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NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD 22 MAY 2019 VOL 45 NO 54

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PARLIAMENT OF ZIMBABWE

Wednesday, 22nd May, 2019

The National Assembly met at a Quarter-past Two O’clock p.m.

PRAYERS

(THE HON. SPEAKER in the Chair)

ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE HON. SPEAKER

APOLOGIES FROM MINISTERS

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, I have received apologies from the following Ministers:

·       Hon. P. Kambamura – The Deputy Minister of Mines and Mining Development;

·       Hon. D. Karoro – The Deputy Minister of lands, Agriculture, Water, Climate and Rural Resettlement;

·       Hon. Haritatos -  The Deputy Minister of lands, Agriculture, Water, Climate and Rural Resettlement;

·       Hon. J. G. Moyo – The Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing;

·       Hon. Prof M. Ncube – The Minister of Finance and Economic Development;

·       Hon. Rtd. Air Chief Marshall Shiri - The Minister of lands, Agriculture, Water, Climate and Rural Resettlement; and

·       Hon. Ziyambi – The Minister of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs.  

I have not received any explanation from the Ministers who are absent.  I have asked the Clerk of Parliament to phone the Chief Secretary to find out where these ministers are.

          HON. GONESE: Thank you very much Mr Speaker Sir.  I will begin by appreciating what you have indicated that the Clerk of Parliament is going to ascertain from the Chief Secretary as to what has happened to those Hon Ministers who are not in attendance.  Just a matter of clarification, I would like to be apprised on who is going to be the Acting Leader of the House.  I think it is very important because in the absence of most of the Hon Ministers we usually channel our questions to the Leader of Government business.  While I am still standing, there is also the issue of Hon Vice Presidents.  One thing that we have noted is that ever since we started, I do not recall a day when any of the two Vice Presidents have been in attendance on question time.  I am not sure whether they are aware that in terms of Section 107 of our Constitution and also our Standing Orders that they are obliged or that it is mandatory for them to attend Parliament in order to answer questions. 

So I will be very grateful if the Hon Chair can assist us in that regard to ensure that at least for today, we are informed as to who is going to be the Acting Leader of the House.  Secondly, to make a follow-up so that the Hon. Vice Presidents are made aware of their obligations that they should also attend Question Time as is required in terms of both the Constitution and Standing Orders. – [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] –

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Thank you, the Leader of the - Hon. Member at the back there, may I please have your attention. – [HON. MEMBERS: Zhou, Zhou!] – No, no it is not Hon. Zhou – [Laughter.] -  Order, order, today I shall advocate for Hon. Zhou.  He has been well behaved up to now – [Laughter.] - 

          Order, order, let me also advise the House that this has been the worst non-attendance by Hon. Ministers.  Whatever answer I will get from the Clerk of Parliament, I will make sure that this is brought to the attention of His Excellency the President this afternoon. – [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] –

          On the question of the Leader of Government Business, I would want to advise   - [HON. HWENDE: Hapana Minister aripo apo!] - Hon. Hwende, tomorrow you may be in my Chair and may want respect of the Chair – [HON. HWENDE: Sure.] -  Thank you.  The authority to appoint Leader of Government Business rests with the President.  So, I have not been advised in the absence of Hon. Ziyambi.  We may, with your indulgence, direct questions to the Hon. Ministers who are her - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.]-

HON. NDUNA:  On a point of privilege Mr. Speaker Sir.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order, you want to say something?

HON. NDUNA:  Yes, please Mr. Speaker Sir.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Please resume your seat whilst I check something.

HON. NDUNA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. At the close of business yesterday, a report was presented to this House – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] -  I asked that I be indulged in terms of the privilege motion on Section 68.  Yesterday, at the close of business, a report was presented - a Qatar delegation report which was the Speaker’s delegation.  I request that - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order, we have to respect the decision of the Hon. Member who was chairing yesterday.  – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – Order, order and in terms of our Standing Orders, the seconder will be given first priority to second the motion once we have finished the business of the Questions Without Notice and Written Questions.  Thank you.

HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  On a point of privilege Hon. Speaker!

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Yes, Hon. Sibanda but can you be brief please.

HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  Indeed, I will be very brief Hon. Speaker.  My point of privilege basically relates to our constitutional duty as an institution. As Parliament, we are bestowed with the duty to protect the Constitution and also to promote democratic governance in Zimbabwe.  My understanding of democratic governance Hon. Speaker is very wide.  It entails the fact that people should be governed in a manner in which they are participating and in which they appreciate everything that is taking place within their country. 

Hon. Speaker, currently as a country, we are going through a  very difficult time to an extent that this morning when I walked up to Fourth Street I saw people jumping onto buses through windows … -[AN. HON. MEMBER:  Aaah vanenge vachimafariraka mabhazi acho!] – The reason for that kind of incident is because of the economic turmoil that we have faced especially in the last two to three days.  Of course, it has been happening for some time, it is my view Hon. Speaker as I come to conclude that …

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order, if you were listening carefully yesterday, I said that those issues of national interest relating to fuel would be debated today.

HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  Sorry Mr. Speaker Sir, I did not get you.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  I said that the matter that you are raising should be part of question time now.

HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  No, it is not about fuel Hon. Speaker, but about the general economic situation.  I believe that the situation has turned into an emergency …

THE HON. SPEAKER:  No, no, no.

HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  It has turned into an emergency Hon. Speaker, to an extent that the nation deserves to be addressed. – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] -

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order, please take your seat.

HON. T. MLISWA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. I want to bring to your attention that as Members of Parliament and the staff itself, I think there are certain issues that need to be looked into.  I think the fuel situation requires probably a specific service station to be allocated to Members of Parliament because what is happening is totally impossible.  We get fuel coupons but we have no access to the fuel.  The queues which are there, for us to be seen having to jump the queues again creates a lot of problems because the anger which is on the ground is not comfortable.

The other issue, Mr. Speaker Sir, is the issue of the salaries.  You know that Interbank rate is 3.2 but our salaries have remained the same.  Members of Parliament too have obligations to pay school fees for their children and to pay their workers as well.  So the money that we are getting does not really take us anywhere.  As such, a review is needed.  The allowances that Members of Parliament are given come much later as well and by the time they get to them, because of inflation which you are aware of, everything is eaten away.

The other issue is in terms of the stands.  We were given stands, Mr. Speaker Sir, and I think it is important that we...

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Hon. Member, I had indulged you to two issues.  Now you are going to the third one.

HON. T. MLISWA:  Okay, let me go to the other issue.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  You cannot go to the third one.

HON. T. MLISWA:  The final issue, Mr. Speaker.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Why did you not simply say welfare of Members of Parliament?

HON. T. MLISWA:  The reason why I talk about stands is because this is an issue which is outstanding and we were given with everybody’s  knowledge.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Yes, I hear you.  That comes under welfare of Members of Parliament.

HON. T. MLISWA:  I agree with you.  Finally, Mr. Speaker Sir, I also...

THE HON. SPEAKER:  You want to go to number four?

HON. T. MLISWA:  No, you actually have corrected me so welfare is one.  So, all those issues are bundled as one.  Let me also say, Mr. Speaker Sir, I think it is important that Ministers take seriously any forensic audit reports, especially from the Auditor General’s Office.  We have been waiting for a long time for the NSSA forensic audit report.  I personally went to the Auditor General’s Office to find out where the audit report was and she says it was complete and it is with the Minister, but you know very well, Mr. Speaker, that the Auditor General’s reports to this Parliament should be tabled first. It is only through being courteous that she gives the report to the Minister.

Already, I am told there is a press conference at 2.00 o’clock where the Minister is trying to deliberate on that forensic audit report.  You wonder why she is trying to do that when we expect it to be tabled here before it even gets to so many hands.  Right now it has been leaked.  So, I really want to know from the Leader of Government Business when that forensic audit report will be tabled here?

Secondly, there is the Hwange forensic audit report which too lies in the ambit of the Minister of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs, as he is responsible for the administrator.  When are we also going to get that report?  It is important that those reports are brought to Parliament and they are debated and the ultimate oversight which we have to exercise is done properly.  I am also told the ZINARA one as well needs to also be presented before Parliament.  Thank you Mr, Speaker.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  The first one under welfare, I think it goes without saying that you have a valid point and we should be able to deliberate on that issue tomorrow.  It is on the agenda of the Committee on Standing Rules and Orders.

On the tabling of the audit reports, the Hon. Leader of Government Business is here and I will ask him to prevail over his colleagues to ensure that those audit reports are so tabled in the House for debate accordingly.  Thank you.

  HON. DINAR:  On a point of privilege Hon. Speaker.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Let us not abuse the point of privilege.

HON. DINAR:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  When we adjourned last time in March, I had requested through Madam Speaker that the Minister of Women’s Affairs, Community, Small and Medium Enterprises Development and the Minster of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing issue a Ministerial Statement concerning the fire outbreaks which are always happening at Glen View Complex.  We were told that the statement would be issued in three weeks time.  So up to now, we have not heard anything because we need to safeguard the people of that constituency as well as safeguard their businesses because they are contributing a lot of money to the Government through the 2% tax.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Which constituency are you talking of?

HON. DINAR: Glen View North Constituency.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  No, if you raise an issue on privileges, it should be a national issue.  Now you are going off side.

HON. DINAR:  It is a national issue Sir.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order.  What you started indicating, I will take and remind the two Hon. Ministers to bring the Ministerial Statement next week.  Thank you.

ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

+HON. MATHE:  Thank you very much Mr. Speaker Sir.  My question is directed to the Minister of Defence and War Veterans concerning their welfare.  My question is, Minister what are you doing in connection with the welfare of war veterans especially when it comes to issues of war veterans who were registered and they were paid once and then as time went on, their payments stopped.  What are you doing about it?

+THE HON. SPEAKER:  That question was asked long back and the Hon. Deputy Minister answered and he said there is a new law that is going to be brought to Parliament.  That will cover everything that you have talked about so that they can improve the welfare of war veterans.

+HON. MATHE:  I am sorry Mr. Speaker Sir, maybe I misunderstood.  Am I allowed to ask another question?

+THE HON. SPEAKER:  No, thank you

          HON. MATHE: Thank you – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

          +THE HON. SPEAKER: Order.  May I make an announcement to all Hon. Members that you should read the Hansard so that if you were not there and you missed something, then you can follow what was discussed in your absence from Parliament.

