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NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD 17 AUGUST 2016 VOL 42 NO 82

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PARLIAMENT OF ZIMBABWE

Wednesday, 17th August, 2016

The National Assembly met at a Quarter-past Two O’clock p.m.

PRAYERS

(THE HON. SPEAKER in the Chair)

ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE HON. SPEAKER

VACANCY IN THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

THE HON. SPEAKER:  I would like to inform the House that on the 16th August 2016, I was notified by the Zimbabwe African National Union Patriotic Front (ZANU PF) that Mr. Munacho Mutezo, a Member of the National Assembly for Chimanimani Constituency had ceased to be a Member of ZANU PF.  Therefore, he no longer represents the interest of the party in Parliament.  Section 129 (l) (k) of the Constitution of Zimbabwe provides as follows: “The seat of a Member of Parliament becomes vacant if the Member has ceased to belong to the political party of which he or she was a member when elected to Parliament and the political party concerned by written notice to the Speaker or the President of the Senate as the case maybe, has declared that the member has ceased to belong to it”. 

Consequently, a vacancy has arisen in Chimanimani West Constituency by operation of the law.  The necessary administrative measures will be taken to inform His Excellency the President of the Republic of Zimbabwe and the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission (ZEC) for the existence of the vacancy in line with Section 39 (1) of the Electoral Act, Chapter 213 as amended.

MOTION

 LEAVE TO MOVE A MOTION ON A DEFINITE MATTER OF URGENT PUBLIC IMPORTANCE: CONDUCT OF CITIZENS CLAIMING TO BE POLICE OFFICERS

          HON. CHAMISA:  Hon. Speaker Sir, subject to what I discussed with you, I had put forward the intention and desire to table my motion, which motion you have indicated and in fact, you saw it but you were awaiting a copy.  I would favour you with an e-copy instead.  As a very digital Speaker, you will not have problems with it. I do not believe that you would want to insist on the analogue platform.

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Yes.  Can you proceed?

          HON. CHAMISA:  Thank you very much Hon. Speaker Sir.  My motion is a motion regarding urgent national importance.  In terms of our rules, as you are aware, as Members of Parliament and as Parliament, we are allowed subject to that confirmation on account of 25 legislators or Members of Parliament supporting that motion to raise it.  This motion has to do with what we have witnessed in our country – a very sad development which I have no doubt is not supported by any legitimate Member of Parliament and we are all legitimate Members of Parliament.  The issue of the conduct of citizens who claim to be police officers because their conduct has not been consistent with the conduct of police officers and here reads the motion:

“NOTING the disturbing images and video footage of men and women in police uniform beating up innocent citizens and civilians; 

AWARE that the Police Charter rests on the settled principles -[AN HON. MEMBER:  Get away!]- - [AN HON. MEMBER:  Inaudible interjections.]- - [AN HON. MEMBER: Mudarikwa.]- - [AN HON. MEMBER: Ndi honourable uyu.]-

          HON. MUTSEYAMI:  On a point of order Mr. Speaker.  Thank you.  My point of order is, during the presentation by Hon. Chamisa, Hon. Member of Parliament Matangira has pronounced clearly - “Get away’’ to an Hon. Member. Kubva ati ngakagare pasi kutaura Hon. Member of Parliament.

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order.  Hon. Matangira, did you actually say that?

          *HON. MATANGIRA: I am seated on the floor cross legged. How did he see me?  I did not say anything – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.]-

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order.  The Chair did not get to hear that.  So, I will ask Hon. Chamisa to proceed.

          HON. GONESE:  Just a follow up Hon. Speaker Sir.  I believe that we have machines.  On the same issue, we have cameras today and we also have the Hansard recording and I was going to propose that you study the matter to try to investigate and ascertain because clearly I heard that voice saying ‘get out’.  You try to establish it and thereafter you can come up with a ruling when you have carried out those investigations.

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order.  I have said order.  I will investigate the matter.

          HON. CHAMISA:  Thank you very much Mr. Speaker Sir.  I just want to say that when we come here to represent the people who elected us, we also expect total respect because the views that we hold are not individual views and I hope that we respect members when they raise their issues.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Alright.

HON. CHAMISA:  I just want to emphasise that because we cannot use macho tactics in a House of Assembly like this one.  Shouting should not be for this House and that Mr. Speaker, I just wanted it to be noted.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Hon. Chamisa, do you want to take the Chair.  I said I will investigate the matter.

HON. CHAMISA:  Thank you Hon. Speaker Sir.  Let me just take the motion once more.

“NOTING the disturbing images and video footage of men and women in police uniform – beating up innocent civilians and citizens;

AWARE that the Police Charter rests on the settled principle of pro lege, pro patria and pro populi.’  - I am sure that those who have served in the police would know what I mean.  It does mean for the law, for the country and for the people.

“WORRIED by the recent behaviour and conduct of certain police details in their handling and beating up of demonstrating and peace loving citizens;

CONCERNED with human rights abuses and rule by law instead of rule of law instigated by certain police officers or persons masquerading as police;

PERTURBED that the Minister responsible for the police or the Commissioner General have not made effort to discipline the perpetrators or make a statement on those who violated the national Constitution.

FURTHER CONCERNED that the bad behaviour of these few bad men in our midst have caused animosity between the citizens who do a good job.

FURTHER ACKNOWLEDGING that the President of the Republic, Mr. Mugabe, has publicly condemned – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.]-

THE HON. SPEAKER:  You should address the President as His Excellency – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.]- Order, order.

HON. CHAMISA:  Let me take that one once more….

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Hon. Chamisa, as a former Minister, surely you know how to address His Excellency the President.

HON. CHAMISA: Oh yes.  I said acknowledging that His Excellency, the President of the Republic of Zimbabwe, Mr. Robert Gabriel Mugabe has publicly condemned – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.]-

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Can you carry on?

HON. CHAMISA:  …..has publicly condemned the public who were exercising their rights but without correspondingly condemning those who have abused citizen rights and particularly those who are violating the Constitution.

NOW THEREFORE CALL UPON THIS HOUSE to do the following:

  1. a) Ask the Minister of Home Affairs to investigate the conduct of the police and report to Parliament within the shortest possible time.
  2. b) Ask the Minister of Home Affairs to issue a public apology in the context of that investigation for the untoward conduct of some of the police officers.
  3. c) Immediately implement a training programme for our police to equip them with the human rights curriculum as is required by the Constitution and the statutes of our country.
  4. d) To put in place an Act of Parliament setting up an independent complaints mechanism for members of the public to report cases of such abuses as contemplated by Section 210 of the Constitution of Zimbabwe.

Last but not least, for Parliament to set up a Commission of Inquiry to investigate into the conduct.

Hon. Speaker Sir, I had not acknowledged the presence of the Vice President of the Republic of Zimbabwe, Hon E. D. Mnangagwa.  I want to acknowledge him.  Shumba makadini?  - [HON. MEMBERS:  Hear, hear.]-  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I just had to make sure we complete the protocol since I had already acknowledged the President.  Thank you very much.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  I had indicated Hon. Chamisa that the very first opening paragraph of the motion is very vague.  It had to be specific to the disturbing images and video footage.  We need to know when that exactly occurred so that we can - [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.]-  Order, order, so that the motion is properly contextualized and also, I noticed that the motion calls for some very fundamental processes, which - in fact could have been highlighted in the presentation of the motion by way of debate.  So I will have to get that detailed information before I can allow the motion to be moved.

HON. CHAMISA:  Thank you Hon. Speaker Sir.  It is just safe to indicate that this was a motion on an urgent matter of public importance.  I am sure as a learned colleague, you are aware that once we invoke urgency, we cannot wait beyond certain circumstances.  This is being necessitated by what happened even today and I indicated to you.  Granted, the issue of the footage has not been particularized to say when but I was going to do that because I have got that footage and I intended to then give you details so that I do not load you with form unnecessarily.

I seek your indulgence to allow the motion; by the time we then debate it, I would have given you those details if you want them.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  I need to be favoured with the actual footage so that I have got the dates and so on and then I will make a decision.  If the Hon. Member could actually favour the Speaker and then we contextualize the motion accordingly.

HON. ENG. MUDZURI:  On a point of order Mr. Speaker.  This point of order is based on my previous request that - I am happy that the Vice President is around today. My point of order is around our duty as Parliamentarians to ensure that we are favoured with the business of the Minister of Finance in terms of introducing bond notes and in terms of regularizing the civil servants salaries and pensioners so that when we talk out there, we have something to discuss and defend the central Government. 

Our duty as parliamentarians must leave us with that responsibility of checking the Executive in ensuring that they do what is necessary.  We, as parliamentarians, will be able to explain ourselves to say this is what Government is doing.  The Minister promised to come here last month and I am sure on the 25th of this month, he is supposed to bring a half annual statement and we are saying, before he brings this, we must be favoured with what is happening to enable us to speak to our constituents.

Mr. Speaker Sir, it is our responsibility and your responsibility to help us so that we make history and we are not seen to just endorse what the Executive is doing.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  I am advised Hon. Member that the Hon. Minister of Finance made a statement in that regard.  We will check in the Hansard and then favour you with a copy.

ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

          HON. MUTSEYAMI:  On a point of order, Mr. Speaker.  My point of order is to do with the presence of Cabinet Ministers to answer questions in this House.  As we speak, we only have less than seven Cabinet Ministers out of a possible 40 and if we include the Deputy Ministers the number should be 71.  But we only have seven, yet we have one of the largest Cabinet in this world.

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order Hon Members.  I think we should stop whipping a dead horse.  Section 107 of the Constitution is very clear.  Ministers and Deputy Ministers are to be here to answer to Parliament and where a Minister is not available, the Leader of Government Business in Parliament will handle those questions.  So, the point of order does not arise.

          HON. ZINDI:  My question is directed to the Hon. Minister of Mines.  In relation to our Constitution Section 18(2) which states that the State, all Institutions and Agencies of the State and Government at every level must take practical measures to ensure that all local communities have equitable access to resources to promote their development.  Citing this section; in Manicaland we do have diamonds but these diamonds …

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Hon. Member, can you please ask the question, do not explain the question.

HON. ZINDI:  My question therefore Hon. Speaker is what is the policy of the Ministry of Mines and Mining Development in relation to this section, which I have just cited on the diamonds which have been discovered in Manicaland, where the community has not accessed and developed their communities as a result of that found, which is the diamond.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF MINES AND MINING DEVELOPMENT (HON. MOYO):  I thank the Hon. Member for that question.  I think the Hon. Member correctly referenced a section of the Constitution, so naturally Government policy has to align itself to the demands of the National Constitution.  Implementation to close the gap of misalignment may take time.  However, the question asked is specific to Manicaland and requires data to see to what extent the community has benefitted against what the investors or operators have realised.  I would suggest therefore that the question be put in writing to allow us to examine the detail of that specific business activity before we bring the response to the House.

+HON. J. TSHUMA:  My question is directed to the Minister of Agriculture.  I would like to find out from the Minister the progress made in the resuscitation of the Cold Storage Commission (CSC) in Bulawayo.

THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, MECHANISATION AND IRRIGATION DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. MADE):  I want to thank the Hon. Member for raising the question on the work relating to the resuscitation of the Cold Storage Commission in Bulawayo.  I want to assure the Hon. Member that there is work in progress in relation to the resuscitation of the CSC.

HON. HOLDER:  I would like the Minister of Mines and Mining Development to explain to this House; since the consolidation of the ZCDC, which was mining diamonds in Manicaland consolidated the diamond mining company, what are they doing in Gachegache?  Are there diamonds in Gachegache or what has gold got to do with diamonds?

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF MINES AND MINING DEVELOPMENT (HON. MOYO): I do not think there is a link between ZCDC and the Gachegache project.  The Gachegache project has to do with gold recovery from the alluvial sands there.  The comment that referenced diamonds simply said that there may be deposits of diamonds in that area.  They were never assessed and we never said they were at a mineable level.  The project at the moment is specifically directed to extracting gold in that river. That is what        is happening.

