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NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD 23 SEPTEMBER 2015 VOL 42 NO 04

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PARLIAMENT OF ZIMBABWE

Wednesday, 23rd September, 2015

The National Assembly met at a Quarter-past Two O’clock p.m.

PRAYERS

(MR. SPEAKER in the Chair)

ANNOUNCEMENT BY MR. SPEAKER

ERROR ON THE ORDER PAPER

  1. SPEAKER: I wish to draw the attention of the House to an error on page 16 of the Order Paper where Orders of the Day, Numbers 1 and 2 should be reflected as Notices of Motion Numbers 1 and 2. Order of the Day, Number 3 should be renumbered as Order of the Day. Number 1.

ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

  1. CROSS: Mr. Speaker Sir, my question is directed to the Minister of Finance and Economic Development. Would he please confirm that an audit of the Government pensioners is currently underway; indicate what policy measures he has made to ensure that all pensioners are covered and that this process is conducted in an orderly fashion.

THE MINISTER OF FINANCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (MR. CHINAMASA): I thank the hon. member for his question and I want to confirm that yes indeed, an audit of pensioners list is being conducted. This is to establish whether or not the pensioners who are being paid are still alive or deceased.

MRS. MISIHAIRABWI-MUSHONGA: Can the Minister explain why in the process of trying to do that audit we have to bring these elderly people to stand in queues the whole day. I can give you an example that as we speak right now, some of these pensioners have been standing in queues in Bulawayo at Milton Park School with no food. They are there at 8:00 am and the people who do the audit take their time to have tea. Is there no other process that could have been used to do a head count of these pensioners because as you know, all of them are old and afflicted with a number of illnesses? I thank you.

  1. CHINAMASA: Yes, I got to know of that complaint. It was conveyed to my Ministry and we are looking into it with a view to rectifying the problem. Thank you.

*MR. CHINOTIMBA: My question is directed to the Minister of Lands and Rural Resettlement. We have got so many problems. A1 farmers are being removed so that A2 farmers can be accommodated, but the people are from the Ministry of Lands and Rural Resettlement. I would like to know why that is happening.

*THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LANDS AND RURAL RESETTLEMENT (MRS. CHIKWAMA): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir for giving me the chance to respond to Hon. Chinotimba’s pertinent question. Let me inform him that work is in progress to rectify all these problems being faced in the resettlement programmes. I also advise him to put his question in writing so that he can get a clear response.

*MR. CHIBAYA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. I will direct my question to the Vice President and Leader of the House, Hon. Mnangagwa. Hon. Vice President, we have a very big problem in the country, which is disturbing the development of industry and is also bringing problems into families and health. The problem I am talking about is with regards to the operations of the power supply which is ZESA. What preparations are you putting in place so that we may not have many incidences of load shedding, some of which seem to be unplanned?

          *THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (MR. MNANGAGWA): I thank the hon. member for asking this pertinent question on frequent electricity load shedding. The Government wishes that people should have a very comfortable life but the unfortunate situation is that as a country, we are not able to generate enough electricity to meet all the needs of the country. We have also commissioned sub-contractors to supply the country with thermal power and there are two of them. We expect them to give us 600MW of electricity. We are also working on the expansion of the Kariba South station and this will add another 300MW to give us a total of 900MW. I am sure this development is going to give joy to the people of Zimbabwe.

We are facing another problem which is beyond our control and this is the receding of water levels in Kariba Dam. We share the water in the Kariba Dam with Zambia. We are supposed to have 750MW but we have now rationed the electricity by reducing the supply of electricity to 475MW so that we can equally share the power. The Government is busy looking for new ideas and taking steps so that we can have enough power generation. I thank the hon. member for asking such a pertinent question and may I please inform him that steps to rectify this anomaly are being taken.

          *MS. MUCHENJE: I would want to thank you hon. Speaker, for giving me this opportunity to make a follow up question. Hon. Vice President, you have given us a clear explanation on the supply of electricity. When we are looking at load shedding, why is it that there seems to be some discrimination in that other areas have more frequent load shedding than others that do not seem to have any load shedding?

          *MR. MNANGAGWA: Thank you hon. member for the follow-up question. I know mothers always want their families to have a good life and have light. She has also observed that we have some areas which do not have load shedding like hospitals but unfortunately, she seems to be missing the point. We do not do load shedding in hospitals because it is a matter of life and death. There will be some procedures that would be undertaken and if the electricity is switched off, people may die on operation tables. The only reason why we have load shedding in residential areas is that we can survive without electricity but hospitals and other essential services cannot survive with electricity cuts. Other areas are security centres; they need to be lighted. As far as we are concerned, in residential areas and other areas, we just have to live with the load shedding – [AN HON. MEMBER: Inaudible interjections.] -

          *MR. SPEAKER: Order, order. Hon. member, ‘imimi zita ndiyani?’ Yes Hon. Bunjira, are you not aware that you have used unparliamentary language when you said the Vice President of the country is lying. That is unparliamentary despite the privileges of the House. If you say you are not responsible for that, then who is? – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – If you are the hon. member who said the Vice President is lying, stand up.

  1. MAKONYA: I withdraw Mr. Speaker Sir.
  2. SPEAKER: Hon. member, the Chair apologises to you for recognizing the wrong person. Thank you.

          *MR. NDUNA: Thank you Mr. Speaker. Thank you Leader of the House for the response that you have given. People are talking about the supply of electricity and load shedding. They are talking of areas which already have electricity but we have areas like Negande, Kanzamba, Kasonde and Mutoko where there is no electrical power. May you please explain the plans by the Rural Electrification Agency in accessing these areas?

  1. SPEAKER: Order, order! I think the import of the question to the hon. Vice President is that there are areas where there has not been electricity, particularly in some rural areas. What is Government on that?

THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (MR. MNANGAGWA): Mr. Speaker Sir, I appreciate the question posed by the hon. member. My understanding is that it is very specific. He has mentioned particular areas where REA has not reached and is asking when REA will reach those areas. I think they need to praise him for thinking that I would know the programme of REA when I am Vice President, kuti musi wakati vanenge vari pakati, musi wakati vanenge vari pakati. He really has much faith in me – [Laughter] – I must say that I am unable to stand that faith. It is a specific question which requires to be asked to a specific Ministry so that they can look at the programme of REA and come and inform the House about the entire programme. I thank him for thinking that I would know these things without looking at the programme.

Secondly, as to the question of policy, it is Government policy that the entire country should be covered by electricity. This is why we have Rural Electrification Agency (REA) which has the duty to make sure that remote areas also receive electricity. That is the policy of Government but the unfolding programme continues to go. It cannot happen overnight but it continues to unfold covering areas.   Yester-year areas had no electricity but this year, some of those areas have electricity and the programme continues. I thank you.

  1. KWARAMBA: I would like to know from the Minister of Finance and Economic Development whether it is true that civil servants are being asked to retire at 50 and that a package has been set aside for them?