          HON. MADZIMURE: Thank you Mr. Speaker.  My question is directed to the Deputy Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing.  Mr. Speaker, Cyclone Idai was declared a national disaster and a lot of people showed good their will and donated a lot of products.  We also received a lot of funding towards the disaster.  Is the Ministry going to carry out an audit of all what was received and make it public information?

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Thank you.  Again, Hon. Members, read your Hansard.  Last week, a Ministerial Statement was requested of the Hon. Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing.  It included what you have said, including the question of donations in cash, which has to be accounted for.  That question was raised and the Hon. Minister indicated that he will not be here this week but when he comes back next week, he will give that Ministerial Statement.  Please read your Hansard.

          ++HON. PHUTI:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I would like to ask the Minister of Primary and Secondary Education.  May I ask when it will be time for effective service delivery, particularly in the attainment of quality education as it was in the past?  I am saying this Mr. Speaker Sir having seen that our education inspectors are failing to access schools in discharging their duties of supervising different schools which has culminated in the deterioration of the quality of education and service delivery in schools. 

Mr. Speaker Sir, we are told that there are no vehicles.  In the past, we used to see Government vehicles going to different schools and this demonstrates that schools play a critical role in society.  I would like to ask when the Minister is planning to restore the critical role that education has been playing in society to bring back the past glory – [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] –

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Order. I hope you heard the Kalanga version of the question.  There is a decline in the inspectorate of schools, as a result, the standards are going down.  What is the Minister’s comment on that?

          *THE MINISTER OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION (HON. PROF. MAVIMA):  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I need to get the correct words for me to be able to give a response because I do not agree that our standard of education has gone down.  I do not agree with that statement because if we are to look at our pass rate, it is on the rise.  If we look at what is happening in schools Hon. Speaker, we have moved from theory to practice.  We are witnessing a lot of people who are saying, ‘our schools are changing from being mere academic to skills development.’  So, I do not agree with that assertion.

However, I want to agree with the Hon. Member that resources which are channeled towards provinces and districts are very little.  The money that we get and is not targeted for salaries is very little.  In that regard Hon. Speaker, I agree with him that if we were able to get some money in order to get the necessary resources to conduct inspections, it would be good.  I do not think the standard of education has deteriorated.  Yes, we faced challenges in 2008, but we managed to get resources to restore those standards and they are currently on the rise.  We had up to 22% for Ordinary Level but it has risen to 33% pass rate.  It is on the rise annually.  I thank you Hon. Speaker.

          HON. PHUTI: Mr. Speaker, in my maturity and as a representative in this House, I know very well that there are a lot of issues that mar the smooth flow of education that we used to know.  As such, I challenge the Hon. Minister to look at schools not at a national level in terms of percentage but also look at various places and regions and check if this issue of deterioration is not a fact.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: What is your question?

          HON. PHUTI: I therefore say, what is the Minister and his Ministry doing about those schools that had their standards affected by ECD deployments of non-speakers of first languages of those recipients of education?

          HON. PROF. MAVIMA: Thank you Hon. Speaker.  I will respond to that issue even though it is a completely different issue from the original question.  Hon. Speaker, …

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Hon. Minister, please can you sit.  I have allowed the question because it relates to the foundational stages of education.  So, if you dispute that, then you are saying my decision is wrong.

          HON. PROF. MAVIMA: Thank you Hon. Speaker.  Let me respond by saying; these are issues that I have even talked about with you and I have indicated the technical problems that we were experiencing.  Through my own intervention and other people’s interventions, we have been able to address that issue to where the Ministry’s policy to teach at infant level using the mother tongue is going to be a reality going forward.

One of the problems that we had was the fact that for some of our indigenous languages we did not have adequate trained teachers, especially in the ECD area but we have taken an affirmative approach to ensure that we train teachers for those areas.  As we deploy, we have also taken a stance to make sure that we deploy people who have an understanding of the mother tongue in the various parts of the country.  I am very much aware and very much alive to the fact that we need to do these deployments effectively.  I have indicated that we have been told previously that the fundamental criterion for deployment was year of graduation, which would actually disadvantage the new graduates that we have sent to teacher training colleges targeting the specific areas of the country where we need to deploy mother tongue teachers in those areas.  Thank you Mr. Speaker.

HON. HAMAUSWA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I would like the Hon. Minister to explain the inconsistencies or contradiction between what he has just said that our educational standards in Zimbabwe are not going down with what the Hon. Minister of Higher and Tertiary Education has said through a Statement delivered in this House, where he raised a lot of issues pointing to the fact that indeed the standard of our education is actually in a sorry state?  I thank you.

        THE HON. SPEAKER: Thank you Hon. Member for that question, unfortunately the original question related to the Ministry of Primary and Secondary Education and not Tertiary Education.

          HON. CHIKWINYA: Thank you Hon. Speaker.  My question relates again to the answer by the Hon. Minister with regards to standards.  During the Inclusive Government and he alluded to it that there were improvements in standards, to the extent that the textbook to student ratio came down to around 1:5; 1:3 but now we are seeing the textbook to student ratio rising to about 1:20 or in other cases 1:40.

With regards to that, what are the policy measures that the Ministry is putting in place to ensure that they go back to the era of the Inclusive Government where students can have one textbook per student?

HON. PROF. MAVIMA: Thank you Hon. Speaker.  Again I do not agree.  The reference to the GNU period refers to textbooks that were distributed under the Education Transition Fund.  We have continued with that Fund which we now call the Education Development Fund.  Hon. Members would be happy to know that since 2017 we have been distributing textbooks through the Education Development Fund to all our schools.  Last year we did the same and this year we are doing the same.  Even as late as last week we were distributing textbooks to replace those that were damaged by Cyclone Idai.

          The ratios that are being talked about here are not factual.  In most of our learning areas we have a ratio of 1:1 for textbooks.  The relevant Portfolio Committee can verify this by going to our schools to inspect.  That is the position, I do not want to debate on the basis of hearsay, when in actual fact the situation in our schools is different.  Thank you Hon. Speaker.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: I think the Hon. Minister’s response is good.  The Committee responsible, can go out and verify that; the Hon. Minister is open to that inspection.

          HON. MUNETSI: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I am just making a follow-up on the standards of education; is it not being also affected by a number of acting Headmasters who have been in schools for years. Most schools in the rural areas have had acting Heads for donkey years. Does that not affect standards?

HON. PROF. MAVIMA: Thank you Hon. Speaker.  Yes, indeed  situation where we do not have substantive Heads can compromise effective management of schools.  We indeed have quite a number of acting Heads.  I am alive to that issue, I am also alive to the fact that we have quite a number of positions that have not been filled at Director level; at Deputy Director level and we have been talking with the Public

 Service Commission to make sure that we get these positions filled by substantive people.  The Ministry is working on that Hon. Speaker.

          The other issue that compromises leadership is the fact that we still have quite a number of satellite schools and unregistered schools which are satellite schools cannot have substantive Heads.  So we need to move as quickly as possible, not just as Government but as the entire nation to resolve the issue of the development of satellite schools so that we can give them substantive leadership.  Once that happens, those substantive leaders can be held accountable for the proper management of their schools.  Thank you Hon. Speaker.

          *HON. CHINOTIMBA: Mr. Speaker Sir, my question is directed to the Minister of Primary and Secondary Education. A year ago the then Minister of Finance mentioned that he was not employing ECD teachers because money was not available.  What measures have you put in place because we have the 2% tax which is increasing the fiscus?  So, have you now started recruiting ECD teachers to ensure that children are taught by qualified personnel?

          THE MINISTER OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION (HON. PROF. MAVIMA): Thank you Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the Hon. Member for his question. Indeed there was a statement some two years ago about ECD teachers.  I want this august House to know that that position no longer stands.  We have just completed the recruitment of 3 thousand teachers and among those teachers were ECD teachers.  We filled those positions based on need and proper regional representation, based on the needs and among those teachers were ECD teachers.  You also remember that in 2017, we were allowed to recruit 6 thousand teachers and the majority of those teachers were also ECD teachers.  I thank you.

          *HON. CHINOTIMBA: Mr. Speaker, the rural area where I come from, the people I represent do not understand English.  As I stand here they are listening and know that Hon. Chinotimba has posed a question.  My question is Minister, which measures did you take to ensure that enrolment of ECD teachers is done since this was a vacant position some two years ago.  Did you present a Ministerial Statement to show the change in policy?  I am asking in vernacular, so, I am kindly asking the Minister to answer in vernacular so that the people I represent will understand.  I know he is the Minister of Education and Primary Secondary and teachers want to hear him respond in English but the rural populace are not well versed in English and want to hear what the Minister has to say I thank you.

          *THE HON. SPEAKER: The issue is not about your constituents getting to hear about it. The issue is whether it was done or not.  Yes, it was done and it was in the media.  Those who read the newspapers and those who watched television can witness this.  I myself also heard this – [HON. CHINOTIMBA: Kumusha kwedu hakuna matv.] –

          HON. MASANGO: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  My question is directed to the Minister of Defence.  What is Government policy on the recruitment of general soldiers having noticed that it is centered on village of origin?  We all know that most Zimbabweans have migrated from their villages of origin due to the land reform.  I thank you.

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF DEFENCE AND WAR VETERANS (HON. MATEMADANDA): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I would also like to thank the Hon. Member for this question.  Yes, the policy is that when we recruit, we take people from all the provinces and districts of Zimbabwe so that at the end of it, we have an army that represents all areas of Zimbabwe including ethnic groups - [HON. ZWIZWAI: KuHome Affairs kune army here?] –

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Order Hon. Member, the question is not about Home Affairs, do not be offside please.

          HON. MATEMADANDA: The specific question was that some people have migrated - that should be proved because if it is not tightened up, we may end up having people who are said to have migrated to one area thereby disadvantaging the original or the people of that area.  So, it is a question of proving that indeed these people have migrated to those areas.  I thank you.

          HON. ZWIZWAI: Supplementary.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: You were talking about Home Affairs and not listening.

          HON. ZWIZWAI: You corrected me Hon. Speaker.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Next time you must listen.

          *HON. ZWIZWAI: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  My apologies, I misconstrued the question and I want to thank you for correcting me.  My question to the Minister is when a person receives the National Identity card there are two important things; the first two digits refer to place of birth and the last two digits reflect village of origin.  For a person who has relocated can they not use that because it is there on the National Identity document because village of origin cannot change? That is not what is being used – [HON. PARADZA: Inaudible interjections.] – Hon. Paradza you will talk about G40 later on, give me the opportunity to pose a question through the Hon. Speaker because you are not the Hon. Speaker.