          HON. KHUPE:  Thank you very much Mr. Speaker Sir.  My question is directed to the Leader of the House, Hon. Vice President Mnangagwa.  In September 2015, world leaders gathered in New York and they came up with sustainable development goals which are a successor framework of the Millennium Development Goals.  They made a declaration that they were going to transform the world and they also vowed that they were going to eliminate poverty by the year 2030.  As Zimbabwe, what is it that we are doing or have done to make sure that there are monitoring and evaluation mechanisms to determine the impact and sustainability of the sustainable development goals if indeed we are to eliminate poverty by the year 2030.

          THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. MNANGAGWA):  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir, I also want to thank the Hon. Member, the Vice President of MDC-T for the question.  I want to thank her for remembering what happened in 2015.  I feel very elated that she thinks that I should remember the decision which was taken at that time.   Mr. Speaker Sir, in terms of policy, I can assure the Hon. Member and the House that everything is being done in the various sub-sectors of the economy to improve the lives of our people.  In particular, coming to the situation of Zimbabwe, we believe that the primary challenge we are facing in this country which I believe everybody who is a citizen of this country would agree that we have a primary economy which is on the bedrock of our agricultural sector. 

Everything is being done by Government and the public sector to support our agricultural sector so that we put behind the issue of continuously importing food, whether there is good season in terms of rain or there is drought.  We have now put measures to make sure that there is food sufficiency in the country.  We wish to accomplish this goal within the next four seasons.  There are two seasons in a year, this means in two years’ time, we shall have accomplished that area.

          Then the other areas which are directed to dealing with the question of alleviating or eradicating poverty among the people; we have various sectors of the economy which deal with those issues.  Obviously, the economy is not performing well but everything is being done by Government, private sector, public sector and parastatals to do our best under these circumstances to make sure we improve the lives of our people. 

          In the area of infrastructural development, I am sure colleagues are fully aware about the projects that are underway which are unfolding in the infrastructural development sector.  We are also fully aware about what is happening in the area of tourism.  We have just completed the runway at Victoria Falls which now is going to be able to take on board bigger planes to land.  As a matter of fact, China alone has something like 250 million tourists per year which is expected to grow to 600 million by 2020.  If we structure our tourism with countries of that nature and various other countries worldwide, we believe that now with the runway which we have completed, we should be able to improve our tourism sector.  As a matter of fact, the indication and projection of that sector shows growth.

          Mr. Speaker Sir, we also go into the areas of manufacturing and ICT.  We are attending to all these areas in order to improve the lives of our people.  More-so, we will continue to make sure that the areas of health and education receive full attention and we hope to receive cooperation from all citizens of this country. 

I am aware that this subject is at the heart of the former Deputy Prime Minister because when he was Deputy Prime Minister, she used to champion this sector very ably and I still recognise that you have not forgotten this thing which you were championing at that time.  I thank you. 

+HON. MISIHAIRABWI-MUSHONGA: Thank you Mr. Speaker.  My question is directed to the Hon. Vice President, Hon. Mnangagwa.  How is the Government handling the issue of deceased people especially those who died during the Gukurahundi period to have proper reburials like what we have seen happening here in Mashonaland, they were reburied properly.  I have noticed that there are people who are trying to rebury those people properly and have a proper burial place for them.   If that is what the villagers want to do, they want to find out from the Government how they can go about exhuming the bodies and reburying those people properly. 

*THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. MNANGAGWA):  I want to thank the Hon. Member for her question that is in connection with those that are able to rebury those that were not properly buried.  It could be that they know that here in Mashonaland, the war veterans are going around the country looking for their fellow veterans who were not properly buried and reburying them.  We cannot order these war veterans to do that but this can be done by the Ministry of Home Affairs. They have a department that could deal with that.  If there are remains that need to be reburied, that can be done by that Ministry.

+HON. MISIHAIRABWI-MUSHONGA:  I do not know whether you understood the question.  I said those who died during the Gukurahundi period.  There are a lot of people who were killed during the Gukurahundi period.  I am saying the villagers want the bodies to be exhumed and reburied properly, how can they go about it.

*HON. E. MNANGAGWA: If my niece was listening properly, I have said that all those whose remains have not been properly buried all over the country, all such matters should be referred to the Ministry of Home Affairs, they are the relevant authority that deal with such issues.  I thank you.

HON. MANDIPAKA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker. My question is directed to the Minister of Rural Development and Preservation of Culture and Heritage, Hon. A. Ncube. Realising that our culture is being adulterated by western values, what is Government policy in terms of promotion of our culture and heritage? I thank you.

          THE MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND PRESERVATION OF CULTURE AND HERITAGE (HON. A. NCUBE): Thank you Mr. Speaker for the question raised by Hon. Mandipaka. May I ask the Hon. Member to put his question in writing so that I can give a favourable response. Thank you.

          HON. MANGAMI: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. My question is directed to the Minister of Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development. What is Government policy regarding the vaccination of animals like dogs against rabies in terms of payments that people make?

THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, MECHANISATION AND IRRIGATION DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. MADE) Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the Hon. Member for raising the question regarding vaccinations. There are vaccinations that are mandatory and that relate to certain issues that are free. So, if it is relating to those vaccinations that are free, that is what it is and you have to take your animals as and when they are called, particularly for rabies vaccination.

*HON. CHIBAYA: Thank you Mr. Speaker. My question is directed to the Deputy Minister of Public Service, Labour and Social Services. Hon. Minister, the delay that you are experiencing in paying civil servants, are we not likely to get to December with the civil servants not having been paid some months salaries? What steps have you put in place to ensure that your workers get their salaries timeously? I thank you. 

*THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE, LABOUR AND SOCIAL SERVICES (HON. ENG. MATANGAIDZE) Thank you Hon. Speaker. I would like to thank the Hon. Member for the question. If you look at it, you would see that we are starting to pay from the 23rd, 26th, 2nd and lastly on the 6th. You will observe that we delayed in the payments of pensioners last month, but we have now brought this forward. We do not foresee a situation where we will have failed to pay certain months, come December. As Government, we are working to ensure that normalcy returns to the normal payment dates for the Civil Service and others. I thank you.

*HON. CHAMISA: Thank you Mr. Speaker. My supplementary question is directed to the Hon. Minister of Public Service, Labour and Social Services. I read in the newspaper a few weeks ago and observed that Hon. Magufuli from Tanzania, upon realising that they were having funding problems, have come up with austerity measures. Among these, is that 4 X 4 vehicles should not be used by Government Ministers.

If you want to individually buy yourself one, that is okay and also that when you travel, you should no longer be in business class. Are we also going to foresee a situation where we are not going to have new 4 X 4 vehicles purchased for you as well as Hon. Members; that we will not have luxury vehicles so that we could be travelling in Honda Vitz vehicles?  We would want to see Hon. Gumbo riding in a Honda Vitz or Hon. O. Mpofu in a Toyota Raum. Are we likely to see such a situation Hon. Matangaidze?

*HON. ENG. MATANGAIDZE: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. These are suggestions that are being given to us by the Vice President of MDC-T, Hon. Chamisa. He is a newly appointed Vice President, so I think he is eager to work. The Government is going to look into the suggestions and see those making sense. We will then adopt those. I thank you.

HON. MUNENGAMI: Thank you Hon. Speaker. I think every Ministry has got a policy which it uses in terms of its functions. Hon. Mandipaka asked a policy question with regards to the preservation of culture in our country. I was a little bit surprised to hear the Minister saying they do not have a policy with regards to the preservation of culture. I just wanted to know if we have Ministries that work without policies with regard to their own functions. Thank you Mr. Speaker.

*THE HON. SPEAKER: Hon. Member, that is not a point of order. We have already gone past that question. We are now on the question that relates to labour.

HON. KWARAMBA: We have heard about command farming from the media, but there has not been a Ministerial Statement. May I ask the Hon. Minister of Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development to shed more light on command farming? Thank you.

THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, MECHANISATION AND IRRIGATION DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. MADE): Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the Hon. Member but that is a detailed question in terms of the details that I can give. I can only say that today already, the Chairman of the Food and Nutrition Security...

THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, order Hon. Minister if you could raise your voice a little so that they hear you.

          HON. DR. MADE:  I am saying in terms of technical detail of that programme.  This morning already, detailed discussions have been given on that programme, if there are any further details, I would be able to put them in a detailed response to a written question, otherwise today a press briefing has been given that has details on command agriculture, as was given this morning to the press.  So I plead with the Hon. Member to allow us to have that programme to be broadcast this evening.

          *HON. MAHOKA:  My question is directed to the Minister of Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development, Hon. Dr. Made.  May you inform us on the preparations that the Government has done for tobacco farming which is going to commence on 1st September because you are talking about maize producer prices.  What about for tobacco farmers?  In the rural areas we do not have collateral.  I thank you.

*THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, MECHANISATION AND IRRIGATION DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. MADE):  Mr. Speaker, let me thank the Hon. Member.  Firstly I would like to say that tobacco is in a better position.  We know that in the tobacco industry we do not intervene much, as is the case with maize production.

Currently, we are in the second season for assistance in cotton production.  In tobacco farming we have contractors and it is done under contract farming and is doing quite well.  We are aware that farmers are complaining mostly about the banks – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.]

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order Hon. Members at the back, may you listen to what the Hon. Minister is saying please.  You may proceed Hon. Minister.

*HON. DR. MADE:  We know that this season the banks would want to request for a lot of surety from tobacco farmers.  We would want to say that the tobacco farmers are better placed than most of the farmers but we are going to look into the matter and see how best we can attend to your grievances.

There is also a plan that those who grow tobacco can also grow maize and alternate one hectarage for maize and tobacco so that they can be in the same programme that we are running for maize farmers, because the majority of them have irrigation systems in place.  When there is crop rotation, we anticipate that those who are into tobacco farming will also go into the other programme. 

For small scale farmers, we have other projects that we would want to bring on board that deal with irrigation so that the small scale farmers can also produce tobacco through mechanisation.  I thank you.

HON. ZINDI:  My supplementary question is on the issue of tobacco and related to the new policy which requires all tobacco growers to collect their cash from the banks … - [AN HON. MEMBER: Which banks?] -  All banks, they were asked to open bank accounts so that they get their monies after sales at the tobacco auction floors through their banks.

Now the obtaining situation is that they are not able to access that cash.  What is the Ministry doing in order to ensure that tobacco farmers are able to access their proceeds or profits after selling their tobacco so then they can return to the farmland because come 1st September, they are supposed to be planting for the coming season.  What is the policy?  What is the Ministry doing about that?

HON. DR. MADE:  I would like to thank the Hon. Member for raising that question pertaining to the tobacco farmers.  In terms of the intervention, we have already brought this matter to the attention of the Minister of Finance and Economic Development as well as the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe through the Tobacco Marketing Board. The matter is being looked into so that we facilitate the activities of the tobacco farmers.  I thank you.

*HON. MUTSEYAMI:  Thank you Mr. Speaker, my question is directed to the Hon. Vice President and Minister of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs, Hon. Mnangagwa.  Hon. Vice President, countrywide and in all our councils, some councils owe salaries to their workers in excess of 15 months, two years and others in excess of three years and because of these debts, the councils are now unable to pay their own workers because they owe them a lot of money.

Of note is the fact that majority of debts are by central Government and have been outstanding for a long time.  As a Government that has noticed that there is this problem countrywide, what plans have you put in place?  Have you set up a committee or any other modalities to ensure that these workers are paid so that there will other arrangements for resolving these council woes in these councils after central Government would have done its own interventions?  I thank you.

 *THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. MNANGAGWA):  Thank you Madam Speaker, we address policy questions.  If it is a question on what does the Government say to someone who is supposed to pay for services rendered …

HON. MUTSEYAMI:  On a point of order Madam Speaker.  My question to the Hon. Vice President is to do with councils across the country.  We have noted, across the country that in most councils, the workers are owed in excess of 15 months, two years, three years and so forth.  Most of these dues are as a result of debts on the part of central Government, of monies that they are supposed to pay to these councils.