THE MINISTER OF FINANCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (MR. CHINAMASA): Mr. Speaker Sir, that is a question to do with conditions of services of civil servants and the responsibility for that is with the Minister of Public Service, Labour and Social Services. I would want to ask the hon. member to channel her question to the relevant ministry.

  1. KWARAMBA: I redirect my question to the Minister of Public Service, Labour and Social Services.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE, LABOUR AND SOCIAL SERVICES (MR. MATANGAIDZE): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. Indeed, I would want to confirm that it is not Government policy at this point to retrench employees. That exercise, as reported, there is no policy on that. As we stand right now, the report that is in the newspaper - going to the effect that there are people looking at our Government employees working is not factually correct. The situation is as remains.

  1. SHUMBA: Mr. Speaker, I will beg for your latitude so that I can expatiate on my question. In the absence of the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing, I will direct my question to the Leader of the House.
  2. SPEAKER: Hon. member, did you say you wanted to expatiate your question?
  3. SHUMBA: I have said I will beg for your latitude as I ask my question so that I do not follow up with a supplementary.
  4. SPEAKER: No, do not anticipate. Please ask your question directly.
  5. SHUMBA: Thank you. Hon. Vice President, in light of the recent demolition of houses, the change of policy on cooperatives to give land to councils, there has been an emergence of new ownership of these peri-urban farms. What is Government policy in ensuring that we do not create another process which is delinquent that empowers new owners of peri-urban land by simply appending their names on CR14s as owners of the new properties; given that that alone, does not prove ownership. Thank you.

THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (MR. MNANGAGWA): I thank the hon. member for asking that question. He has mentioned some forms which must be filled - whether they are authentic or not authentic, I do not know and I have never heard about the forms. In terms of policy, I am positive that the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing is far much suited to answer such a detailed question about minute issues relating to their mandate.

At policy level, it is true that Government is fighting land barons to make sure we dispossess them. There was an issue where State land was acquired and the barons would go about selling State land to innocent people causing them to suffer. That is the issue we would want to stop at policy level to make sure that all State land must be owned by the municipalities and proper allocation of land is done through the official and formal channels of local authorities, not through individuals and so on. In relation to the forms he is talking about, I am not sure if forms are an issue of policy. I think it is an issue of administration.

*MS. MUZONDIWA: Thank you Mr. Speaker, for giving me the opportunity. My question is directed to the Minister of Health and Child Care. Is it Government policy that pregnant women who go to referral hospitals owned by Government should bring their own items which are to be used during delivery, items such as code clips, gloves and everything for their delivery?

*THE DEPUTY MINISTRY OF HEALTH AND CHILD CARE (DR. MUSIIWA): Thank you for bringing up that pertinent question. It is not Government policy that pregnant women should bring their items when they come for delivery at referral hospitals but at the moment, because of the economic crunch we are facing, we are running short of essential items which are to be used during delivery. Hence they have to supply. However, the Government policy is that women should receive assistance at the hospitals without bringing any items for their treatment.

  1. KHUPE: My question is directed to the Deputy Minister of Health and Child Care. Considering that our thrust as a country is to reduce child mortality, there are reports that these days the BCG vaccine is not available. Since tuberculosis is an airborne disease, are we not heading for a disaster since the vaccine is not available because women have been discharged and their children have not received the BCG vaccine?

THE DEPUTY MINISTRY OF HEALTH AND CHILD CARE (DR. MUSIIWA): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. Although this is not a policy question, I would like to give this House the correct position. The correct position is that for a few days, we had supply bottlenecks of the BCG vaccine. For those few days, we requested the mothers to bring back the children for vaccination. The current position is that we now have the BC vaccine in stock. I have personally checked and that is the correct position. Thank you.

          *MRS. MASHONGANYIKA: My question is directed to the Deputy Minister of Health and Child Care. We have noticed that a child who is healthy, goes to hospital and is injected with this BCG drug, the child becomes ill. Why is that so and where is the problem? Why should the child fall sick when they have been introduced to BCG? Is it an overdose of the drug or what, because some infants have died after getting the vaccination?  

  1. MUSIIWA: I would like the hon. member to know that when you administer a vaccine, it is what we call ‘self attenuated’. If it is BCG, we are actually giving you a virus that is weakened. We are introducing a vaccine that is weakened into your body so that you can attain immunity. Because we have introduced to you a mild weakened virus, you are going to have certain symptoms but these are mild. That is how you acquire immunity. Thank you.

          *MRS MASHONGANYIKA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir, for giving me the chance to ask my question. My question is directed to the Deputy Minister of Transport and Infrastructural development. May you please explain the Government policy regarding feeder roads, dirt roads in rural areas, especially in remote areas? We are now going into the rainy season and some of them will be so bad that during that season, school children cannot cross the roads. Ambulances cannot travel on these roads. We also notice that these roads were under the care of the District Development Fund (DDF) - as of now, what is the prevailing condition? Who is responsible for maintaining these roads?    

          *THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (MR. MADANHA): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. I will respond to this question which has been directed to me. I would like this House to be aware of the fact that our roads fall under two categories. The and classified roads fall under the Ministry of Transport and Infrastructural development. I can give an example of the Plumtree-Harare-Mutare road. We also have these small and unclassified feeder roads which into these major roads. These roads fall under the Rural Districts Councils. The hon. member is talking about roads that are under the RDCs.

May I inform this House that the Rural District Councils have an allocation of funds which are given to them from ZINARA aimed at maintaining these rural roads. I am sure that each district is now in a financial position to maintain its roads. We know our country has been going through a lean economic financial spell but Government is now harvesting money from the toll gates and this can be used for the maintenance of roads.

May I plead with you hon. Members of Parliament that when you go to your constituencies please hold meetings with your people and advise them not to avoid toll gates, but to pay up so that we have enough funds to repair our roads.      

          *MR. MAONDERA: I thank the Deputy Minister for the response given. He said the councils are being allocated money by ZINARA to take care of the feeder roads. Is it Government policy that we have some Members of Parliament who are encouraging members of the public in rural areas to contribute $2 towards buying fuel for the machinery used in the maintenance of roads?

*MR. MADANHA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir, I will respond to this pertinent question raised by the hon. member. We have heard that in some constituencies or areas members of the public are asked to make a contribution of $2 for buying diesel used by the machinery meant for maintaining the roads. I would advise you to report this to the police because there could be some fraudsters who are getting money from people. We know councils are being given money by ZINARA and the money given is supposed to be used for fueling the machinery for the repair of these roads. Whosoever is doing that might be a fraudster. Thank you.    

  1. TARUSENGWA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. My question is directed to the Minister of Home Affairs, in his absence to the Deputy. May the Hon. Minister clarify to this House why investigating officers use their own resources to prepare State papers? I thank you.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MR. MGUNI): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. I would like to thank the hon. member for his pertinent question. It is not Government policy for the investigators to charge the complainant or somebody to pay for the typing or transport. It is not allowed. It is actually illegal and paves way for corruption. If something like that is done, can you please report to us with immediate effect and we will take action.

