bridge into the river where he hit a rock and died instantly. One of the group members realized that one of them had slipped into the bridge. He advised others and they returned to make out what had transpired. As they searched for the deceased, a police officer based at ZRP Davata arrived in a South African registered car whereupon the suspected border jumpers asked for help. The police officer instead arrested the suspected border jumpers. Admittedly, the police officer did not even try to locate the now deceased or offer help. The body of the now deceased was only located the following day.

The official report of what had transpired was made the following day and investigations were immediately instituted. It is through these investigations that it was established that the now deceased had fallen into the river whilst escaping from the two men believed to be soldiers on patrol. The police officer was dealt with in terms of the Police Act. The now deceased was not murdered by anyone, let alone the police as alleged but met his death whilst escaping from the perceived soldiers on patrol.

Corrective measures against members of the police force are guided by the Police Act (Chapter 11.10) where, after an investigation into the conduct of a member of the force, disciplinary action is taken if necessary against the member concerned. Criminal charges can also be instituted when circumstances clearly show that a criminal offence was committed. The two; disciplinary and criminal proceedings can run concurrently.

In the case referred to above, investigations were instituted and it was established that the police officer concerned had improperly carried out his duties, hence, he was charged under the Police Act, (Chapter 11.10). Even the relative of the deceased who was among the group exonerated the police officer on any allegations of murdering the now deceased.

The Zimbabwe Republic Police has always and will continue to carry out awareness campaigns as a way of conscientising the general public of the dangers of using illegal crossing points when going to neighbouring countries. Even police officers themselves are often reminded by way of training of the need to observe the tenets of policing and good corporate governance.

GOVERNMENT POLICY ON STRAY OR LOST CATTLE

4. MR. MAKAMURE asked the Co-Minister of Home Affairs to explain to the House;

a) Government's Policy or the procedures regarding the sale of stray or lost cattle;

b) Measures which have been put in place to assist the rural people who have no access to the Media to be informed about such auctions of stray cattle.

THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MRS. MAKONE): Mr. Speaker Sir, the question of livestock including cattle that would have strayed is guided by the statutes of our country. As you might be aware, the policy is clearly spelt in the Stock Trespass Act.

The law stipulates that stray livestock is kept for three months before being auctioned. During this period, the police carry out investigations to establish whether the livestock indeed strayed or could have been stolen. Effort will be made to establish the owner. Awareness of the stray livestock is done through such fora as public meetings, schools, dip tanks gatherings and of course the media. In the event that the stray livestock have brand marks, the police would through the Registrar of brand marks locate the owners of the stray livestock since all registered brand marks are known.

However, let me make it clear that the mandate of auctioning stray livestock rests with local authorities. When the stray livestock are ready for auctioning, the local authorities advertise the auction, giving the dates, times and venues of the sales. The local authorities also have to include the types of livestock that will be on sale. Advertising is done for fourteen continuous days before the sale is undertaken.

On (b) Mr. Speaker Sir, it is apparent to us that all the rural community is rather disadvantaged in terms of communication and information dissemination.

The Zimbabwe Republic Police together with other stakeholders such as local authorities embark on extensive awareness campaigns to alert communities of stray livestock that would be due for auction. This has indeed been a successful exercise as the majority of the populace is reached.

The sales are also carried out in public places such as schools, dip tanks or at the place the stray livestock would have been kept. Effort is also made to make use of traditional leaders, veterinary officers, schools and notices in public areas such as beer halls, growth points and other public gatherings.

*MR. VARANDENI: Hon. Minister, what if a person loses his cattle and police do not take action and then the owner of the cattle sees his cattle being auctioned. What should be done in this case?

* THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MRS. MAKONE): Hon. Varandeni, if you have a specific incident where one could not find the cattle and reported to the police who did nothing about it please bring it forward because it is an offence. The police will have broken the law and the trust entrusted to them by the public or people.

COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF POLICE'S POST

5. MR. MUCHAURAYA asked the Co-Minister of Home Affairs to explain the position regarding the Commissioner General of Police's post.

THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MRS. MAKONE): The hon. member's question is vague. I am not sure if the hon. member is asking about how the Commissioner General of Police is appointed or his duties in terms of the Zimbabwe Constitution.

The Constitution of Zimbabwe provides for a broad administrative set up of the police force. Section 93 (Amendment 18) of the Constitution states that, "there shall be a police force, which together with such other bodies as may be established by law for the purposes, shall have a function of preserving the internal security and maintain law and order in Zimbabwe."

Subject to the Provisions of an Act of Parliament, the police force shall be under the command of the Commissioner General of Police, who shall be appointed by the President after consultation with such person or authority as my be prescribed by or under an Act of Parliament. In terms of Part (ii), Section 5 of the Police Act (Chapter 11:10) the Police Service Board recommends to His Excellency the President such appointments.

Pursuant to these provisions of the law, the post of Commissioner General Police is currently filled by Commissioner General Augustine Chihuri. I am not sure Mr. Speaker Sir, if the hon. member was asking for or whether he wanted to be specific about something - if so he is free to ask now.

MR. MUCHAURAYA: Hon. Minister, this is with regards to media reports about the status of the Police Commissioner's position whether his contract expired he was now in acting capacity or it has been renewed. It is in the best interest of this nation to know the current correct position of the Commissioner General.

THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MRS. MAKONE): Thank you Hon. Muchauraya, now you have been more specific. There was controversy I think sometime at the beginning of the year as to what the real status was and my understanding was is that the question was dealt with by the Principals in government namely, the President of the Republic of Zimbabwe and the right Hon. Prime Minister of the Republic of Zimbabwe. As Minister together with my co-Minister and colleague Hon. Mohadi, we have not been advised that he is no longer the Commissioner General of the ZRP. So we take it that between them they have agreed that he is duly appointed and until at such time as we are told otherwise, we leave it right there.

MR. MUCHAURAYA: It is on record that after that meeting at State House the Hon. Deputy Prime Minister and his counterpart addressed a press conference and issued a statement that he was in acting capacity. Are we having an Acting Police Commissioner or we are having someone in retirement?

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order Hon. Minister. Hon. Muchauraya, I think the Minister has given you the position of the two Co-Ministers. I advise you to direct that question to the Principals.

CHIADZWA DIAMOND FIELDS

14. MR. MUSHONGA asked the Minister of Mines and Mining Development to:

1. Explain the Ministry's policy regarding the release of information on Chiadzwa Diamond Mines in view of the conflicting figures given by the chairperson of the Minerals Marketing Corporation of Zimbabwe and the Deputy Minister of Mines and Mining Development on diamond production;

2. Explain the Ministry's policy in reporting to Parliament regarding the following mining companies operating at Chiadzwa Diamond Fields in view of the fact that only three companies are usually mentioned:

· Mbada Diamonds which is run by MMCZ and Reclamation Company of South Africa.

· CANADILE run by ZMDC and retired Zimbabwe National Army Commanders.

· ANJIN run by the Chinese and Zimbabwe National Army.

· Central Intelligence Organisation and Partners.

· Zimbabwe Republic Police and Partners.

· Zimbabwe Prison Services and Partners

· Marange resources.

· Block Wood Mining

· Condurango Investments

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF MINES AND MINING DEVELOPMENT (MR. CHIMANIKIRE): Thank you Mr. Speaker. I would like to thank the hon. member for posing the questions that are on the order paper. The first question refers to an explanation that is being sought on policy regarding the release of information on Chiadzwa Diamond Mines. In view of the conflicting views given by the chairperson of the Minerals Marketing Corporations of Zimbabwe and Deputy Minister of Mines and Mining Development in Diamond Production. This question is rather personal but I will respond to it.