Then I was asking Hon. Vice President as the Deputy President for the Republic of Zimbabwe what policy is the Government coming up with in order to address the dues that have accumulated across the country.  Chances are that councils will not have the capacity to clear their dues.  What is the Government policy in that regard so that we help workers across the country?  Thank you.

          *THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. MNANGAGWA):  Thank you Madam Speaker.  I am gifted in that I understand both English and Shona.  I was answering in Shona because he first asked in Shona.  He has not added anything new on what he said in Shona.  He said that local authorities countrywide are failing to pay their workers because they are owed money by Central Government.  As a result of that, what is the Government’s policy?  The Government policy is that you must pay your debts.  People should pay all their debts that need to be paid. 

If such a question was put in written form, the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing would be in a position to know because I do not believe that all local authorities have the same problems.  The relevant Minister can then be in a position to articulate issues as pertains to each and every local authority.  It is not correct to say that all council workers have not been paid for more than 15 months.  Some are paying and others have lesser months that they owe their workers.  However, the Government policy is that everyone should pay their debts.  I thank you.

*HON. MUNENGAMI:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  The Vice President has mentioned that people should pay their debts.  Therefore, my question is in 2013, the Government directed local authorities to write off all the debts that were accrued by residents.  That is when this problem started.  Now that they are failing to raise revenue by having corrected an anomaly in 2013, what measures are being put in place by the Government to ensure that this problem could be cleared?  I foresee the same problem coming in 2018 when the Government is going to write off all the debts and councils continue to sink into oblivion.  I thank you.

*HON. E. MNANGAGWA:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  He has seen the crux of the matter which he believes I have not seen.  He had not mentioned that point and that is why I have not addressed it.  He said there was a time when the Government had to write off certain known debts.  This is not the issue today.  If it is the issue, you can go back to the Government.  Madam Speaker, they should take the matter to the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing and tell him that it is not a fresh issue; it arose as a result of Government policy.  This could be solved without difficulty. 

*HON. CHIBAYA:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  From what you have said Hon. Vice President, my supplementary question is what are you doing as a Government.  We know that we have experienced this problem.  Can you not do something to alleviate the problems that councils are facing?  The councils were supposed to receive money from the residents.

*THE DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Hon. Member, that question has been answered adequately.  Order, order please.  If we were listening attentively, the Hon. Vice President said every local authority has its own problems and each council should present its problems to the Government; they should go to the Ministry concerned. 

HON. A. MNANGAGWA:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  My question is directed to the Minister of Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development.  Maybe God is going to bless us with rainfall this year.  What is the Ministry’s preparedness in terms of inputs?  I thank you.       

*THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, MECHANISATION AND IRRIGATION DEVELOPMENT:  I would like to thank the Hon. Member for the question.  We are waiting for the Meteorological Department to inform us on the weather pattern.  As a Ministry, we are anticipating a good farming season.  The preparations that were done regards command agriculture.  However, we are going to wait for what the Meteorological Department is going to tell us.  This programme is going to be dealing with rural farmers.  We are hopeful that God is going to bless us with good rains.  We are going to go ahead with the Presidential Input Scheme, where we are going to give seed packs and fertilizers to rural farmers so as to assist them so that they can realise meaningful harvests.  We have put a lot of priority as regards farming, those farmers that are in A1 and the programme that is directed towards those that are in the small irrigation schemes, especially those that are receiving machinery from Brazil.  We are saying that we are now getting to the second phase.

          In the second phase, we will be targeting those that are in rainfall areas that do not have a high rainfall pattern.  We are grateful to the Brazilians for them to have been able to assist us to go into Phase 2.  It was as a result of success of Phase 1 of the programme.  In Phase 3, we are going to be targeting cotton farmers and we are into the second season where we are giving assistance to cotton farmers.  There are those dry or hard rainfall areas where we would want to give assistance.  Thank you Madam Speaker.

          *HON. MAJAYA:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  This Presidential Scheme that gives members inputs – seeds and fertilizers used to give predominantly ZANU PF members.  This time around, are you going to be giving to every Tom, Dick and Harry or it is going to be another predominantly ZANU PF scheme?

          *HON. DR. MADE: Madam Speaker, I would want to thank the Hon. Member for the question.  I specifically pointed out that the Presidential Scheme targets all farmers that are in the communal areas; in the A1, in the old resettlement schemes and small scale.  I said these are farmers and I did not say that they should belong to a particular political party.  I thank you.

          *HON. MATANGIRA:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  My supplementary question is that, besides command agriculture, does Government have any other plans that it has put in place as regards banking so that farmers could access the finance because it is not everyone who can be on this particular programme?  I thank you.

          *HON. DR. MADE:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  I may reiterate that, that question has been answered.  I earlier on said that we are going to look at the grievances of farmers holistically and we are not going to be excluding any type of a farmer by saying that they belong to the command scheme or any other such scheme.  We want to holistically attend to the issues of our farmers so that they all benefit from Government programmes and that there should be programmes where our farmers are well treated by banks.  But as farmers, we should also listen to what the banks are saying and those that are giving us assistance I thank you.

          HON. MARUMAHOKO:  Thank you Hon. Speaker.  My question is directed to the Minister of Industry and Commerce.  Some three years ago, we saw companies like Lever Brothers and Reckitt and Coleman relocating to South Africa and starting to produce from there and then export to Zimbabwe.  Now, in view of Statutory Instrument 64, what is the position of their products into the country?  I thank you.

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (HON. MABUWA):  Thank you Madam Speaker Ma’am.  I would like to thank the Hon. Member for this very important question.  Yes, you rightfully note that in the years 2009 when we all were saying that our shelves are now occupied, they were occupied by imports.  At that, some firms particularly the ones which you mentioned, the sector where Lever Brothers is performing in the edibles – cooking oil or butter if you want, was operating then at 10%.  But I am happy to say that now, because of removing items from the open general import licence and issuing out import licences for particular products that show that they are on the recovery in terms of manufacturing here in the country, we have had revival of industries.  Particularly the oils industry has improved from the 10% then three years ago to now operating at 100%.  We are even ready to export.  I thank you.

          *HON. MARIDADI:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  My question is directed to Hon. Minister Supa Mandiwanzira.  I want to find out what Government policy allows the Hon. Minister to have a motor vehicle purchased for him by a parastatal which is under his Ministry?  I am saying so in light of the allegations that you are said to have received a loan for $200 000 and you bought a motor vehicle for $190 000.  It is an infinite motor vehicle.  Is it Government policy that parastatals under them, when they have Government vehicles that are purchased for them…

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  I do not think that, that question was supposed to go straight to the Minister.  The question is supposed to go to the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development because he is the one who negotiates for that.

          HON. MARIDADI:  Madam Speaker, I would have asked the Ministry of Transport and Infrastructural Development in relation to vehicles that are made available by Government to Ministers in general.  But, this is a specific case where a Minister has instructed a parastatal under his purview to buy him a vehicle.  So, it has nothing to do with the Minister of Transport and Infrastructure Development.

          Madam Speaker, the Minister is available unless Hon. Gumbo is saying that he is a better Minister than the Minister.  The Minister has to answer for himself.  Hon. Gumbo, allow Hon. Mandiwanzira to answer the question.  Thank you.

          THE MINISTER OF INFORMATION COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY, POSTAL AND COURIER SERVICES (HON. MANDIWANZIRA): Thank you Madam Speaker.  I would like to thank you for allowing me to respond to this question because it is very important that we expose the lies that have been perpetrated for the longest time and led by Hon. Maridadi, even writing articles in the newspapers – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Order Hon. Member. 

HON. MARIDADI:  On a point of order. Minister, you answered a question and not a lie – nhasi topedzerana, toenda kumapena.  Madam Speaker, the Minister must answer the question and spare us the lecture.  He must answer the question and spare us a lecture!

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Order Hon. Maridadi.  Hon. Maridari, sit down.

HON. MANDIWANZIRA:  Thank you Madam Speaker for giving me the opportunity to answer a question which is supposedly fact but it is not fact.  The reality of the matter is that I have never obtained a loan from Government or a parastatal to buy a vehicle.  The vehicle I drive as a condition of service vehicle issued to me by the Government of Zimbabwe is actually owned by CMED.  So, Hon Maridadi must be well informed before he abuses parliamentary privilege to make allegations of corruption against Ministers. 

It is very important that Hon. Members of the other side must not abuse their parliamentary privilege by lying – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Order, order, order Hon. Members. 

HON. MANDIWANZIRA:  I have never obtained a loan.  The car that I drive is owned by CMED.  I thank you.

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Order, order, order.  Hon. Maridadi, may you please sit down.  – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –Order, order, order Hon. Members.  Can I have order please?

Hon. Minister, it is the duty of the Minister to give the information that is required when you are asked.  It is not the duty of Members of Parliament to go around and research.  Once you are asked, you have to give a full answer so that people know what is happening –[HON. MEMBERS:  Hear, hear.] – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – Order, order.  Let us have order please.  Do not be so excited, you are Hon. Members of Parliament.

Questions Without Notice were interrupted by THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER in terms of Standing Order Number 64.

ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER

VISITORS IN THE SPEAKERS GALLERY

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  I acknowledge the presence of the Palestinian Ambassador to Zimbabwe, Her Excellency Mrs. Taghrid Senouar in the Speaker’s Gallery. - [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] -

HON. GONESE:  On a point of order.  Thank you for finally recognising me.  My point of order is very simple.  We have a question which was properly posed by Hon. Maridadi. 

Our practice and procedures are very clear.  When we have questions that have been asked on a policy matter, Hon. Members of Parliament are entitled to make follow up questions.  This is the reason why, if a Minister is responding to a question, the Minister cannot be interrupted because it is now 1545 hours.  The Minister finishes answering the question and thereafter, supplementary questions are posed and only when that question has been exhausted, that is when we can then say the time for questions without notice has expired.

For that reason, if the Minister is in the middle of giving a response….

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  The Minister was not in the middle of answering. You are out of order Hon. Member.

HON. GONESE:  The Chair cannot interrupt the Minister.

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  You are out of order Hon. Member.

HON. GONESE:  No, I am still articulating my point.  For the same rationale whereby a Minister or whoever is asking a question cannot be interrupted on the basis that time has expired.  It is my respectful submission that the question to Hon. Mandiwanzira had not yet been exhausted because we had supplementary questions which we intended to pose to the Minister but you have now allowed the Minister to leave the august House depriving us of that opportunity, right and privilege to have follow up questions to that response.

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Hon. Member, would you please take your seat. You are out of order because the Minister was sitting down after answering.  I responded giving you the opportunity that you are supposed to have the answer when the Minister answered and other members complained.  We are now going to questions with notice.

HON. SITHOLE: On a point of order. My point of order is in relation to a previous ruling made by the Speaker, Hon. Advocate Mudenda, specifically section 140 (3) which talks about the Presidential question time.  Since the presidium is here, maybe you can inquire on our behalf.  When are we going to see His Excellency coming here for question time so that he may answer some of these questions?

THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. MNANGAGWA):  Madam Speaker, I think it is important that the Chair should not bend rules because some people are insisting to violate procedures of the House.  You have closed question time and we are going to written questions.  You can only raise a point of order in terms of where we are and not where we have passed.  I thank you.  

ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS WITH NOTICE

POLICY MEASURES TO ENCOURAGE DOMESTIC PRIVATE SECTOR INVESTMENT

  1. HON. NDUNA asked the Minister of Industry and Commerce to explain the policy measures Government is putting in place to encourage domestic private sector investment as part of efforts to revive the economy.

