You are here:Home>National Assembly Hansard>NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD 18 NOVEMBER 2015 VOL 42 NO 21

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD 18 NOVEMBER 2015 VOL 42 NO 21

Download attachments:
PARLIAMENT OF ZIMBABWE

Wednesday, 18th November, 2015

The National Assembly met at a Quarter-past Two o’clock p.m.

PRAYERS

(THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER in the Chair)

ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

HON. MAONDERA: On a point of order Madam Speaker. This House has been expressing concern about the absence of Ministers and I am happy that the Leader of Government Business is in the House. We do not know what is happening because the bench is empty and who are we going to pose the questions to when there are no Ministers? So, I am proposing that we defer Questions Without Notice until such a time when the Ministers are in.

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: You have mentioned the Leader of the House, are you posing a question to the Leader of the House or you are making a point of order?

HON. MAONDERA: I am raising a motion and I am allowed on a point of privilege.

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Order, the Hon. Member is proposing that we defer Questions Without Notice, is there any objection?

          HON. CHINOTIMBA: I object.

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Now, we proceed with Questions Without Notice.

          *HON. CHINOTIMBA: Thank you Madam Speaker. My question is directed to the Minister of Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development, Dr. Made. Hon. Minister, firstly I would want to thank you for the inputs that you gave to farmers but my question is, I think you realise that it is very hot and if we do not empower A2 farmers, the inputs that you gave to communal areas, it is like they will end up being a waste. We are saying, instead of people who have vast pieces of land going to banks to get loans where they already are indebted for three years now, is it not possible that you empower GMB by giving it money so that it buys seed and gives to farmers for contract farming? I realise that the more people go to borrow money from banks; the chance that they end up not being able to approach the banks because they already owe money to the banks for the past three years.

          Other countries are getting subsidies but Zimbabwe is not doing that. Is it not possible that farmers go and get inputs from GMB and places like that, for people who cannot go and get loans from the banks so that they can manage to plough and get their own food?

          *THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, MECHANISATION AND IRRIGATION DEVELOPMENT (DR. MADE): I would like to thank Hon. Chinotimba for the question. He asked a very pertinent question. As a policy, Government is looking after all farmers and there is nothing like small farmers, for example, people from the resettlement areas or those from the purchase areas, the A2 farmers. Let me take you back a bit. Initially, we were assisting A2 farmers and I just want to remind him of that. We were sourcing grain for small farmers and the Government decided that the small farmers should also be assisted but we did not forget about A2 farmers. I would like to make that point known that we did not forget about them. What we have done this year is to look at all the farmers and we did not mind about whether or not he was on A1 or A2, we thought that all farmers should be paid equally for their grain that they would have taken to the GMB. That was the first point. Like now, some farmers took their wheat and maize to the GMB and we are supposed to be paying for those who delivered in 2013/2014. We will be paying those very soon starting tomorrow.

Now, coming to those other people whom we have referred to the banks, we are saying that all farmers should go to the banks, talk to them and maybe, honour up that they are owing the banks. Every farmer should go to their bank. We know that farmers are owing banks but we are not saying that they should go today. What we are saying is that we are aware that farmers are owing the banks. We are saying that they should go back to their banks and honour up to the banks and maybe they will be given advice by the banks which they have to follow.

Coming to what the Government is going to do with the farmers, we are looking at vulnerable farmers and at the moment, we are looking at the rains. The rains have come late and we are not expecting a lot of rains, but we will assist the farmers. We are not saying that there are no rains, but there are other things that we are also doing. We are trying to put up irrigation that will assist the small farmers and we are also going to go into irrigation to cater for the A2 farmers. We will be helping each other.

What we are really looking at this year is the issue of cotton because he has asked a question that was directed towards that. We will be assisting about 1000 0000 households. We will be assisting them with cotton inputs especially in the dry regions. We will also try and assist the cotton farmers. We are still discussing the issue, but at the end of the day we know that we will assist. The Government is going to announce that it will assist cotton farmers with inputs because we want to go back to serious cotton farming. We will be looking at fertilizers and crop chemicals because those are mostly expensive for cotton farmers.

We know that we will get good harvests from there. We will also get seed cake where we can get cotton cake. The Chairman, the Hon. Vice President is here. He is responsible for the Food and Nutrition Cluster. We will still have to sit down and come up with proper things. I am saying, we will not discriminate against the A2 and the A1 communal farmers. We will be looking at all the farmers and all farmers will be assisted.

Now, coming to this year, we have been told how much rains we are going to get. We are not saying that because of the weather forecast we are not going to do anything. No farmer is going to sit back because of the weather forecast. We are expecting all our farmers to start ploughing. We will also look at our farmers who are into animal husbandry and other things. I thank you very much.

ANNOUNCEMENTS BY THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER

VISITORS IN THE SPEAKER’S GALLERY

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: I have to recognise the presence in the Speaker’s Gallery, students and teachers from Gateway Junior School, Harare Province. You are most welcome.

*HON. CHINOTIMBA: Minister, you did not understand my question. My question is, we have contract farmers – as Government, why do we not empower GMB to get into contract farming where they will plough maize? Here you are talking about cotton but we do not get food from cotton. We might plant vegetables and cotton, but what we want is our stable food sadza.

I am saying that as Government, why do we not give money to GMB for GMB to buy seed from SEEDCO and other places like that so that they can go into contract farming? After ploughing, they can just get their money instead of us going to the banks because we do not get money from the bank. From what I am being told, the money that is meant for farmers has been taken to the banks but people have lost their houses because of these banks.

What I am saying is, why do you not give the money to GMB to buy inputs so that we go into contract farming for people to get food?

*HON. DR. MADE: Madam Speaker, I think I answered properly and I explained that we are paying the farmers that took their grain to GMB. Hon. Chinotimba, I said we are going to look into assisting all farmers. I said we started by assisting A2 farmers and I also went on to say that we were not going to leave out the A1 farmers.

When he says we should give money to GMB, it is not only GMB that the Government has to look after. There are other institutions. GMB as a parastatal has its own contract activities. GMB looks at how they can assist farmers and we also look at how we can assist. This is just a suggestion that the Hon. Member has made which we will examine, but there is a lot that we have to look into when we look at our institutions and what we ask them to do.

HON. CHIMANIKIRE: My question is directed to the Minister of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs, in the absence of the Minister of Home Affairs. In terms of the Constitution, Section 70, on the rights of accused persons, there is a certain amount of protection that the accused person is supposed to get. Last week it was reported in the media that an accused person died at St Mary’s police station after having been taken into custody. This is not the first time that an accused person has died at this particular police station. I would like the Hon. Vice President and Minister of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs to explain to the nation what Government policy is as regards the rights of accused persons as enshrined in the current Constitution of Zimbabwe, Section 70?

          THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. MNANGAGWA): Hon. Madam Speaker, I thank the Hon. Member for the question directed to the Minister of Home Affairs but in his absence I will give a reply.

It is true that the Constitution guarantees every citizen the right to life and right to protection. Again the same Constitution allows people who commit crime to be arrested. So, from what I understand the person referred to committed murder and he was arrested and kept in police cells. I am not aware of the details of the death but I am informed that he was found dead the next morning.

Unfortunately, the Constitution does not guarantee that where God decides a person must die, the Constitution will protect. I have no doubt that proper investigations will be undertaken by the relevant authorities as regards to the cause of the death of that individual. The scant facts that are there, which were in the paper, I do not know whether it is correct or not. It was discovered that he was hitting himself against the wall and then was taken to Chitungwiza hospital, somewhere – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections] –

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Order Hon. Members.