  1. SPEAKER: Order, order! Hon. member your question.

          *MR. SITHOLE: I thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. I come from Gokwe North. My question is directed to the Minister of Agriculture. We harvested a lot of maize in my area but, we have seen cars loading maize from Gokwe taking it to other areas. So, where is this maize being taken to because Gokwe is going to be faced with starvation. It is an unnecessary expense for maize to be taken out of Gokwe and only to be transported back. What is the correct position?

          *THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE (LIVESTOCK) (MR. ZHANDA): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir, for the question. If I understood the question being asked was that there is maize which is in the GMB and then it is transported to other areas or is the member saying maize should not go to the GMB? Maybe I need some explanation. When maize has been sold to the GMB, it belongs to GMB and it is up to the GMB to sell it to whosoever comes in need of that maize. Therefore, if somebody has bought that maize it is his property. So, he can take it to wherever he wants to take it to. I thank you.

          *MR. MANDIPAKA: Thank you Mr. Speaker. I will ask my supplementary question from the response given by the Deputy Minister of Agriculture (Livestock) …

  1. SPEAKER: That little corner there, we cannot hear the question and as hon. ministers also have problems in answering. Can the hon. member please be heard in silence?

          *MR. MANDIPAKA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. From my understanding I was told that in Gokwe and Buhera there is hunger and so my question to the minister is that when are you going to start distributing grain to the needy areas?

*THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE (LIVESTOCK) (MR. ZHANDA): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. This is a very good question. The responsibility of my Ministry is to see to it that Zimbabwe has enough maize to feed the nation. The Ministry of Labour and Social Services is responsible for the distribution and feeding of people. I thank you.

*MR. SITHOLE: My question is we have some areas that are faced with starvation. Is it not possible for the Government to open up so that other counties can give us support in the grain which we want in order to supply our people who are starving?

  1. SPEAKER: Order, I remember very well in the last Session Hon. Minister Made indicated that maize grain was being ordered from Zambia to supplement the deficit. So we cannot be repeating the same.

*MRS. A. MNANGAGWA: I thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. My question is directed to the Deputy Minister of Home Affairs. I have realised that in the areas that we come from, we have many people who moved into these areas and brought children without birth certificates. When they apply for these birth certificates, they are advised to go to their areas of origin and collect documents where the children were born so that there is proof that they were born there. But, because of the economic situation in the country people do not have money to travel long distances to obtain these documents.

The same problem is also faced by people who want IDs. Can the Government make it easy for the people to acquire the birth certificates and national identity cards?

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MR. MGUNI): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. This is a very good question. In Home Affairs we are seized with the problem of birth certificates. Actually, we have sat down and we are making up a programme for district offices to have a better way of accepting the people who need birth certificates. Some of them are from outside the country so it is in the pipe line. I think the Minister will publicise it very soon. Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. –[HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.]-

*MS. BUNJIRA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir for affording me the opportunity to direct my question to the Leader of the House. Hon. Vice President, we have noticed that for a long time employees of City Councils have not been paid. There is now domestic violence caused by nonpayment of salaries because there is mistrust. So, what is Government policy in ensuring that these employees are paid what is due to them in order to avoid these misunderstanding in the homes?

*THE VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (MR. MNANGAGWA): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. This is news to me that we have people who have not been paid for quite some time. If, the hon. member is talking about Government policy - Government policy says employees should be paid. I know as members of this august House we are also in unison that employees should be paid what is due to them and we have to investigate the reason why employees are not being paid.

  1. MHLANGA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. My question is directed to the Minister of Health and Child Care. Hon. Minister what policy measures are in place pertaining to the decentralisation of early cancer detecting facilities to clinics and rural health centres in light of the long distances that patients have to travel to hospitals where facilities are currently housed and also cognisant of the fact that early detection of cancer is key?   I thank you.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HEALTH AND CHILD CARE (MR. MUSIIWA): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. I would like to thank the hon. member for raising this very important question.

          We hold the World Cancer Day in Zimbabwe today and it is something that is on our radar right now. The Ministry of Health and Child Care is in the process of decentralizing centres to all district hospitals so that they can detect early detection of cancer. We are struggling to provide medication and so that people who are detected with cancer can go for early chemotherapy treatment.

  1. KEREKE: My question is directed to the Minister of Agriculture (Livestock). We have conducted snap surveys looking at the maize seed situation and major producers are saying total locally produced seed is around 20 000 metric tonnes and the country requires around 50 000 metric tonnes. What policies have been put in place to ensure that this season which is upon us, the country has enough maize seed for farmers?

          THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE (LIVESTOCK) (MR. ZHANDA): I want to thank the hon. member for bringing the situation to my attention through that question on the said deficit in the supply of seed maize.

          Admittedly, I am not aware of that deficit as all the time we were under the impression that we have enough stocks of seed maize. I do not know the methods that he used in ascertaining the stocks that we have of seed maize. As a result, may he give me the opportunity to go and verify on the actual figures and revert to the House?

  1. TOFFA: Minister, in light of a prediction of a low rainfall, what measures has your Ministry put in place to mitigate this?
  2. ZHANDA: I think that question should be redirected to the Ministry of Environment, Water and Climate who are responsible for cloud seeding.
  3. SPEAKER: Order, order hon. members. I know you are standing from all corners. I hope you are aware of the fact that I am being directed by a list. – [DR. LABODE: Inaudible interjections] – Is there anything wrong Hon. Labode?
  4. LABODE: Mr. Speaker, I did not realise there is a list that has been written and I have been standing up. I would not have bothered had I been informed that the list would have gone. I am sorry and I withdraw my statement.
  5. ZINDI: On a point of order Mr. Speaker, a further clarification from what Hon. Labode has just said. Does it mean if I do not appear on the list that you have, even if I stand, you will not give me the chance to speak?

          Again, is that the new rule of the House? If it is the new rule of the House then at least we should be informed so that whenever we come in to contribute on Wednesdays during Questions Without Notice; we know that we have to be listed before we stand up to raise our questions?

  1. SPEAKER: Order, order. If you have not been so advised, I am directing that you raise the issue with your Chief Whips.
  2. ZINDI: Thank you, point taken Mr. Speaker.
  3. CHIPANGA: My question is directed to the Minister of Primary and Secondary Education. I am seeking clarification on why it is that our rural schools do not have sports teachers unlike their urban counterparts?

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION (PROF. MAVIMA): I want to thank the hon. member for that question. It is not necessarily true that rural schools do not have sports or other extra curricula activity teachers. It just depends with the establishment of a specific school, if in that particular school, there is a position for a sports teacher that teacher is provided for.

          Schools that require sports teachers need to make representations for that position to be established and the teachers will be provided.

  1. J. TSHUMA: My supplementary question comes in terms of our Matabeleland situation. What is the Ministry of Primary and Secondary Education doing in order to improve the teacher ratio in terms teaching of science subjects especially in Bulawayo?

You will realise that up to now, we still have a lower intake of students at the National University of Science and Technology (NUST) because of that disparity. What is the Ministry of Primary and Secondary Education doing so that there is promotion of teachers for sciences in Matabeleland and Bulawayo in particular?