The whole ministry operates such that the Permanent Secretary is in charge of the various administrative duties and therefore he is accountable for whatever happens in the Ministry. The Ministry of Mines and Mining Development is the only authority responsible for releasing information on Chiadzwa Diamond Mines and therefore when the Deputy Minister stands up to give responses those responses are based on the advice that comes from the Permanent Secretary of the Ministry and is undisputed by any junior including any member of the MMCZ or ZMDC. Therefore the authority with which a minister issues a statement in this House is based on solid information as supplied by the Permanent Secretary.

The second question, Mr. Speaker, there is a request to explain the ministry's policy reporting to Parliament regarding the following mining companies operating at Chiadzwa Diamond Fields in view of the fact that only three companies are usually mentioned. There is a list of companies that are mentioned, that is, nine of them. The response is as follows:

Mbada Diamonds is a joint mining venture between ZMDC, which is Government and Reclamation Company of South Africa MM. That is the company that has a joint venture with ZMDC. MMCZ does not own any shares in Mbada Diamonds, in fact, the Minerals Marketing Corporation of Zimbabwe is a marketing corporation, a parastatal of the ministry or a parastatal that falls under the ministry which is responsible for the marketing of diamonds. Secondly, Canadile was actually replaced by Marange Resources Limited, which is 100% owned by ZMDC and therefore owned by government.

Anjin is owned by the Chinese and the Government of Zimbabwe where ZMDC owns 10% and Zimbabwe Defence Industries owns 40% shareholding. Hon. Members of Parliament should be alert and be abreast with matters of national interest. It is imperative that hon. members of Parliament understand how Defence Industries are run. Defence Industries are a common practice world over and there is nothing peculiar about it in Zimbabwe because Anjin itself is a defence industry company that is owned by the Chinese, which is in a joint venture with Zimbabwe Defence Industries.

Thirdly, there is a company listed here as Central Intelligence Organisation and Partners. From a ministry point of view, Central Intelligence Organisation and Partners, Zimbabwe Republic Police and Partners and Zimbabwe Prisons and Partners do not have any companies operating in Chiadzwa Diamond Fields. I would advise members that if they have any information contrary to what the ministry is providing to approach the Ministry of Anti Corruption because it can only be a corrupt practice that the ministry is not aware of.

There is the issue of Block Wood Mining. Block Wood Mining, Mr. Speaker, Sir and Condurango, which is the last one on the list, they do not operate at Chiadzwa Diamond Fields, in fact, the ministry is not aware of the existence of such companies. Those are the facts that I have been provided by the Permanent Secretary. It is important to note that there are five operating companies in Chiadzwa Mining Fields, that is Marange Resources (100% Government), Mbada Diamonds (joint venture between Government and a private investor), Anjin (joint venture between Government and a private investor), Diamond Mining Corporation (joint venture between Government and a private investor and Sino Zimbabwe (100% Government).

REMITTANCE BY DIAMOND MINERS

15. MR. MUSHONGA asked the Minister of Mines and Mining Development to disclose all the companies mining diamonds at Chiadzwa Diamond Fields, the total quantities that are mined per month and remittances to the Consolidated Revenue Fund in terms of taxes, royalties and the Government's share of dividends.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF MINES AND MINING DEVELOPMENT (MR. CHIDARIKIRE): I have the following table Mr. Speaker which I will read out to the House.

Month (2012)

Production/carat

Dividends (US$)

January

956,415.56

14,516,960.00

February

800,231.80

5,060,594.00

March

787,790.91

9,472,204.31

Total

3,001,464.48

29,049,758.31

Mr. Speaker, let me point out that the question did not specify what total period they wanted us to cover in terms of specific figures on production, it was just said per month. If you had indicated that you wanted the full figures for 2012 or 2011, we could have provided those figures. These figures are all for Chiadzwa diamond mining companies, we have not made mention of the other mining companies outside Chiadzwa.

Mr. Speaker Sir, may I also underline, that hon. members must understand the operations of the diamond industry the world over. The industry closes between December and February of each year and sales are negligible under this particular period. The country as you are aware is under restrictive measures. I must say when I mention this close, we have a party policy and I am a Deputy Minister coming from the other side. Those restrictive measures therefore in the trade of diamonds also affect some of the operations and sales processes. So the restrictive measures have a negative impact on the prices and buyers who bid for our diamonds. The majority of our buyers are from Europe and America and some of them are afraid of being blacklisted when they are seen to be openly buying Zimbabwe diamonds.

EFFECTIVENESS OF OPERATION HAKUDZOKWI

16. MR. MUSHONGA asked the Minister of Mines and Mining Development to:

(i) inform the House whether it is true that after Operation Hakudzokwi, there is theft and pilfering of diamonds which are sold in Mozambican markets and;

(ii) state the measures the Ministry is taking to stop the leakages.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF MINES AND MINING DEVELOPMENT (MR. CHIDARIKIRE): It is not true that after Operation Hakudzokwi there was theft and pilfering of diamonds which were sold on the Mozambican markets. However, one can not deny that there may be operations of a small scale nature where diamonds are being produced but not within the designated areas that fall under the joint venture between ZMDC and those companies operating in Chiadzwa and Marange. They may be responsible to a certain extent of smuggling diamonds to Mozambique. However, four weeks ago, I was in Mozambique and I had a meeting with the Mozambican Minister of Mines who indicated that most of the smuggling in that area is not of diamonds but gold. As a Ministry we can state that, measures that are being taken in terms of security or otherwise are such that there is very little or negligible or not noticeable smuggling of diamonds after Operation Hakudzokwi. All diamond mining companies at Chiadzwa meet the KPCS minimum standards and have the best security systems in the world throughout the entire diamond value chain. That is as a matter of record and as stated by the KPCS report at their last inspection in November 2011. I thank you Mr. Speaker.

MR. MUSHONGA: Taking into account that Zimbabwe is now a member of KPCS and that on the world market, a carat of diamond is selling between US$200 and US$800. The prices which the Minister has referred to indicate that our diamonds are selling for about US$9 per carat when we are members, we are now allowed in the international community of diamond mines to sell our diamonds. Is it profitable how the Ministry is disposing of our diamonds?

MR. CHIDARIKIRE: That question is specific and I am sure the hon. member would want us to do the figure crunching. It is not correct that I have presented figures that reflect that we are selling a carat of diamond for US$9, it has never sold at US$9. What we had by the end of last year was that, in January, it was indicative that a carat was selling at an average price of US$100. There was a drop in the price to about US$40 around June, July last year. That figure improved to an average of US$100. So figure crunching can be done and if the member wants specific figures that we are getting from the sale of each carat, that can be provided but I dispute the statement that I have issued a statement that averages the sale price at US$9.

ACTIVITIES OF CHINESE AT MUPEDZAPASI IN MBIRE DISTRICT

17. MR. NYAUDE asked the Minister of Mines and Mining Development to shed light on the activities of the Chinese at Mupedzapasi in Mbire District.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF MINES AND MINING DEVELOPMENT (MR. CHIMANIKIRE): Afri-Sino Mineral Resources is the company that is operating in the Mupedzapasi area. The company was issued with a Special Grant 4888 to prospect for Uranium on 26 September 2008, which expired on 25 September 2011. The application for renewal is under consideration by the Ministry of Mines and Mining Development, hence the stoppage of exploration activities at the site. The conditions of the Special Grant were for exploration to quantify existing uranium deposits. Feasibility studies have to be completed to develop the uranium deposits to the production stage. Afri-Sino has met the requirements, despite having obstruction from the local hunting firm, with the Parks and Wild Life Management to agree on the operation of the field drill, which hindered the progress of the work to a larger extent. Uranium is radio-active and needs specialized mining. It can only be transported after the company has been issued with a permit with the Radiation Authority of Zimbabwe. This explains why the samples are being stored in cores and that they use the chemicals during drilling in order to contain minerals.