          HON. MNANGAGWA: For medical checkup and all this is in the newspapers and I have not heard a formal report from the Ministry. What I have is what other colleagues have also read about. There is not much that I can do but to say that every citizen is protected constitutionally, to right of life, to protection against any torture, to protection against any harm and to receive humane treatment under the conditions of arrest.   I thank you.

          HON. MADONDO: Thank you Hon. Madam Speaker. My question is directed to the Leader of the House, Hon. Vice President and Minister of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs. I just wanted to know, what is the Government policy regarding cancellation of Government policy by parastatals. This is in reference to Sable Chemicals that it was formed in 1966 and the Government took a position that this is a critical factory and they have to be subsidized or not to be charged commercial rates. The power company decided otherwise and that has resulted in quite a number of people losing their jobs and multiple effects in so many companies like ZFC, BOC which receive some bi-product from Sable Chemicals. What is Government policy regarding that because people are now suffering?

          THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. MNANGAGWA): I did not hear what policy he is looking for? I think he is talking about some entity which has gone into some commercial problems and I have no doubt that there is the Ministry of Industry which is suited and mandated to deal with issues of that nature. I think even the Ministry of Industry would not answer about problems in a particular firm or company without investigating the issues that the Hon. Member is asking. So, I would recommend that the Hon. Member should put his question in writing so that the facts he is asking can be investigated. I am not sure if the issues relate to policy. I thank you.

          HON. ENG. MUDZURI: Thank you Hon. Madam Speaker.   My question goes to the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development. We have asked several questions in this House. I do not know whether it is Government policy to ignore certain roads for as long as they live. I have asked a question on the road from Chivhu to Triangle, on that road I have lost two tyres myself. It has so many ditches and potholes, we have asked about it since last rainy season. Another rainy season has come and nothing completely is done and if more rains come it is really going to be a disaster. I do not know how many more people have lost their tyres but right now it is going to have more serious accidents then probably loss of life.

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: That is on a particular road but I think you can take the opportunity that the Minister is here.

          THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. GUMBO): Thank you Hon. Madam Speaker. I want to thank Hon. Mudzuri for asking that question but he is asking a question which relates to a particular road which has particular problems which I think needs to be investigated. As a matter of policy, it is not Government policy to ignore any one road for rehabilitation or resurfacing or whatever. The policy is that all roads must be attended to but at this particular moment and time, it is not just that particular road he is referring to but also many other roads across the country which need attention. The problem at this particular time is funding for rehabilitating the road. I can assure you that as soon as funds are made available, we will attend to the road that you are talking about so that you will be happy and you will not lose more tyres. I thank you.

          HON. MUDZURI: Supplementary Hon. Madam Speaker.

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: I think that the question was well answered because you are asking on a particular road so, I think the Minister is requesting that you put it in written form so that he goes to research about that road.

          HON. MUDZURI: My supplementary question is for how long will the Ministry of Transport and Infrastructural Development say its plans are indefinite until funds are available because the plan must be there? It must be planned such that we get results. If you just say until funds are available it could be in 10 years. So the Minister must be specific that they are working towards doing something.

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Hon. Minister the question is can you be specific when the funds will be available?

          HON. DR. GUMBO: Thank you Hon. Madam Speaker. I will ask the Hon. Mudzuri to put the question in writing so that we can then go to the plan of attending to all roads then I can come back specifically to tell you whether it will be next year or the following year. Now you want to be specific and this is why I am saying put it in writing then we can go back to the plan of rehabilitating the roads then come up with a specific date. The underlining answer to your question which I put earlier on is that it is because of the issue of funding but there is also an issue of priorities. Now, if you put it in writing, I can then be able to tell you when that particular road will be attended to. I thank you.

          *HON. R.N.S. MAWERE: My question is directed to Hon Made. We have heard that ARDA has been allocating land to people but we know that Government has not exhausted all its land. There are still tracts of land that can still be allocated to people. Why are they targeting the Government institutions which should be reserved for the future generation? Is that what is happening or not?

          THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, MECHANISATION AND IRRIGATION DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. MADE): My answer to that question is no, land is not being distributed to other people by ARDA. When we allocate land to institutions, we expect those institutions to utilise the land but if they are working with others on other activities, maybe it could be something else which could be good. Maybe you can put your question in writing and give any other information that you may have so you can get a clear response.

          *HON. R.N.S. MAWERE: Hon Made, this is an open secret that it is happening. Maybe we can assist each other and send people out there to go and check if that is what is happening. There are places like Gairezi Estate which can be visited.

          *HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: I think the Hon Minister said put your question in writing and mention the affected places so as to enable him to investigate.

          *HON. R.N.S. MAWERE: I did hear that Hon Speaker but I will stand guided. I thought he could assist but I will do as you said.

          HON. BEREMAURO: I would like to find out from the Minister of Energy and Power Development what Government policy is on ensuring that there are no power cuts to institutions like hospitals and ZINWA. As I speak now, Karoi Hospital is discharging patients due to non availability of water.

          THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. UNDENGE): It is indeed Government policy that in all critical institutions including hospitals where there are sewer works and pumping of water, electricity should not be cut in such institutions.

          HON. SITHOLE: I will direct my question to the Vice President Hon Mnangagwa and it is based on the disturbing media reports concerning the health of the President viz-a-viz the events that happened in India at the airport. Can the Vice President inform the House and the nation at large on the state of health of the President of the nation?

          THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. MNANGAGWA): Madam Speaker, I assure the Hon. Member that the President is healthier than him.

          HON. MAJOME: I will direct my question also to the Leader of the House Hon Vice President Mnangagwa. Why is this House receiving annual financial reports of State Institutions and Parastatals towards the end of the year? In yesterday’s Order Paper, there were the Agricultural Marketing Authority’s reports and the Tobacco Marketing Authority’s reports, two months before the end of the year and these are 2014 financial statements. Last month we also got that of the Grain Marketing Board and the National Railways of Zimbabwe for 2014, yet the Public Finance and Management Act requires those Parastatals to submit reports to the relevant Ministers within five months before the end of the year and the relevant Hon. Ministers to table those reports to this august House as soon thereafter. This is now like 10 months afterwards. Why is it taking that long to simply table a report that has been prepared by another entity?

          THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. MNANGAGWA): What I know is that every Parastatal falls under a particular Ministry and the period of submitting reports are stated in the Act. What I do not know is whether she is telling the truth or not about whether they have been submitted or not. She specifically mentioned three or four reports from the Ministry of Agriculture and the Minister is sitting right here and I do not know why she is afraid of asking the Minister of Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development as to what has happened – [HON. MEMBERS: Laughter] – but I feel very proud that she thinks that I know everything and that is very good. I really thank you for thinking that I know everything that happens in every Ministry. In terms of policy, as to when a report must be submitted and why a report has been delayed, that would be understood. It might not even be the Minister but the institution which will have submitted the report late. So, those are specific questions which would require to be investigated for us to establish the facts relating to a particular report. I thank you.

         

HON. MARIDADI: Thank you Madam Speaker. This is a very serious issue because it talks about governance and it talks about the economy of the country. The Ministers that are here, Hon. Minister Undenge and Hon. Minister Made, parastatals that are under their purview have not submitted audited accounts on time and I think they owe the nation an explanation. We want to know why it takes long for an organisation like ZESA, GMB and NRZ to submit their audited reports on time. Why does it take so much time? I will direct that to Hon. Minister Undenge.

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Order, they cannot speak while they are two, so it will be one by one. It is a supplementary question which is directed to someone. So, the Hon. Vice President has responded to the questions, that is when you ask the Minister, but you have asked for a supplementary question while the Hon. Vice President has answered you. If it is an outstanding question, you can direct it to the relevant Minister, but I am not giving you this chance – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – yes, because you stood up for a supplementary question.