  1. SPEAKER: Order, I will indulge Hon. Tshuma because the original question was about sports. Hon. Minister, will you be so gracious?

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION (PROF. MAVIMA): Thank you Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the hon. member for that question. The issue of science and mathematics teachers is not just a Bulawayo or Matabeleland issue, but it is a national issue that we are dealing with as a Ministry. We have serious shortages but members would realise that the Ministry, with the support of His Excellency and the support of our development partners, have started a teacher capacity development programme where science and mathematics education is one of the targeted areas. I am not sure about the specific number of teachers that are under training in the areas of science and mathematics. Most of these are being trained at Bindura University of Science and Technology.

          In addition to that, there is a general training of science graduates that has been going on but in order to supplement that, there is a deliberate programme that we have taken as Government in order to train science teachers. Our largest deficits are in the areas of mathematics and physics but we have a programme underway to address that issue. As a Ministry, we have done a curriculum review. It is now in the Cabinet process. There is going to be an emphasis in the promotion of the education of science right from primary school level so that we have a pipeline of people who are interested in science and mathematics, graduating into teacher training colleges or into universities so that in the long run we can deal with this deficit which does not affect Matabeleland or Bulawayo alone, but our nation as a whole. Thank you.

          +MRS. MISIHAIRABWI-MUSHONGA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. I would like to pose a question especially coming to the issue of teachers that are sent to Matabeleland. You send teachers who are not fluent in the local language like Ndebele, why are you doing that? Also looking at Matabeleland, the other issue is not just on science only, and not only on teachers who are deployed in the southern region Bulawayo, Matabeleland South, Matabeleland North or even Binga. Why is it that you send teachers who are not fluent in the local language? Why is it that you send teachers who are only fluent in Shona because this is a problem especially to children who are being taught in a language that they are not familiar with? Thank you.

          PROF. MAVIMA: I do not know if this question only refers to science and mathematics teachers and their inability to speak the specific languages, whether Ndebele, Shona or not. I understand it is general but …

  1. SPEAKER: Hon. Minister, it is not general. Teachers deployed to Matabeleland are not conversant with the local language there. That is the question?

          PROF. MAVIMA: The deployment of teachers is guided by the need for a specific teacher. If it is a geography teacher, the deployment of a geography teacher in a specific school depends on the availability of that geography teacher to that particular school. So there is a possibility that a geography teacher who is not conversant in Sindau for example, who may be Ndebele or who may be Tonga may find themselves in Chipinge or a physics teacher who may not be conversant in Shona may find themselves in Dotito. The demand depends on the specific subject area. Where we have done a specific intervention as far as languages are concerned is in the infant school, where we are saying teachers in the infant school should be conversant with the mother tongue of the people that are being taught. We have started a programme to train teachers in these specific languages so that they can go and teach in infant schools. If it is secondary and high school, the demand is driven by the training that is available and what the school needs at that particular point in time.

          +MS. D. NDLOVU: My question is directed to the Minister of Primary and Secondary Education. Coming to science subjects on trained teachers, even if that is the case, there are no laboratories. Even if they are trained, what are they going to do because a lot of children who come from Matabeleland do not go to NUST because there are no laboratories? What is Government doing about that?  

          PROF. MAVIMA: Hon. Speaker, the issue of science laboratories is a little different from the issue of languages. The issue of science laboratories speaks to the issue of infrastructure in our schools and this is an issue that we are addressing differently. We realise the depth of infrastructure in general but specifically, science laboratories in most of our secondary schools. As a Ministry, we are in the process of coming up with an infrastructure development programme under the PPP model. At the same time, as we are doing this, we also appeal to communities and responsible school authorities to provide science laboratories through the mobilisation of local resources, but Government has a programme that we are working with right now, to try and source funds from the private sector through PPPs for the development of infrastructure in general. But, there will be a section that deals specifically with science laboratories. Our curriculum review is going to emphasise on science technology and mathematics. In order to fulfill that aspiration, we need to have adequate science laboratories and it is one of the focus areas as far as infrastructure development is concerned.

          +MS. MUDAU: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. My question is directed to the Deputy Minister of Health and Child Care. May I know why people with HIV and TB are being given tablets for free when those who are diabetic and with BP are asked to pay for their medication?

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HEALTH AND CHILD CARE (DR. MUSIIWA): Thank you Mr. Speaker. I would like to thank the hon. member for raising this very important question. It is true that the availability of ARVs and anti malaria drugs is better in our hospitals than medication for these non-communicable diseases. The reason is that we depend on donor funds for the procurement of the ARVs, T B drugs and anti-malaria drugs from the Global Fund. This is the problem we have when we get donor funds, they come with strings attached. So the prescription is, for that money, we can only buy certain drugs and not the other types. It is unfortunate, but that is the position. Thank you.

  1. L. SIBANDA: My question is directed to the Leader of the House. Hon. Vice President, according to our Constitution, Section 273, when is the Government going to swear in the Provincial Councilors into Office?

          THE HON. VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (MR. MNANGAGWA): I am not so sure if I got the question. If the question is when, meaning what day, I do not know the day. It cannot be Government policy to know a date, but if it is the issue of whether there is a programme or work in progress to implement a provision of the Constitution - yes that is correct. Work in progress is there but I do not have the date. Thank you.

          +MRS. MISIHAIRABWI– MUSHONGA: Thank you Hon. Vice President. I am making a follow up on the question that you have been asked. If there is a programme, since you are knowledgeable about legal matters, how are you going to handle the matters since the people have been voted into office, but they are not yet working? What does that mean when a person is voted into office and that office is not operational? Do you want the people to approach the courts on the matter? Can you explain that please? I thank you.

  1. MNANGAGWA: I am fully aware that the hon. member has this matter at heart because we worked together on this issue. However, what she has forgotten which she should not forget, is that the creation of any new structure requires resources. So the constraint is on the issue of resources to implement that. It is not an issue of failure to implement or lack of interest to do so, but it is a question of putting the structures into places which requires resources. This is why I have said this is work in progress that we are going to implement. I thank you.

          *MS. MATSUNGA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. My question is directed to the Deputy Minister of Home Affairs. I would like to seek clarification on Itai Dzamara. How far are you on investigations? The High Court gave an order that we should be updated from time to time. Thank you.

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS (MR. MGUNI): Thank you Mr. Speaker. I can say work is in progress. Thank you.

          +MR. MLILO: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. My question is directed to the Minister of Primary and Secondary Education about Cowdry Park Primary School. This school has two classes, it has 512 students. We are now approaching the rainy season. What measures has the Ministry taken to ensure that children are catered for when the rains come so that they learn in a place where they are not affected by rains and also learn in a clean and healthy environment? I thank you.

          +MR. SPEAKER: Thank you for the question but it is not on policy.

  1. LABODE: My question goes to the Minister of Finance, Hon. Chinamasa. Hon. Minister, sometime last year, you presented a corporate governance framework here for which one of the issues it set to address was on salaries of parastatal heads. You have not come back to Parliament to tell us whether that is now indeed a policy of Government, whether it is being honoured and whether the salaries have been scaled down to US$6000 as presented. Thank you.