Afri-Sino Mineral has drilled 62 drill holes translating to 10 000 metres of drill depth to date since 2010. However, no work is being carried out at the moment and drill rigs are just parked inside fenced premises as work was suspended in November 2011. All cores recovered from core drilling are still in the shed. Four Chinese personnel and about eight employees are on site maintain equipment and guarding the fenced area. The area under prospecting at K1 is now bushy indicating that it was worked before the rainy season.

Prospecting done on site K1 confirmed a reserve base of 3000 tones and additional 7000 tones required for a viable project. The company needs three to four years in order to complete the exploration in search of the additional 7000 tonnes. Currently the company has discovered another at K2 which is about eight kilometers from K1 and is yet to evaluate the resource once renewal has been granted.

In conclusion, there are no mining operations as alleged are taking place in Mupedzapasi area in Mbire District. There is a road construction site nearby which has been contracted by the Mbire Rural District Council which is using dump trucks to ferry gravel. Afri-Sino Mining Resources is prospecting for uranium in the area and the core recovered from drilling is stored in the core shed. No movement of the core or any form of ore has taken place since the company started its drilling operations in 2010.

MINING ACTIVITIES AT TROJAN NICKEL MINING

18. MR. NYAUDE asked the Minister of Mines and Mining Development to explain to the House why Trojan Nickel Mine is not carrying out mining activities despite enunciation of the 'use it or lose it' principle provided for in the Medium Term Plan.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF MINES AND MINING DEVELOPMENT (MR. CHIMANIKIRE): Trojan Nickel Mine falls under Bindura Nickel Corporation and is an established mine with developed infrastructure which shows that it is in serious business of producing nickel. Trojan Nickel Mine is situated in Bindura and most if the mining locations were registered in 1956 and 1957. The company has been mining these claims since the date of registration. In 2008, the company made a submission to the Ministry of Mines and Mining Development to put the mine under care and maintenance and the Ministry allowed it because of the harsh macro-economic environment. The economic environment was characterised by hyper-inflation, skills flight and their recessionary effects. During the time in question, it was also expensive to mine as the price of producing it was higher than its selling price.

The 'use it or lose it' principle is applicable to mines that are held for speculative purposes; those that are situated on virgin ground that has been developed at all. Trojan Nickel Mine has contributed immensely to the society and has been producing since December 1956 to 2008. The parent company of Trojan Nickel Mine, Bindura Nickel's major shareholder, Mwana Africa PLC has managed to secure 21 million funding for the re-start of Trojan Nickel Mine from a Chinese investor. This amount of money is specifically targeted for the first year of Trojan restart.

MINING ACTIVITIES AT MUPEDZAPASI IN MBIRE DISTRICT

19. MR. NYAUDE asked the Minister of Mines to clarify whether the Chinese at Mupedzapasi in Mbire District are prospecting or mining uranium in view of the alleged loads of ore seen driven out of the area.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF MINES AND MINING DEVELOPMENT (MR. CHIMANIKIRE): Question answered under question 17.

MAINTANACE OF ZESA TRANSFORMERS

20. MR. SHOKO asked the Minister of Energy and Power Development to explain to the House:

i. The Ministry's policy regarding ZESA transformers which get damaged due to theft of transmission oil;

ii. The ownership of those boxes considering the contribution of the community towards the repair and maintenance of those transformers.

THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (MR. MANGOMA): ZESA is responsible for the replacement or repair of faulty transformers that get damaged due to the theft of transformer oil. Such work is carried out under fault maintenance in order to ensure the continuity of supply to customers. However, at the height of the country's economic challenges, ZESA had very little capacity to replace the damaged transformers owing to uneconomic tariffs. This resulted in customers waiting for long periods for replacement of transformers. However, some customers voluntarily

donated transformers in order to get supplies restored quickly. In an effort to manage theft and vandalism of infrastructure, ZESA engaged communities to safeguard transformers in their areas to avoid theft. Some communities employed neighbourhood watch committees to patrol transformers whilst some erected physical barriers in conjunction with ZESA.

The boxes and transformers belong to ZESA as part of the distribution infrastructure. The community's contribution was voluntary and it was a win-win situation that was meant to manage supply during the harsh economic climate.

It should be noted that this phase has since passed as ZESA now has the capacity to replace faulty distribution transformers following the award of a reasonable tariff. 2 500 transformers were replaced since February 2009 as up to 35 000 customers had gone for up to 3 years without electricity.

EXPLANATION OF HIGH ELECTRICITY BILLS

21. MR. SHOKO asked the Minister of Energy and Power Development to explain why electricity bills for ordinary citizens continue accumulating in light of continued power outages.

THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (MR. MANGOMA): Thank you Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the hon. member for the question. The main reason for the accumulation of arrears is the non-payment of electricity accounts by some domestic customers. In spite of power outages, most customers carry out their household chores once supply is restored after load shedding thus consuming energy. The consumed energy is billed and this is perceived negatively.

ZESA is now managing to read about 80% of meters. The 20% that are estimated are not estimated for more than two consecutive months. The estimates are based on historical consumption as captured in the billing system. However, when the meter is read, the bill will be adjusted.

Mr. Speaker Sir, I advised Cabinet yesterday that we are now starting on the pre-paid meter role out programme which will start at the end of this month and therefore, the issue of meter reading might be something of the past. We expect that this role out programme will be over the next ten months. I have also taken the opportunity to look at Hon. Shoko's bill itself, I am glad to say that it has been serviced well. I am sure that it has not been accumulating because there was no electricity going into his premises.

AVAILABILITY OF DRUGS IN MALARIA PRONE AREAS

25. MR. CHIMHINI asked the Minister of Health and Child Welfare to state the plans the Ministry has to ensure that Malaria drugs and testing kits are made available in malaria prone districts such as Mutasa District, in view of the serious shortage of Malaria drugs and testing kits in these districts.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HEALTH AND CHILD WELFARE (DR. MOMBESHORA): Thank you Mr. Speaker. Let me start by explaining how the system works. Mr. Speaker Sir, the health delivery system in Zimbabwe and in the Ministry of Health and Child Welfare in particular is decentralised from national, provincial, district up to the primary health facility level.

All the levels have competent personnel trained in all the various disciplines of health that are in tandem with the health problems they are likely to handle or face in the discharge of their duties. The referral procedures are clearly outlined, and have to be adhered to.

All health facilities have a minimum set of essential medicines in stock and have received training on the procedures to be followed when ordering stock from the National Pharmaceutical Stores (NATPHARM).

Drug-Medicine Distribution in Zimbabwe

The National Pharmaceutical Company of Zimbabwe is the Ministry's central medical stores. NATPHARM procures, stores and distributes most medicines used by the health facilities. Regional stores are located in Gweru, Harare, Chinhoyi, Bulawayo and Mutare. This arrangement ensures that medicines are stored as close as possible to the districts to ensure easy access and proximity to the recipient institutions. Every quarter, NATPHARM staff visit all health facilities checking on stock levels, as well as replenishing the stocks.

Institutions which experience high demands for any commodities resulting in stock outs and experience minimum stock level, place orders to NATPHARM even outside the NATPHARM scheduled visits. The Ministry of Health and Child Welfare has provincial pharmacists, who provide support to health facilities within their jurisdiction and ensure that institutions do not experience any stock outs.