          HON. MARIDADI: Since the question has come already Hon. Speaker, they have all heard it, I think it must just be …

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: No, we do not operate that way.

HON. MARIDADI: Okay thank you.

*HON. CHAPFIKA: Thank you Hon. Deputy Speaker. My question is directed to the Minister of Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development. We thank you for encouraging A2 farmers to go into contract farming with others who are well resourced. We know you will be working with other people and other Ministries but are you aware that some of these contracts are just as good as slavery. Maybe you are not aware because some of the farmers are getting 5% or even 7%. Those who would have got a bigger percentage would have got about 10%. Instead of him not doing anything on the farm, they think it is better to go into contract farming with whites. Secondly, are you aware that some of these farmers who were on contract are delivering maize at a very low price to the contractors and those are the people who take the maize and sell it to GMB for a profit. Can you comment on that Hon. Minister?  

*THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, MECHANISATION AND IRRIGATION DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. MADE): Thank you Hon. Speaker. I would like to thank Hon. Chapfika for asking that question. The question was in two parts. I will answer the other part where I can, as the Minister of Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development and the other part can be directed to the Minister of Lands and Rural Resettlement, but I will just answer all the same – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjection] –

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Hon. Minister, could you please raise your voice so that the whole House can hear what your answer is to the question that was asked by the Hon. Member. This is a request.

HON. DR. MADE: Firstly, I will answer on the contract question. There is no one who has signed a contract from what he has said before they get permission from the Ministry of Lands and Rural Resettlement. If you enter into a contract without the authority of the Minister of Lands, then it means you will be committing an offence. I think the Minister of Lands once said that. I think all those farmers who go into contract farming should first have the contract checked. Maybe the place they would have been allocated would have been either an A1 or an A2 farm. He also explained that they have to investigate the person you will be entering into contract with as he has already said that some farmers are getting 5%, 10% and so on. That is my answer from a policy point of view. He spoke about certain people selling maize to GMB. Those are specific people that have to be investigated and if he has evidence, then it can be investigated.

*HON. MAPIKI: My question is directed to the Minister of Tourism and Hospitality Industry. We would like to know how far he has gone in terms of the preparations for ICASA and how far he has gone in preparing for those visitors who will be staying in South Africa, and coming to spend the day here because they say things here are expensive.

THE MINISTER OF TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY (HON. ENG. MZEMBI): Thank you Hon. Speaker. We are very advanced with the preparations for ICASA and all systems go, we are on course and as far as accommodation is concerned, as I indicated last time…

HON. CHINOTIMBA: On a Point of order Madam Speaker.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER (HON. DZIVA): What is your point of order Hon. Chinotimba?

*HON. CHINOTIMBA: My point of order is that when we speak in the vernacular, we want the whole country to understand. Hon. Mzembi is from Masvingo, he is a Karanga. We have killed our country by speaking in English. He should speak in the vernacular for everyone to understand.

*HON. ENG. MZEMBI: I would like to thank Hon. Chinotimba for asking me to speak in the vernacular. What I would like to say is that this meeting that is going to be held in Harare where people will be talking about HIV/AIDs – I cannot translate HIV/AIDs into Karanga, the preparations are progressing very well. We have more than enough accommodation, hotels and some homes whose owners have registered for hospitality purposes and people can go and stay. We have plenty of food and there is no need for our people to go and eat food in South Africa. Everything is on course and even electricity distribution has improved. I have not received any report, especially hotels in Harare that they have had power cuts. I would like to thank the Minister for the provision of electricity in hotels. I also urge everyone to be very friendly to our visitors who are coming. I thank you.

          HON. MAPIKI:  Hon. Minister, a lot of visitors who are coming to Zimbabwe are complaining that Zimbabwean hotels are very expensive. Some people from the hotels are saying that the Government has imposed some fees and this results in things becoming very expensive for them. What is it that the Government will do to assist them?

          HON. ENG. MZEMBI: Before the conference begins, we agreed with the organisers of the meeting that delegates will be getting a certain concessional rate. I have not received any report complaining that we are very expensive here such that they are going to be sleeping in South Africa. I think they are all going to be staying here in Zimbabwe. What I am saying is that, one can go and register their homes with the Zimbabwe Tourism Authority (ZTA). You can now spend your bonuses and put them away or in your pockets. This is the time for you to make money as well. This is the empowerment we are always talking about.

          *HON. CHINOTIMBA: Hon. Minister, I think there is a question that you have not answered properly. Some visitors come and spend the day here in Zimbabwe and go back to South Africa. I have an example of visitors who visit the Victoria Falls, they come from South Africa, spend the day in Zimbabwe and go back. I think our hotels are not benefitting and our country is not benefitting. I think that is the question that was being asked.

THE DEPUTY SPEAKER: Hon. Chinotimba I think that question has been answered; let us move on to another question.

          HON. CHIBAYA: My question is directed to the Leader of the House, the Vice President, Hon. Mnangagwa. Hon. Speaker, is the Government able to deliver anything, given the vicious in-fighting and power struggle in the ruling party? I thank you.

          THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. MNANGAGWA): I thank the Hon. Member for asking that question. You did not only help the people in this House, but the entire region, that Zimbabwe is among the most peaceful countries in the region. Zimbabwe is the most stable country we have in the region. We are so peaceful. Other parliamentary institutions in the world fight in parliament. We do not have that in here; we are so peaceful and dignified. I am so happy that this is the country which ZANU-PF rules – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

          THE DEPUTY SPEAKER: Order Hon. Members, particularly those to my right. The Hon. Vice President is talking and we are busy shouting at each other, we should show respect.

          HON. MNANGAGWA: The stability we are enjoying in this country is a result of ZANU-PF being in power.

          HON. CHIBAYA: Hon. Vice President, I am talking about the in-fighting in ZANU-PF. Do you not think that this in-fighting in ZANU-PF will deter investment?

          HON. MNANGAGWA: Madam Speaker, I understand that this side of the House (signaling to the right side of the House) is of the ruling party and the other side is of the opposition. A member of the opposition is talking about the ruling party. I am not so sure whether he has crossed the floor and has the knowledge of what is happening in the ruling party. We in the ruling party are not aware of any in-fighting. We are so united in our political party.

          HON. CHIBAYA: Hon. Speaker, I think it is within my responsibility as a Member of Parliament to ask the Leader of the House. I belong to the opposition yes, but what I am talking about here is; one of the factors which is considered by investors when they want to invest is political stability. Therefore, what I am talking about here makes sense. We get worried when we hear that some people in Chitungwiza got killed whilst doing party business. This is a pertinent question Hon. Speaker and with all due respect Hon. Vice President, I deserve an honest answer.

          HON. MNANGAGWA: Indeed, the Hon. Member deserves an honourable and honest answer. The honest answer in relation to the case he has mentioned is that some murder was committed, which is criminal. The person who committed the crime was arrested. This shows how the rule of law applies in this country. It does not matter which party you belong to, if you commit a crime, you will be arrested. Whatever type of crime you commit, you will get arrested.

However, we are so happy that this country is peaceful and stable. Committing of a crime where a person has been murdered cannot be the reason for anybody who wants to invest to stop investing. There is not even one single country you can point to me and say in this country, there has never been a murder. I thank you.

*HON. CHAMISA: Thank you Madam Speaker. I am surprised by the answer that was given by the Vice President. It is good that the country is peaceful. Hon. Vice President, from the time that you were elected into office, are you happy? Are you having a good night sleep because the First Lady has been moving around all over the country and the slogan has been Handei naAmai, Handei naAmai –

*HON. CHINOTIMBA: On a point of order. My point of Order is that before the Vice President answers, let him respond to the fact that Hon. Chamisa is being insulted by the MDC-T. So, can he answer that as well?