          We have a problem Mr. Speaker with the people who belong to factions in this House and want to disturb me.  My question is: is there need to go and see a person, physically asking him of his village of origin and yet the first two digits show where one was born for example the Avenues Clinic in Harare is 63, the last two digits do not change even for our grandchildren as long as they use the surname Mudenda.  So, we want the Minister to tell us why they cannot use that approach.  I thank you.

*HON. MATEMADANDA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir and I also want to thank the Hon. Member for the question. His first question shows that the Hon. Member knows that when recruitment is done, the I. D. is used as it reflects the village where that I. D. was taken from and where the person comes from. For example, I come from Gokwe but I acquired my I. D. from Hurungwe and it has 38 but it also shows 26 which reflects Gokwe where I come from. That is what we take when we are recruiting. We then see that a person has 38 from Karoi but his home area is Gokwe. I think the Hon. Member may not have seen clearly that the national identity documents are the ones we are using to determine one’s place of origin. I thank you.

HON. SIKHALA: Mr. Speaker Sir, I do not think that the Hon. Deputy Minister has understood the import of the first Member of Parliament who asked the question. The Hon. Member is asking considering that there has been a lot of movement of our citizens during the period of the Land Reform Programme where people who have been living in Masvingo have been allocated land in Mashonaland West. They already have their identity documents. When they have been allocated land in Mashonaland West, their domicile standi is now Mashonaland West. So, how are you going to treat those people who have been moved because of the Land Reform Programme where they have gone to new districts, whether they are going to be considered in those provinces or they have to go back to their province of origin? That is the simple question the Hon. Member asked.

HON. MATEMADANDA: I also want to thank the Hon. Member for repeating the same question. Yes, people have moved from Masvingo to wherever or any other place but I have said that if that is the case then it should be proved. We have councillors, chiefs and so forth, who can vouch to say this person indeed resides in Gokwe but the identification shows another place. Let me also Mr. Speaker, further explain that we have a scenario where 1 000 people originated from Masvingo and have moved all over in Zimbabwe. If we take it based on what people say we might even take from any other province or district and end up having people in the army who originated from one place. This is what we are trying to avoid. Hon. Members should understand and appreciate that we want all people of all ethnics groups and origins to be in the Zimbabwe National Army. I thank you.

HON. CHINYANGANYA:  My question to the Leader of Government Business is, what is Government policy regarding the assumption of debts of parastatals?

THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): Mr. Speaker, if there is need for debt assumption for any parastatal then that will be brought to the House for approval.

HON. CHINYANGANYA: Why is it that the Government takes pride in implementing policies that bring parastatals to their knees yet in the end the Government then assumes those debts? Mr. Speaker, I will give an example. Recently, the Government slashed fares for ZUPCO by 50% but the fuel has increased. So, who is subsidising the parastatal because in the long run the Government will come back and assume the debt of that parastatal putting it on the taxpayers who are earning peanuts?

HON. ZIYAMBI: My response to this is that governments take on social responsibility roles worldwide. If you look at the mass public transport systems across the world, they are subsidised by the government and that other cost is absorbed by the government to make sure that there is efficient movement by the people. So, I am not sure which part of the policy it iswhere Government is subsidising transportation to ensure that people move freely, whether that can be taken as a bad policy.

HON. MUSHORIWA: If the Minister is correct that the Government has a social responsibility to do the subsidy, can the Minister explain the logic in terms of the recent Government policy? Initially, when fuel was going for $3,30 the recommended ZUPCO price was $1. Fuel goes up and then the price is now 0,50c. What basic economics is the Government applying in such a situation?

HON. ZIYAMBI: When the price was $1, 50, we had a manual ticketing system and I will defer the question to the Minister of Higher Education. They came up with – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – a very efficient system of managing fuel and also ticketing, so that he can explain to the Hon. Members the rationale why the price had to come down – [THE HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – I thank you.

THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, order! The Chair uses his discretion.  Hon. Minister Murwira, can you assist? – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

THE MINISTER OF HIGHER AND TERTIARY EDUCATION, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT (HON. PROF. MURWIRA): Thank you Hon. Speaker Sir. – [HON. MEMBERS: Reshuffle, reshuffle.] - I am actually acting as the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing.  The Harare Institute of Technology…

THE HON. SPEAKER: Order! Can I remind the Hon. Members who are asking for a reshuffle to wait for their own time – [Laughter] - More than that, Section 107 (2), of the Constitution says Ministers can act individually or collectively in responding to the work of Parliament or their Committees.  So, we are perfectly within the constitutional provisions.

HON. PROF. MURWIRA: Thank you Hon. Speaker.  I would also want to thank the Hon. Members for asking on the issue to do with pricing of ZUPCO buses.  Most of the prices that we charge are due to the inefficiencies in the collection systems. So, through the Harare Institute of Technology helping ZUPCO, we have developed a tap and go system with a card which is a recharge card that you can put money in advance and be able to use that and I was very happy to see Hon. Mliswa buying that card at ZUPCO.

This card makes the customer not carry cash anymore. You will be having the card which has money in advance and then you can use it every time.   It therefore means 0.50 cents according to calculation can make a big bus make profit – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] - The transport in this country is overpriced.  We are proving through technology that we can have proper prices.  So, I think that is basically the issue of introducing efficiencies using technology at ZUPCO.  This is why we say ZUPCO will make profit even at 0.30 cents.

HON. KARENYI: Thank you Mr. Speaker.  I remember very well that some time ago we asked about the same question when the issue of ZUPCO and other bus operators were given an opportunity by Government to ferry people and we said how sustainable this process is.  Hon. Speaker, I am sure you will agree with me that even those buses were no longer transporting people from town to their respective areas.  How sustainable then is this issue of 0.50 cents?  Honestly, last time they promised us that they are going to sustain it but they failed.

HON. PROF. MURWIRA: We are repeating the fact that the prices of a bus has nothing to do with the price of a litre of fuel but it has something to do with the efficiency with which we collect money and running of the system.  So through this e-system, we are really looking forward to a situation whereby business does not over-profiteer or under profiteer based on the efficiency of their collection system.  So, we are basically tackling the collection system and this collection system will make it so efficient and sustainable.  I think the proof of the pudding is in the eating.  Thank you.

THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, order!  If you want to taste the pudding and be satisfied, ask Hon. Mliswa; he understands what the Hon. Minister has said.

HON. CHIDHAKWA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  My question goes to the Leader of Government Business in the absence of the Minister of Finance.  What does the Government policy say where fuel suppliers are obtaining their forex at inter-bank rate?  This means that prices will fluctuate everyday impacting on prices of goods and services.  It will also result in the civil servants income being eroded on a daily basis – [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] – I thank you.

THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI):  I would like to thank the Hon. Member for the question.  I have spoken to the Minister of Energy Hon. Chasi, and we are agreed that he prepares a comprehensive Ministerial Statement. We will allow Hon. Members to interrogate what Government is doing in terms of the fuel sector in which they are trying to close loopholes where there are leakages.  He agreed that he is doing that and he will bring the Ministerial Statement to the august House.

HON. MUSHORIWA: Mr. Speaker Sir, whilst we hear what the Minister has said, the question relates to the inter-bank rate and what has happened…

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, Hon. Member, please take your seat.  That matter will be clarified through a Ministerial Statement, if not tomorrow then next week.

          HON. MASENDA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  My question is directed to the Minister of Primary and Secondary Education.  What is Government policy on the registration for examinations for schools that register students for both ZIMSEC and overseas examination boards?  I ask this question in view of the fact that some schools are not registering students for ZIMSEC preferring to register them only for overseas examination boards – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order.  Minister, that requires a brief response.

THE MINISTER OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION (HON. PROF. MAVIMA):  We have a number of schools that are private and offer Cambridge.  They do that with the approval of our Secretary.  The majority of our schools offer ZIMSEC.  Government policy has allowed that to happen and that is not a problem at all.

*HON. MATAMBANADZO:  My question is directed to the Leader of the House and Minister of Parliament or whatever.  Has he gone out?  He is standing that side; will he be able to hear my question?

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order, order.  Hon. Members, please know the correct accollation for the Hon. Ministers.  He is Minister of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs.

*HON. MATAMBANADZO:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir for correcting me on the Minister’s title. Hon. Minister of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs, what does the policy say on the fact that the Minister does his work and proceeds like what has happened with fuel without giving a Ministerial Statement in advance?  If there are any loopholes or mistakes that we see, we can then advise him on the advantages and disadvantages.  For him to just increase the price of fuel silently – right now Members of Parliament are not proud to say we are Members of Parliament because of what is happening out there. 

Mr. Speaker Sir, it is difficult to walk out there.  If you walk out there – for some of us who are so dark, they have seen us on television and they will ask us about what is happening because people are now travelling on bus carriers.  They say it is cheaper.  The cards have been bought.  The card that has been acquired is not different from ZESA.  We pay for electricity in advance but there is no electricity. The buses are very few and are not sufficient.  People end up using lorries as transport.

*THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI):  I want to thank the Hon. Member for the question.  That is what Hon. Chasi is in the process of putting together so that when he brings the Ministerial Statement, Members of Parliament cam seek clarification accordingly.

HON. GONESE:  My point of order arises from the fact that the import of the question was on why Government does not do the necessary consultations in advance.  It was not on the substance of the fuel increases but rather on the policy of Government whereby before implementation, Hon. Ministers come even to Parliamentary Portfolio Committees and indicate their intentions so that Hon. Members of Parliament as representatives of the people can also make their own inputs into the issue at hand.  I think that was the substance and essence of the question.  I think that the Hon. Minister skated that aspect.

HON. ZIYAMBI:  The Act allows ZERA to vary the prices of fuel and that they have done.  What I have indicated is that the Minister will come and explain the circumstances and the modalities of why that had to occur. In terms of the laws, Government is not constrained to act in terms of their mandate before coming to Parliament.

*HON. CHIKWINYA:  I read the statement from RBZ and that from ZERA.  It stated that fuel procurement will now follow the inter-market bank rate but there was fuel that was at the pump station.  That fuel’s price went up there and there.  What is Government’s policy on protecting consumers so that the new price will be effected after seven days?  What is Government’s policy to protect people from this shock because coupons that were procured are no longer valid because of the situation?