National Stock Status For Anti Malarials

The Ministry has adequate stocks of both ACTs (coartemether), as well as RDTs (test kits). The Ministry procured an additional 600 000, ACTs, and 300 000 test kits a few weeks ago. Any health institution experiencing stock outs should place emergency orders with NATPHARM. Facilities have also been encouraged to use the pull system in which the institutions take the initiative to order direct from NATPHARM. It is admitted that some facilities face transport challenges, thus making it difficult to collect their medicines. The partners and stakeholders are encouraged to provide support to these institutions.

THE MINISTER OF CONSTITUTIONAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS: Mr. Speaker, we have noted that Ministers came in their numbers to respond to Questions With Notice. In terms of the Standing Orders, the time for responding to those questions has expired. I thought that let us give Ministers opportunities to respond to those questions .. -[MR BHASIKITI-CHUMA: Vaivepi, we want to debate our motions]- ..

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order, order, hon. members, hon. Minister continue.

THE MINISTER OF CONSTITUTIONAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS: Before I was rudely challenged by Hon. Bhasikiti-Chuma, I was seeking, Mr. Speaker, your indulgence that Questions with Notice be extended to enable Ministers who are present to respond to those questions.

Motion put and agreed to.

PROGRESS REGARDING CHIKOMBEDZI WATER SUPPLY PROJECTS

26. MR. BALOYI asked the Minister of Water Resources, Development and Management to inform the House on the progress made regarding the Chikombedzi water supply projects.

THE MINISTER OF WATER RESOURCES, DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT (MR. s. NKOMO): Thank you Mr. Speaker and I would like to thank Hon. Baloyi for the question.

Hon. Speaker, the Chikombedzi Water Supply Project is supported by the Zimbabwe National Water Authority [ZINWA] which is an arm of my Ministry. This centre is earmarked to be a growth point for the Chiredzi District and as such, it is home to the Chikombedzi hospital which is a referral hospital for the District, the Chikombedzi Police Station and two schools - that is a primary and a secondary school. The center has quite a number of shops, bottle-stores and beer-halls. There are some residential developments which are taking place as the Chiredzi District Council has contracted private developers to develop and service residential stands at the centre. Chikombedzi is a hub for travelers going out to Mozambique by road and by rail via Sango Border post. Travelers can reach it from Chiredzi and Rutenga by roads. In terms of tourism, it lies a few kilometers from the Gonarezhou Trans-frontier Park, and is therefore an ideal centre for refreshments for tourists visiting the park, who obviously would be looking for water after coming out of those hot wild forests.

ZINWA is currently supplying water to Chikombedzi from two boreholes which are yielding 140m3/day, against a peak demand of 300m3/day from the centre.

It is because of this ever increasing water demand at the centre that my ministry, over some ten years ago, started the Chikombedzi Water Upgrading Project to upgrade the water supply system in Chikombedzi.

To meet the present and projected water demand at Chikombedzi, my ministry completed the construction of Masukwe Dam in 2001 which has a capacity of 1.1 million cubic metres as a source of raw water to the planned new Chikombedzi Water Supply Station. ZINWA designed a 14 m3 per hour water treatment plant which is located some 1.7km from Masukwe Dam. The Treatment plant is approximately 17km to the south of the growth point. Having undergone purification at the treatment works, water will be pumped some 17.2km using the 250mm diameter pvc pipeline to the existing water storage reservoirs that are located on the northern side of the growth point.

Before I present to you the progress of works to date, let me hasten to say that the economic downturn which our country suffered the past ten years affected very much the progress of work at the new water supply station at Chikombedzi, otherwise the project could have been completed a long time ago. It is my hope and wish that during this coming financial year, the Ministry of Finance will avail the required funds which I will give below to bring this project to its fruitful conclusion.

The following table is a summary of progress of works to date;

Nature of Works

Proposed works

Progress to Date

Masukwe dam

Construction of an earth dam of capacity 1x106mto supply Chikombedzi with domestic water.

Dam construction was completed in 2001

Water Treatment Plant

Construction of:

· Raw water pump house equipped with 2 sets of pumps and motors [one to be on standby].

· 2.1km 250mm diameter pipeline from dam to treatment works

  • 2 by 70m3/hr sedimentation tank units
  • 3 units 50m3/hr rapid filter tanks
  • A 500m3 clear water tank

· Clear water pump house equipped with 2 sets of pumps and motors to deliver water to the 1000m3 reservoir.

Work not yet started.

0.2km of piping was purchased and laid.

1 sedimentation tank has been built.

Only one set of the filter units has been constructed

Only foundation excavations done

Work not yet started.

Clear water pumping main and storage works

· Trenching and laying 17.2km 250mm diameter pipeline from treatment works to the 1000mstorage reservoir.

  • Construction of the 1000mreinforced concrete reservoir

No work has commenced.

No work has commenced.

So, in short, what I can say is that ZINWA needs US$800 000 to complete the above outstanding works, which would be for the construction of the new water supply station and pumping main. My ministry has been bidding for funds every year from Treasury since the adoption of the multicurrency system to complete this project without success. I am hoping that money would be availed this coming financial year.

PROGRESS ON THE GWAYI SHANGANI DAM CONSTRUCTION

27. MR. MADUBEKO asked the Minister of Water Resources, Development and Management to inform the House on the progress made on the Gwayi Shangani Dam Construction and if he could make a statement.

THE MINISTER OF WATER RESOURCES, DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT (MR. S. NKOMO): Hon. members, the Gwayi-Tshangani Dam, just for the background for those of our Hon. Members who may not know, is located at the confluence of Gwayi and Tshangani rivers, 6km downstream of that confluence.

The dam is a concrete gravity arch dam, with a height of 71m. The capacity of the dam is 635 million mwith a yield of 10% per year. The dam forms the first phase of the National Matabeleland Zambezi Water Project.

The purpose of the dam is to augment water for Bulawayo as well as local communities and the provision of irrigation water along the route to Bulawayo.

The contract for the construction of the dam was awarded to China International and Electric Corporation by the Matabeleland Zambezi Water Trust for a bid price of US$40,898,288.77 in May 2003. The government took over the implementation of the project in 2011. The following is the work which was done by the Matabeleland Zambezi Water Trust before Government took over the project;

· The construction of the site access roads, excavations of the dam foundation and outlet works were completed,

· The plinth blinding concrete was placed in the river bed,

  • The overall dam project is 6% complete.

The State Procurement Board instructed that as part of the takeover of the project legal due diligence exercise on all contracts of the National Matabeleland Zambezi Water Project be carried out by the Attorney General. The legal due diligence was completed in 2011 and the State Procurement Board also instructed that a technical due diligence exercise of the Gwayi-Shangani Dam project be carried out by an independent engineer. A final report of the technical due diligence exercise was submitted by an independent engineer on 25 April 2012.

The legal due diligence and the technical due diligence exercises were completed as part of the process of the takeover of the project by Government. The due diligence reports are being submitted to the State Procurement Board. In fact, they have already been submitted to the State Procurement Board and a resolution has been done. This will unlock resumption of work on the project.

Financial Status

Ø The project was allocated US$4 million in the 2011 National Budget;

Ø The project was allocated US$8 million in the 2012 National Budget;

Ø The estimated cost for outstanding works on the dam is US$61 million;

Ø The estimated cost for 98km of tarred permanent access roads, four bridges, permanent houses of Water Bailiff team, dam office block, hydro-power station and pump station is US$70 million.

The contractor has now been authorized to move on to site and I believe he will be moving on to site this weekend.