THE MINISTER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (HON. MABUWA): I would like to thank the Hon. Member for this question which is all encompassing of the mandates of several Ministries.  However, I will highlight policy measures that my Ministry has initiated and in most cases is implementing to encourage domestic private sector investment as part of efforts to revive the economy.  The policy measures include the following:

  1. The establishment of Special Economic Zones (SEZ);
  2. The establishment of the National Competitiveness Commission (NCC);
  3. The improvement of the Ease of Doing Business;
  4. The promulgation of legal instruments that are encouraging domestic private sector investment;
  5. The management of imports and
  6. Exposing potential domestic investors through outward missions.
  7. SPECIAL ECONOMIC ZONES (SEZs)

Special Economic Zones are designated geographical regions that operate under special regulations which are different from other areas in the same country.  This provides companies which are operating within SEZs with some business advantages as compared to competitors.  These SEZs have been initially targeted to be established for the following sectors and in the following locations:

  • Bulawayo for the leather and textiles sector;
  • Lupane for petro-chemicals;
  • Victoria Falls-Gwayi-Binga-Kariba - corridor for tourism
  • Victoria falls for finance
  • Harare-Sunway City as a technology hub and
  • Harare and Mutare for diamond cutting

As you are aware Hon. Members, the SEZ Bill is now awaiting

Second Reading in this august House.

  1. NATIONAL COMPETITIVENESS COMMISSION (NCC)

The National Competitiveness Commission which was

established following recommendations by the Zimbabwe Economic Policy and Research Unit (ZEPARU) Consultants on the Cost Drivers Study has the objective of addressing the constraints that are affecting the competitiveness of the economy and encouraging local business investment and growth.  The National Competitiveness Commission will be operationalised as soon as the legal framework is in place.  The draft Bill is currently under review by the Cabinet Committee on Legislation (CCL).

  1. EASE OF DOING BUSINESS

Mr. Speaker Sir, whilst the National Competitiveness

 Commission is being finalized, several “Ease of Doing Business Reforms” are being examined by the Thematic Technical Working Groups, which have been established to enhance issues concerning:

  • Starting a business;
  • Paying taxes and trading access borders;
  • Getting credit and resolving insolvency;
  • Enforcing contracts and protecting minority investors; and
  • Registering property and getting construction permits.

These reforms are intended to streamline the business environment and encourage domestic private sector investment.

  1. LEGAL INSTRUMENTS THAT ARE ENCOURAGING INVESTMENTS

     The following are examples of legal instruments that have been put in place with the objective of encouraging domestic private sector investment:

  • Rebate of duty on capital equipment imported for use in specific industries (Statutory Instrument 6 of 2016).

-This provision grants the private sector relief from payment of duty on capital equipment and allows companies to import equipment at a lower cost.

  • VAT deferment on imported capital equipment

-Deferment of VAT is an officially sanctioned temporary

postponement of paying VAT on importation of specified goods of a capital nature imported by companies in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, aviation, transport and health sectors.  The goods should have been imported for own use by the importer.  This provision grants an importer of capital equipment a deferment of VAT for three (3) months.

          The aforementioned legal instruments, among others, are designed to encourage and support private sector investment in sectors such as manufacturing, mining, agriculture and energy.

  1. MANAGEMENT OF IMPORTS

          Government is utilizing the management of imports as a tool for the resuscitation and growth of new industries.  The removal of selected products from the Open General Import Licence (OGIL) is currently being done through the following Statutory Instruments among others:

  • I. 18 of 2016 (23 pharmaceutical products);
  • I. 19 of 2016 (second hand clothing, shoes and blankets);
  • I. 20 of 2016 (batteries, candles, floor polish and tobacco twine);
  • I. 126 of 2016 (milk, potatoes, tomatoes, onions, biscuits, yeast, cement, soap and soap preparations, tubes, pipes, conveyor belts, rubber hoses and plastic bags);
  • I. 6 of 2014 (sugar)
  • I. 64 of 2016 (42 items)
  1. EXPOSING POTENTIAL DOMESTIC INVESTORS THROUGH OUTWARD MISSIONS.

          Government has come up with pipeline projects available for

possible funding in line with the industrialization agenda.  Business

persons have participated in outward missions that include Russia,

Japan, South Africa and Hungary; just to mention a few.  Hon. Members

should note that additional investment initiatives are being implemented

to support domestic private sector investment by other line Ministries

and that all these initiatives are being spearheaded by the Minister

 

of Macro-Economic Planning and Investment Promotion.

HON. NDUNA:  I have a supplementary questionWhat I need to know specifically is what it is that the Ministry is doing to promote the manufacture and export of refrigeration equipment that is being manufactured by local indigenous companies such as Capri.

HON. MABUWA:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  This is a new question which I cannot respond to off the cuff.  May I request Hon. Nduna in his usual tradition to put it in writing?

HON. GABBUZA:  From the list of goods that the Minister is saying are allowed to be imported, they are agricultural products.  We still see supermarkets selling imported agricultural produce.  Why are these supermarkets not being arrested or stopped from selling imported produce since there is evidence of the imported produce in the supermarkets.

HON. MABUWA: That is a very important follow up question.  The issue is that there is no ban but there is a control.  You will find that the agriculture produce that is imported and seen in the public supermarkets is under the surveillance of my Ministry and the Ministry of Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development.  Those items normally are issued with import licences and usually they are products that we do not have here in Zimbabwe, for example grapes and apples to mention a few.

HON. PHIRI:  I have a supplementary question on the continued drama and David Whitehead Textiles.  Sometime last year, you told us that you were waiting for the court action to come to an end but there is still drama.  What is Government doing to assist and make sure that the investors are local rather than people from outside because it looks like the drama will never end?

HON. MABUWA:  Thank you very much.  Indeed as the Hon. Member has put it, there is some activity which is outside the law of Zimbabwe which is taking place at Beitbridge, which includes the continued marches, strikes or whatever they are called.  Like the Hon. Member has rightfully said, it is under investigation and there is a possibility that there is a third hand – non Zimbabweans who are involved in these activities.  We are monitoring the situation and the security forces are establishing the truth about the systems and then the two countries will communicate and take control of the issues.

HON. PHIRI:  Hon. Speaker, I think she did not get my question well.  I asked about the drama at David Whitehead.

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Hon. Member, can you put the question in writing because it is specific to David Whitehead so that you can get a well researched answer.

RESUSCITATION OF ZISCO STEEL

  1. HON. NDUNA asked the Minister of Industry and Commerce to apprise the House on the way forward with regards to the resuscitation of ZISCO Steel in light of the reported collapse of the ESSAR deal.

THE MINISTER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (HON. MABUWA):  I thank the Hon. Member for wanting an update regarding the resuscitation of ZISCO Steel in light of the reported collapse of the Essar deal.  May I advise this august House that the resuscitation of ZISCO Steel is in two broad areas at the moment, which are as follows:

  1. Government is engaging potential investors pending a definitive conclusion of the ESSAR-Government of Zimbabwe transaction on ZISCO Steel. Government is currently negotiating with potential investors who have expressed interest in reviving the steel making project. I will accordingly inform this House once these negotiations have been concluded by Government. 

          Secondly, Government is working on various measures to improve the ZISCO Steel balance sheet to make it more attractive.  The measures include;

  • the management of an estimated US$380 million of the external and local debt
  • the submission of the Bill to manage ZISCO STEEL’s  legacy debt
  • management of employee contracts in line with the current labour laws,
  • hiving off the viable standalone subsidiaries
  • audit and evaluation of programmes to assess the net worth of the company and a bid document which is currently prepared for the engagement of the potential partner. 

          HON. MARIDADI:  The question here talks about ESSAR and in your response you talk about ESSAR.  I remember once upon a time, you came to this House and you told us that the ESSAR deal had collapsed so I thought ESSAR was out of the picture.  Why do you continue talking about ESSAR almost seven years after ESSAR came to Zimbabwe.  Can you appraise us on what measures you have put in place as Ministry to ensure that the problems that we encountered will not recur so that when we get an investor, we will not have a recurrence. 

          HON. MABUWA:  I want to thank the Hon. Member for the supplementary question.  Yes, there was talk on the collapse of the ESSAR deal which is on record and it is true.  Concluding a business deal takes nuts and bolts, we have to agree on and sign.  That is exactly what we are doing; we are concluding the collapsed deal.  That is why I talked of working out on issues of concluding the  ESSAR-Government Zimbabwe transaction.  The collapsed transaction has got to be concluded. 

          On the measures, it is the bid document which is being currently prepared to engage the potential partners, it is going through scrutiny.  That is an attempt to make sure that the lessons learnt from the collapsed deal will not recur.  Thank you. 

UTILISATION OF THE LAST HOPE ESTATE IN DETE

  1. HON. MKANDLA asked the Minister of Industry and Commerce to inform the House on what plans the Ministry has to fully utilise the Last Hope Estate in Dete, in the Hwange District so that employment opportunities accrue to the Community in view of the fact that the existing farm, comprising of the Detema Safari Lodge, a hotel, service station, bakery, garden and other infrastructure, is underutilised and grossly mismanaged.

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (HON. MABUWA):  I wish to thank the Hon. Member for her concern on the state of affairs at the Last Hope Estate in Dete.  As Hon. Members may be aware, the Estate is operated by the Industrial Development Corporation of Zimbabwe (IDCZ), which is a parastatal under my Ministry.  The title to the property is however still with the now defunct Zimbabwe Development Corporation (ZDC), a parastatal that was under the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development.

          Due to the existing sanctions, the IDCZ faces financial challenges to fund the business of the project at the Last Hope Estate.  The organisation has therefore made efforts to secure a strategic partner with financial and business capacity to help develop the project under the Build Operate and Transfer (BOT) or Build Own Operate and Transfer (BOOT) arrangement.  These efforts have, to date not been successful.  Indications are that questions surrounding the legal standing of the property which I earlier on alluded to have negatively affected the negotiations with proposed joint venture partners.  Arrangements are now underway to transfer the title of the property to my Ministry so as to facilitate future negotiations.

          May I also advise the august House that the IDCZ has in the meantime been leasing the hotel and service station to local business people in support of the empowerment programme. The Lupane State University used to lease the green garden but they have since been allocated their own piece of land.  The bakery equipment is however obsolete and efforts to dispose of the bakery through public tender have not been successful. 

          May I highlight that at its full capacity in the 1990’s, Detema Safari Lodge employed a maximum of 30 people. The number of employees went down to 10 at the beginning of the year 2000.  By the time the lodge was gutted down by fire in September 2015, it had a staff complement of four people.  The business, like most in the country, was negatively affected by the macroeconomic environment. 

          It is hoped that the completion of the extended runway upgrade project at the Victoria Falls International Airport and the enactment of the SEZ Bill will assist the IDCZ to secure joint venture partners who will also be able to provide market access.  The IDCZ will however consider disposing these assets to the local community on an open tender basis as per Government policy. 

SCRAPPING OF STATUTORY INSTRUMENT 126 OF 2014

4 .   HON. MAONDERA asked the Minister of Industry and Commerce when the Ministry is going to scrap Statutory Instrument 126 of 2014 in view of the introduction of Bureau Veritas which plays the same role and considering that the duplication is impinging on the ease of doing business.

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (HON. MABUWA):  I would like to thank the Hon. Member for the question.  These two legal instruments are very different in nature as the first one.  Statutory Instrument No. 126 of 2014 is an import quantity restriction whereas the second, Statutory Instrument No. 132 of 2015, is a standards of quality assessment regulation. Therefore, there is no duplication as the two legal instruments address two different aspects of imports.

          To allow resuscitation and investments in the manufacturing sector, the Ministry is implementing a programme to manage imports.  This entails the removal of OGIL of products that are being manufactured locally, to a process where importation of similar products will be done through limiting imports on a time framed arrangement using import licences as a control measure.  Therefore, it is important to note that the imports management programme is not permanent but a time framed measure to enable local products to compete with foreign goods. 