*HON. ZIYAMBI: Mr. Speaker Sir, the Reserve Bank was allocating foreign currency on a one to one basis for those who bring fuel into the country.  The Reserve Bank was subsidising fuel companies – in terms of US dollars, it was around US$0.68.  What the Reserve Bank has done is, for it to continue giving these fuel companies money, some of these diverted the money, such that after receiving  allocation for ten thousand litres, only five thousand would then come here.  To stabilise that, if the price that they are buying for is the same throughout, there is no pilferage whereby it finds its way out and sold.  When the Minister of Energy comes, he will clarify why he agreed to that measure because it was realised that if the bank continues to give these companies money in such a protective manner, they would divert the money and sell the fuel.  I thank you.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  We will wait for the Ministerial Statement, no supplementary.

HON. T. MLISWA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker.  My question is directed to the Minister of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs.  It is on the rule of law.  Mr. Speaker Sir, the Supreme Court ruled that ZCDC was not supposed to mine on any of the concessions.  Parliament, in its recommendation of the Eighth Session, equally made a recommendation that the mining houses must be back as per February 2016.  Now we have a situation where ZCDC continued to go against the Supreme Court ruling, the Parliamentary recommendation ...

THE HON. SPEAKER:  What is the question?

HON. T. MLISWA:  My question is that how serious is Government on restoring the rule of law when it ignores Parliament and it ignores the Supreme Court.

THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMETARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI):  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I want to thank Hon. Mliswa for the question which I believe is a very good question.  The Government of the Second Republic respects the rule of law and it respects court decisions.  If there are incidences where that is happening which becomes very specific and there is a court order to that effect, it is regrettable.  I will refer it to the Minister so that he can interrogate with a view of ensuring that we uphold our court judgements.  I thank you. 

HON. T. MLISWA:  Madam Speaker, the Minister is the Leader of Government business as well as the Minister of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs.  He sits in Cabinet and he must be able to direct the President accordingly when there is a matter which has been dealt with by the Supreme Court.  The Minister said this the last time when I asked the question and he said he would bring it up to the Head of State that ZCDC were in violation of the Supreme Court ruling.  It only goes to show that the Cabinet Ministers are misleading the President in the decisions that he is making because as the Minister of Justice, he must be able to raise the red flag.

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  What is your supplementary question Hon. Mliswa?

HON. T. MLISWA:  The supplementary question is that the Minister of Justice heard this issue before in the last time.  If you check in the Hansard, he equally said he was going to bring this matter up to the President.  Did he bring the matter up to the President in Cabinet to say, President, ZCDC is violating the Supreme Court ruling?  He said that he is going to ask the President.  My question is, Minister did you take this question to the President in Cabinet, to tell him that ZCDC were in violation of the Supreme Court ruling?  Now you see all these scandals at ZCDC, it is because it is an illegal activity.  Did you brief the President on that in Cabinet because there is a hindsight which talks about you going to tell the President but the situation continues?  Did you tell the President?  Did the President defy the Supreme Court or you did not tell the President?

HON. ZIYAMBI:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  I want to thank the Hon. Member and advise that not all issues are discussed in Cabinet and his reference that this was discussed in Cabinet is misplaced.  The matter belongs to the Ministry of Mines to take action on and I indicated that I will follow up and ensure that if the Ministry of Mines is in violation of the court ruling, they have to comply.  I thank you.

HON. GONESE:  On a point of order Madam Speaker.

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  What is your point of order Hon. Gonese?

HON. GONESE:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  My point of order Madam Speaker – HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Order Hon. Members.

HON. GONESE:  My point of order Madam Speaker arises from the fact that the question was raised previously in this House by the same Hon. Member and posed to the Hon. Minister.  So it is not something new.  As such, the Hon. Minister is acquainted with the issue and it cannot be referred to the Hon. Minister of Mines because the Hon. Minister previously made an undertaking to raise the issue which he did not.  The Hon. Minister is obliged to answer the question as to whether he raised the matter in Cabinet because it is not arising for the first time.  If it was arising for the first time, that would be understood but there is a different complexion because it is not something new.  I believe that the Hon. Chair should direct the Hon. Minister to respond directly to the issue which has been posed.

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  I heard the Hon. Minister saying he is going to make a follow up on the issues.

HON. T. MLISWA:  He was asked before Madam Speaker and he said he was going to take this issue up.  This is about the rule of law. That is why money is not coming into the country.  They continue with illegal mining and we are losing millions of dollars.  Is it a cartel or not?  Hon. Chitando went ahead and ZCDC now ...

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  It is okay Hon. Mliswa.  Let us allow the Minister to respond.

HON. T. MLISWA:  He must not get away with murder.  The Minister of Justice is being arrogant and it shows that you have no intention for Government to deal with the rule of law – [ HON. T. MLISWA:  Inaudible interjections.] –

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Order Hon. Mliswa!

HON. ZIYAMBI:  The Hon. Member is completely lost about the meaning of the rule of law.  He does not understand.  There are procedures and processes to charge someone with contempt of court if you are in violation of a court order.  The Hon. Member is within his rights to do so.  I gave an undertaking that I will follow up that but should the Hon. Member believe that there is violation of his rights or there is a court order that has been ignored, it is within our laws to go to court and if there are procedures and processes to charge someone with contempt of court if you are in violation of a court order, and the Hon. Member is within his rights to do so. I gave an undertaking that I will follow-up that, but should the Hon. Member believe that there is violation of his rights or there is a court order that has been ignored, it is within our laws to go to court and a contempt of court charge can be preferred. I thank you.

          HON. T. MLISWA: This is a Government entity Madam Speaker. It is not a question of entity - ZCDC is an arm of Government. So there is no rule of law and there must clarity...

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Switch off the mike; I did not give you the floor Hon. Mliswa. Please take your seat.

          Hon. Dzuma having stood up to make a point of order.

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: No more points of order.

          *HON. MUSABAYANA:  Thank you Madam Speaker. My question is directed to the Leader of the House. I am saying that this year 2019, Zimbabwe is faced with hunger and drought. We understand that the Government wants to assist with food. I wanted to ask if there are no opportunities in our policies in areas where gold is mined for parents and those living in those areas to embark on alluvial gold mining for them to get a form of livelihood. I thank you.

          HON. T. MLISWA: This is a serious issue in the country and the whole world is watching the Minister being arrogant in terms of a Supreme Court ruling which binds Government. The Government is bound by any Supreme Court ruling and you are saying that there must be contempt charges. This is why we are not getting money in the country because the Minister becomes arrogant. We need the rule of law. ZCDC is an illegal entity and Government is bound by the Supreme Court. Is Government not bound by the court ruling....

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Take your seat Hon. Mliswa.

          HON. T. MLISWA: If Government is not bound by any court ruling – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.]-

          *HON. MATANGIRA: On a point of order Madam Speaker.

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: What is your point of order Hon. Member?

          *HON. MATANGIRA: Thank you Madam Speaker. My point of order is on the issue that we fail as Members of Parliament to respect the one in the Chair because she is a woman. What are we doing, we are failing to respect her because she is a woman. Why are we doing that? We are not outside - we should follow what is in the Standing Orders and respect her.

          *THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): I want to thank Hon. Musabayana for that question. Yes, the Government had come up with measures that alluvial gold mining should not be done, but now we are looking into the matter to find out how alluvial gold mining can be done, looking at the issue of desilting the dams that are full of sand. So the Government is looking into the matter to see how this can be done without damaging our environment but ensuring that our people are able to mine the gold from these rivers. I thank you.

          Hon. Dzuma having stood up to make a point of order. – [ HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections]-

          Hon. Sikhala having also stood up to make a point of order.

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Hon. Members, please may you sit down. May you sit down Hon. Sikhala.

          HON. SIKHALA: Alright.

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: What is your point of order Hon. Sikhala?

          HON. SIKHALA: Madam Speaker, there was a very important question which a number of Hon. Members of Parliament asked in this House today. It is a question concerning the fuel crisis. The Leader of Government business and the Minister of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs referred all questions pertaining to fuel to the Ministerial Statement. Like what Hon. Matambanadzo indicated, Madam Speaker Ma’am tirikutsva kunze uku. Today I was driving from Beatrice and I managed to meet about five people at different stations who were asking me what are we doing in Parliament when things are like this.

          We plead with the Leader of Government business and Minister of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs that this issue is urgent. Can he try to talk to his colleague that he gives us the Ministerial Statement tomorrow so that our constituents who are waiting for us outside there, we will have something to tell them? This issue Madam Speaker is burning,  tirikutsva uku vanhuwee! Please can the Minister come here and give us the Ministerial Statement and we seek clarification so that we will have something to tell the people. I thank you Madam Speaker.

          Hon. Dzuma having stood up to make a point of order.

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Take you seat Hon. Member.

          *THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS HON. ZIYAMBI): Thank you Madam Speaker. Hon. Sikhala has just reiterated what I had said that that is exactly what we are doing. I thank you.

          *THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Yes, the Minister is coming tomorrow.

          Questions without Notice were interrupted by the HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER in terms of Standing Order No. 64.

ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS WITH NOTICE        

INSTALLATION OF TOLLGATES IN URBAN AREAS

          9.   HON. MAYIHLOME asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to explain why the Ministry is not installing tollgates in urban areas to ensure that the user pays principle applies.

          THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. ARCH. MATIZA):  I want to thank the Hon. Member for the question.  The notion of urban tolling requires policy position through engagement with key ministries including the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development and the Ministry of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing as well as other relevant stakeholders.  There are a lot of processes involved before implementation. As such, processes include feasibility studies over and above ascertaining the costs involved and crafting of legal frameworks.  Currently, some consultations were made but the indication is that it is a long way before this can be implemented in Zimbabwe. 

          HON. GABBUZA:  Madam Speaker, I appreciate the answer given by the Hon. Minister but when the contract for the tolling of Beitbridge-Chirundu road was given to a contractor, it included the tolling of Harare.  So, what more consultations is the Minister talking about?  When that contract was awarded were there no consultations?

          HON. ARCH. MATIZA:  I want to thank the Hon. Member for the question.  When that contract was awarded, it did not take off -meaning that there was no conclusive action to be taken.

HON. MAYIHLOME:  Unfortunately, I have to ask this supplementary question after another supplementary because the Minister’s voice is so low and inaudible from here.  What we want you to understand is that the burden of tolling fees is being borne by a smaller proportion of the driving population in this country.  For consultations to take this long, it is almost 10 years since tolling began in this country.  By any standards, it is just too slow.  Why is the urban populace relieved of this burden and the rural populace carrying the burden on their own when the benefits are spread throughout the whole country?

HON. ARCH. MATIZA:  As I have already indicated, the consultations are in progress and once this is concluded, action will be taken.