          THE MINISTER OF FINANCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (MR. CHINAMASA): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. I thank the hon. member for putting forward the question. I can confirm that work is advanced to produce a Bill. I think it is one of the Bills which has been referred to in the Official Opening of this Parliament by His Excellency, the President. A Bill on Corporate Governance is going to be debated this Session and I hope it will address this and other matters, not only on salaries but also on other aspects of good corporate governance which include; the need for Annual General Meetings of these parastatals and also the need for certain procedures to be followed when fixing conditions of employment. Currently, a lot of conditions of employment were fixed solely by sometimes the Chairman and the Chief Executive Officer outside the knowledge of the Board of Directors. So, all those things are going to be sorted out in the new Bill when it is complete. I thank you.

          *MS. CHIGUDU: My question is directed to the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development. I am pleading with the Minister that if it is possible, he should visit us in Masvingo so that we show him the road which was constructed through the help of the late Hon. Mudenge, the road to Kapota which was left unconstructed, so he can tell us who is going to mend that piece of road. I would also want to know about the piece of road from Morgenster to Rengo which was constructed while Hon. Zvobgo was still alive. The piece which goes to Rengo has not been attended to. So my plea to the Minister is for him to come and see these roads so he can tell us who is going to construct those roads.

  1. SPEAKER: Your question is very good but it is not a policy question. I think you should put your question in writing so that you can get a written response.
  2. SITHOLE: I would like to know from the Leader of the House, the Vice President Hon. Mnangagwa, what progress Government has made in terms of the 2.2 million jobs promise that it made.

          MR SPEAKER: Order, order, hon. members. I want to remind hon. members that in terms of our Standing Orders, the Hon. VP and Ministers are expressed as honourable all the time. Thank you.

          THE HON. VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (MR. MNANGAGWA): I am impressed by the hon. member who interests himself with the manifesto of ZANU-PF. I would ask the hon. member to come to our meetings so we can inform him about what we are doing because the 2.2 million jobs that we promised were in the manifesto of our 2013 general elections. We are very happy with the programme that we are implementing which is unfolding. We have many mega deals that are being implemented and these are creating a lot of employment. So feel free to come to our meetings and get briefed. I thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.

          *MS CHIKUNI: My question is to the Deputy Minister of Women Affairs, Gender and Community Development. In the last Session, she came to our Committee meeting and indicated that money had been set aside for the women’s bank to be set up. I would like to know when the bank will start operating because people are waiting for money from that bank.

          +THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF WOMEN AFFAIRS, GENDER AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (MS. DAMASANE): The current position is that documents pertaining to the opening of that bank are at the Attorney General’s office. This morning the papers were sent to the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe. Preparations are in place and the money will come after we have prepared the relevant documents. I thank you.

          ENG. MUDZURI: I would like to find out from the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development what Government policy is, in terms of the dualisation of Masvingo road and repairing the roads which have so many potholes such as the road from Gutu to Triangle?

          THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (DR. GUMBO): The road you are talking about has been on the cards for a very long time. As we speak, efforts are being made to award tenders to some companies to work on the dualisation of the whole road from Chirundu to Beitbridge. As you are aware, the tender for that road had been awarded to Zim-Highways and there was a litigation issue between the Ministry and that company. That issue has now been resolved and work will begin very soon. So just be patient because something is going to happen and you will no longer see the potholes. I thank you.

          *MR ZHOU: I would like to find out from the Leader of House, Hon. Vice President Mr. Mnangagwa, the nation was really pleased including me when the Chinese deals were sealed through Dangote, can we have an update so that people know the position of the deals?

  1. SPEAKER: Hon. member, that is an administrative question. Order, order, the time for Questions Without Notice has expired. However, in consultation with the Chief Whips and because there are no Written Questions, the time for Questions Without Notice will carry on.

          *MR. MAPIKI: My question is directed to the Minister of Finance and Economic Development, Hon. Chinamasa. What plans does the Government have in closing illegal gold markets taking place in our constituencies? People are buying gold and the Government is not benefiting at all. This is emanating from the 50kg which was intercepted at Plumtree Border Post.  

          *THE MINISTER OF FINANCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (MR. CHINAMASA): Thank you for the pertinent question. The plans which are there in place are that we should curb the illegal gold transfer. Firstly, what we have done is that we have raised the gold prices; the prices are now the same as those ones sold at the London Bullion Market. There is no incentive for people to sell gold illegally.

          Secondly, we have cut down the royalty when we buy gold especially gold that we buy from artisanal miners. It was five percent royalty and we have reduced it to three percent and now, it is one percent. I want to encourage those who are selling gold that they should sell their gold here instead of selling gold outside. What this august House should know is that what has led those people to be caught is because there is now a Committee comprising of Reserve Bank workers, Ministry of Mines and Mining Development and those from the Police Force which sits from time to time looking at how things are going on. The Committee is monitoring those who are taking gold outside the country and those who are mining, exporting the gold, how they are doing it. Investigations are going on, that is why you see that there are a lot of people who are being caught at our borders trying to smuggle gold outside the country.

  1. MATANGIRA: Why should we allow people to steal gold first and then we use the machinery that we have as the State instead of nipping the system in the bud, that is what Hon. Mapiki asked. What is Government policy in curbing and stopping illicit gold dealings?
  2. CHINAMASA: Thank you Mr. Speaker, I am not sure I got the essence of the question. I thought that my answer to the earlier question fully explained the measures that we are taking to curb illicit outflows of gold from Zimbabwe. But over and above that, when people commit crimes, it is difficult to know which people are going to commit crime and where. At border posts, we now have machinery to detect any illegal outflows of gold from Zimbabwe but we also use whistleblowers and in fact, the recent seizure of the gold was through reports received from whistleblowers. Sometimes those whistleblowers are people who have been shortchanged in some of the deals but whichever way at the end of the day what is important is that we are able to increase the machinery that will curb the illicit outflow of gold and other precious minerals.

          *MR. MATAMBANADZO: What does the law say when we are talking about the exportation of gold. We gave you some ideas on how we could go about exporting gold. Our advice was that people who are in constituencies where there is gold, they should be financed so that they can buy gold. As a result, they are being overpowered by the illegal market. The illegal market has enough to give to these secret buyers and they take the money. This is sabotage from the enemies of the State. We have given people licences but nobody has been given a cent to buy gold. Therefore, we are advising Government to finance these licenced holders so that they can buy gold and take it to Fidelity Printers and Refiners to curb the smuggling of gold.

  1. CHINAMASA: We are open to any suggestions to improve the trading of gold in the country. But the policy of Government right now is that Fidelity Printers and Refiners which is a subsidiary of the Reserve Bank is the sole buyer and refiner of gold, the law is very clear. It is illegal for anyone to export or smuggle out of any gold the country. The only authorised exporter of gold is Fidelity Printers and Refineries. We assisted a lot of artisanal miners with respect to putting together a good facility for them; to buy equipment to facilitate their operations. As far as gold mining is concerned, the policy of Government is that their operations are decriminalised, it used to be criminal for artisanal miners to mine gold and that is no longer the case. So, we have gone out of our way to assist our local artisanal miners to produce the gold and the measures that we have put in place have demonstrated that they are starting to bear fruits. In the 6 months of last year, artisanal miners delivered 900 kgs or so of gold. After the measures were implemented, the first 6 months of this year, artisanal miners alone delivered 3 tonnes. So, we will continue to look at where the leakages are and we will certainly take measures to plug those leaks. I thank you Mr. Speaker.