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: I do not think there is any need to keep on raising point of orders. Hon. Chamisa posed a question to the Vice President, can you please give a chance to the Vice President to answer that question.

*THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. E. D. MNANGAGWA): I was asked by this boy –[AN HON MEMBER: What is muchinda?]- The Hon. Member who asked the question spoke in Shona. Honourable is not a Shona word. In the kings court, members are referred to as machinda which is a Shona word which refers to a virtuous person. If he does not understand vernacular, then I will call him honourable because he does not know the vernacular word. He asked if I am getting a good night sleep. Do I look like someone who is not getting a good night sleep? – [Laughter] – He knows my wife is here and why did he not ask my wife if I slept well? You can even find out from my sister-in-law if I do get a good night sleep. If you are too shy to ask my wife, you can find out from my sister-in-law over there.

Coming to the second part of the question that was asked about the First Lady holding rallies across the country, the First Lady is conducting ZANU PF rallies and not MDC-T rallies. Why should you be bothered by that?

*HON. MAVENYENGWA: My question is directed to the Minister of Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development. I come from Zaka Constituency which is situated in the rural areas and there is drought there. Government used to buy maize at $390 per tonne from the farmers but now, the Government is selling the same maize it bought from the farmers for $500 per tonne. I just want to know how the Government can assist the people in rural areas in view of the fact that they are facing starvation and hunger. The price that the Government is selling its maize is even higher than that which obtains on the black market which is $360 per tonne?

*THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, MECHANISATION AND IRRIGATION DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. MADE): I want to thank the Hon. Member for asking that particular question. I will explain how we buy grain from the farmers. At the moment, we have an arrangement with the Ministry of Public Service, Labour and Social Services that we should assist those families that are facing hunger in the rural areas. The programme is already in motion. That is what is happening throughout the country.

Then, there is maize that is sold by the GMB. At the moment, the maize that is being sold by GMB – and he mentioned a price and he was specific – but what I know is that all the maize at the moment is being kept by the GMB so that we could assist those families that are facing hunger. I would like to thank the Hon. Member for the information that we got. I will go and check how much maize is being sold. At the moment, we are keeping maize for those people who are under the programme which is being run by the Ministry of Public Service, Labour and Social Services. I thank you.

*HON. MARIDADI: My point of order is that there is a ruling that was supposed to be delivered by the Speaker of the National Assembly on the contempt of Parliament regarding Hon. Kasukuwere and Hon. Wadyajena. When we were in Victoria Falls for the Pre- Budget Seminar recently, there was an argument between Hon. Wadyajena and Minister Patrick Zhuwao where it was alleged that Hon. Wadyajena wanted to kill the President. So, I am now saying, we want to know about those rulings and we want to know who was in the wrong between Hon. Wadayajena and Hon. Kasukuwere. I thank you.

HON. CHAMISA: My question is directed to the Minister of Media and Broadcasting Services. Recently, we saw the arresting of some journalists in the country, we want to hear from the Ministry because clearly that arrest hinged and almost infringed Section 61 of the Constitution on freedom of expression, freedom of the media as well as the freedom to hold a profession. Do we get an assurance of the Minister that this is not the beginning or heralding of another spate of an onslaught on media practitioners and also on the freedom of the media?

THE MINISTER OF INFORMATION, MEDIA AND BROADCASTING SERVICES (HON. MUSHOHWE): I would like to thank the Hon. Member for this question that he has asked. Surprisingly, the Hon. Member is a distinguished lawyer who knows that the matter is sub judice and we cannot deliberate on it until it is disposed of. [HON. CHAMISA: What about the policy of Government?]- I am saying the issue is sub judice.

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Hon. Minister, just answer your question.

HON. MUSHOHWE: No, no, no, the policy of Government is not to violate – let me assure you that it is not Government policy to arrest any member of society without any due process. But if the police, I am sure would do whatever they do on the basis of the information given to them but the courts are the ones but I can assure you that Government has no policy of violating the Constitution, which is our Constitution.

          HON. CHAMISA: Thank you Hon. Minister. My supplementary has to do with the criminalisation of the profession of journalists. If you look at the Criminal Law Codification and Reform Act, there is a section that was struck off, which criminalises the profession, especially when then one looks at the current Section 31. Are we seeing a shift in Government from the criminalisation of the profession or you are actually entrenching it? This is what I would want to hear from you.

          *HON. MUSHOHWE: I had given the assurance but I cannot go into the details of the matter because it is sub judice. I have said it and we cannot discuss the matter as yet.

          HON. MARIDADI: I doubt that the Minister is understanding. We are not talking about this particular matter, but we are talking about criminalisation of the profession of journalism in general and not this particular matter. This has been used as a reference but criminalisation of the profession in general Hon. Minister.

          *HON. CHAMISA: Should I ask in Shona so that he understands?

          THE HON DEPUTY SPEAKER: Order, maybe it is because of the noise that he is not understanding the question.

          *HON. CHAMISA: Our Hon. Minister of Information, Media and Broadcasting Services, Mr. Mushohwe - the question is, whenever a journalist is arrested, not particularly in this case but this is a criminal offence that journalists are being arrested. He must try to understand what I am saying that as a journalist, whether short or tall, black or white, fat or thin, gamatox or not, I am saying Sections 31 and 95 of the Criminal Law Codification and Reform Act, is that this is a criminal offence instead of it being treated as a civil offence. How is the Government treating it? Is Government taking it as a criminal or a civil offence so that we know if one wants to sue?

          *HON. MUSHOHWE: Firstly, I would like to thank the Hon. Member for asking the question but let me assure him that his speaking in Shona does not mean that I did not understand what he was saying.   Madam Speaker, the point that I was making is that Government has no policy for arresting people just because they are journalists or carpenters. So, there is no such policy that they are arrested because they are journalists or that they are not journalists.

          *HON. ZHOU: Thank you Madam Speaker. My question is directed to the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development. There is a very short road and a bridge in Beitbridge and only 2 km were done. So, is that on the Government plan for them to be completed and when?

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: I think Hon. Member, you should put your question in writing so that the Minister can go and check with his Ministry to see if that road is also on the cards.

          HON. MURAI: Thank you very much Madam Speaker. My question goes to our Vice President Hon. Mnangagwa. The civil servants have already started receiving their salaries exclusive of their 13th cheque as promised by the Minister. Do we still expect the 13th cheque to be received and if yes, when do we expect that?

          *THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. MNANGAGWA): I would like to thank the Hon. Member for asking the question. I was not aware that some people have already received their salaries but what I know is that Government promised that they were going to pay bonuses and that is still the position.

          *HON. MUCHENJE: Thank you Hon. Speaker. My question is directed to Minister of Tourism and Hospitality Industry Hon. Eng. Mzembi. I am asking on behalf of women, how much we got from the Carnival that was conducted in this country that exposed us for what we are? How much did we get as a country out of it?

          *THE MINISTER OF TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY (HON. ENG. MZEMBI): I would like to thank the Hon. Member for that question on the Carnival and how much we raised. We had no intention of raising money when we conducted the Carnival. We wanted Zimbabweans to meet and get to know each other. Everywhere else where carnivals are held, the main reason or why it is held is for the social cohesion of people. Their coming together, going on to the streets, having fun, walking and marching and they were selling each other things like airtime, freezits and such things. That is something that happens and it is not money that is taxed.

          Now getting to the point where people were being served, we were not trying to raise money but we wanted Zimbabweans to get to know each other and be happy as Zimbabweans.

          *HON. MUCHENJE: Thank you Hon. Speaker. I would like to seek more clarification on this issue. The Minister said we were not after money but socialization.   I thank him very much for saying that it was not meant for raising money but it was meant for socialisation. We were exposed as women, but now we are saying that maybe men also should have been exposed – [Laughter]

*HON. ENG. MZEMBI: I did not get the question.