WATER BILLING BY ZINWA

28. MR. MUDARIKWA asked the Minister of Water Resources Development and Management to explain why the Zimbabwe National Water Authority has a fixed charge on its billing system yet there is no constant supply of water.

THE MINISTER OF WATER RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT (MR. S. NKOMO): The fixed charge is for the cost of maintaining records of a consumer's account irrespective of the actual consumption billed to the consumer on monthly basis. It also caters for the cost of servicing the infrastructure and keeps it in a sound position so that when water is then supplied there is no disruption due to breakdowns.

It is, however, unfortunate that due to the challenges we are currently experiencing, services are not always delivered as planned resulting in unavoidable deficiencies. When a consumer has a continuous full calendar month without water, fixed charge is dropped. So, there can be no fixed charge when a consumer has not received a full supply of water for a full calendar month. If you have not received any water or you have received supply half the time of the calendar then you are charged the fixed charged, please refer the issue to ZINWA because you are not supposed to be charged if they have not supplied you fully.

The fixed charge is currently being reviewed with a view to reduce the amount if not eliminating it altogether. My thoughts are whether to reduce it or to eliminate it altogether. This is not only for ZINWA but even for other water providers elsewhere. We are reviewing the fixed charge.

MR. MUDARIKWA: The fixed charge in question amount to $34 per month and this relates to people who earn say $200. So, we are saying $34 per month is working to a dollar per day for paying for a service which is not there. ZESA has dropped completely all the fixed charges because they realized there is no point in having fixed charges when there is no fixed supply. People can not part with $34. Just for argument's sake, if ZINWA is connected to one million clients, it is going to get $34 million without delivering a drop of water. So why would ZINWA have the need to supply water to the people?

MR. S. NKOMO: I would want to receive some specific information on that. If the hon. member has got that specific case, I would be very happy to follow it up but I must say that $34 as a fixed charge sounds to me to be very excessive and I can not accept that that should be what ZINWA will do. But apart from that I have already given an undertaking that I am reviewing the issue of the fixed charge with a view of either reducing or eliminating it altogether. You have my word that I am actually reviewing that and I will be making announcements immediately after we have launched the National Water Policy on that.

MR. KANZAMA: In view of the challenges the Ministry is facing of failing to supply enough water to the nation particularly basing on the issues that councils in towns and in rural areas with ZINWA, people have resorted to drilling their boreholes but it seems like soon after the realization by the Government that many people are now drilling boreholes, you have now resorted to charging them again and register their boreholes when in actual fact they are trying to solve a problem on their own and you have resorted to charging them fees again. Why has the Government come up with such a policy?

MR. S. NKOMO: I want to thank the hon. member for that supplementary question. It gives me an opportunity to clarify. First of all, the announcement that we have made that all boreholes should be registered between 2nd May to the 30th June 2012, is actually free. You do not actually pay anything. If there are some catchments that are asking anyone to pay, that is not correct, it is illegal. They should charge nothing because the intention of the Government is actually to manage water resources whether surface or underground. So, unless we know where a hole is dug - and you know if you dig a hole here and you dig a hole next, you might find that both holes do not have enough water because they are taking water from each other.

Apart from that there is say, seismic underground compulsion that can take place if we willy-nilly drill anywhere and we have a policy that you can not drill boreholes 200 metres apart and so all we are doing just now is to ask the nation to register all boreholes. We want to know the depth of the borehole, the level of the water and the yield (how much water comes out of the borehole) and once we know that it will gives us the ability and the capacity to manage our water resources wisely in this country. So, I would urge Zimbabweans to register their boreholes.

It is not a catch at all. It is an endeavor to manage our water resources but when you have a borehole and you drill it yourself and we have also said those companies who drill boreholes can not now drill a borehole unless they are registered with us. If you call them to drill a borehole and you have no permit for it, they will not drill a borehole. So, that is very important but once you drill a borehole yourself and you have paid for it, casing and the water comes out; I just want to let the nation know that the water in the borehole is not yours. That water belongs to the state and you have to pay a levy for the water that you take out of Zimbabwe. So, I think that we are going to be launching a major programme this month to rehabilitate almost 7 500 dysfunctional boreholes and sinking 1 500. That will then help in the augmentation of the availability of water particularly in the rural areas. However, in the towns, you must accept honourable member that since 2009 the water supply in the towns and cities has improved. I think that you must give us credit for making water available not necessarily every time, not necessarily everyday but some water to the nation. I thank you for asking that question - [HON. MEMBERS: But there is no water in our houses] -

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order, order honourable members.

OPERATIONS OF MPANDAWANA POST OFFICE

20. MR. MARAMWIDZE asked the Minister of Finance to explain to the House why pensioners who get their pay at Mpandawana Post Office are offered a fraction of their salaries instead of the whole amount and have to travel to Masvingo POSB for the rest of the amount.

THE MINISTER OF CONSTITUTINAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (ADV. MATINENGA) on behalf of THE MINISTER OF FINANCE (MR. BITI): The Post Office Savings Bank (POSB) operates through agencies in addition to their own branches. Currently they operate through 180 agencies which are mainly Post Offices.

Pensioners can get their payments from all the agencies up to a maximum of US$100, an amount which was deemed to be the average pension payments.

Where there are POS machines such as at Mpandawana, pensioners can withdraw up to a maximum US$1000. This can be done even if a pensioner does not have a pin card (ATM card). The pensioner punches in their account number and they are given their money.

Follow up is being made with Mpandawana Post Office on why pensioners are being given part payments when there is a POS machine where pensioners can access a maximum of US$ 1 000.

POLICY REGARDING THE PROVISION OF FOOD TO FAMILIES RESIDING IN MINING AREAS

30. MR. NYAUDE asked the Minister of Labour and Social Services to explain the Ministry's policy regarding the provisions of food and other welfare assistance to families residing in mining areas where operations have been suspended, for example Bindura Nickel Corporation at Tojan, Shangani in Bulawayo and Mwana Africa at Freda Rebecca Mine.

THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MRS. MAKONE) on behalf of THE MINISTER OF LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE (MS. MPARIWA): The social protection programmes that are run by the ministry have a national coverage and do not exclude anyone based on area of residence as long as they are eligible for assistance based on set parameters. The eligibility criteria has been put in place realising that with the limited resources at hand, the ministry will not be able to assist everyone but the most needy cases so that such households do not suffer irreversible welfare losses and live a dignified standard of living. Key programmes which are available to all communities are:

1. Basic Education Assistance Module Programme (BEAM)

The BEAM programme is one of the most successful programmes

in Zimbabwe and in the SADC region. It provides education to orphans and vulnerable children with access to school fees and examination fees. This year, the programme has a budget of $26 million both from government and donors and is set to assist 780 thousand children in Primary and Secondary Schools.

2. Food Deficit Mitigation through Public Works Programme

Another major programme that is implemented through the

Ministry of Labour and Social Services is the Food Deficit Mitigation Programme. The programme was designed to assist food insecure household with to food through distribution of 50kg bags of grain and US$10 per household per month.

3. Harmonised Social Cash Transfers

This programme is currently being administered in 10 districts,

one district per province. It will expand to cover 10 more districts this year until all districts are covered. The programme provides a monthly cash allowance to labour constrained households that include older persons, persons with disabilities, child headed households and households with a huge orphan care burden.

In all other districts, the ministry is still running the public assistance programme which targets the same category of households though targeting mechanisms are different. For the public assistance, individuals who feel that they qualify for the programme should approach the social services offices for means testing before they are enrolled into the programme.

Apart from cash transfers, a special attention has been given to the elderly and persons with disabilities.