HON. NDUNA:  Madam Speaker, it is a supplementary but it is basically trying to persuade the Minister to try and make sure that in those tolling facilities is also embedded trauma centres.  I am alive to the fact that toll gates are currently about 100km apart and it can take less than an hour to get to one toll gate from the other.  So, it is within that hour that I am trying to get to alleviate the plight of those that are involved in road accidents so that they are attended to within the hour after the accident in a trauma centre.  Would it be alright for the Minister on establishment of the urban tolling facilities or any other tolling facilities in the future to ensure that there are trauma centres in those facilities to cater for those involved in road accidents?

HON. ARCH. MATIZA:  For other tolling my Ministry is discussing the issues with the Ministry of Health and Child Care in order to establish either ambulance centres or trauma centres in between tollgates.  However, it is selective, in some cases we have towns that are between 10km and 20km apart.  Those are the areas where we will have to equip the existing clinics in those centres and enable them to take care of any of the victims of accidents.

HON. MADZIMURE:  Madam Speaker is the Minister telling us that now there is a Government policy to build hospitals between tollgates because in his response he told us that they are considering building trauma centres on the basis of the tollgates that exist.

HON. ARCH. MATIZA:  Madam Speaker, I said there are consultations and there is no policy that has been established.  We are consulting to see the feasibility of putting such facilities. 

BREAKDOWN OF ZINARA BENEFICIARIES BY THE LOCAL AUTHORITY FROM 2015 -2017

          10.  HON. MAYIHLOME asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to give a breakdown of the ZINARA beneficiaries by local authority from 2015 to 2017 and state the criteria used in the disbursements.

          THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTURCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. ARCH. MATIZA): The criteria for disbursement is in terms of Section 17 of the Road Act [Chapter13:18].  Generally, funds are disbursed in two modes:

- routine maintenance funds which are allocated using a disbursement formula matrix based on each Road Authority network and these funds are disbursed in advance then the Road Authority will acquit later. 

-Any other funding from period maintenance and emergency road works are allocated on a need basis by the ZINARA Board and approved by the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development.  These funds are disbursed upon presentation of payment certificates of completed works by the Road Authority.  The schedule will be attached to this response.

          HON. MAYIHLOME:  My supplementary question is, if the Hon. Minister could please explain what measures are in place to ensure that there is no disproportionate allocation at the expense of other regions and constituencies?  We have seen areas that have not benefited from ZINARA allocations and yet others have benefited large amounts of money almost every year.   So we wanted a breakdown that gives a clear indication by district, province and constituency, at least we need that clear information.  Thank you.

          HON. ARCH. MATIZA:  Thank you Madam Speaker. There are issues where some local authorities do not acquit – they do not have acquittals to show that they have used the amounts that have been disbursed to them.  Without showing acquittals, there are no further disbursements to those local authorities.  So I would urge the Hon. Member to check with the local authorities those that are purporting not to have received disbursements, whether they have acquitted the previous disbursements.

          The other problem that was bedeviling the ZINARA Fund was due to late disbursements but that has already been dealt with now.  So the main issue is about the local authorities not acquitting the disbursements.  I thank you.

          HON. CHIKWINYA:  On a point of order Madam Speaker. The Hon. Minister was responding to a specific question that in terms of our Standing Orders he had been given sufficient time to go and investigate and come to Parliament with answers.  He has got the answers but has chosen to tender the answers to the Hansard instead of reading the answers.

          The reason why the Hon. Minister is supposed to respond to our questions in detail is for us to then follow-up and be able to deliberate on these matters of national importance and more-so, of specific attachment to the Hon. Member.  I, therefore request your ruling Hon. Chair, that the Hon. Minister reads out the disbursements as required by Question Number 10 for the Hon. Minister to give a breakdown of the ZINARA beneficiaries of local authorities from 2015 to 2017. 

I say so for two reasons – one, the Hansard itself is being delayed in terms of printing for other reasons and not all Hon. Members have access to it in time.  Therefore, we need to take these answers to our constituents in time.

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Hon. Minister, may you please approach the Chair?

Hon. Arch. Matiza approached the Chair.

HON. ARCH. MATIZA:  Madam Speaker, may I be allowed to tender the schedule in the next session?  - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Order, order, the Hon. Minister will bring the answer next week on Wednesday - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – No, next week on Wednesday.

HON. CHIKWINYA:  Madam Speaker, there was a point of order that was once raised by Hon. Matangira that we need to respect the Chair.  When the Hon. Minister initially responded to this question, he said that, ‘May I be allowed to tender the schedule to the Hansard?’

The impression that was given to all of us was that he had the schedule but then it was so long that he thought he was going to waste our time.  Therefore, he wanted to short circuit by submitting the schedule to Hansard.  Now it is turning out that he did not even have the answer.  Unfortunately, Madam Speaker, I would beg leave that this question be retained on the Order Paper so that we can deal with it next Wednesday and not be deferred.  Otherwise, it risks being removed from the Order Paper when it has not yet been completely dealt with.

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Your point of order has been noted.  The Hon. Minister will bring the answer next week and the question will be retained on next week’s Order Paper. - [Hon. Mliswa having stood up. ] - Please Hon. Mliswa, I did not recognise you, may you sit down. 

HON. T. MLISWA: Madam Speaker, on a point of order.

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Hon. Mliswa, may you please approach the Chair?

HON. T. MLISWA:  Madam Speaker, my point of order really emanates from the fact that the Hon. Minister, in his own wisdom, has his constituency roads done while our roads have not been done.  That is why you see Hon. Members of Parliament are saying this.  The ZINARA Chairman is from Mashonaland East andthe Hon. Minister is from Mashonaland East.  His roads have been done and our roads have not been done and the Chibero Road has not been done up to now.  This is why Hon. Members are saying that our roads are not being done yet he worked on his roads in Murewa as soon as he assumed office – you can go and see. – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Your point of order has been overruled Hon. Mliswa.

CONSTRUCTION OF A BRIDGE ACROSS TETENU RIVER

11.  HON MARONGE asked the Minister of Transport and

Infrastructural Development to outline Government plans for the construction of a new bridge across Tetenu River, near Nyajena Rural District Hospital.

          THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. ARCH. MATIZA):  Thank you Madam Speaker and I also want to thank the Hon. Member for the question asking the Hon. Minister to state when the tarring of the Mashate-Renco Mine Road in Masvingo South Constituency will be completed.

          The two above questions relate to the same road, i.e. Bondolfi-Renco Road that falls under the Department of Roads.  Under the ongoing Emergency Rehabilitation Programme, the road was allocated $817 212.00 which was used to gravel 10 kms and rehabilitate some of the failed sections

 Currently, there are no funds to service the remaining 28 kms of the road and to construct the bridge.  However, the project has been included in the 2030 Vision and the Five Year National Road Upgrade programme that is being financed by Treasury.  I thank you.

*HON. NDUNA:  I am grateful for his expertise in road construction.  What I want to find out is when the Norton road over rail is going to be completed because the road also leads to Kadoma and when is it going to be done?

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  That is a new question.  Please take your seat, Hon. Nduna.

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Question number 12, Hon. Maronge.

HON. MARONGWE:  Actually the Minister seems to have combined the two questions.

SURFACING OF HEADLANDS-CHENDAMBUYA-MAYO-CHIKORE ROAD

   14.  HON. MUNETSI asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to state when Headlands-Chendambuya-Mayo-Chikore Road will be surfaced.

THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. ARCH. MATIZA):  Headlands-Mayo Road has always been in our plans for construction and servicing but due to limited resources, only culvert repairs and grading were carried out under the Emergenency Road Rehabilitation Programme.  Major roads in the province like Ngundu-Tanganda, Murambinda- Birchenough and Nyanga-Ruwange have been prioritised first.  Once they have been completed, the Headlands-Mayo Road will be the next in line for construction and resurfacing.  I thank you.

HON. MUNETSI:  My question is very clear.  When is it going to be resurfaced?  That is my question.  I have heard promises several times and now this time I am asking when so that I can tell people when it is going to be resurfaced.  Remember, I am your neighbour.  We border with Nyagadzi River and roads starting from Nyagadzi getting into Murewa are surfaced.  Mine is not.  When is it going to be started?

HON. ARCH. MATIZA:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  First, I want to say that Murewa roads have not been surfaced, it is not correct.  In fact, the roads that pass through even my constituency have not been done. 

Now, I will answer the question when.  I specifically said Ngundu-Tanganda, Murambinda- Birchenough and Nyanga-Ruwange have been prioritised first and once they have been completed, the Headlands-Mayo Road will be next in line for construction and surfacing-[HON. MEMBERS:  When?]-  When these are completed.

REPAIR OF BANKET-RAFFINGORA-GURUVE AND MUTORASHANGA-MAPINGA ROADS

16.  HON. CHOMBO asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development when the Banket-Raffingora-Guruve and the Mutorashanga-Mapinga Roads in Zvimba North Constituency will be repaired.

THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. ARCH. MATIZA):  Under the ongoing Emergency Road Rehabilitation Programme, Banket-Raffingora-Guruve Road has been allocated $450 000 for regrading 15km of the road.  Due to the shortage of pieces of road equipment on the market for hiring, the project could not be implemented in-house, so it was tendered.  The tender for the project closed on 29th October, 2018.  The contract was awarded but the contractor immediately asked for a variation in prices upon mobilisation.  My Ministry is attending to this variation.

For Mutorashanga-Mapinga Road, the project did not receive any funding for the years 2018 and 2019 but the road has been included in the routine maintenance programme for the year and I know there is some work going on now.  I thank you.

HON. CHOMBO:  Thank you Hon. Speaker. I did not understand what he was saying.  Can he repeat his response?

HON. ARCH. MATIZA: Under the ongoing Emergency Road Rehabilitation Programme, Banket-Raffingora-Guruve Road has been allocated $450 000 for regrading 15km of the road.  Due to the shortage of pieces of road equipment on the market for hiring, the project could not be implemented in-house, so it was tendered.  The tender for the project closed on 29th October, 2018.  The contract was awarded but the contractor immediately asked for variation in prices

HON. MUTSEYAMI:  On a point of order, Madam Speaker.

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Order Hon. Minister.

HON. MUTSEYAMI:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  For the good of the House and for the good of what the Honourable Minister is presenting, may the good Hon. Minister amplify his voice please, like zvavanoita kuma rally.

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Hon. Minister, please may you try to speak up.

HON. ARCH. MATIZA:  This is how far I can go.  The contract was awarded but the contractor immediately asked for a variation in prices upon mobilisation.  My Ministry is attending to this variation.