          *MR. MAVENYENGWA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. My question was supposed to be directed to the Minister responsible for the chiefs of this country. Therefore, in his absence, I will now direct it to the hon. Vice President and the Acting President of the Republic of Zimbabwe. We have some chiefs whose powers were taken from them because they were supporting freedom fighters. In Zaka, we have chiefs like Muroyi, Zibwowa and Chamburukira who were dethroned because of their participation in the liberation struggle. What is Government’s policy regarding the reinstallation of these chiefs because we are now 35 years into independence. How are we going to reinstall these chiefs?

          *THE HON. VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (MR. MNANGAGWA): Thank you Mr. Speaker. I would also want to thank the hon. member for the question. When we use the term jinda, in Shona, we are saying you are an honourable person. The hon. member asked a question regarding the chiefs who were dethroned by the imperial regime and most of those chiefs who were dethroned were punished for supporting the liberation struggle and in their place, puppets were installed.

We are saying, if ever we have such obtaining situations, may these please be brought to the attention of the Government so that the problem can be rectified. This is situational. In other words, we are saying, those in the chiefdom who were dethroned by the Smith regime should come forward and explain what happened and what their expectations are. But, as Government, we really know that there were some people who were dethroned because of their activities in the liberation struggle and we are also aware that there were some puppet chiefdoms which were installed. It is Government’s wish that the appropriate people take their rightful positions and if we do that, we will have appeased the spirits of Zimbabwe. I thank you.

  1. SHAMU: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. My question is directed to the Minister of Industry and Commerce. Firstly, I would want the Minister to confirm that the policy with regards to the consignment based conformity assessment will definitely be fully operational as from the first of November. If so, if she could inform this august House as to what her Ministry has done to address concerns raised by importers over the issue of costs on goods that have the consequence of overburdening the already overburdened consumers in the country. I thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (MS. MABUWA): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. May I thank the hon. member for asking this very important question regarding the contracting by Government of a french company, Bureau Veritas to conduct consignment based assessments for specified items, for pre-inspection from the various sending countries that will take effect from the first of November. As you may be aware hon. Speaker Sir, the contract was signed by Government and the inspections were meant to start as early as August but, due to the results of consultative processes that were conducted by the Ministry, we found it in place for us to firstly address the issues that were raised. Having addressed those issues that were raised, we also sent our cleaned up version of how the operations will take place through to Cabinet which has since been approved.

          Having said that, the issues that were raised, the one which particularly refers to the cost of the services that will ultimately be borne by the importers, the companies here. We have revisited these and consulted with Bureau Veritas. The costs have been matched with other receiving countries that have contracted Bureau Veritas in the region. We have also attempted to address all the issues, but what will ultimately happen is that, at the end of the day, the country will not be used as a dumping ground for inferior products. That is the benefit that we are going to take and I imagine we are all on board now.

Let me also mention that the website for the Ministry and that of Bureau Veritas is continuing to receive complementary information and addressing it before the first of November. I end by calling upon members of this august House that, if they have suggestions, can they please approach the Ministry through the various fora, including that of the Committee responsible for Industry and Commerce to channel the suggestions, questions and queries so that we address them before the effective date. Thank you.

  1. SHAMU: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. Bureau Veritas is a french company. Zimbabwe is under sanctions and I do not know as to whether the Minister could assure this august House that this company will indeed prosecute this very important task in the interest of the country without adversely affecting us as the country they come from is part and parcel of those that have imposed sanctions on Zimbabwe.

         THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (MS. MABUWA): I would like to thank the hon. member for that patriotic question regarding the selection of a French company, but also I would like to assure the member that all due diligence was conducted for us to consult and contract this French company. You might be aware that we are engaging so as to de-sanction the sanctions or mitigate the impact of sanctions. We are in consultation or engaging these sanction imposing countries which include the EU and there is diffusion, if not a lot of goodwill that has been expressed and diffusion of certain sectors in the sanctions category. It is not yet all eradicated but we are working on it. The good proceeds that we have benefitted include engaging and doing business with some of these companies in the countries that imposed sanctions on Zimbabwe.

          On why Bureau Veritas, we went through processes which included seeing where most of our imports come from and what we established is that most of those countries that send us goods have got the presence of Bureau Veritas. It is actually present in more than 150 countries out of the 186/7 countries in the world. So, we were also looking at the presence of the countries and of course, their reputation insofar as pre-inspections are concerned.

  1. GABBUZA: My question is directed to the Minister of Welfare Services for War Veterans, War Collaborators, Former Political Detainees and Restrictees which is specifically looking at the two types of war veterans. We have the war veterans that never made it back, from the liberation or war fronts after the independence. Then we have the war veteran that made it back, who was there at independence but because of the vetting process which took a bit of time, was not able to be vetted. These people have families and they need to benefit, and I am aware they are not benefitting. Is Government putting in measures, now that we have a brand new ministry, to ensure that their families are able to be looked after?

          THE MINISTER OF WELFARE SERVICES FOR WAR VETERANS, WAR COLLABORATORS, FORMER POLITICAL DETAINEES AND RESTRICTEES (MR. MUTSVANGWA): I want to thank the hon. member for presenting the issues before the august House of this Parliament. The Constitution is very clear about who is a war veteran and it covers the people you are talking about. There is still a discrepancy between the Constitution and the Act, and the current efforts at harmonising the laws of the country will be addressing some of the discrepancies which may arise in that particular instance.

          We are of the feeling that the definition by the Constitution of a war veteran is catering for even those who may not have survived during the war. The issue which then arises is to the modalities at which we can identify those who took part in the war, sacrificed heroically but did not make it home. I am glad to say since His Excellency established a ministry which now is fully dedicated to these issues, we are working on comprehensive plans which will include a way of discovering, as far as can be done, all the war veterans who may have perished during the war but did not make it home.

In the event that we do have such a list, we would like them to be eligible for the benefits which are entitled to them under the Constitution. This is now much more an issue of resources and administration. I do not want to pre-empt my brief to Cabinet as well as to the other members of Government, but what we are working on is a relationship even with the donor community which has now since decided to become very friendly to the war veterans.

We are prepared to look into ways where we can comprehensively address all aspects of the liberation struggle including the records of everybody who went to that war as far as possible. We are working with UNESCO and I have met the Director of UNESCO and the donor community. In due course of time, I will want to post all these developments to this House so that this issue can be comprehensively given the attention which it deserves. A lot of work is being done with my ministry and you will be posted.