  • The elderly:

The ministry also supported 1 166 elderly persons with

monthly maintenance allowances. At the same time, administrative grants were paid to 15 institutions caring for the elderly.

  • Persons living with disabilities

The ministry also supported persons with disabilities access

assistive technologies and also provide them with vocational training to acquire life skills.

4. Another major programme that is administered by the ministry

is health assistance. This programme gives support to indigent person so that they can access health referral system with bills accruing being paid by the ministry.

All these programmes are available in all districts and I would urge individuals who fall within the mentioned categories to approach the nearest social services office and seek assistance.

RESOLUTION OF LABOUR ISSUES AT TROJAN NICKEL CORPORATION

31. MR NYAUDE asked the Minister of Labour and Social Services to inform the House of its plans to resolve pending labour issues at Trojan Nickel Corporation and Mwana Africa as this has resulted in more than 4000 families suffering from a wide range of social ills especially food shortages.

THE CO-MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MRS. MAKONE) on behalf of THE MINISTER OF LABOUR AND SOCIAL SERVICES (MS. MPARIWA): I would like to thank the hon. Member of Parliament for asking the question. Bindura Nickel Corporation applied to the Ministry of Labour and Social Services to retrench 1080 ordinary employees and managers. The Ministry, in consultation with stakeholders, has since determined the case. It was noted that Trojan, Shangani mines and the Nickel Refinery have been under care and maintenance since 2008.

With this in mind, the Ministry approved the retrenchment of the employees. The employees are to be retrenched in batches as the employer raises funding for the packages. The retrenchment packages are to be paid in cash and it is the Ministry's hope that the mines and the refinery will start operating soon. Thank you again hon. member for asking this question.

PRICE OF COTTON

34. MR. CROSS asked the Minister of Agriculture Mechanisation and irrigation Development to explain to the house measures that the Ministry has put in place to ensure that the price of cotton is at least more than 25 cents a kilogramme for the cotton deliveries currently offered by ginners this season.

THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, MECHANISATION AND IRRIGATION DEVELOPMENT (DR. MADE): I can only say that the Minister is seized with the issue and it is under consideration. An announcement of measures that will be put in place will be made soon. I thank you.

51% INDIGENISATION POLICY ON FOREIGN OWNED COMPANIES

35. MR. MARAMWIDZE asked the Minister of Youth Development and Indigenisation to inform the House whether the small scale industries owned by Nigerians and Chinese are included in the 51% Indigenisation policy on foreign owned companies considering that the majority of Zimbabweans cannot afford to buy the shares from big corporations.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF YOUTH DEVELOPMENT AND INDIGENISATION (MR. MATUTU): The Indigenisation and Economic Empowerment Act [Chapter 14:33] does not distinguish between types of businesses that must comply with the 51% indigenous shareholding requirement. Section 3(1)(a) of the Indigenisation and Economic Empowerment Act [Chapter 14:33] requires all businesses operating in the country to comply with the 51% indigenous shareholding requirement.

The Indigenisation and Economic (General) regulations 2010, as amended stipulate that companies whose net asset values are US$500,000.00 or above should comply with the 51% indigenous shareholding requirement. These regulations go on to make sector specific notices which may vary the net asset value for each sector. The mining and manufacturing sectors have had their sector specific frameworks published with net asset value thresholds of US$1 and US$100,000.00 respectively. The following conclusions can be drawn from the above:

· All businesses operating in the mining sector must comply with the 51% indigenous shareholding requirement.

· Businesses operating in the manufacturing sector with a net asset value of US100, 000.00 and above should comply with the 51% indigenous shareholding requirement.

· Businesses in all other sectors with net asset values which fall below the US$500,000.00 threshold will comply with the 51% indigenous shareholding requirement when the sector specific frameworks for the other sectors are published.

Section 9, of the Indigenisation and Economic Empowerment (General) Regulations of 2010, as amended, deals with the reserved sectors; some businesses operated by Nigerians, Chinese and other non indigenous investors are covered by this section. The Ministry noticed that Section 9 did not adequately cover or protect indigenous players operating in the reserved sectors as it is only forward looking. The Ministry then decided to come up with a legal instrument to rectify this anomaly. The reserved sectors are as follows:

· Agriculture primary production of food and cash crops.

· Transportation passenger buses, taxes and car hire services.

· Retail and wholesale trade.

· Barber shops, hairdressing and beauty salons.

· Employment agencies

· Estate agencies

· Valet services

· Grain milling

  • Bakeries

· Tobacco grading and packaging

· Tobacco processing

· Advertising agencies

· Milk processing

· Provision of local arts and craft, marketing and distribution.

Once the National Indigenisation and Economic Empowerment Fund is capitalized, the majority of indigenous Zimbabweans will be able to buy shares as the fund has the statutory responsibility to warehouse shares and finance indigenisation and economic empowerment transactions with a view to ensure broad based participation by the broad spectrum of indigenous Zimbabweans. The Indigenisation and Economic Empowerment Act [Chapter 14:33] allows Government to come up with programmes specifically targeted at the youth, women and disabled. It is hoped that once the Fund is adequately capitalized, such programmes will be designed by the National Indigenisation and economic Empowerment Fund. I thank you.

ENGAGEMENT OF SPORTS PERSONS IN ALL DISCIPLINES

36. MR. CHITANDO asked the Minister of Education, Sport, Arts and Culture to explain to the House:

a) The Ministry's Policy regarding the engagement of sports persons in all disciplines who are in the diaspora to represent Zimbabwe.

b) Whether the Ministry has an accurate database of soccer players who are playing in foreign leagues.

THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, SPORT, ARTS AND CULTURE (SENATOR COTART): Mr. Speaker, sport in Zimbabwe is primarily arranged in clubs for specific sporting disciplines and these disciplines, in terms of the law are organized under International Sports Associations. In Zimbabwe there are forty-eight national sports associations registered with the Sports Recreation Commission, which are in turn affiliated to the Zimbabwe Olympic Committee and the respective International Federations such as FIFA and the International Cricket Council. It is that arrangement which governs how sports persons in all disciplines are able to represent their respective countries.

In terms of sport and competition rules and regulations worldwide, only a citizen of a country can represent his or her country provided that athlete is a registered member of the particular national sports association. In a particular case for example, a member of ZIFA or Zimbabwe cricket cannot represent another country if they are part of ZIFA or Zimbabwe Cricket. That is also to say that athletes from their own arrangement are denied from playing sport whilst in the diaspora, and even to play in the diaspora, they must regularise their membership with their own country's National Sports Associations. To turn to the matter of the question Zimbabweans who reside in the diaspora and are Zimbabwean passport holders and are also registered members of Zimbabwean National Sports Associations are eligible for selection to represent a country. According to the SRC Act Chapter 25:15 of 1991 as revised in 1996 and S.I. promulgated in 1995. Athletes who are Zimbabweans residing in the diaspora and who have not been registered with Zimbabwe National Sports Association are entitled to regularise their membership with NSAs and they can be eligible to be released to represent players for Zimbabwe. This is an arrangement which is coming throughout the world and is acceptable at international levels.

Turning to the second aspect of the question on whether the Ministry has an accurate data base of soccer players. It is the responsibility of the National Sports Associations and in particular ZIFA to keep a database of their own members who are playing outside the country. The Ministry itself does not have a database of players but it encourages respective sports associations to develop such data bases. I thank you.

TARRING OF BINGA KAROI ROAD

37. MR P.N. SIBANDA asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to inform the House;

(a) the criteria for the selection of major roads to be tarred and upgraded considering that Binga-Karoi road, has not been given attention by the ministry and since Zimbabwe is hosting the UNWTO conference the Harare to Victoria Falls via this route could be cheaper and shorter.