*HON. MPARIWA: Thank you Hon. Speaker. Maybe we would like the Hon. Minister to inform this House that men should also expose themselves in future carnivals like what the women did – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

*HON. ENG. MZEMBI: We invited Zimbabweans to come and meet and have fun. We wanted them to be happy as Zimbabweans. I did not strip anyone and I did not see anyone stripping. I saw people marching. Some were wearing body suits and some were wearing their traditional clothing. There was no one who was stark naked on that day. Everyone was dressed.

*THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: The question that was asked by the Hon. Member was, in future is there going to be such an event where men will also be asked to do that?

*HON. ENG. MZEMBI: I have seen such carnivals in places where they allow gays and lesbians, but here we do not allow gays and lesbians – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.]-

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Order Hon. Members. Please listen to what is being said here.

HON. MAJOME: On a point of order Madam Speaker. The Hon. Minister I think is advised not to make sexist comments that are also discriminatory against women because our Constitution finds men and women equal. So if his response is to the effect that we do not do that because we are not homosexuals, is he implying that the nakedness of those women who were around was to appease men only and women are only sexual objects and that was the object of the carnival?

HON. ENG. MZEMBI: Madam Speaker, now that she has asked this question in English let me just give it back to the Hon. Member in the manner that I understand carnivals to be. We do not organise carnivals in the name of nudity. We organise carnivals so that the people of Zimbabwe are socially organised to express their happiness. The objectives of carnivalism are in pursuit of gross national happiness of a people, their social cohesion and I am referring to the people of Zimbabwe who include men and women.

Now in conducting carnivals, in organising them, we invite countries and locals to organise themselves into floats so each float expresses the brand image or construction of the act that they want the people of Zimbabwe to see about themselves. I did not see during that procession any float that sort to express the aspect of nudity, whether it was coming from men or from women. I think that by fielding such questions we are now hanging on to the coattails of peripherals regarding this concept and I do not further wish to trivialise it because that was not the intended objective of the carnival.

*HON. ZWIZWAI: Thank you Madam Speaker. When the Minister answered the question he said that men do not go about wearing body suits because we are not gays. This therefore means that, from what he is saying, those ladies who were exposing themselves it would appear were lesbians. We had children who attended the carnival who participated in the carnival. So, we would like the Minister to withdraw the word lesbians because he is saying those ladies who were exposed were lesbians or they were after men. I think he should withdraw that.

*HON. ENG. MZEMBI: Madam Speaker I have no reason for withdrawing what I said.

*HON. ZWIZWAI: Madam Speaker, you should make a ruling on whether or not he should withdraw his statement – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Order, order Hon. Members let us listen to the question by the Hon. Member.

+ HON. M.G. NCUBE: Thank you Madam Speaker. My question is directed to the Minister of Welfare Services for War Veterans, War Collaborators, Former Political Prisoners, Detainees and Restrictees. We understand that war collaborators will be vetted. My question is how about those who were detained in Botswana, Zambia and other countries? Are you also going to vet them together with collaborators?

HON. ENG. MUDZURI: According to the rules and regulations of Parliament if someone raises a point of order you are supposed to give a ruling and not for the Minister to answer. I think on a point of order given by the Hon. Member, no matter how trivial it is, you must give a ruling and then the question can be answered because it is a point of order not to be answered by the Minister.

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Hon. Member and that Hon. Member who asked the Minister to withdraw there is no need to withdraw because there is this word ngochani. It is always being talked about, so there is no way he can withdraw.

+THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF WELFARE SERVICES FOR WAR VETERANS, WAR COLLABORATORS, FORMER POLITICAL PRISONERS, DETAINEES AND RESTRICTEES (HON. T. J. DUBE): What happened is that all those who were in camps and refugees are all going to be vetted. Earlier on it was the liberators who were vetted. These people were being given guns and we wanted to see whether or not they could assemble the guns. There were others who were assisting the liberators, some were teachers, some were those who were cooking for the liberators but they did not qualify. As of now, it has been agreed that they will also qualify. It is going to be a tall order because already we have vetted 700 000 war veterans, collaborators and the ex-detainees and there are still a lot more who are going to be vetted, may be they will come up to a million. I thank you.

          HON. KHUPE: My question is directed Minister of Economic Planning and Investment Promotion. Zimbabwe has come up with brilliant documents and I think we have had more than 10 Blue Prints, ZIM ASSET included. The problem that we have is that when it comes to implementation nothing is implemented. My question is, is there a problem in ZANU PF to the extent that you are allergic to implementing some of these documents? I thank you.

          THE MINISTER OF ECONOMIC PLANNING AND INVESTMENT PROMOTION (HON. S. K. MOYO): Thank you Madam Speaker. I thank the hon. member for her question. She is very much aware that she was part of the Inclusive Government and for her to say nothing has been implemented when she was part of Government, it is really most unfortunate. The position I can talk of now, after the expiry of the Inclusive Government is; we have as a ruling party, an economic Blueprint called ZIM ASSET. A lot of is happening, you have seen a lot happening across the country because this is an instrument which addresses effectively the issues of food security and nutrition. This is a Blueprint which also addresses the issue of social services, infrastructural development, utilities, value addition and beneficiation.

          It is quite clear that if one understands that premise and follow what is happening across the country – we are making sure and the Minister of Agriculture Mechanisation and Irrigation Development is making sure that we received as you know - a lot of tractors from Brazil which are being distributed across the country.   Also you can be rest assured that the issue of failing to implement this Blueprint is a thing of the past. You saw yesterday the Hon. Vice President here together with the President with a delegation from Belarus bringing a lot of implements as well as to improve the agriculture sector.   You have seen a number of roads also being attended to in terms of the use of infrastructure development. The issue of energy – you have also seen a lot of things happening both in terms of hydro and thermal. So, to say nothing is happening is not fair to the truth.

          I want to assure the hon. member that this is not of course a matter of a day’s event, it is not an event, and it is a process. We are giving it such time that by the time the Blueprint itself expires in terms of the time factor, this country will be something else. You can see what is happening, so it is up to you if you do not want to use the roads which we are making please use the foot paths, you are welcome you can take the so called foot paths. If you do not want to use the electricity we are generating, use the candles. If you do not want to use – be rest assured – [HON. CHIBAYA: Ndosaka wakabviswa muhuChair.] -

          HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Order Hon. Minister I heard something which was said by Hon. Chibaya of which he should withdraw.

          HON. CHIBAYA: Thank you very much Madam Chair can you tell me what you said I must withdraw.   

          HON. MADAM SPEAKER: You said ndosaka wakabviswa muhuChair. Withdraw that.

          HON. CHIBAYA: I withdraw Hon. Madam Speaker.

Questions Without Notice were interrupted by HON. MADAM SPEAKER in terms of Standing Order Number 64.

ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS WITH NOTICE

POLICY REGARDING PROVISION OF DAMS

  1. MANGAMI asked the Minister of Environment, Water

and Climate to explain the policy regarding the provision of dams for irrigation purposes in all the wards in the country.

          THE MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, WATER AND CLIMATE (HON. MUCHINGURI): Hon. Madam Speaker, I would like to thank the Hon. Mangami for the question.

          According to part (6) of the Water Act the functions of the Minister include development of policies to guide the orderly and integrated planning of the optimum development, utilization and protection of the country’s water resources in the national interest. The Water Policy of 2013 identified water as an essential requirement and enabler for all sectors of the economy and for national growth and development. Availability of water is also critical for the attainment of the required outcomes under ZIM ASSET.