  1. MUNOCHINZWA: My supplementary question to the Minister of Welfare Services for War Veterans, War Collaborators, Former Political Detainees and Restrictees is that, I wanted to understand what the Government policy is to curb the proliferation of counter revolutionaries who are going into agreements with white farmers and making sure that the sons and daughters of this country who died for the land, do not end up benefitting from the land that is supposed be redistributed. What is your policy to make sure that these counter revolutionaries, at best, are probably charged with treason for their treasonous acts?
  2. MUTSVANGWA: I want to thank the hon. Member of Parliament. The Constitution is very clear on the entitlement of the war veterans for the land which they are given by the Government of Zimbabwe as a result of their sacrifice to the liberation of this country. It says that land which has been given to the war veterans of the liberation struggle of Zimbabwe, once allocated, it is not going to be alienated. There is no reason whatsoever why any land which has been given to a survivor of the war should be alienated.

The issue which may arise is that since we did not have a ministry dedicated to these issues, there have been lapses and there have been people who may have taken undue advantage against war veterans who had been granted land. What I want to say now is that we have a ministry and I am warning those who may have done so to return that land.

          Furthermore, if there are any who have the intention to do so, they should stop it because the law does not allow it. My ministry now shall be carrying out an audit of instances where war veterans land may have been alienated unlawfully according to the Constitution. We may want to warn people that we will take recourse to the courts in order to enforce the Constitution. So, please do not touch any land which belongs to the surviving fighters of the national liberation war of Zimbabwe, I thank you.

  1. MUNOCHINZWA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. My question is directed to the Minister of Finance and Economic Development. Hon Minister, what is Government policy with regards to the payment of special responsibility allowances to both primary and secondary school teachers. Are these allowances paid on termly basis, annually or they are not paid at all? I thank you.

          THE MINISTER OF FINANCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (MR. CHINAMASA): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. Unfortunately, the question is misdirected to me. The issue of conditions of service for civil servants is the responsibility of the Ministry of Public Service, Labour and Social Services. So, I would want to ask the hon. member to please direct her question to that ministry. I thank you.

  1. MUNOCHINZWA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. Let me re-direct my question to the Deputy Minister of Public Service, Labour and Social Services. Minister, what is Government policy with regards to the payment of special responsibility allowances to both primary and secondary school teachers. Are these allowances paid on termly basis, annually or they are not paid at all?

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE, LABOUR AND SOCIAL SERVICES (MR. MATANGAIDZE): Thank you Mr. Speaker. I want to thank the hon. member for the pertinent question. The allowances should actually be reflecting on the monthly salaries of the teachers. So, that is a specific question. If there are instances where you know some people who are due to be paid these allowances and have not been receiving these allowances, please by all means make that information available to us and we will follow, otherwise they are supposed to be paid on a monthly basis.  

Questions Without Notice were interrupted by the THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER in terms of Standing Order Number 64.

MOTION

PRESIDENTIAL SPEECH: DEBATE ON ADDRESS

          First Order read: Adjourned debate on motion in reply to the Presidential Speech.

          Question again proposed.

  1. MANDIPAKA: Thank you very much Mr. Speaker Sir. This debate; I would like to refer you to today’s paper, the NewsDay where there is a headline – ‘ZANU PF legislators praise President Mugabe’s Speech’. I stand before this august House unashamed to praise His Excellency, the President of this country. We have no regrets in thanking His Excellency for his visionary leadership for this great nation – [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] –

          Mr. Speaker Sir, allow me also to make insights observations and above all, to debate the address by this great Statesman, an intellectual par-excellence, a great politician and liberator who fought for equity and justice and that is the reason why we praise him each time. I will also want to begin my debate by thanking the following hon. members from the opposition:- Hon. Khupe, Hon. Majome and Hon. Misihairabwi-Mushonga for making contributions or debating the speech by His Excellency. In fact, it is important that this august House listens to the voice of the opposition so that we understand what they stand for, who they represent and what they aim to do.

So we are grateful Mr. Speaker, but I would like to at least, for good parliamentary democracy, to differ a bit with the observation by Hon. Khupe, where she said the speech by His Excellency failed to address bread and butter issues. Allow me to differ very strongly with that assertion because the legislative agenda that is coming out of the speech by His Excellency sets the tone to improve the economy sets the tone to improve the well-being of the majority of the people of Zimbabwe. If that is not addressing bread and butter issues, I then do not know what that is addressing. When you closely take a look at the speech by His Excellency, he was looking at the vital Bills that will create vibrancy in the economy. Once we discuss in this august House those Bills, that creates a conducive environment for economic development and the President is actually addressing bread and butter issues. He is also looking at bread and butter issues. So, I do not see inadequacies in the speech that was given to us by the President of this Republic.

Mr. Speaker Sir, I am tempted also to thank Hon. Mutomba for moving the motion which was seconded by Hon. Dziva. I want to also extend profound gratitude to all other members that I have not mentioned in my debate who had a contribution to the President’s Speech.   The legislative agenda that we find in the President’s Speech is unequivocal. It clearly sets out the parameters within which as legislators we are going to debate and it also sets parameters within which the President of the country expects us to do business for this Session. I do not see any ambiguity in that speech. What strikes me in the President’s Speech, Mr. Speaker Sir, is what is found in the third last paragraph of his Speech and I would like to quote verbatim, “Let us channel our collective energies towards the development of our country guided by our economic blueprint, ZIM ASSET”. That statement alone is a clear indication Hon. Khupe and other members here present that the President of this country is concerned about the economic well being of our people, despite the economy having been ravaged by sanctions.

          Mr. Speaker Sir, Section 324 of the supreme law of the country, our Constitution talks about aligning legislation to the Constitution. We have been challenged by His Excellency Mr. Speaker Sir, to speed up that process as Parliament. What I would say in my debate is to challenge the Executive to ensure that they bring these Bills with speed for the betterment of our people.

Hon. Khupe talked about new money in the economy. The President of the Republic in his Speech talked about foreign direct investment. He also talked about a raft of measures that the Government of Zimbabwe has put in place to ensure that we attract foreign direct investment. So, basically we are saying that we have a caring Government that appreciates the economic problems faced by the nation, at least they are not sitting on their laurels, they are doing something to ensure that these issues are addressed. So, we want to appreciate the position by the leadership and the Executive.

In the Speech, Mr. Speaker Sir, there is talk about ease of doing of business; it has been singled out in the Speech. As hon. members we should ensure that this is paramount because once we improve the ease of doing business as a nation then it would mean we are able to create our own new money and at the same time attract investors.

There is also talk about the Border Post Bill which shall be brought before Parliament, it is very critical once it has been brought in and we debate about it. We intend as a nation to make sure that there is smooth flow of investors in our country who would want to come and do business. As they come through our borders, we quickly facilitate their entry but of course taking cognisant of our security situation. When they come, we enter into various deals, we have heard the hon. Vice President taking about the mega deals that have been signed. We anticipate that something is in the offing and we anticipate that this is one of the best Governments that we have ever been found because it understands the plight of the poor. Mr. Speaker Sir, I thought hon. members would applaud that statement a round of applause. - [HON MEMBERS: Hear, hear] - The beauty about this country is that it is a very safe destination for investors. We have enjoyed peace for the past 35 years. Perhaps Mr. Speaker Sir, courtesy of our people, security forces and the President has quite often commended the security forces for making sure that they create a conducive environment to do business, where we do not fight each other. As a nation we challenge investors within and without to come to Zimbabwe and do business with us.