          To this end, Statutory Instrument No. 126 of 2014 is a legal instrument that specifies the exclusion of the following products from the Open General Import Licence (OGIL):

  • Milk (liquid and powder)
  • Potatoes, Tomatoes and Onions
  • Biscuits and yeast
  • Portland Cement
  • Soap and soap preparation
  • Plastic bags and polymers
  • Tubes, pipes, conveyor belts and rubber hoses

In addition, there are also other Statutory Instruments restricting the importation of certain goods into the country, such as;

  • I. 6 of 2014 (sugar, poultry and meat of swine):
  • I. 18 of 2016 (23 pharmaceutical products).
  • I. 19 of 2016 (2nd hand clothing, shoes and blankets)
  • 1.20 of 2016 (batteries, candles, floor polish and tobacco twine) and
  • I. 64 of 2016 (coffee creamers, body creams, plastic pipes and fittings, builders ware products, metal clad insulated panels, bottled water, et cetera)

The removal of these products on the Open General Import Licence (OGIL) implies that a licence will be required by anyone who wishes to import them into the country.  This import permit can be obtained by applying for it from the Ministry of Industry and Commerce.  The effect of this type of import restriction is to limit the quantities of selected products into the country.

          As you are all aware Zimbabwe has a negative trade balance meaning that as a nation we are currently importing more than we are exporting.  For instance, according to ZIMSTAT, in 2015, imports were estimated at US$6 002 596 473 billion whilst exports were worth US$2 704 095 948 billion only.

          Therefore, the afore mentioned Statutory Instruments are measures that my Ministry has implemented in order to resuscitate local industries, safeguard local formal employment and reduce the bulky import bill and prevent Zimbabwe from bring a retail economy.  To date, this measure has to some extent paid some dividends as seen by the resuscitation of some sectors such as the cooking oil sector, the fairy processing sector and the confectionary sector. 

          Hon. Members, as a result of the observation of the sub-standard nature, in terms of both technical and health standards of some imported products, my Ministry introduced the Consignment Based Conformity Assessment (CBCA) Programme.  The continual influx of such products are a threat to the implementation of the economic blueprint ZIM ASSET, the country’s growth and development agenda and the competitiveness of our local industry.  Hence, the need to curb these sub-standard imports which do not meet quality, safety, health and environment standards in line with the World Trade Organisation (WTO) agreements. 

          Therefore, as of the 1st of March, 2016, the CBCA programme was enforced and is regulated by Statutory Instrument No. 132 of 2015.  This new import regulation stipulates that selected products as cited in the Statutory Instrument must be verified for conformity or compliance to standard by the contracted conformity assessment agent, Bureau Veritas, in the country of origin before they can be imported into Zimbabwe. 

          The CBCA programme is aimed at substantially reducing the importation of hazardous and sub-standard imported products that are harmful to the consumer and the environment and the same time create an even playing field for our local industry.  The Government of Zimbabwe has contracted Bureau Veritas, a French company to provide conforming assessment services under the CBCA programme for the next 4 years.  This intervention is an interim measure whilst my Ministry works on the establishment of the Zimbabwe Quality Standards Regulatory Authority.

          The Zimbabwe Quality Standards Authority will be responsible for ensuring that products imported into and exported from Zimbabwe meet quality, safety, health and environment standards.  This Authority will be administered by the Zimbabwe Standards Regulatory Authority Act whose draft Bill has been forward to the Attorney General’s Office for examination.

          Currently, the CBCA programme is progressing steadily with more importers complying with the regulations as evidently shown by compliance levels increasing significantly to 58% in June, 2016.  The majority of the certificates of conforming issued are for chemical products respectively whilst pearls are the least.  Most of the conformity assessment activities are carried out in South Africa, as it is the largest trading partner, constituting 77% of total certificates of conforming issued followed by China, Zambia and the rest of the world.

PROGRESS ON THE IMPLEMENTATION OF SPECIAL ECONOMIC ZONES

  1. HON. NDUNA asked the Minister of Macro-Economic Planning and Investment Promotion to apprise the House on the progress that has been made to date with regard to the implementation of Special Economic Zones which are meant to provide renewed impetus for foreign direct investment.

THE HON. MINISTER OF MACRO-ECONOMIC PLANNING AND INVESTMENT PROMOTION (HON. DR. MPOFU):  Thank you Hon. Speaker.  Hon. Members may recall that a Special Economic Zones (SEZ) Bill (H.B. 15, 2015) was drafted and presented for the First Reading here at Parliament following Cabinet’s approval for the principles.   The Bill is now on the last stage of being passed into an Act. Very soon, the Bill will be assented into law by the His Excellency, the President of Zimbabwe.  Once this is done, the SEZ Authority will be created and the implementation of SEZs will kick off. 

Meanwhile, my Ministry signed an agreement with Qingdao City of China to facilitate the country to learn from the Chinese experience on the SEZs implementation.  Japan has also come on board and the Ministry is working with Professor Suzuki from JICA who shall be helping us with international best practice on SEZs incentives. 

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order, can the owner of the following vehicle ADI 9344 go and remove the vehicle, it is blocking other vehicles.

PLANS TO ADDRESS CONCERNS OVER HIGH TAX RATES

  1. HON. NDUNA asked the Minister of Macro-Economic Planning and Investment Promotion to state the Ministry’s plans to address concerns over high tax rates, infrastructure deficiencies and the multiplicity of licences which are not conducive for investment.

THE HON. MINISTER OF MACRO-ECONOMIC PLANNING AND INVESTMENT PROMOTION (HON. DR. MPOFU):  The Hon. Members may be aware that that my Ministry is responsible for Macro-Economic Planning and Investment Promotion. To this end, my Ministry is in the process of addressing the issues raised through a number of initiatives. 

  • To address infrastructure deficiencies, my Ministry plans to establish Special Economic Zones which are meant to develop infrastructure in the areas where they are to be located.
  • Furthermore, my Ministry is involved in promoting investment in all sectors of the economy in order to attract the much needed investment into the same. A number of investment conferences have been undertaken and also a number of delegations have been hosted. My Ministry will also launch the country’s Investment Handbook which will be used as an international investment promotion tool. This is aimed at attracting investment in all sectors of the economy, infrastructure included.
  • The One Stop Investment Centre at the Zimbabwe Investment Authority aims to addressing the issue of a multiplicity of licences by streamlining the investment approval process to shorten the turnaround time for investment approvals. Furthermore, we will be launching the virtual OSS which will enable investors to interact on line with investment facilitating agencies, thus cutting on the time required to obtain investment related licences and permits.
  • Government, through the Office of the President and Cabinet, is spearheading a programme of reforming the doing business environment in Zimbabwe. This is addressing issues such as multiplicity of licences as we aim to make Zimbabwe an investment destination of choice to investors. I thank you Mr. Speaker.

HON. NDUNA: Mr. Speaker Sir, it is certainly Question Number 7 but hearing from what the Hon. Minister gave as his answer, it looks like he has also answered Question Number 7. With your indulgence if he feels he still needs to submit that answer but I heard it clearly. I would, with your indulgence again move to Question Number 8.  

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER (HON. MUTOMBA): The Hon. Member is saying you have actually answered Question Number 6, so now you can go to Question Number 8. You can present your answer to the desk.

IMPLEMENTATION OF REFORMS TO IMPROVE THE EASE OF DOING BUSINESS

  1. 8. NDUNA asked the Minister of Macro-Economic Planning and Investment Promotion to state the progress that has been made in the implementation of reforms intended to improve the ease of doing business whose target date is end of March 2016.

          THE MINISTER OF MACRO-ECONOMIC PLANNING AND INVESTMENT PROMOTION (HON. DR. MPOFU):  Thank you Mr. Speaker. I want to thank Hon. Nduna for that concession. That was my feeling as well that Question Number 7 is more or less the same as Question Number 6. The answer for Question No. 8 is as follows:

  • Ease of Doing Business reforms are being executed under a multi-stakeholder structure of technical working groups constituted along thematic areas as measured by the World Bank in the Doing Business index. The reforms are being implemented under a 100 Day Rapid Results Initiative approach to ensure maximum output, accountability and measurability of the efforts. The second phase of 100 Day Rapid Initiative was launched on Thursday, 4th February 2016 and was concluded on the 13th May, 2016 for the following reconstituted technical working groups:
  • Starting a business/Protecting Minority Investors.
  • Dealing with construction permits/Registering Property.
  • Enforcing contracts/Resolving Insolvency.
  • Paying Taxes/trading Across Borders.
  • Getting Credit.

          A review workshop was also conducted on the 14th of June, 2016 where updates were made on the progress of each technical working group.

  • The reforms are aimed at reducing and simplifying procedures, automation of processes and review of processes and legislative framework in all these indicated thematic areas. Some of the highlights so far include the following:
  • Starting a business has been reduced from 30 days to 15 days.
  • Finalising the legal framework for a credit registry and operationalising it by 30 June, 2016.
  • The Banking Act was also amended to provide for the establishment of a credit registry and the amendment was gazetted in May 2016.
  • Time taken to pay tax has been reduced from 242 hours to 160 hours.
  • Cost to export and import has been reduced by 30%.
  • Time to process construction permits has been reduced from 448 days to 120 days.
  • Property registration now takes 14 days from 36 days.
  • All necessary steps for the establishment of a commercial court have also been done.
  • You may wish to note Hon. Members, that publicity campaigns of the implementation of the DB have also been undertaken. It is worth noting that the exhibitions were made at the ZITF wherein all TWGs exhibited under the OPC pavilion and the 2 VPS visited the stand and were impressed. Aggressive public awareness campaigns will continue.
  • My greatest call is to you Hon. Members such that once the legal instruments (Bills) come to you, they will be attended to expeditiously to pave way for better scoring in the next Doing Business ranking as this has a bearing on our credit ranking and investor perception also. I thank you.

          HON. NDUNA: My supplementary question is, if the Hon. Minister has the information, can he care to let this House know how much we have improved from the ranking that we had before, of 174 out of 180 something countries on the ease of doing business, either barometer or ranking?

          HON. DR. MPOFU: Thank you Mr. Speaker. In my answer, I alluded to the compilation of information to address that particular question. I have got a draft Investment in Zimbabwe document which will address those issues. We also would appreciate the contribution by the Hon. Members towards that kind of an initiative so that we sing from the same hymn book. I thank you.

ELECTRIFICATION OF MAITENGWE BORDER POST

  1. HON. NLEYA asked the Minister of Energy and Power Development to state when the Ministry will electrify Maitengwe Border Post.

          THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. UNDENGE): Thank you Mr. Speaker. Maitengwe Border Post is 33km from Madyambudzi which is the nearest point that has electricity. Madyambudzi is fed from an 11KV network which is 70km from Plumtree. Extending the grid from Madyambudzi by another 33km to Maitengwe using 11KV network provides capacity constraints. Alternatively, it could be fed form a 33KV network but the nearest point is 71km away. Feeding Maitengwe from the 33KV is the most technically feasible option. Currently, REF is targeting to electrify institutions within 20km from the grid by 2018. Maitengwe is therefore expected to be powered using solar technology by 2018. I thank you Mr. Speaker.

CONNECTION OF ELECTRICITY TO SCHOOLS IN BULILIMA

  1. HON. S. NDLOVU asked the Minister of Energy and Power Development to state   when ZESA will connect electricity to the following schools in Bulilima.

          (a)  Bhalule Primary School

          (b)  Ntunuywe Primary School, and

          (c)  Peace and Good Hope Primary School

          THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. UNDENGE): Thank you Mr. Speaker. In Bulilima district, the following institutions have been electrified:- 40 schools, 16 clinics, 14 Government offices, 27 others which include chiefs, business centres and villages.

          As for Bhalule Primary School, electricity was connected on 11th May, 2015.  What remains is for the infrastructure to be put in place and the school to pay ZETDC what are called connection fees.  The same applies with Ntunungwe Primary School; it was also electrified on 11th May.  Once connection fees are paid, electricity will be switched on.  The same applies for Peace and Good Hope Primary School, electricity arrived there on 1st April, 2015.  Once the connection fees are paid, electricity will be switched on.  Perhaps, the Hon. Member can assist the schools with the payment of the connection fees.  I thank you.