SENATOR COLTART: I am sorry Hon. Speaker, my answers are on one sheet and I will hand them all in together if that is acceptable.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Sorry Hon. Minister, I am following the Order Paper and question number 37 is for the Minister of Transport.

THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (MR. MUSHOHWE): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir,the Hon. Member Mr. P.N.Sibanda wants me to inform the House on what criteria is used for selection of major roads to be tarred and upgraded considering that Binga-Karoi road has not been given attention by the Ministry and since Zimbabwe is hosting the UNWTO conference, the Harare to Victoria Falls via this route could be cheaper and shorter.

Mr. Speaker Sir, the criteria used to upgrade major roads certain standards obtain, which include traffic levels - existing and forecast, as well as the need to connect places of economic activities such as agriculture, tourism, mining etc.

In the case of the road in question, the Ministry of Finance has not been able to provide funding for its upgrading to safest standards. Mr. Speaker Sir, we are as a Ministry in agreement with the hon. member that the upgrading of the Karoi-Binga road provides a shorter route from Harare to Victoria Falls. It is for that reason that my department of roads has started upgrading this road. The construction of the work was suspended at the 51km peg in 2004 due to the unavailability of funding. As soon as funding is availed, work will resume.

However, hon. members may wish to note that the gravel section of the road is being attended to under the Rural Road Regrading Programme currently on-going. Currently we have gone beyond the 90km peg. I thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.

CLOSURE OF NYAMAKATE SECONDARY SCHOOL

38. MR CHITANDO asked the Minister of Education, Arts, Sport and Culture to explain to the House the circumstances which led to the temporary closure of Nyamakate Secondary School in Karoi and the action taken by the Ministry to protect the teachers affected.

THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, SPORT, ARTS AND CULTURE (SENATOR COLTART): Thank you Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, to the best of my knowledge there has not been a temporary closure at Nyamakate Secondary School in accordance with the question posed but what I am aware of is the temporary closure of Nyamakate Primary School in Hurungwe District, Mashonaland West which I believe the hon. member is probably referring to and so I will address the question making that assumption that it is the primary school.

The closure took place for one day on the 17th of January 2012 and then on another day on the 8th of May 2012 during the first and second terms respectively.

Relations between two teachers Ms. Farai Kaitano EC No. 0815521K and Simon Mupfurutsa EC No. 0856402W and the community of Nyamakate Primary School soured in 2009 when allegedly these two teachers taught two Grade 7 classes at the school. What I am informed Mr. Speaker is that the two teachers in question requested to teach during school holidays and requested parents to pay them an incentive for extra work. The parents agreed and made the payments but when the Grade 7 papers were written and the results published, both classes I am told scored zero percent pass rate. This angered the parents leading to a serious deterioration in relations.

On the 16th of January 2012, there was an AGM at the school parents' assembly. The School Head, I am informed had discussed with the teachers that they would all be introduced to the parents after they would meet the respective classes since the lessons were ongoing. However, Kaitano and Mupfurutsa rejoined the AGM and I am informed that the former began recording the proceedings on his mobile phone. Parents were angered and they abandoned the meeting. Parents then withdrew their children from the school on the 17th of January and said lessons could only be resumed after the two teachers were transferred from the school. As a result a report was made at the District Education Officer and the District Education Officers visited the school immediately and lessons resumed the next day.

As a result of this Kaitano and Mupfurutsa had charges preferred against them and they were suspended for three months. However, these teachers appealed to the Head of the Ministry and the charges were withdrawn on technical grounds and the suspension was lifted.

When the two teachers resumed duty on the opening day on the 8th of May 2012, parents were outraged and again protested. They locked the Head's offices as well as the classrooms demanding that the two teachers should leave the school. A team of Head Office and Provincial Office was dispatched and arrived the same day and convinced the parents that the lessons should resume whilst officials were given an opportunity to address the grievances and lessons resumed the following day.

Meanwhile the two teachers have been suspended again on the 30th of May 2012 to facilitate investigations which are ongoing. I would like to commend the parents for not issuing any physical threats to the teachers and I want to assure them that the due process of law will be followed in the best interest of the children at the school. I thank you.

VACANT TEACHING POSTS IN MASVINGO PROVINCE

39. MR. CHITANDO asked the Minister of Education, Sport, Arts and Culture to inform the House on the following:

(a) the number of vacant teaching posts in Masvingo Province, District by District.

(b) the number of those in acting capacity in the Province, District by District.

(c) the Ministry's Policy regarding filling of vacant teaching posts.

THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, SPORT, ARTS AND CULTURE (SENATOR COLTART): Thank you Mr. Speaker,the Hon. Member wishes to know the number of vacant teaching posts in Masvingo Province in each district. I am pleased to inform the hon. member and the august House of the following breakdown of the vacant teaching posts in Masvingo Province by District.

 

TEACHING VACANCIES

D/HEAD

HEAD

District

PRY

ECD

SEC

PRY

SEC

PRY

SEC

Bikita

0

94

42

39

18

37

12

Chiredzi

21

200

12

64

12

42

11

Chivi

0

95

22

64

21

39

15

Gutu

0

153

44

79

38

80

16

Masvingo

0

12

9

34

39

47

13

Mwenezi

32

69

37

7

3

22

15

Zaka

0

109

26

37

29

48

12

Total

53

732

192

324

160

315

94

Mr. Speaker Sir, the hon. member requests for the number of those in Acting capacity in Masvingo Province, in each District.

The hon. member and the august House should be informed of the following Acting posts in Masvingo Province, district by district as indicated in the table below;

STATION

POST

NUMBER OF VACANCIES

Provincial Office

Provincial Education Deputy Director

2

Bikita

D/Heads Primary

39

 

D/Heads Secondary

18

 

Heads Primary

37

 

Heads Secondary

12

Chiredzi

D/Heads Primary

64

 

D/Heads Secondary

12

 

Heads Primary

42

 

Heads Secondary

11

Chivi

D/Heads Primary

64

 

D/Heads Secondary

21

 

Heads Primary

39

 

Heads Secondary

15

Gutu

D/Heads Primary

79

 

D/Heads Secondary

38

 

Heads Primary

80

 

Heads Secondary

16

Masvingo

D/Heads Primary

34

 

D/Heads Secondary

39

 

Heads Primary

47

 

Heads Secondary

13

Mwenezi

D/Heads Primary

7

 

D/Heads Secondary

3

 

Heads Primary

22

 

Heads Secondary

15

ZAKA

D/Heads Primary

37

 

D/Heads Secondary

29

 

Heads Primary

48

 

Heads Secondary

12

TOTALS

Provincial Education Deputy Director

2

 

D/Heads Primary

324

 

D/Heads Secondary

160

 

Heads Primary

315

 

Heads Secondary

94

 

GRAND TOTAL

895

Mr. Speaker Sir, the hon. member requests for information about the ministry's policy regarding filling of vacant teaching posts. I wish to inform the hon. member and the august House that the Ministry is undertaking the following measures in filling of vacant teaching posts.

i) Deployment of teachers from Colleges and Universities;

ii) Through reappointments of those who had left service;

iii) Extension of service for retirees and;

iv) Renewal of contracts for those on annually renewable contracts.

Thank you.

HOLDING OF POLITICAL MEETINGS AT SCHOOLS

40. MR. CROSS asked the Minister of Education, Sport, Arts and Culture to explain:

a) the position regarding the holding of political meetings at schools and whose responsibility it is to report damages caused by the political violence at ZANU PF meeting at Shangara Primary School in May 2012.

b) The enforcement mechanisation, the ministry is devising to make sure repairs are done.

THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION SPORT, ARTS AND CULTURE (SENATOR COLTART): It is alleged that there was violence at a ZANU PF meeting at Shangara Primary School in May 2012. Our Ministry records show that there is no school by that name in all our 10 provinces. In the light of the above, it is not possible to discuss the repair of damages. Perhaps the Hon. Member of Parliament would like to verify the correct name of the school and state possibly the province since many school names are common to district and provinces.

On the position regarding the holding of political meetings at schools and whose responsibilities it is to repair the damages caused by the political violence; In terms of Circular Number P. 7 dated 11 June 1979, Circular Number P. 53 dated February 1981 and the Ministerial Statement of 1 July 2009, schools are meant to facilitate the promotion of effective learning and teaching. To that end, School Heads should vigorously implement ministerial policy not to entertain unauthorised persons in schools. Furthermore, no partisan political paraphernalia, including documents, pamphlets and posters should be displayed in schools. No school premises are to be used by any persons, groups or organisations without permission first being obtained in writing from the Permanent Secretary in compliance with Circular P7 and P53 mentioned above.

The core business of the school is teaching and learning. The school is the knowledge site for learners and there must be minimal disruption to the activities which go on there. Ministry regulations prohibit the use of school premises to further political objectives. The prohibition against use of school premises to further political objectives is as outlined in the following text;

· The responsible authority of every school, Government or non Government shall take whatever measures necessary to prevent any part of the school premises from being used to further a political objective.

· If any part of the school premises is used to further a political objective, the head of the school shall immediately report the matter to the police and to the Secretary and to the School Development Committee.

  • Any;

- Teacher or other member of staff of a school, or member of the responsible authority of a school, who knowingly permits any part of the school premises to be used to further a political objective; or

- Head of a school, who, without just cause, fails to report to the police or to the Secretary, the use of any part of the school premises to further a political objective; person who knowingly uses any part of school premises to further a political objective; shall be guilty of an offence and liable to a fine not exceeding level five or to imprisonment for a period not exceeding six months or to both such fine and such imprisonment for a period not exceeding six months or to both such fine and such imprisonment.

Without limiting the above, any of the following activities, when conducted in or on school premises, shall be regarded as using the school premises to further a political objective -

- the holding of a meeting to express support for a candidate for election to a local authority or Parliament or to the office of President;

- the holding of a meeting at which a member of a local authority or Parliament addresses persons in order to persuade them to support a particular political party;

However, the school premises shall not be regarded as being used to further a political objective when:

- school premises are used by electoral officers for polling in an election and election agents or candidates are present at the school on polling day for the purpose of the election or

- school hostel and any of the school's facilities are hired by a political party during school holidays to accommodate members of the party who are attending a party congress.

Under the above scenarios, costs for damages to school property while using the school premises as a venue for meeting, should be met by the organisers of the meeting in line with the agreement entered into between the party and the school prior to using the school facilities.

In conclusion Mr. Speaker, we have seen that where there has been political violence and political activities in schools, there is a correlation between that and the deterioration in results. We have demonstrated and we have seen in areas where there has been a high level of political violence that often qualified teachers have left schools resulting in unqualified teachers taking over. The inevitable result is a dramatic drop in the results of children attending that school. To that extend, I trust that all hon. members will fully support these new regulations which are designed not to further the objective of any one political party but to make schools havens of peace and non political activity.

RECEIVING OF PENSIONS

41. MR. CROSS asked the Minister of Public Service to explain to the House:

a) Why pensioners are not receiving their pensions from the Central

Payments Office;

b) Indicate when the audit of the pensions data base will be

undertaken to establish the number of active pensioners who are

still eligible for a state pension;

c) To confirm the status of the findings supported by the Governments

of Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe and U.K. for the purpose of federal

pensions.

THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS on behalf of THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE: On part (a), most payments from the Consolidated Revenue Fund are currently being made through the Public Finance Management System which replaced the old system that was being used by the Central Payments office. The Central Payments office, as an office, still exists but the payment system has changed.

Pensioners are being paid through the Public Finance Management System, which is the current system being used by Government for payments from the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

On part (b), the number of active pensioners in the database is known. Statistics of these pensioners are submitted to the Ministry of Finance every month together with the pension bill.

To ensure that deceased pensioners are not paid, the Pensions Office verifies electronically on a monthly basis records in its database against records in the Registrar General's dataset. All deceased pensioners are thus removed from the database monthly, using this verification method.

In addition to the above, Pensions Office is sending out life certificates to pensioners to confirm their existence. If life certificates are not returned, pension payments are immediately suspended. In the case of pensioners resident outside Zimbabwe, all remittances were suspended and reinstatements are done only after receipt of life certificates.

On part (c), federal pensions are paid by the British Government through Crown Agents. The Government of Zimbabwe is not paying federal pensions. Therefore, Crown Agents may be in a position to confirm the current status of that fund.

MOTION

ADJOURNMENT OF THE HOUSE

THE MINISTER OF CONSTITUTIONAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS: Mr. Speaker Sir, it has been a longish afternoon, I move that the House do now adjourn.

MR. CROSS: Mr. Speaker, there are two questions that I have asked today - question number 24 and 33. Question number 23 has been directed to the Minister of Industry. I think it is three months since I saw the Minister in this House and this question has been on the Order Paper for two and a half months. I really think it is an urgent matter. It is now 15 months since the ESSAR deal was signed and I think the Minister has not been able to keep this House informed of what is happening. This is probably the biggest business deal ever conducted in Zimbabwe. The fact that it is not being implemented is affecting hundreds of thousands of people in the Midlands and thousands of workers. I would really ask that the Clerk of Parliament write to the Minister and at least ask him to afford us the privilege of a working response. On the question of…

MR. BHASIKITI-CHUMA: On a point of order………

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: What is your point of order?

MR. BHASIKITI-CHUMA: My point of order is that the hon. member could have raised that issue at the point the question was being read and now the question is, it is not that question. So he is out of order.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order not sustained. Hon Cross, can you continue?

MR. CROSS: Thank you Mr. Speaker. The second question was in connection with the forthcoming conference at the Victoria Falls. I asked the Minister of Tourism to brief the House on the status of preparations for the conference.

It is fifteen months to go to this conference. In a period of time we have to build a conference centre for 5000 people and a five star hotel. There is no way we can be ready and I will again ask the Clerk of Parliament to make relevant arrangements to make the Minister brief the House either verbally or as soon as possible or to give us a written response.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Hon. Cross, the point of order was supposed to be on the motion moving adjournment of the House. However, your point of concern has been noted and we shall ask the Minister of Constitutional and Parliamentary Affairs to reason with the Ministers so that they come and provide the answers.

THE MINISTER OF CONSTITUTIONAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS: Every right thinking person is concerned when issues are not addressed timeously. A week ago, I read out in Cabinet the number of questions which are outstanding and the Ministers who were supposed to address those questions. Yesterday, a copy of the Order Paper was circulated to each and every Minister who was in Cabinet yesterday, again to remind Ministers of their responsibilities to come and respond to questions. I can confirm that the Minister of Industry was in Cabinet yesterday and he would have been aware of his responsibility in this regard. The Minister of Hospitality and Tourism Industry was not in Cabinet and I am therefore unable to say whether he is in the country or he is elsewhere, but I take the point which is made and we will make sure that the Ministers concerned are made alive of their responsibilities.

Motion put and agreed to.

The House adjourned at a Quarter to Six O'clock p.m.

 

 

 

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National Assembly Hansard Vol. 38 NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD - 13 JUNE 2012 VOL. 38 NO. 40