For Mutorashanga-Mapinga Road, the project did not receive any funding for the years 2018 and 2019 but the road has been included in the routine maintenance programme for the year.

HON. CHOMBO:  Thank you Hon. Speaker.  The tender was floated way before July last year and it looks like there is a lot of non decision makers on the ground because we have been to offices in the province. We came to head office and nothing seemed to have been done.  Other roads are being fixed but this road has been neglected, I do not know for how many donkey years.  We have got social welfare, they are ferrying maize from Raffingora to Matabeleland and there is a lot of traffic.  Now, it just has a strip road which is damaged.  Nothing is being done.  All the resources are being channelled to other roads but what about this road?  Okay, there is variation but how come other roads are getting the variation they need and not Banket-Raffingora-Guruve Road?  Thank you.

HON. ARCH. MATIZA:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  The road in question has a variation and there is work that is being done by our management, staff and the Provincial Roads Engineer.  I will assure the Hon. Member that work will resume in earnest.  By next month June, work should start.

HON. CHOMBO:  Thank you Hon. Speaker.  You said it will earnestly start.  There was a grader that was brought in and it just grazed across the road from Banket to Rafingora.  To them it was a job done. He said some work is going to be done in June, what kind of work, re-grading or tarring?  Thank you.

          HON. ARCH. MATIZA: Thank you Madam Speaker, there will be re-grading.

          HON. CHOMBO: Thank you.  The re-grading is long overdue because it now qualifies as a main road.  It needs more than re-grading on the road.  Can the Hon. Minister consider that so that when he does the work in June, he should do a proper one not just bringing graders that will not be of any service to the road.  Thank you.

          HON. ARCH. MATIZA: Thank you Madam Speaker.  It is the policy of our Ministry to look into the needs that arise on each of the roads.  As I said, we will definitely look into it and my management and staff are looking into this particular road.

          HON. CHOMBO: Thank you.  That was Banket Rafingora Road, then there is Mutorashanga/Mapinga Road.  When I went to the offices of the Ministry of Transport and Infrastructure Development, they told me that ZIMASCO had an arrangement to fix that road.  For now, ZIMASCO had approached the Ministry to say that they do not have enough funds for them to be able to rehabilitate the road.  ZIMASCO has given tributes to the Chinese who have destroyed that road.  Nobody is taking care of that road.  We have been to the offices and this is a live issue that we have presented to the Ministry and nothing is being done on that road.  Thank you.

          HON. ARCH. MATIZA: Thank you Madam Speaker.  I want to thank the Hon. Member for asking that question.  It is the same situation with the road that I have just talked about.  However, we are looking at both roads.  My management is looking at both of them in order to make sure these roads are rehabilitated.  We are aware of the issue of ZIMASCO and the shortcomings you have talked about but we are going to implement the reconstruction and upgrading of those roads.  Thank you Madam Speaker.

          *HON. MATAMBANADZO: Thank you Madam Speaker for affording me the opportunity to pose a supplementary question to our Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development.  Hon. Minister, I need you to appreciate that the issue of roads is cross-cutting, it affects everyone.  What I need to understand is that; as a Ministry, what are your targets regarding the number of roads that you intend to attend to?  In total, how many kilometers is that and to date how many kilometers have you attended to?  We need proof in that regard to know what your targets are. If we were to go to a field, we work with targets Madam Speaker. The same applies, if you do not have targets, you miss the mark, the whole year will be spent without anything tangible having been achieved.  Tell us province by province or district by district, how many roads you have targeted and how much have been done. 

          *THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: It is a new question that you have posed Hon. Matambanadzo.  Please put it in writing and an answer to your written question will be provided.

          *HON. CHIKWINYA: The Hon. Minister spoke of $450 000 which has been allocated to this road.  He also spoke of adjustments which are required by contractors who would have won the tender.  These contractors require adjustments to this amount before they start work, but after they have mobilized - my issue is that, the Hon. Member who asked this question was motivated by the fact that there is no work being done.  If you look at questions number 6 to 16 Hon. Speaker, it speaks of the same principle of money being availed and adjusted but work not being done.  Who is responsible Hon. Minister of making a follow-up with contractors who would have done either half a job or who would not have done the job completely but would have either received the money or money is pending to come for them to be able to do that job? This is between yourself and the Ministry of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing.  I am saying so on the basis that other roads are said to be belonging to local authorities.  I just want that clarification so that there is no back and forth application of matters whilst work is not being done.  Thank you.

          HON. ARCH. MATIZA: Thank you Madam Speaker.  I want to thank the Hon. Member.  We have road authorities who have their own independent budgets and determine the roads which they want to execute.  So, there is the department of roads which falls under our Ministry.  There is the Urban and Local Authorities, rural authorities and DDF; these have their separate budgets and their own programmes which speak to the issue which you have just asked.  I hope I have answered you – [HON. CHIKWINYA: Inaudible interjection.] -  No, There is a lot of delivery taking place.  In every province, we have no less than four roads being worked on.  There is a lot of activity in this country as far as road construction is concerned.

            HON. MADZIMURE: Madam Speaker, the Hon. Minister has said that on the other road there was an agreement or – an undertaking by ZIMASCO.  Was this a written agreement that ZIMASCO was going to do the work on the road?  If it was an agreement, have they rescinded the agreement or it still stands?

          HON. ARCH. MATIZA: Thank you Madam Speaker.  The issue of ZIMASCO is not the key issue for us now.  The key issue for the Ministry is to make sure that the road is upgraded and repaired.  We have taken over this issue and we are going to be upgrading the road and re-developing it as Government.  Thank you Madam Speaker.

          HON. MADZIMURE: Madam Speaker, I am asking this question because we have had situations where an organisation would do work and we still find money being allocated by Government to that specific project.  That is why I wanted to know whether it is an agreement that has been rescinded or ZIMASCO still has the obligation to do so?

          HON. ARCH. MATIZA: Thank you Madam Speaker.  As I have just said, the obligation now lies with us, the Government to do this work.

REPAIR OF ZINARA GRADERS AT RAFFINGORA ZRP DEPOT

          17.   HON. CHOMBO asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development when ZINARA graders that were parked at Raffingora Zimbabwe Republic Police deport six months ago will be repaired?

          THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. ARCH. MATIZA): Thank you Madam Speaker.  I want to thank the Hon. Member for that question.  The graders that were given to road authorities are now the responsibility of the specific road authority, just like any other asset in their system.  The Ministry was only responsible for the procurement and handover to the specific road authorities, including Department of Roads which maintains its own.  I thank you.

          HON. CHOMBO: Thank you Madam Speaker.  I went by to see the grader and I was informed that they were stopped because they lacked routine maintenance like service for them to be operational.  Anyway, I approached also the council offices about the graders and they prophesied that it was still the property of ZINARA and the grader by now has been parked for almost a year.  Also, in the whole province, there is not even a grader but here is a grader that could service the province or the constituency and it is just parked just because there is no service done to the grader.  I thank you.

          HON. ARCH. MATIZA: Thank you Madam Speaker.  The graders are the property of the local authority.  The local authority is responsible for maintenance, including the usage of those graders.  Thank you Madam Speaker.

          HON. MATEWU: Thank you Madam Speaker.  I am really surprised that the Minister is saying this.  We all know that when ZINARA procured many graders, there is one company according to the forensic audit report of ZINARA which is being paid hundreds of thousands for upgrading and maintenance of these graders; UNIVERN.  Now we realise that there are graders which have not been repaired for more than a year.  Can the Minister tell us when he is going to bring the ZINARA forensic audit report into this House so that we can sort out these issues like these graders which are not being maintained; so that as Parliamentarians, we can see the nature and the abhorrent rot which is residing in ZINARA.  Thank you.

          HON. ARCH. MATIZA: Thank you Madam Speaker.  I would like to assure the Member that the report will be tabled in the next sitting.  That I assure you, I will table it myself in the first days of the next sitting.  I thank you.

EXPANSION OF THE BULAWAYO-NYAMANDLOVU-TSHOLOTSHO ROAD

          19.   HON. S. S. KHUMALO asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to state when the Bulawayo-Nyamandlovu-Tsholotsho Road will be expanded in view of the increasing volume of traffic?

          THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. ARCH. MATIZA): Thank you Madam Speaker.  I would like to thank the Hon. Member for that question. The existing Bulawayo-Tsholotsho Road has been awarded funding in 2018 for upgrading under the Road Development Programme to the tune of $7 million and $6 million in 2019.  The funding has been estimated to finance the construction of 5kms of road to surface standard.  The designs of 10 kms of the purported section have just been completed and upgrading of the project is going to be advertised soon in a view to engage private contractors to implement the work. 

          In the mean time, to maintain the road trafficable, the re-graveling and grading of the road shoulders was done in 2018.  The progress of the road upgrading will depend on the rate at which funding is availed by the Treasury.  I thank you Madam Speaker.

          HON. S. S. KHUMALO: Madam Speaker I want to bring to the attention of the Minister that this road has been a strip road all along and perhaps the answer that it is being upgraded - I do not know really what portion of the road is being upgraded. Why I asked is it needs expansion to accommodate the increase of traffic because the road is a strip.  A strip road that has been there; I found it there myself when I was born and it has just been like that to date.  So, the only thing that can be done to that road to upgrade it is to widen it and surface it.  I think that will be the best Hon. Speaker.

          HON. ARCH. MATIZA: Thank you Madam Speaker.  I have said that the Bulawayo-Tsholotsho Road has been awarded funding of $7 million and $6 million in 2019.  The funding is estimated to finance the construction of 5kms of the road to surface standard.  I thank you.

TAR SURFACING OF THE TSHOLOTSHO-SIPEPA-LUPANE ROAD

          HON. S. S. KHUMALO asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to state when the surfacing of the Tsholotsho-Sipepa-Lupane Road will be completed?

          THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. ARCH. MATIZA): Thank you Madam Speaker.  I would like to thank the Hon. Member for that question.  The Tsholostsho-Lupane Road is 118 km long and 80kms of this road has been surfaced.  The road has not received an allocation in the current Road Development Programme but remains a high priority.  In the 2019 Budget the project received $4 million for the 2 km stretch.  In the mean time, the gravel section is included in the plans of my Department of Roads before the end of 2019 in order to keep the road trafficable.  I thank you.

          On question 21. Hon. Mamombe having stood up to stand in for Hon. Karenyi – [HON. MEMBERS: Is this Hon. Karenyi.] –

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER (HON. MAVETERA): Order Hon. Members this is procedural. Hon. Karenyi has already written a letter to that effect, please Hon. Member proceed.