AVAILABILITY OF RURAL ELECTRIFICATION PROGRAMME IN BULILIMA EAST CONSTITUENCY

  1. HON. S. NDLOVU asked the Minister of energy and Power

Development to state –

  • When the Rural Electrification  Programme would be availed to Bulilima East Constituency;
  • the fees that are required as contributions by households.

THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER

DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. UNDENGE):  Thank you Mr.

Speaker, the following institutions have been electrified, this is in Bulilima Constituency. 

  • 24 primary schools;
  • 10 secondary schools; and
  • 7 clinics.

Two primary schools, namely Nyabane and Ntenjane are on the 2016 roll-out.  The planned date for Nyabane Primary School electrification programme was expected to begin in early February ending in May 2016 but due to cash constraints, this programme was delayed.  Ntenjane Primary School electrification which was expected to begin in May 2016 will begin any time from now.  Then the fees that are required as contributions by households is $90.00 per household.  I thank you.

COMPLETION OF INSTALLATION OF PREPAID METERS IN GLEN NORAH

  1. HON. MAONDERA asked the Minister of Energy and Power

Development what plans are there to complete the installation of prepaid meters in Glen Norah which was stalled in 2014?

  THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER

DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. UNDENGE): Mr. Speaker Sir, ZETDC had embarked on the installation of prepaid meters in Glen Norah after the State Procurement Board (SPB) had granted permission …

          Hon. Tarusenga having asked the question on behalf of Hon. Maondera.

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER (HON. MUTOMBA): Order, order Hon. Minister.  It would appear that Hon. Maondera is not in the House and you did not inform the front desk that you are standing in for Hon. Maondera.  They are not aware.

          HON. TARUSENGA:  Mr. Speaker Sir, Madam Speaker was informed about that before you took the Chair.

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Alright, Hon. Minister, you may proceed.

          HON. DR. UNDENGE:  Mr. Speaker Sir, ZETDC had embarked on the installation of prepaid meters in Glen Norah after the State Procurement Board (SPB) had granted permission for three contractors to install single phase meters in Harare.  However, the installations in Glen Norah stalled mainly due to meter availability challenges as well as the need for modifications before installations on some houses in the area.

          ZETDC is currently procuring a total of 130 000 meters from two suppliers who were approved by the SPB, contracts signed thereof and deliveries are expected.  We hope that once we have that delivery, the issue of shortages of prepaid meters will be a thing of the past.  I thank you.

INSTALLATION OF ELECTRICITY TOKEN SALES POINT AT LUSULU CENTRE

  1. HON. NKOMO MAIL asked the Minister of Energy and

Power Development when the Ministry would install an electricity token sales point at Lusulu Centre in Binga to alleviate the plight of the community which currently buys electricity tokens from Hwange town and Binga Centre?

   THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER

DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. UNDENGE): ZETDC is sending a team on 19th July to talk to the business community and individuals who are interested in third party vending of electricity.  Those interested will be given details of banks and Powertel to formalize the arrangements so that vending can start at Lusulu Centre.  This is the practice at all business centres where ZETDC does not have offices.  I thank you.

MEASURES AGAINST RUVHENEKO PRIMARY SCHOOL HEADMISTRESS

  1. HON. MAONDERA asked the Minister of Primary and

Secondary Education what measures are being taken to bring to book the Headmistress of Ruvheneko Primary School in Glen Norah, Mrs. Chigabo who was implicated in a recent audit by the Ministry’s auditors?

           THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION (HON. PROF. MAVIMA): Thank you.  Hon. Speaker.  I would like to thank Hon. Maondera for the question relating to Ruvheneko Primary School in Glen Norah and I would like to respond as follows:  Issues to do with financial management in schools are matters of concern to the Ministry.  For this reason, we instituted an audit of our schools in order to bring transparency in the use of the funds that are collected at school level. 

          In 2015, the Ministry managed to audit 1697 schools.  In some cases, there were reports of abuse of school funds by heads of schools.  As a matter of fact, where there were allegations of abuse of funds, thorough investigations were carried out.  With respect to Ruvheneko Primary School, audit was carried out and the initial report indicated that there were some irregularities in the handling of funds.  The concerned head has now been asked as a matter of procedure to provide a response on that audit.  That is where we are at the moment.  Thank you Hon. Speaker.

SUBSTANTIVE HEADMASTERS FOR SCHOOLS IN MUDZI

  1. HON. MUDYIWA asked the Minister of Primary and Secondary Education to explain why:
  2. One secondary school out of 35 registered and satellite schools in Mudzi District has a substantive headmaster while the rest are in acting capacity;
  3. What is Government policy regarding the period one should be on an acting capacity as school head;
  4. Whether these acting headmasters get an acting allowance and at what rate.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION (HON. PROF. MAVIMA):  Thank you Hon. Speaker.  My response to the above questions is as follows:

  1. The Ministry considers leadership at school level as vital to the day to day running of the school. As such, the majority of our schools are under substantive heads.  Satellite schools are schools that are under a registered school and the head superintending over a satellite school is a substantive head for that particular satellite school.  This phenomenon does not only apply to schools in Mudzi District.  It applies to all schools in the country.  So, by their nature, all satellite schools are under a head of an established school.
  2. There are indicative periods for acting in post. All members who have requisite qualifications are free to apply whenever such posts are advertised.  More often than not, it is the function of budgetary control as well as institutional fitness that determines the process of appointing substantive heads.
  3. Issues to do with acting allowances are not under the purview of the Ministry of Primary and Secondary Education. However, as a Ministry, our responsibility is to indicate to the Public Service Commission members who are in acting capacities.  Allowances and rates are determined by the Public Service Commission as the employer.  Thank you Hon. Speaker.

BUYING PRICE OF COTTON FOR THE 2015/2016 FARMING SEASON

  1. HON. MANGAMI asked the Minister of Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development to inform the House on Government’s buying price of cotton for the 2015/2016 farming season.

          THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, MECHANISATION AND IRRIGATION DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. MADE):  Thank you Hon. Speaker, I would want to appreciate the question from the Hon. Member.  The question is already superseded because the price of cotton is already in the public domain.  The cotton buying price by Cottco is 45c per kg, with price adjustments being paid after grading.  Thank you.

CONSTRUCTION OF AN IRRIGATION SCHEME AT SOKWELA DAM

  1. HON. MANGAMI asked the Minister of Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development to state the progress that has been made on the construction of an irrigation scheme at Sokwela Dam in Gokwe South.

          THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, MECHANISATION AND IRRIGATION DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. MADE):  I want to thank the Hon. Member for raising the question.  I just want to emphasise that on this question, currently Government is developing an inventory of all small dams in Gokwe and assessing the irrigation potential of each water body.  Thank you.

PURCHASE OF SMALL GRAINS FROM FARMERS BY GOVERNMENT

  1. HON. MANGAMI asked the Minister of Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development to state whether Government buys small grains from farmers and if so, to state the price.

          THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, MECHANISATION AND IRRIGATION DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. MADE):  I also want to thank the Hon. Member for raising the question.  The Grain Marketing Board (GMB) purchases small grains from the farmers.  The price that is paid for small grains is equal to the price that we pay for maize, which is $390 per metric tonne.  I am aware that in certain areas, GMB could have been paying farmers less than that.  If there are any areas where small grains have been paid differently, the price is $390.  I want that to be known because it is very important.  That is why I have said that this is an important question.  I state it as the Minister that small grains should be paid at the same price as maize because we want to encourage farmers who are in those areas that are suitable for small grains.  If there are any farmers who have been paid less than this, they should immediately make their way to the GMB and the price should be adjusted.  Thank you

ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: I have to acknowledge the presence in the Speaker’s Gallery, members from the African Parliamentarians Network on Development Evaluation (APNODE) from Cote D’ivoire, Uganda, Kenya and supporting staff.  You are most welcome – [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] –

CONSTRUCTION OF DINGANI DAM

  1. HON. M. NKOMO asked the Minister of Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development to inform the House what progress has been made in the construction of Dingani Dam at Mzola Central area in the Lupane West Constituency.

          THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, MECHANISATION AND IRRIGATION DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. MADE): Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the Hon. Member for raising the question. However, I have to say that the question is misdirected as the Minister of Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development is not responsible for the construction of dams.  This question must be redirected to the Minister of Environment, Water and Climate.  Thank you.

PLANS TO RE-GRAVEL THE HEADLANDS-MAYO ROAD

  1. HON. MAONDERA asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development, what plans are in place to re-gravel the Headlands-Mayo Road, which is in a very deplorable state.

THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. J. M. GUMBO): Mr. Speaker Sir, 18 km of the Headlands-Mayo road was surfaced between 2002 and 2005.  This surfacing project was stalled because of funding constraints.  The Ministry is now pursuing the engagement of the private sector in road development through Public-Private-Partnership or Build-Operate and Transfer concessions.

     Headlands-Mayo road is also lined up for gravelling in July and August this Financial Year, 2016, to make it trafficable since it is in bad shape.  I thank you.

PROGRESS ON RESURFACING OF GURUVE TO MAHUWE ROAD

  1. HON. KANHANGA asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to apprise the House on the progress made on the re-surfacing programme of the Guruve to Mahuwe road, particularly on the 7km stretch of broken tarmac between Makombe and Camperdown.

THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. J. M. GUMBO): Mr. Speaker Sir, the Ministry intends to regravel and grade the narrow Mat Section of Guruve-Mahuwe Road, which is in bad shape and grade the rest of the gravel road.  The Ministry is financially constrained, hence, at the moment is not in a position to resurface the 7km stretch from Makombe to Camperdown.  The gravelling and grading should make the section trafficable, until funds to surface the section become available.  I thank you.

REHABILITATION OF THE CHIMOYO-CHIWONDE ROAD

  1. HON. MUFUNGA asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to:-
  2. State when the Ministry is going to rehabilitate the Chimoyo-Chiwonde Road in Muzarabani;
  3. State when the Ministry is going to construct the following bridges in Muzarabani which were destroyed by floods in 2006;
  4. Bridge at Hoya river;
  5. Musingwa bridge; and
  • Chimoyo bridge

THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. J. M. GUMBO): Mr. Speaker Sir, Chimoyo-Chiwonde Road and bridge fall under the jurisdiction of Muzarabani Rural District Council, which I believe are mobilizing resources for the needed works.  Mr. Speaker Sir, the Ministry is currently mobilising resources to the tune of US$515 000 required to carry our repair works on Hoya bridge.  It is the intention of the Ministry to start work on this bridge before the end of the year, 2016.  To construct a bridge across Musingwa River, the Ministry needs US$2.5 million.  Considering limited resources, the Ministry will start works on Musingwa Bridge after completion of needed repair works on Hoya Bridge.  I also regret to advise that, currently, there is no provision for the re-construction of the Chimoyo Bridge.  I thank you.

HON. GABBUZA: The Hon. Minister reports that the local authority is mobilizing resources to sort out this road.  My understanding was that the road authority is under the Ministry and gives the resources to the local authority.  Is the Hon. Minister indicating that the local authority has a different system or way of mobilising resources?

HON. DR. J. M. GUMBO: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  The Ministry of Transport and Infrastructural Development, through its arm of ZINARA gives money or disburses funds to local authorities.  Therefore, in order to answer the question, I have said, the responsible authority is mobilising funds.  This means that the funds that will come from the Ministry, through ZINARA for their second disbursements, after they have acquitted whatever they have been given, is the money they are mobilising in order to repair the bridge. It is already in their plans, they are just awaiting us to disburse the money, which we can only do after we have received their acquittals.  That is what I am referring to, it might have been put in such a way that it implies that the local authority is going to be getting money from somewhere, but the essence or the answer to the question is that, through ZINARA, they are waiting for us to give them the money so that they can use on their project.  I thank you.

HON. MUFUNGA: Thank you Mr. Speaker.  I understand Hoya Bridge is bigger than Musingwa Bridge. How can Musingwa Bridge require US$2 million yet it is smaller than Hoya bridge?  Thank you.