          Madam Speaker, the Government launched the Dam per District programme in order to ensure that availability of adequate and sustainable water supply to meet domestic, agricultural and industrial water demand. The Government planned to build one medium sized dam per district under the Dam per District in response to fulfilling the requirements of Agenda 21 adopted after the Rio Earth Summit held in 1992 and also in order to meet national requirements. The programme would also be critical in the mitigation of climate change effects as rain fed agriculture is no longer sustainable in light of changing rainfall patterns.

          The programme has slowed down due to limited fiscal space. The Government is looking at alternative forms of financing such as Joint Ventures using the Build Operate and Transfer approach. I thank you.

COMPLIANCE TO COMMUNITY SHARE OWNERSHIP SCHEMES

  1. HON. MARIDADI asked the Minister of Youth, Indigenisation and Economic Empowerment if companies have finally complied with their obligations to Community Share Ownership Schemes.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF YOUTH DEVELOPMENT, INDIGENISATION AND EMPOWERMENT (HON. TONGOFA): My Ministry has established 61 Community Share Ownership Trusts (CSOTs) which have been duly registered with the Deeds Office. Out of the 61 registered CSOTs, 60 are rural and Mabvuku/Tafara is the the only urban CSOT registered to date.

To date, a total of US$134 million has been pledged by qualifying businesses. Out of the 61 Community Share Ownership Trusts, 21 have received seed capital from qualifying businesses within their jurisdiction. A total of US$38 182 698 was released to the trusts and has been directed towards socio-economic infrastructure development in the communities. The trusts have managed to provide goods and services to their respective communities to the value of US$14.6 million to date. The balance of US$23.7 million remains in the accounts of the Trusts for various purposes including investment.

Hon. Speaker, some of the qualifying businesses have fully honoured their pledges and these are Zimplats, Unki and Pretoria Portland Cement (PPC). Zimplats pledged US$10 million to Mhondoro-Ngezi, Chegutu and Zvimba Community Share Ownership Trusts. Unki pledged US$10 million to Tongogara Community Share Ownership Trust and PPC pledged US$3 million to be shared equally between Gwanda and Umguza Community Share Ownership Trusts. Some of the qualifying businesses have submitted their payment plans which were approved by the Ministry. annexure 1 attached shows CSOTs that are operational, the seed capital pledged, and the seed released. We are continuing to engage the companies so that they fulfil their pledges.

COMMUNITY SHARE OWNERSHIP TRUST

NAME OF QUALIFYING BUSINESSES

AMT OF SEED CAPITAL PLEDGED (US$)

SEED CAPITAL PAID TO DATE

REMARKS

Chegutu

Mhondoro-Ngezi

Zvimba

Zimplats

10 000 000

10 000 000

Zimplats has fully paid the seed capital agreed on.

Tongogara

Unki

10 000 000

10 000 000

Unki has fully paid the agreed seed capital.

Zvishavane

Mimosa

10 000 000

     6 000

The deed of Trust for Zvishavane CSOT has been amended to incorporate Mberengwa District which is also affected by the operations of Mimosa Mine.

Mberengwa

Mimosa

 

 

The Deed of Trust for Zvishavane CSOT has been amended to incorporate Mberengwa District. The $10 million will be shared between the two districts. Mimosa Mine has promised to disburse the first tranche of US$300 000 by 20 November 2015.

 

Murowa Diamonds

       500 000

   300 000

The company is yet to release the remaining balance of US200 000.

Umguza

PPC

1 500 000

1 535 000

PPC has fully paid the agreed seed capital.

Gwanda

Blanket Mine

5 000 000

5 000 000

Fully paid.

 

PPC

1 500 000

1 524 900

PPC has fully paid the agreed seed capital.

 

Jessi

250 000

250 000

Fully paid.

 

Farvic

150 000

30 000

The company will release the funds once its financial position has improved.

Bikita

Bikita Minerals

500 000

50 000

Bikita Minerals is yet to release the balance of US$450 000.

Masvingo

Lenox Mine

10 000

10 000

Fully paid

Chivi

Murowa Diamonds

500 000

300 000

Murowa Diamonds is yet to release the balance of US$200 000.

Zimunya-Marange

Mbada diamonds

10 000 000

200 000

Negotiations are underway for the companies to pay the seed capital.

 

Anjin

10 000 000

 

Marange Resources and Mbada

 

DMC

10 000 000

 

Diamonds released US$250 000 and US$200 000 respectively.

 

Marange Resources

10 000 000

250 000

 

 

Jinan

10 000 000

 

 

Mutasa

Metallon Gold

5 000 000

 

Metallon Gold will release US$1 million every year for five years.

UMP

Lafarge

1 000 000

333 000

Lafarge pledged US$3 million to be shared equally between UNP, Goromonzi and Mabvuku/Tafara CSOTs. The amount is to be paid over a period of three years i.e. one million per year.

Goromonzi

Mabvuku/Tafara

 

1 000 000

1 000 000

333 000

333 000

The company has released US$1 million to the trusts to date. The company deposited US$333 000 into the accounts of the three districts.

Bindura

Freda Rebecca – Mwana Africa

10 000 000

2 000 000

Freda Rebecca pledged US$10 million to Bindura CSOT Trust. The agreement made is that the company pays US$1 million per year for 10 years.

Shamva

Magobo Milling

50 000

10 000

The company will release the funds once its financial position has improved.

 

Canteberry

50 000

10 500

The company will release the funds once its financial position has improved.

 

Metallon Gold

5 000 000

10 000

The company will release US$1 million every year for five years. The company has released US$10 000.

 

Natural Stone Export Company (Pvt) Ltd

666 666

1 666

Natural Stone Export (Pvt) Ltd pledged US$2 million. The company operated in three districts namely; Shamva, UMP and Mutoko. The seed capital is to be shared equally among three districts. The company proposed to release US$5 000 per month. However, the Ministry is negotiating with the company to narrow down the period of payment.

Hwange

Hwange Colliery

600 000

 

The companies are yet to contribute towards seed capital due to cash flow constraints.

 

Makomo Resources

600 000

 

 

 

Chibondo Mines

600 000

 

 

 

South Mining

600 000

 

 

 

Hwange Coal Gasification

500 000

 

 

Bubi

Duration Gold (Casyme Mine)

1 000 000

29 000

The company proposed to pay US$29 000 quarterly.

Umzingwane

Metallon Gold

5 000 000

10 000

The company will release US$1 million every year for five years. The company has released US$10 000.

Mazowe

Metallon Gold

5 000 000

10 000

The company will release US$1 million every year for five years. The company has released US$10 000.

Mutoko

Natural Stone Export Company (Pvt) Ltd

666 666

1 666

Natural Stone Export (Pvt) Ltd pledged US$2 million. The company operates in three districts namely; Shamva, UMP and Mutoko. The seed capital is to be shared equally among three districts.

 

 

 

 

The company proposed to release US$5 000 per month. However, the Ministry is negotiating with the company to narrow down the period of payment.

Wedza

Imire Game Park

 

2 000

The company did not make any pledge but has paid US$2 000.

 

Mutemwa Holdings

 

300

The company did not make any pledge but has paid US$300.

 

TARRING OF MUTOKO TO RWENYA RIVER ROAD

  1. HON. HUNGWA asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to state when the road from Mutoko to Rwenya River will be tarred in view of the fact that it is a busy road that links Mashonaland East and Manicaland.

THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. GUMBO): Hon. Speaker, the road from Mutoko to Rwenya was one of the roads which was improved under the labour based programme, making it an all weather trafficable condition through gravelling. The Ministry would very much want to upgrade this and other roads to a surfaced standard. The major constraint is funding. Whenever funding levels improve, consideration will be given to upgrade this road. I thank you.