INSTALLATION OF INFRASTRUCTURE AT THE 25KM TOLLGATE ALONG MASVINGO-MUTARE ROAD

          21.   HON. KARENYI asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to state whether there are plans to install proper infrastructure at the 25km tollgate along the Masvingo-Mutare Road, near Roy shopping centre to ensure security of officers and revenue collected.   

          THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. ARCH. MATIZA): Thank you Madam Speaker, I want to thank the Hon. Member for her question. My Ministry is very aware of the need for security of our employees and the revenue being collected at our tolling stations.  The tollgate in question was opened end of September 2018.  ZINARA in its 2019 budget, set aside funds to install proper infrastructure that include booths and back office, for the security of our employees and the entire tolling operations.

          HON. MAMOMBE: Thank you Madam Speaker.  I am sure that what the Hon. Minister is supposed to answer is not just the question of security only, but also the question that relates to even the weather conditions that these security officers are being exposed to.  So I also want him to answer in that line.  I thank you.

          HON. ARCH. MATIZA: Thank you Madam Speaker.  As I have already said that my Ministry is aware of the need for the security of our employees and the revenue being collected at our tolling stations.  The tollgate in question was opened end of September 2018.  ZINARA in the 2019 budget set aside funds to install proper tolling infrastructure, proper - that means it will take care of that; proper infrastructure that include booths and back officers for the security of our employees and the entire tolling operations.  The designs are being done and this will now go to tender for us to start.

          HON. CHIKWINYA: Thank you Madam Speaker.  My question is why is there an appetite by Government to proceed to collect funds using rudimentry structure without first of all putting up the proper structures; wherein all these matters of concern from the original question by Hon. Karenyi would have been taken care of before they proceed to roll out collection of funds?

          HON. ARCH. MATIZA: Thank you Madam Speaker.  The fundamental issue here is that of security for the funds being collected.  We must be alive to the fact that there is dire need to repair and redevelop or even build green roads as soon as possible.  So whatever has been put there is functioning properly in terms of collection of funds at those tollgates is concerned.

          HON. MADZIMURE: Madam Speaker, the Ministry is aware of areas where they would want to put up tollgates.  This particular one - it is now almost a year since it was put up there. Can the Minister explain why, if they knew that they wanted to put up a tollgate?  Why did they not take their time to construct a proper structure which will also enhance the collection?  Right now that same tollgate, we have a problem of tickets running out and people are collecting monies and putting it in their pockets. Why did the Minister not see the urgency of putting up a proper tollgate where they maximize on the collection?

          HON. ARCH. MATIZA: Thank you Madam Speaker.  I want to thank the Hon. Member for the question.  The urgency of the matter is being addressed as we speak now, there have been proper designs and proper procurement; and these take some time.  We used what exists now and we believe the collection is being done properly, to collect funds for the key issue of developing our own infrastructure.

          HON. NYAMUDEZA: Thank you Madam Speaker. I would like to know from the Minister, how long it would take and cost to put in place a proper structure?  I thank you – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order Hon. Members may the Hon. Minister be heard in silence.

          HON. ARCH. MATIZA: Thank you Madam Speaker.  The tollgate will take about 6 months to complete the construction part of it and the cost; this has to be revisited now because of passage of time. I thank you.

CONSTRUCTION OF HUMPS AT WATSOMBA SERVICE CENTRE

          22.  HON. SARUWAKA asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to state whether the Ministry could consider construction of humps at Watsomba Service Centre in Mutasa Central constituency along the Nyanga-Mutare Highway since the area has become a death trap for crossing pedestrians.

          THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. ARCH. MATIZA): The Ministry has plans to construct speed humps at Watsomba Service Centre along Nyanga-Mutare Road for the safety of the crossing pedestrians and all road users in general.  We also intend to install speed limit signs on the said section.  However, the only constraint is the availability of funds, of which ZINARA has been instructed to release.  The construction work will begin as soon as the funds are available.

          HON. SARUWAKA: I am pleading with the Minister just to qualify the ‘soon’ part of it.  Is there anything that is going to happen in the next month, two months or soon as in the ‘Bible’ sometimes it takes years, how soon is soon?

          HON. ARCH. MATIZA: Thank you Madam Speaker.  These humps will be done within this financial year.

REPAIR OF THE NHODO SECTION IN MUTASA CENTRAL CONSTITUENCY

          23.  HON. SARUWAKA asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development when the Ministry will repair the Nhodo Section, along the Bonda Road, between Knowstics Boys High School and Bonda Girls High School in Mutasa Central Constituency.

          THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. ARCH. MATIZA): Thank you Madam Speaker, I want to thank the Hon. Member for his question. The said Nhodo section along Bonda Road is on our priority list for roads to be repaired under the Emergency Road Rehabilitation Programme for the year 2019.  We intend to commence the works as soon as the funds are availed.

WRITTEN SUBMISSIONS TO QUESTIONS WITH NOTICE

RECONSTRUCTION OF THE CHIMOYO-KAREZO BRIDGE AND SURFACING OF THE MUZARABANI-CHADEREKA ROAD

6.    HON. SODA asked the Minister of Transport and

Infrastructural Development to outline the Ministry’s plan for the re-construction of the Chimoyo-Karezo Bridge across Hoya River and the surfacing of the Muzarabani-Chadereka Road.

          THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. ARCH. MATIZA):  Chimoyo-Karezo Road falls under the District Development Fund (DDF), which is within the office of the President.  Muzarabani-Chadereka Road falls under Muzarabani Rural District Council (MRDC), which falls under the Ministry of Local Government and Public Works.  Both DDF and Muzarabani Rural District Council are Road Authorities with their own annual budgets for road maintenance.  The Ministry of Transport and Infrastructural Development through ZINARA will only avail funds for the projects once the relevant Road Authorities include the projects in their budgets and request funding.

EXPANSION OF THE CHIRUNDU-MASVINGO-BEITBRIDGE HIGHWAY

7.   HON. SHOKO asked the Minister of Transport and

Infrastructural Development when the expansion of the Chirundu-Masvingo-Beitbridge Highway will resume.

THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. ARCH. MATIZA):  The Ministry is currently seized with the project as directed by Cabinet.  There are discussions which are currently underway with AFFECC and once they have been finalised the House will be appraised.  In the meantime, Government is currently mobilising equipment to commence work so as to attend to road sections which have completely failed.  The work will be done by the Department of Roads.

RELEASE OF FUNDS TO THE CITY OF GWERU BY ZINARA

8.  HON. CHIBAYA asked the Minister of Transport and

Infrastructural Development when ZINARA will release money to the city of Gweru to resurface roads in Mkoba Constituency.

THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND

INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. ARCH. MATIZA):  The Ministry of Transport and Infrastructural Development through ZINARA allocates road funds to all Road Authorities, including the City of Gweru.  Each Road Authority is notified in advance about their annual allocations.  Each Road Authority prioritises road works they intend to cover with the allocation and submit to ZINARA for approval. After approval, which usually occurs at the beginning of each year, the road authority then proceeds with its internal processes which include procurement and actual implementation of the works.  When the works have been completed the road authority sends payment certificates to ZINARA for payment.  In 2017, the City of Gweru was allocated $1,797,335.00 which they utilised on their roads.  This current year, the City of Gweru was allocated $2,797,963.00 of which routine maintenance funds have been released already.  The bulk of the funds will be accrued when the City has finished its internal process.  So far ZINARA has no pending certificates from the City of Gweru.

REPAIR OF ROADS IN GOKWE-GUMUNYU CONSTITUENCY

18.   HON. NGWENYA asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development when the Musadzi-Tafara-Gandavaroyi; Musadzi-Muchichiru-Gandavaroyi, Tshoda-Peter Store Road in Gokwe-Gumunyu Constituency will be repaired?

          THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. ARCH. MATIZA): Thank you Madam Speaker.  The above-mentioned roads in Gumunyu Constituency fall under the District Development Fund (DDF), which is a road authority with its own annual budget allocations.  For 2018, DDF was allocated $12.5 million for road maintenance and construction from Treasury.  The Ministry of Transport and Infrastructural Development through ZINARA will only fund the projects if the road authority has prioritised the projects and included them in their annual budgets.

          Questions Without Notice were interrupted by the TEMPORARY SPEAKER in terms of Standing Order No. 64.

          HON. CHIKWINYA:  My point of order Hon. Speaker and I am sure that it will benefit the majority of this House.  Does Section 107 (2) which entails that Ministers can come to Parliament to answer questions also pertain to Ministers of State?  Can I get clarification from the Chair? 

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: I thank you Hon. Chikwinya for your question.  According to the definition of a Minister, it entails all Government of Zimbabwe Ministers.  If you can read your Standing Order Clause, it actually says that a Minister means a Minister of Government of Zimbabwe and that includes a Deputy Minister.  So

Ministers of State are actually included in that face.

          What has to happen however is that, in terms of policy questions - that only relates to those that get into Cabinet and those are the Cabinet Ministers.  Thank you Honourable. 

          HON. SARUWAKA: Madam Speaker, a point of clarification.  Regarding the Questions with Notice, when a Minister is in the middle of answering a question which has been on the Order Paper for months, the moment the time lapses, then he can stop.  Is he not allowed to dispose of that question before you then stop the questions session.  Like in this particular case he was in the middle of answering my question and you say the time is up. 

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  The Chair has already ruled Hon. Saruwaka.  We will continue with that next time. 

          HON. S. BANDA: Thank you very much Madam Chair.  Without necessarily bothering myself with the responses of the Minister, what I am happy about is that he has just been chosen to be the Minister of Infrastructure and he has come in to answer questions which have been on the Order Paper since November.  We have a Minister of Finance and Economic Development who has questions since November which are yet to be answered and some in December and so on.  May we have the Minister of Finance and Economic Development to come and answer questions which have been on the Order Paper for too long?  Thank you very much. 

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER.  Thank you very much Hon. Member, I am sure that that has been noted.  That is an administrative issue and the Hon. Leader of the House is here, I am sure that he is going to take action to that.  Thank you.

MOTION

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

          THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): Madam Speaker, with the leave of the House, I move that Orders of the Day, Nos. 1 to 31 on today’s Order Paper be stood over until Order of the Day, No. 32 has been disposed of.

SECOND READING

CONSUMER PROTECTION Bill [H. B. 10, 2018.]

          Thirty-Second Order read: Adjourned debate on motion on the Second Reading of the Consumer Protection Bill [H. B. 10, 2018].