HON. J. M. GUMBO:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I am talking about a project for which the bill of quantities has already been worked out by the professionals.  If Hon. Mufunga is that qualified to make those bill of quantities, then I possibly can assist the staff and see whatever can be done but these are the bill of quantities that have been worked out by engineers and I am just an economist; I am not qualified to do BOQs.  I thought he would be happy to see to it that whatever has to be done for his project is going to be done. 

          He might look at the bridge and say this one is smaller but he is not qualified, I think to deal with the soils and whatever might be required to be done.  So, I think you might have to exercise your expertise with the engineers and see whether the soils are that easy to make a bridge and make it cheaper or it might be small but requires a lot of money because the soils might not be that good.  I rest my case Mr. Speaker Sir I am not qualified but I am just giving you the information as is given by the engineers.  I thank you.

          HON. MUFUNGA:  Minister, the monies that you are disbursing to local authorities, are you satisfied that the monies are being used for the purposes that you are giving them for, because you have given to some local authorities US$300 000 or US$600 000 but after acquittal, what is on the ground is not the true reflection of the monies that you have given them.  Are you happy with that?

          HON. DR. GUMBO: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I am a Member of Parliament, representing a constituency and I am also one, like any Hon. Member in here who came up with this Act that put together ZINARA.  As a Member of Parliament, my role is also to oversee.  So, if the money is given to your constituency and we always talk about it and you do not check how those monies are being used, then as Members of Parliament we are failing on our oversight role.

          My first advice to the Hon. Member is that, please play your oversight role and see to it that the money that was given to your local authority is being properly utilised.  On our part and I as Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development, if the money has not been properly acquitted, we will not disburse any more money and that is exactly what I have said.  So, play your part on the ground and I play my part, then we meet half-way.  I thank you.

RESURFACING OF ROBERT GABRIEL HIGHWAY AND INKOMO-DARWENDALE-TRELAWNEY-BANKET ROADS

  1. HON. MUKWANGWARIWA asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to inform the House when the following roads would be resurfaced:

(a)   Robert Gabriel Mugabe highway from Norton to Murombedzi; and

(b)  Inkomo-Darwendale-Trelawney-Banket road, in Zvimba East.

THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. GUMBO): Mr. Speaker Sir, the preparation for work commencement is currently underway for the resealing and resurfacing of Norton-Murombedzi road.  Delivery of materials by our suppliers has already commenced.  Delays have been due to procurement challenges.

Referring to part two of the question, the road is segmented into two.  Inkomo – Darwendale road is pothole infested and requires urgent resealing and pothole patching which will be done as soon as funding from ZINARA is availed.  As for Banket-Trelawney road, rehabilitation and resurfacing is required and there have been plans to do this for a long time.  However, Treasury has not been able to fund this and other roads on the national programme.  When funding gets provided, this and other roads will be constructed as required.  I thank you.

WRITTEN SUBMISSIONS TO QUESTIONS WITH NOTICE

PROGRESS ON THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE ONE STOP SHOP INVESTMENT CENTRE

  1. HON. NDUNA asked the Minister of Macro-Economic Planning and Investment Promotion to state the progress that has been made on the establishment of the One Stop Shop Investment Centre.

          THE MINISTER OF MACRO-ECONOMIC PLANNING AND INVESTMENT PROMOTION (HON. DR. MPOFU): I have set up a transformation taskforce comprising of Investment Promotion department and ZIA which is working flat out to operationalise the physical OSS. Key parameters notes as being hurdles to the full operationalisation of the OSS and which are being attended to are:

  • Legal provisions to legalise the OSS – being addressed through amendments to the ZIA Act. To this end, the AG’s office is finalising the amendments which seek to give legal effect to OSS and the intention is to have the ZIA Act amendment being brought to this House before the end of the third quarter of 2016.
  • Secondment arrangements – being addressed by making the ZIA Act an Omnibus Act and so providing for Secondment of OSS officials at ZIA. The Ministry is also roping in the Public Service Commission to develop suitable contracts for the seconded staff n liaison with the taskforce and the respective institutions that are members of the OSS.
  • Payment arrangements – being addressed through justifying the payment platforms and having a single payment platform that generate one receipt for all OSS agencies. Payment methods to be widened to include internet banking, mobile banking and international payment cards (VISA and MasterCard).
  • Turnaround time – All agencies to adhere to an agreed turnaround time, with possibility of graduating to a “silent is consent rule” being applied, once the 5 day working period is attained. All post approvals like EIEA also have agreed timeframes to adhere to, i.e. one month at most.
  • Digital OSS – making provision to have on line licence application. Currently, on line company registration, ZIMRA registration, NSSA and ZIMDEF registrations is being finalised. Other agencies would be added once the system is fully running. Target is end of year but so far name search is on line and database of names has already been uploaded.
  • Operationalise date – Honourable Members, my Ministry can report that the OSS is now 90% operational. The officers are now stationed at ZIA as from 1 August, 2016. All the OSS officials underwent some training during the last week of July which is now ahead of them, i.e. to facilitate investment into the country. I thank you.

COMPLETION OF RURAL ELECTRIFICATION IN MSALA WARD

  1. HON. O. NCUBE asked the Minister of Energy and Power

Development to state when the rural electrification programme in Msala Ward in Gokwe-Kana Constituency will be completed.

  THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER

DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. UNDENGE):  I would like to thank the Hon. Member for his question.  As the Hon. Member may be aware, the Rural Electrification Agency plans to extend the electricity grid network to all rural public institutions within 20 km of the existing grid network and to electrify those beyond 20 km using solar technology by 2018.  This is in line with ZIM ASSET targets and is subject to availability of funding.  These projects are already being implemented and 2015 saw the electrification of institutions such as Mateme Primary and Secondary schools as well as Mateme clinic as scheduled.

          The following is a table showing un-electrified rural public  institutions, including chiefs homesteads, in Gokwe-Kana Constituency, the estimated distances from the existing grid network, the dates by which the institutions are expected to have been electrified and the mode of electrification, that is whether grid or solar.

STATUS OF CURRENT AND FUTURE ELECTRIFICATION PROGRAMMES IN GOKWE-KANA CONSTITUENCY

Item No.

Name of Institution

Distance from

Grid Network

 

When to be

electrified

Source of

Energy

 1.

Dzvuke School

6.2 km

By 2018

Grid

 2.

Paradza School

12 km

By 2018

Grid

 3.

Maboke School

8 km

By 2018

Grid

 4.

Marirangwe School

4.5 km

By 2018

Grid

 5.

Ndarire School

7 km

By 2018

Grid

 6.

Tachi School

15 km

By 2018

Grid

  7.

Mapiwa School

25 km

By 2018

Solar

 8.

Lutochani School

33 km

By 2018

Solar

 9.

Mwambani School

1.7 km

By 2017

Grid

10.

Mayambi Primary

School

1.5 km

By 2017

Grid

11.

Lukukwe School

14 km

By 2018

Grid

12.

Jiri Primary School

Underline

By 2017

Grid

13.

Mudzimundiringe

School

0.8 km

By 2017

Grid

14.

Chief  Jiri

15 km

By 2018

Grid

 

          The Agency is implementing a 42 km Single Wire Earth return (SWER) line covering 7 institutions in Gokwe-Kana Constituency, listed below.

  • Kambe Primary School;
  • Chehamba Primary School;
  • Msala Primary School;
  • Msala clinic;
  • Msala business centre;
  • Mbungu Secondary School; and
  • Mbungu Primary School.

Electrification of these institutions is almost complete as all the lines

have been done and REA now awaits the delivery of transformers from ZESA Enterprises (ZENT).  Unfortunately, ZENT has a huge backlog of transformer supplies mainly as a result of resource constraints.  I would, however, like to assure the Hon. Member that these institutions will be prioritised once transformers become available as they were scheduled to be completed in 2015.

ELECTRIFICATION OF CLINICS IN MUZARABANI

  1. HON. MUFUNGA asked the Minister of Energy and Power

Development to explain why the following areas in Muzarabani have not been electrified:-

  • Chiweya Clinic,
  • Dambakurima clinic,
  • Chadereka clinic and
  • Kairezi business centre.

THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER

DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. UNDENGE):  Mr. Speaker Sir, I would like to thank the Hon. Member for raising such an important question which helps explain plans in place to ensure that the stated institutions in Muzarabani are electrified.  Let me hasten Mr. Speaker Sir, to point out that, the implementation of the Rural Electrification Programme is an ongoing process which, among other things, is dependent on the availability of resources.

          Mr. Speaker Sir, in respect to the Chiwenga Clinic not Chiweya Clinic as asked, the clinic is 29 km from the nearest existing electricity grid network.  According to the Rural Electrification strategy, institutions located far away from the existing electricity grid are for now only being considered for solar in view of the distance from the grid.  However, I am happy to advise the Hon. Member that Chiwenga Clinic is targeted for electrification using the solar off grid system (solar system) in 2018.

          Mr. Speaker Sir, as for Dambakurima Clinic, my Ministry is reliably informed that the grid leading to the institution was completed over 5 years ago.  However, the ZETDC network feeding the area was down until the last two weeks when it was repaired.  The institution has completed the internal wiring which has so far been inspected by ZETDC.  ZETDC is now waiting for the institution to pay connection fees and once this is done, this shall pave way for connection.

          Similarly, Mr. Speaker Sir, Chadereka Clinic had its grid completed on 30th July, 2014.  Delays in connecting the institution were due to slow pace by the institution to do the internal wirings.  Recently, the institution just completed the internal wirings and ZETDC has inspected the institution and is now waiting for the institution to pay the required connection fees for its connection.

          Mr. Speaker Sir, I would also want to inform the Hon. Member that Kairezi Business Centre is 21 km from the nearest electricity grid network.  The grid network will be extended for 9.6 km to Kakonono Primary School towards the business centre.  This will leave the grid network 11.4 km away from the business centre.  The business centre can then apply for electrification on a 50% capital subsidy as only Government institutions qualify for 100% funding.

ELECTRIFICATION OF SCHOOLS IN MUZARABANI

  1. HON. MUFUNGA asked the Minister of Energy and Power

Development to explain why schools in Muzarabani have not been electrified given that they have fully paid connection fees?

THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. UNDENGE):  Mr. Speaker Sir, in respect of schools that have paid connection fees in Muzarabani but are yet to be connected, the situation on the ground indicates that electricity connections have recently been done at the following schools:-

  1. Kapembere Primary School – two houses have been connected.
  2. Hwata Secondary School – Administration block has been connected.
  • Sapa School – two houses have been connected.
  1. Kasembere School – The administration block and five houses have been connected.
  2. Bore School – a meter has been installed on one house. However, the network is faulty and is being attended to.

In addition to the above Mr. Speaker Sir, my Ministry is aware

that internal wiring is in progress at the following schools:-

  1. Chadereka;
  • Chimoi;
  • Musengezi; and
  1. Dambakurima Secondary School.

Once wiring has been completed, Mr. Speaker Sir, ZETDC will do

the inspections and complete the connections.

ZETDC INFRASTRUCTURE IN HARARE WEST

  1. HON. MAJOME asked the Minister of Energy and Power

Development why ZETDC is prevaricating for more than two years in responding to a written request by the sitting Member of Parliament to visit and familiarize herself with ZETDC infrastructure in Harare West.

           THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. UNDENGE):  Mr. Speaker Sir, it is unfortunate that Hon. Majome has been failing to get access to familiarize herself with ZETDC infrastructure in the Harare region for the past two years.  However, let me indicate that access to such highly protected places requires vetting for security clearance.  As such, I advise the Hon. Member to direct her request to my Ministry for possible clearance upon providing her personal details and date of intended visit.

FAILURE BY ZETDC TO ATTEND CONSTITUENCY COMMUNITY MEETINGS

  1. HON. MAJOME asked the Minister of Energy and Power Development why ZETDC is habitually failing to turn up at constituency community meetings to explain electricity issues despite confirming their willingness to attend?

          THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. UNDENGE):  Mr. Speaker Sir, while the utility is obligated to provide relevant information to its stakeholders on its operations and programmes, the major concern is that some meetings particularly the last meeting that the ZETDC Harare Region staff attended in Mbare turned violent.  As a result of such unfortunate high levels of intolerance within our society, the utility made a precautionary position to avoid attending such meetings.

          I am, however, happy to inform the Hon. Member that the utility has been attending meetings with Harare Residents Trust which comprises of various residents representatives.  Members are also free to visit ZETDC offices for particular issues of concern so that they can keep their constituencies informed.

 

INSTALLATION OF HEADMAN MSALA OF GOKWE-KANA AS A SUBSTANTIVE CHIEF

  1. HON. O. NCUBE asked the Minister of Rural Development and Preservation of Culture and Heritage to state when Headman Msala of Gokwe – Kana Constituency will be installed as a substantive Chief of the Tonga People.

THE MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT, PROMOTION AND PRESERVATION OF NATIONAL CULTURE AND HERITAGE (HON. A. NCUBE): I am aware that indeed there is Msala Headmanship in Gokwe South and there is a substantive headman who was appointed in terms of Section 8 of the Traditional Leaders Act (Chapter 29:17). I would like to bring to the attention of the Hon. Member the fact that if one is appointed as headman, that becomes their position and they do not necessarily graduate into chiefs. It is incumbent upon the clan to approach my office through the office of the District Administrator who will in turn make a recommendation on the submission. We have not yet received a claim for the upgrading of the Msala Headmanship to Chieftainship.

PAYMENT OF ALLOWANCES TO HEADMEN IN HWANGE WEST

  1. HON. B. MPOFU asked the Minister of Rural Development and Preservation of National Culture and Heritage to explain whether there are any plans to pay allowances to some village headmen in Hwange West Constituency after they completed the vetting process.

THE MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT, PROMOTION AND PRESERVATION OF NATIONAL CULTURE AND HERITAGE (HON. A. NCUBE): I would like to bring to the attention of the Hon. Member the fact that completion of the vetting process does not mean that a person has been appointed as village head. The appointment is completed when the Secretary has approved the recommendation for appointment in terms of the Traditional Leaders Act. Once the Secretary has appointed a village head, the village head will start getting his or her allowances from the date of appointment.

PROVISION OF BICYCLES TO VILLAGE HEADMEN IN HWANGE EAST

  1. HON. B. MPOFU asked the Minister of Rural Development and Preservation of Culture and Heritage to explain whether it is possible to provide village headman in Hwange West Constituency with bicycles in view of the fact that they walk long distances to attend Chief’s meetings.

          THE MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT, PROMOTION AND PRESERVATION OF NATIONAL CULTURE AND HERITAGE (HON. A. NCUBE): We take note of the concern raised by the Hon. Member. However, I regret to advise that currently, we do not have a policy that caters for the procurement of bicycles to village heads. The village heads are only entitled to their monthly allowances. Benefits may be reviewed once fiscal space improves.

ALLOWANCES FOR HEADMEN IN SMALL SCALE FARMING AREAS

  1. HON. BEREMAURO asked the Minister of Rural Development and Preservation of Culture and Heritage to explain if headmen in the small scale farming areas are eligible to receive allowances after having been appointed by the Chief because Chipapa and Vuti have village heads appointed but are not receiving allowances.

THE MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT, PROMOTION AND PRESERVATION OF NATIONAL CULTURE AND HERITAGE (HON. A. NCUBE): Well, in terms of the Traditional Leaders Act, headmen and village heads are appointed by the Minister and Permanent Secretary respectively. Chiefs are merely expected to nominate candidates for appointment either as headmen or village heads. Therefore, once a suitable person has been appointed as headman or village head by the responsible appointing authority, they are automatically entitled to receive monthly allowances accordingly. In this regard, Chipapa and Vuti village heads will only qualify for allowances once appointed.

Again, headmen and village heads presiding over resettlement areas which have not been emplaced under the authority of Chiefs are not entitled to an allowance until those areas such as small scale farming areas have been gazetted under Chiefs.

PROVISION OF E-LEARNING EQUIPMENT TO SCHOOLS IN GOKWE-KANA

  1. HON. O. NCUBE asked the Minister of Primary and Secondary Education to state when the Ministry will provide E – learning equipment to the following schools in Gokwe – Kana Constituency:
  2. Mbungu Secondary School;
  3. Marimasimbe Secondary School;
  4. Mateme Secondary School;
  5. Lukukwe Secondary School;
  6. Kana Secondary School;
  7. Njanje Secondary School;
  8. Choto Secondary School;
  9. Batanai Secondary School;
  10. Mkoka Secondary School; and
  11. Selima Secondary School

THE MINISTER OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY

EDUCATION (HON. DR. DOKORA): It is the thrust of the Ministry of Primary and Secondary Education to promote e-learning in all schools in Zimbabwe. The new Curriculum Framework for Primary and Secondary Education: 2015-2022 provides for the teaching of information communication technology (ICT) from Early Childhood Development to Advanced Level. For this reason, syllabi for ICT for infant, junior primary and secondary levels were developed.

          Further, the Ministry through its Curriculum Development and Technical Services department has made efforts to come up with an e-learning solution for our schools. This will see our schools getting a variety of appropriate digital content. All the above mentioned schools in the Gokwe-Kana Constituency and beyond will benefit from the current initiatives that are underway. However, the provision of hardware equipment for e-learning is a shared responsibility. While the Ministry can play a part in providing hardware equipment, schools and other partners, including the Hon. Member can assist where possible.

          The ratio of computer tools to learners is recommended at the UNESCO benchmark of 1:8. Since e-learning software solutions may be centrally accessible, and we did an initial agreement to use MS 365 Suite. We have since invited TelOne, Zarnet and E-learning to provide a Proof of Concept (POC) that demonstrated connectivity at the most efficient, cost-effective and non-disruptive thresholds. Once the POCs are signed off, schools can then become connected within the radius of their cluster points.

          More information will be made available as we develop this frontier in the immediate future. Hon. Members can contact the District Schools Inspectors who will gladly indicate areas they can be useful in the massification of ICT tool presence and utilisation in schools.          

REVIVAL OF SHASHE IRRIGATION SCHEME

  1. HON. S. NCUBE asked the Minister of Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development to state when Shashe Irrigation Scheme would be revived, considering that there is plenty of water in Shashe River.

          THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, MECHANISATION AND IRRIGATION DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. MADE):  Hon. Speaker, the irrigation scheme being referred to is Mambali Irrigation Scheme, which has already been earmarked for rehabilitation once resources are availed.

STATUS OF GWANDA-MAPHISA ROAD

  1. HON. S. NCUBE asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to clarify the status of Gwanda-Maphisa Road, in view of the fact that documents at Matobo Rural District Council indicate that it was tarred in 2006, while the situation on the ground is that it is still a gravel road.

THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. J. M. GUMBO): Mr. Speaker Sir, Gwanda Maphisa Road is 58kms long and a gravel road.  It was last graded in 2015.  The road is in a fair condition and is due for regrading before the4 end of this year, 2016.  The information in Matobo Rural District documents of the road being tarred in 2006 is incorrect, but certainly, there are plans to surface it at some stage.  I thank you.

PLANS TO COVER POTHOLES ALONG BEITBRIDGE-MASVINGO ROAD

  1. HON. B. TSHUMA asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development whether there is an emergency plan to cover the potholes littering the Beitbridge-Masvingo Road, especially between Beitbridge and Rutenga as these potholes are a death trap.

THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. J. M. GUMBO): Mr. Speaker Sir, the potholes between Beitbridge and Rutenga are being attended to with the aim of resurfacing the worst section.  Please be advised that the road from Beitbridge to Harare has been awarded to a developer on a Triple P Concession for dualisation and rehabilitation, and work on this very busy road is expected to start towards the end of the year.  I thank you.

COMPLETION OF CONSTRUCTION WORK ALONG KAROI-BINGA ROAD

  1. HON. BEREMAURO asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to –
  2. Explain why it has taken the Ministry more than 25 years to complete construction of Karoi Binga Road and;
  3. State when construction is likely to resume.

THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. J. M. GUMBO): Mr. Speaker Sir, it has taken the Ministry a very long time to complete the construction of the Karoi-Binga Road because of financial constraints.  The Ministry is now pursuing engagement of the private sector in road development through Public-Private-Partnership or Build-Operate and Transfer Concessions.  Karoi-Binga Road is one of the targeted roads and tenders are to be floated this year, 2016, for this road and others.  I thank you.

COMPLETION OF KAROI TOLLGATE

  1. HON. BEREMAURO asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to explain why it has taken construction of Karoi Tollgate six months before completion and when it is likely to be completed.

          THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. J. M. GUMBO): Mr. Speaker Sir, the construction of the Karoi Tollgate has taken six months before completion because of inconsistent release of funds for the construction works.  The matter has been discussed with ZINARA and it is hoped that the funding will improve.  The tollgate is targeted for completion by the beginning of the fourth quarter of the year 2016.

MEASURES TO IMPROVE TECHNOLOGY AT THE VEHICLE INSPECTION DEPARTMENT

  1. HON. MASUKU asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to explain the measures in place to improve the technology used at the Vehicle Inspection Department in order to curb corruption particularly on the Provisional Drivers’ Licence tests.

          THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. J. M. GUMBO): The Ministry has zero tolerance policy on corruption in line with the aspirations of ZIM ASSET.  In this context, the Ministry has implemented the following proactive strategies to curb corruption at the Vehicle Inspectorate Department (VID):-

  1. VID depots are grouped into three categories, that is, small, medium and big, respectively for purposes of analyzing their performance and the strate4gy helps the Ministry to monitor performance per each depot and be able to identify the existence of wayward behaviour through daily, weekly and monthly returns and reports analysis. This strategy has demonstrated its effectiveness from 2009 to current, where 32 officers were fired when it surfaced from the analysis on the returns that corruption was taking place at 13 VID depots namely: Eastlea, Belvedere, Chitungwiza, Gweru, Mutare, Chiredzi, Bindura, Kadoma, Victoria Falls, Zvishavane, Nyamapanda, Chinhoyi and Marondera, which issued 199 Drivers and Provisional licences to undeserving applicants and were cancelled by the Ministry.
  2. We have erected conspicuous notice boards at all VID depots and introduced on March 6, 2016, three toll free numbers (08013121-3), informing members of the public to call the supplied numbers if they have been asked for consideration or bribe by VID officials in order to pass a Drivers licence or a provisional licence. The tol free numbers are also displayed at the rear of all VID vehicles.
  3. All depots have suggestion boxes strategically positioned for members of the public to air their views as a feedback on service delivery.
  4. We have a dedicated multi-skilling strategy for all our officers, that is, every officer is trained as both an examiner and an inspecting officer. The strategy helps to remove pre-arranged corrupt practices and predictability from officers on duty in that the manager at any given time, can reshuffle officers from driving examinations to vehicle inspections or vice-versa.
  5. We have a three-year transfer policy which helps in mitigating against over-familiarisation of officers with members of the public which has high propensity for corruption.
  6. In line with advancement in the global village, VID as a learning organisation, will in the near future, move towards automation of its services, which will help to reduce direct human interface therefore reducing corruption.
  7. It is from best practice that we monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of the above strategies for continuous improvement. Any reported case of corruption is investigated in order to get to the bottom of it and appropriate action is taken as indicated in item one above.
  8. My Ministry intends to commercialise the VID as a strategy to improve the quality of service delivery and eradicate corruption, given that it will be easy to motivate diligent performers and weed out unruly elements without going through the bureaucratic processes.

I thank you.

On the motion of THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. GUMBO), the House adjourned at Five o’clock p.m.

 

 

 

 

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National Assembly Hansard NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD 17 AUGUST 2016 VOL 42 NO 82