The State Procurement Amendment Bill, we are told, is going to be brought before this august House – it is a welcome development and it have been long overdue.   There are a lot of inconsistences, some red tape of some nature which has also opened flood gates for corruption. Once that Bill is crafted, comes before Parliament and becomes law, it will curtail corrupt tendencies and corrupt activities within our institutions and that is good for our country.

Mr. Speaker Sir, the introduction and establishment of economic zones – what a beauty, what some strategic thinking! There is no other option which is better than thinking of introducing economic zones. Once these are introduced, the bottom line is that the economy of the country is improved. We are constrained with resources, yes, here and there, financially and materially but efforts can be felt that there is happening for the betterment of our people. That is the reason why this Government has existed for the past 35 years because it is a caring Government.

It is my considered view, Mr. Speaker Sir, that His Excellency has set the correct tone, the correct legislative agenda, when he singled out Section 296, where there is talk about the Land Commission that will carry out land audit. As these audits are being carried out, we should not overlook the need for productivity because it is only productivity from our pieces of land that we got from our caring Government that will enable us to revive the manufacturing sector and industry. So, I think such a Bill will be welcome and it has been highlighted, correctly so by His Excellency in his Speech. So, in my view this is a Speech that is quite explicit, that gives us direction of what we are expected to do as hon. members during this session. Mr. Speaker Sir, we continue to call for productivity, to ensure food security.   ZIM ASSET talks about food sufficiency and food security once there is productivity in our farms, then of course this nation is going to be able to feed itself.

Hon. Khupe talked about His Excellency failing to explicitly tell this august House how 2,2 million jobs are going to be created. She also observed that in 1984, Zimbabwe was almost the bread basket of Southern Africa. Yes, it was, it continued to be from 1980 but apparently the introduction of opposition MDC brought disaster to the economy. They wined and dined with the enemy and paralyzed our economy. The agenda for some of us was very clear; it was to overthrow the constitutionally elected Government lead by Comrade R.G Mugabe.

I do not understand the definition that the opposition attaches to employment but I am sure if we have thousands and thousands of people in the small to medium scale enterprises doing their business – that is a form of employment because at the end of the day they get some money to feed their families. They will have some money to put in their banks and that is employment. We can see Mr. Speaker Sir, that even here in Harare, the City of Harare has been making efforts to construct stores and ablution facilities for our vendors so that they carry out their businesses in an environment that is conducive. Like the hon. Vice President has rightly pointed out, the creation of employment was a ZANU PF manifesto, if those in the opposition are interested to know, the doors are open, yes they are open but we are quite convinced that people are able to maneuver. When we were allocated farms and we have our families relatives and friends being employed in those farms tilling the land. That is some form of employment. So, it is not far fetched to say that we are going to create employment for our people. When we say employment for our people is going to be created, it is not overnight. It is over a period of time. So, we want to acknowledge the efforts of this right Government which brought independence to this country.

We are encouraged, Mr. Speaker Sir, by the idea of discussing the National Border Post Authority Bill. We are also encouraged because when we discuss this Bill in this august House, it enables us to ensure that tourists flock into the country day-in and day-out. It ensures that goods also are able to come into the country and we are able to do business.

Mr. Speaker, we need to give credit where it is due. There is remarkable progress, in my view, that has been made by Government in the digitalisation project which is going, at the end of the day, to enable us to send information from one corner of the country to the other through radio and through television. So, we should actually clap hands for the Government of Zimbabwe for having made efforts to meet the millennium goals and actually digitalising.

Last but not least, Mr. Speaker Sir, when one looks at the President’s Speech, he talks about the provision of quality education; he talks about the Public Health Bill which shall be brought before this House. He talks about health challenges, corruption which is cancerous and almost at every platform that he addresses the nation, he condemns corruption. What else would one need from a leader of this great nation? He has tried to look at all corners and all angles in the legislative agenda which have a great impact on the livelihoods of our people and so, we should applaud His Excellency for his wonderful speech, for his wonderful address.

He also talked about rapists when he addressed this august House. He said their days are numbered. That would actually indicate the moral uprightness of our leader when he is condemning those men who are in the habit of raping juveniles. This august House should also assist the Head of State and Government when we go out to our various constituencies to educate those men of the like-mind who have gone on the rampage to rape our minors because they are the future of this country. So, we should clap hands, acknowledge, approve and support the address by His Excellency, the Hon. R. G. Mugabe who liberated this country and the Executive for some job well done. I thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.

THE HON VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (MR. MNANGAGWA): Mr. Speaker, I move that the debate do now adjourn.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume: Thursday, 24th September, 2015.

MOTION

LEAVE TO MOVE RESTORATION OF THE GENERAL LAWS AMENDMENT BILL (H. B. 3, 2015) ON THE ORDER PAPER

THE HON VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (MR. MNANGAGWA): Mr. Speaker Sir, I seek leave of the House that the General Laws Amendment Bill, (H. B. 3, 2015) be restored on the Order Paper at the stage it was when the motion was superseded by the end of the Second Session of the Third Parliament.

Motion put and agreed to.

MOTION

RESTORATION OF THE GENERAL LAWS AMENDMENT BILL (H. B. 3, 2015) ON THE ORDER PAPER

THE HON VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (MR. MNANGAGWA): Mr. Speaker Sir, I move the General Laws Amendment Bill, (H. B. 3, 2015) be restored on the Order Paper at the stage it was when the motion was superseded by the end of the Second Session of the Third Parliament.

Motion put and agreed to.

MOTION

LEAVE TO MOVE RESTORATION OF THE CRIMINAL PROCEDURE AND EVIDENCE AMENDMENT BILL (H. B. 2, 2015) ON THE ORDER PAPER

THE HON VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (MR. MNANGAGWA): Mr. Speaker Sir, I seek leave of the House that the Criminal Procedure and Evidence Amendment Bill, (H. B. 2, 2015) be restored on the Order Paper at the stage it was when the motion was superseded by the end of the Second Session of the Third Parliament.

Motion put and agreed to.

MOTION

RESTORATION OF THE CRIMINAL PROCEDURE AND EVIDENCE AMENDMENET BILL (H. B. 2, 2015) ON THE ORDER PAPER

THE HON VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (MR. MNANGAGWA): Mr. Speaker Sir, I move the Criminal Procedure and Evidence Amendment Bill (H. B. 2, 2015) be restored on the Order Paper at the stage it was when the motion was superseded by the end of the Second Session of the Third Parliament.

Motion put and agreed to.

On the motion of THE HON VICE PRESIDENT AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS, the House adjourned at Seventeen Minutes to Five o’clock p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

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National Assembly Hansard NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD 23 SEPTEMBER 2015 VOL 42 NO 04