PLANS ON REDUCING THE OUTBREAK OF FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE

  1. HON. VUTETE asked the Minister of Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development to explain the Ministry’s plan to reduce the outbreak of foot and mouth disease which affects livestock in Chivi District every year.

THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, MECHANISATION AND IRRIGATION DEVELOPMENT (DR. MADE): I want to thank the Hon. Member for raising the question. Indeed Chivi District is targeted for the following measures in order to avert any possible foot and mouth outbreaks. In areas where the buffalos come into contact with cattle, the areas are separated and we are intensifying that activity. This is on the national side but Chivi is not affected by that. There is also quarantining of affected areas only if the cited area is affected, as said by the Hon. Member in terms of an outbreak in Chivi.

Animal movement control is the third item. That means that if that area is affected, we then control the movement of animals, particularly animals that are going to be slaughtered. Lastly, there is vaccination of animals against foot and mouth disease in the appropriate areas if there are specific matters. I know that the season which we are now approaching, because of lack of water, what will be intensified will be the programme of water development and deepening of boreholes. That is a separate issue in order to contain the animals. However, generally answering this question, we also seek cooperation of the farmers in specific areas in terms of working with veterinary services and bringing notification of suspected cases. The cases must be examined by those with the expertise in diagnosing foot and mouth disease. I thank you.

ELECTRIFICATION OF NYAHOMBE CLINIC, SCHOOLS AND AGRITEX OFFICES

  1. HON. VUTETE asked the Minister of Energy and Power Development to state when the following areas in Chivi District will be electrified:-
  2. Nyahombe Clinic;
  3. Nyahombe Primary School;
  4. Nyahombe Agritex Offices; and
  5. Nyahombe Secondary School.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF YOUTH, INDIGENISATION AND ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT (HON. TONGOFA) on behalf of THE MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. UNDENGE): Madam Speaker, I thank the Hon. Member for his question. Hon. Member, it is my Ministry’s wish to see all rural areas having access to modern forms of energy, be it grid or off-grid technologies. Plans which are currently in place will see all public institutions (primary, secondary and rural health centres) within 15 km from the existing grid network being electrified by 2018. Those areas which are further than 15 km from the grid will be provided with other forms of modern energy services such as solar and biogas before the grid eventually reaches them.

As I have reported before to the august House, Nyahombe Primary School is earmarked for electrification this year, 2015. The Rural Electrification Agency (REA) is not deviating from that position. As such, REA implementation teams will be moving to site by 23 November 2015 to implement this project, which includes Nyahombe Primary School, Nyahombe Clinic and Nyahombe Agritex offices. Nyahombe Secondary School is planned for electrification by 2017 as previously advised. I thank you.

WRITTEN SUBMISSIONS TO QUESTIONS WITH NOTICE

BENEFITS OF THE PUNGWE WATER PIPE LINE TO MUTASA COMMUNITY

  1. HON. SARUWAKA asked the Minister of Environment Water and Climate to state when the people of Mutasa specifically those from Mutasa, District Council Service Centre, Tsonzo Small Scale Farmers, Watsomba Business Centre, Schools and Communities along the Pungwe water pipe line are going to benefit from the pipeline.

THE MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, WATER AND CLIMATE (HON. MUCHINGURI): Madam Speaker, I would like to thank the Hon. Member, Hon. Saruwaka for the question. The Pungwe pipeline has six specific take-off points which were provided for by the City of Mutare during the construction phase of the pipeline. These were meant to serve villagers and institutions along the pipeline. Each take-off point has an estimated discharge of five cubic metres per hour. The Ministry of Environment, Water and Climate, through the Zimbabwe National Water Authority (ZINWA), has engaged the local communities along the pipeline route with a view to setting up community gardens and irrigation schemes. Meetings with the following communities and groups were held during the week from 12 to 16 October 2015;

  • Headman Sakupwanya and his community,
  • Headman Sanyamandwe and his community,
  • Chitova/Matsaire Irrigation project,
  • Nyakatsapa Mission,
  • Shamu shopping Centre and the surrounding community.

The Ministry of Environment, Water and Climate, through ZINWA is currently working on the modalities for resource mobilisation to establish these gardens, irrigation and water supply schemes. Setting up of the gardens, irrigation and water supply schemes will commence as soon as resources are in place.

The Engineers from my Ministry responsible for overseeing the project are Eng. Albert Mare, contact number 0712641691 and Eng. Tendayi Linda Myambo. Both Engineers can be found at Save Catchment Offices which are found at number 7 Park road in Mutare.

ROLE OF THE MINISTRY RELATIVE TO LAND CONFLICTS IN LOCAL COMMUNITIES

  1. HON. MISIHAIRABWI-MUSHONGA asked the Vice President and Minister of National Healing, Peace and Reconciliation to explain the role of the ministry in relation to land conflicts in Local Communities.

THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF NATIONAL HEALING, PEACE AND RECONCILIATION (HON. MPHOKO): As the Vice President responsible for National Healing, Peace and Reconciliation, may I point out that my wish is to ensure that peace prevails in Zimbabwe at all times. Conflicts of any form occur because relations have broken down and people are not seeing an issue from the same perspective. It is thus important that parties in a dispute or conflict are brought to a round table for dialoguing in order to come up with an amicable solution that builds or restores the relations for the two parties to continue working together for the benefit of themselves and their families and development of their communities.

          In Zimbabwe, we have Local Government structures in place where our Chiefs down to village heads play an important role of resolving conflicts that occur in their various communities. These structures help to resolve conflicts closer to where they occur. At the National level, the Ministry of Lands and Rural Resettlement was given the mandate to distribute land to Zimbabweans. In the process of conducting its work, land conflicts do occur in some instances. The Ministry then works with the parties involved in the conflicts to come up with a workable solution.

          As the Vice President responsible for National Healing, Peace and Reconciliation, my role is to ensure that all relevant Government structures that have a role to play in resolving conflicts are functioning properly. That way, even land conflicts at the Local Community level are dealt with accordingly.

EMPLOYMENT CREATION THROUGH THE YOUTH EMPLOYMENT CREATION FUND

  1. HON. CHIRISA asked the Minister of Youth, Indigenisation and Economic Empowerment to appraise the House on the measures that the Ministry has put in place to ensure employment creation through the Youth Development and Employment Creation Fund (YDECF).

THE MINISTER OF YOUTH, INDIGENISATION AND ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT (HON. ZHUWAO): Thank you Madam Speaker.

1.0    In response to the Hon. Member’s question, the Government has come up with some initiatives to support employment creation and reduce unemployment. Among the initiatives are the Youth Development and Employment Creation Fund and the Youth Empowerment facilities run in conjunction with the private sector.

  • Youth Development and Employment Creation Fund.

In order to promote access to project finance for the youths as a strategy for employment creation, Government established a Youth Development Fund (YDF) in 2006, a revolving micro loan facility for the youth. The YDF was merged with the Employment Creation Fund (ECF) that was established in the late 90s. The facility is now known as the Youth Development and Employment Creation Fund (YDECF) and has a constitution that was approved by Treasury. The facility financially supports youth in the 18 – 35 years age group from entrepreneurship development with a view to create employment for the entrepreneurs and other youths. YDECF provides loans at a concessionary rate of 10% per annum with a tenure of up to 36 months depending on the nature of the project. The facility has a bias in supporting projects in the productive sectors that are in value addition and beneficiation.

          The facility is co-administered by the Ministry and some financial institutions. These are IDBZ, Stanbic Bank and CBZ. The objectives for collaborating with the financial institutions in the disbursement processes include taping into the banks’ expertise in loan management and introducing the youths to the real business environment where they work with financial institutions for the development of their enterprises. The move also served to stretch the dollar from Treasury, as the banks mobilise more resources against guarantee investments invested in the banks by the Fund.