          Question again proposed. 

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (HON. MODI):  Thank you Madam Speaker.  The Second Reading of the Consumer Protection Bill was presented in this August House yesterday, 21st May, 2019.  Before we proceed with the debate, may you allow me to respond to some of the issues that were raised.

          In response to the report by the Parliamentary Portfolio Committee on Industry and Commerce, Madam Speaker, appreciation of the Bill by the public was low. The Ministry takes note of that save to state that the Ministry together with the Consumer Council of Zimbabwe undertook awareness campaigns in all the country’s ten provinces to publicise the Bill in 2016. A detailed report was produced to account for the public concerns and these findings were incorporated in the Draft Bill.

HON. CHIKWINYA: On a point of order Madam Speaker. Yesterday, we went through debate on the Second Reading of the Consumer Protection Bill and members were in the process of making debates on the Bill. I now see the Minister responding before members have finished. Certainly, I was prepared to make a presentation and I would expect the Minister to make a response. I am not quite sure procedurally if we are not short-changing members who had prepared to debate. What I had heard from my Chief was that we were going to adjourn debate in consideration of what the Chief Whips had agreed on and we were going to debate whilst the Minister takes note and the Minister will respond to all of us collectively including the Portfolio Committee report to which he is responding to now.

THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): Thank you Madam Speaker. What transpired is that when you called out if there is any debate, members had a chorus that there was no debate and I indulged the Minister to respond to the debate that happened. There is no member who stood up when debate was called for but however, you still have an opportunity to contribute at the Committee Stage. It is not fatally defective, you can allow the Minister to respond to submissions that were already given. I thank you – [HON. CHIKWINYA: But you interjected the Speaker.] - 

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Thank you for that point of order. It is noted and if Hon. Members feel that they need to debate now, we can actually debate the motion.

HON. S. BANDA: Thank you Madam Chair. I am in the Portfolio Committee on Industry and Commerce. Yesterday when the debate was being closed, we indicated that we would also want to debate. However, I think I do agree with the Minister that we can still debate during Committee Stage, so there is no problem. Thank you.

HON. MODI: The public also raised the issue that the proposed agency in Part 2, Clause 4 of the Bill be a stand-alone, adequately funded, decentralised and independent Commission. This issue was also raised by parliamentarians during the debate session. The Ministry concurs with such an observation and would like to applaud the august House and the public for such remarks. This was the initial thought when the principles of this Bill were presented to Cabinet. However, during the consideration of the Bill by the Cabinet Committee on Legislation, the position was changed since Government was in the drive to streamline the number of authorities as a way of rationalising the fiscal expenditures. The Ministry will therefore amend the Bill accordingly – [HON. CHIKWINYA: Wadii kungoisa paWhatsApp nhai mdhara?] –

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order, Hon Member. May the Hon. Minister be heard in silence.

HON. MODI: Issues raised by the public such as violation of the lay bye agreements, public transport insurance cover, medical insurance, bus fare proportional to distance travelled, multi-tier pricing, price and availability of basic commodities, disclaimer clause, overbooking, currency issues and offences and penalties thereof would be covered in the regulations for specific sectors.

The proposed Consumer Protection Commission will be at the apex of various consumer related regulators. It is a harmonisation of all the consumer related issues that people encounter in the different sectors of the economy…

HON. S. BANDA: Madam Speaker, I was just praying that maybe we could get the report in the committee and then maybe we can deliberate on it slightly.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Can you repeat, we did not hear the last words.

HON. S. BANDA: I was just requesting the Hon. Minister to submit the report to the House so that we can go through it.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Your point of order is overruled. Hon. Minister, may you kindly continue.

HON. MODI: The Ministry appreciates the comments that were coming from the debate most of which were concurring with the issues raised by the Parliamentary Portfolio Committee on Industry and Commerce, such as changing the agency to a stand-alone and independent Commission. The concerns emanated from the fact that consumer protection issues are of importance to sustainable development of the economy, hence there was need for some independence in the way the Commission would be run to reduce bureaucracy, conflict of interest and suppression of consumer rights. The parliamentarians …

Hon. Chikwinya having moved to the back of the House and indicating that they could not hear the Hon. Minister – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections] – [Laughter.]

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order, Hon. Members. Hon. Chikwinya, may you kindly come back to your place. Order! Hon. Minister, may you speak louder so that the Hon. Members can hear you.

HON. MAGO: Hon. Speaker, are you able to understand what the Minister is saying yourself?

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order, order! Hon. Minister, I am kindly asking you to raise your voice – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] - Order! One thing we need to appreciate and understand is that we do not speak all the same. So, let us be able to accept the way that the Hon. Minister speaks.  All we need to do is to be attentive and listen to what he has to say.

          HON. MODI: The Ministry goes along with the issue raised by Hon. Members of the august House.  We will accordingly amend the proposed Bill as suggested.  A good law is a law that speaks the views of the people.  The proposed Consumer Protection Act seeks to protect the rights of the consumer and also regulate consumer conduct vis a vis business responsibility.

          THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI) on behalf of THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (HON. MODI): I move that the debate do now adjourn.

          Motion put and agreed to.

          Debate to resume: Thursday, 23rd May, 2019.

MOTION

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): I move that Order of the Day, Number 33 on today’s Order Paper be stood over until Order of the Day, Number 34 has been disposed of.

Motion put and agreed to.

SECOND READING

MICROFINANCE BILL [H. B. 11, 2018]

Thirty-Fourth Order read: Second Reading: Microfinance Bill [H. B. 11, 2018].

THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): Madam Speaker, it is my singular honour to move that the Microfinance Amendment Bill be reada second time.  I will just go through the provisions of this Bill.  The Bill seeks to address various gaps and weaknesses in the existing microfinance framework and to ensure an effective regulatory framework aligned to international best practice.

The Bill also seeks to achieve two fundamental objectives namely; to reduce the variety of institutions that carry on microfinance business from the current four different types, that is corporate financiers, credit only micro financiers, deposit taking micro financiers and money lenders to two types of institutions namely; credit only microfinance institutions being companies that provide loans and credit to small scale borrowers and deposit taking microfinance institutions, these being companies that accept deposits from small scale businesses and members of the lower income groups in order to reduce confusion and overlaps emanating from the existence of the current four types of institutions. 

Secondly, the Bill seeks to extend and strengthen the supervision of microfinance institutions and enhance corporate governance in the management of microfinance institutions.  The Bill will introduce an Advisory Council to advise the Minister on matters pertaining to microfinance.  The council will be a platform for microfinance stakeholders to provide inputs into the formulation of strategies and policies to develop the microfinance sector in Zimbabwe.

Key provisions of the Bill – Madam Speaker, Clause 2 deals with the new definitions introduced in the Bill, including the definition of associate which is in relation to a microfinance institution and this means it is a subsidiary as defined in Section 143 of the Companies Act, Chapter 24.03 or any company of which the microfinance institution is the single largest shareholder; its holding company as defined in Section 143 of the Companies Act where the microfinance institution itself is a subsidiary of a holding company as defined in Section 143 of the Companies ACT, any other such subsidiary of the same holding company or any person who has power directly or indirectly to control the microfinance institutions management policies. 

Clause 2, further repeals certain definitions including that of a corporate financier and the repeal and substitution of the definition of credit only microfinance business in line with the new classes of microfinance institutions being introduced by the Bill.  The definition of a deposit taking microfinance business is also repealed and substituted with a new definition in line with the objectives of streamlining of the lines of business that a microfinance institution may undertake as I have outlined above.

Madam Speaker, Clause 3 will clarify the application of the Act to microfinance institutions so that in paragraph A thereof, the Act will extend to cover anyone who engages in microfinance business as defined in Clause 2 of the Bill.

Paragraph (c) will repeal Section 3 of the Act in order to remove reference to money lenders who will no longer be covered by the Act.

          Clause 4 introduces a new section in Part II of the Act by the insertion of a new Section 5A to provide for a Microfinance Advisory Council whose membership is set out in sub-paragraphs (a) to (j).

          A new Sub-section 3 of the new Section 5A provides for the functions of the Microfinance Advisory Council which shall include advising the Minister on strategies and policies to develop the microfinance business and to promote good financial practices among microfinance institutions.

Clause 5 will deal with applications for registration as microfinance institutions which shall be made to the Registrar in the prescribed form and manner and shall require various disclosures including the name and address of every person holding 5% or more of the applicant’s shares.

Clause 6 deals with the register of microfinance institutions and will remove references to “money lenders”.

Clause 7 of the Bill deals with periods of registrations and lengthens the periods of registration as follows; the periods of registration of a credit for only microfinance institution shall now be five years, subject to renewal, whilst the registration of a deposit taking microfinance institution shall remain in force until it is cancelled in terms of the Act.

Clause 9 deals with the publication of notices of registration and cancellation of registration.

Clause 11 of the Bill provides for sanctions to be imposed on microfinance institutions which contravene provisions of Section 4 (1), (2) and (3) of the Act.

Clause 12 of the Bill provides for requirements for loan and financial lease agreements and what such agreements must contain.

Clause 15 relates to a new section being inserted to deal with responsibilities of directors and shareholders of microfinance institutions.  Clause 15 will also require every microfinance institution to establish and maintain adequate and effective procedures of corporate governance consistent with such prudential standards as may be prescribed.  It also deals with the requirement for such institutions to have a compliance function and establish a risk committee.

Clause 20 of the Bill provides for a requirement that any loans given by microfinance institutions to their directors and shareholders be secured by 100% collateral.

Clause 23 of the Bill will require microfinance institutions to maintain prescribed levels of capital and reserves.

Clause 26 of the Bill extends the supervisory powers of the Reserve Bank so that they recover associates of microfinance institutions as well as the microfinance institutions themselves, hence the insertion of the definition of “associate” in the Bill.

Clause 31 of the Bill will clarify the duty of auditors from disclosing information about the institutions so that they may disclose information which they are professionally required to disclose following an audit.

Clause 34 will allow persons who are currently registered as moneylenders and corporate financiers (both classes of which will be abolished by the Bill) to continue their business until their current registration certificates expire and until their applications for registration under the new provisions have been finalised.

Mr. Speaker Sir, I now move that the Bill be read a second time.

I also move that the debate do now adjourn.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume:  Thursday, 23rd May, 2019.

On the motion of THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI), the House adjourned at Eight Minutes to Six o’clock p.m.

BLOG COMMENTS POWERED BY DISQUS
National Assembly Hansard NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD 22 MAY 2019 VOL 45 NO 54