  • Youth Empowerment Facilities

The Ministry also engaged the private sector to form Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) to increase the capital base for financial support for youth self-employment initiatives. One of the major partnerships is between the Government of Zimbabwe, as represented by the Ministry of Youth, Indigenisation and Economic Empowerment and Old Mutual that is the Kurera/Ukondla Youth Fund, administered jointly with CABS.

The Facility supports youth self-employment initiatives and the funds are availed for both capital expenditure and working capital at a concessional interest rate of 10% per annum.

The background to this Fund is that Old Mutual Zimbabwe Limited, in partial fulfillment of its Indigenisation and Economic Empowerment quota allocated 2.5% of shares to a Trust fund for youth empowerment. The shares have been hedged as security for a youth empowerment facility (Kurera/Ukondla). The facility is securitised to the tune of $10 million and is administered by the Kurera/Ukondla Youth Fund Trust which comprises of Old Mutual Zimbabwe Limited, CABS, Ministry of Youth, Indigenisation and Economic Empowerment and Zimbabwe Youth Council (ZYC).

Stanbic Bank has also setup a youth enterprise support window (the Wealth Creation Fund). The facility supports on-going projects with security. It provides a maximum of USD 20 000 per project.

Meikles Pvt. Ltd has setup USD 200 000 horticulture and Small Livestock out-grower scheme that runs under IDBZ. The scheme has been on a Pilot phase and has funded 73 projects in horticulture and small livestock production. The projects have created 199 jobs.

4.0    Statistics on Youth Enterprises supported and employment created

To date, nationwide, about 6 213 youth enterprises have been supposed from these various windows to the tune of US$8 400 000. The projects have created 11 285 jobs for both the entrepreneurs and other youths.

5.0    Current Plans

The Ministry is conducting an evaluation of the Youth Development and Employment Creation Fund with a view to develop improved lending models benchmarked against best practices. The details of the new model will be made available in due course.

Government has also unveiled the Localised Empowerment Acceleration Facility (LEAF). The facility is a direct outcome of the inaugural National Economic Empowerment Conference. The conference adopted several resolutions including the need to facilitate opening up of empowerment windows in financial institutions. This is, therefore, an empowerment window setup in partnership with the RBZ and financial sector. The funds will be distributed equitably to all parliamentary constituencies and will initially target previous beneficiaries of various windows who have fully repaid their loans. This is designed to restore confidence in the finance sector and in turn, the financial sector will also have confidence in doing the business with the youth. The facility will be run by financial institutions with the involvement of the community in which the applicant resides. This enhances social security and will ensure that the money revolves within the locality.

Mr. Speaker Sir, in conclusion, we are convinced that the new lending model, supported by LEAF, adequate resources and stakeholder buy-in, will immensely contribute towards reduction of youth unemployment.

I thank you.

COMPLETION OF TARRING OF MREWA-MADICHECHE ROAD

  1. HON. KAUNDIKIZA asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to state when tarring of the Mrewa – Madicheche Road will be completed in view of the fact that it serves people from Uzumba – Maramba – Pfungwe, Mudzi and Mutoko to access health services at Karanda Mission Hospital in Mt. Darwin.

THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. GUMBO): Mr. Speaker Sir, Murewa –Madicheche Road was an ongoing low volume road construction. Work stalled due to shortage of funds to continue with the works. When funds are available, the construction works of this road will resume. In the meantime, the department of roads will continue to grade the road and re-gravel in selected spots to make it trafficable. I thank you.

REHABILITATION OF ROADS IN MUTASA CENTRAL CONSTITUENCY

  1. HON. SARUWAKA asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to state when the following roads in Mutasa Central Constituency will be rehabilitated in view of the fact that bus companies have withdrawn their services owing to the bad state of the roads while commuter omnibus operators and private vehicles are charging exorbitant prices:
  • Watsomba – Gandanzara road which is a major link between Mutasa Central and Rusape;
  • Jombe Road especially at the Mbito Section just above ‘B’ Shopping Centre; and
  • Bonda road especially the Bonda – Chikonye potholed section, Nyamazi Stores Section and the District Council – District Administrators Offices section.

THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. GUMBO): Mr. Speaker Sir, the following roads Watsomba- Gandanzara to Rusape and the Jombe Road are gravel roads which both District Development Fund and the department of roads will continue to grade to keep them in good trafficable condition since both road authorities are now receiving disbursements from ZINARA.

In the same vein, the Bonda road which is a surfaced road will be receiving attention on the patching of potholes, since the department of roads is now receiving disbursements from ZINARA. The department has a huge backlog of roads that require attention but it is planning to attend to all roads that require attention. I thank you.

REVAMPING OF MANYUCHI BRIDGE

  1. HON L. MOYO asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to state measures in place to repair the Manyuchi bridge which links Mwenezi West Constituency to Mwenezi East, Beitbridge and Mberengwa Constituencies given that the bridge was swept away ten years ago.

          THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. GUMBO): Madam Speaker, the Manyuchi Bridge is one of the bridges that was affected by the Cyclone Eline floods. Because of funding constraints, we have only managed to attend to Nyahodi Bridge. We still have bridges like Runde, Tuli and Manyuchi still to be attended to. As soon as funding levels improve, the bridge in question will be attended to.

GRADING OF ROADS IN MWENEZI CONSTITUENCY

  1. HON L. MOYO asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to explain why the Ministry and the District Development Fund have not graded the roads in Mwenezi Constituency since 2013.

THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. GUMBO): Madam Speaker, the Department of Roads and District Development Fund have not been able to grade most roads in the Mwenezi Constituency due to inadequate releases of funds from Treasury and ZINARA. Since ZINARA is now releasing funds, both authorities will soon be visible in the Mwenezi Constituency grading roads in this area and regravelling in selected spots.

MOTION

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

          THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. MNANGAGWA): I move that Orders of the Day Numbers 1 to 16 be stood over until Orders of the Day Numbers 17 and 18 are disposed of.

          Motion put and agreed to.

MOTION

LEAVE TO MOVE FOR THE RECOMMITTAL OF THE GENERAL LAWS AMENDMENT BILL [H.B. 3A, 2015] AND THE CRIMINAL PROCEDURE AND EVIDENCE AMENDMENT BILL [H.B. 2A, 2015]

          THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. MNANGAGWA): Madam Speaker, I seek Leave of the House to move that the General Laws Amendment Bill [H. B. 3A, 2015] and the Criminal Procedure and Evidence Amendment Bill [H. B. 2A, 2015] be recommitted in terms of Standing Order Number 153 (1).

          Motion put and agreed to.

MOTION

RECOMMITTAL OF THE GENERAL LAWS AMENDMENT BILL [H.B. 3A, 2015] AND THE CRIMINAL PROCEDURE AND EVIDENCE AMENDMENT BILL [H.B. 2A, 2015]

          THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. MNANGAGWA): I move that the General Laws Amendment Bill [H.B. 3A, 2015] and the Criminal Procedure and Evidence Amendment Bill [H.B. 2A, 2015] be recommitted in terms of Standing Order Number 153 (1).

          HON. CROSS: Madam Speaker, can you explain to us what exactly this means?

          THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. MNANGAGWA): Thank you Madam Speaker. It means that we recommit the Bill back to the Order Paper so that we can have the amendments that have been proposed to appear in the Order Paper. That is Parliamentary procedure.

          Motion put and agreed to.

          On the motion of THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. MNANGAGWA), the House adjourned at Fourteen Minutes past Four o’clock p.m.

         

 

 

         

 

BLOG COMMENTS POWERED BY DISQUS
National Assembly Hansard NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD 18 NOVEMBER 2015 VOL 42 NO 21