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SENATE HANSARD 08 mAY 2018 VOL 27 NO 37

PARLIAMENT OF ZIMBABWE

Tuesday, 8th May, 2018

The Senate met at Half-past Two o’clock p. m.

PRAYERS

(THE ACTING PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE in the Chair)

ANNOUNCEMENTS BY THE ACTING PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE

PHOTO SHOOT FOR ZWPC MEMBERS

          THE ACTING PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE (HON. TAWENGWA): I have to inform all members of the Zimbabwe Women’s Parliamentary Caucus who did not have the opportunity to get photos taken at the launch of the manifesto on 6th March, 2018 for the 8th Parliament photo group that they are requested to do so today.  The photo journalist will be in the court yard until 1630 hours.

LIAISON AND COORDINATION COMMITTEE (LCC) MEETING

          THE ACTING PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE:  I also have to inform the Senate that the second monthly meeting of the Liaison and Coordination Committee (LCC) will be held tomorrow Wednesday, 9th May, 2018 at 1000 hours in the Senate Chamber.   

MOTION

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

          HON. SEN. MOHADI:  Mr. President, I move that Order of the Day, Number 1 be stood over until the rest of the Orders of the Day on today’s Order Paper have been disposed of.

          HON. SEN. MUMVURI:  I second.

          Motion put and agreed to.

MOTION

DEVOLUTION AND CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT

Second order read: Adjourned debate on motion on cultural development as being key to economic development.

Question again proposed.

HON. SEN. B. SIBANDA:  Thank you Mr. President.  I stand here to make a small, concise and considered contribution on this debate.  Mr. President, I also want to state that may be the contextual framework in which the debate was initiated might have led to certain criticism including the stoppage of the mover of the motion before she could conclude her contribution.

In that context, I would like to say when people who consider themselves minority appear to want to be heard, we should develop a culture of appearing to listen to them and hear what their concerns are.  Having said that, I want to say that the Constitution that we drafted is in my opinion based on our values as a nation and among those things, some of the attributes of that Constitution, which I will focus on today, is equality of opportunities.  In my opinion, that constitutes some of the values that we should have. 

The mover of the motion did indicate that she believes that there is no equality of opportunities particularly in employment, that equality, we derive from our Constitution and from our national values.  In that area, I would like to share with you an experience.  I was sitting in my car in Bulawayo, waiting for somebody and three people from a certain region were having a discussion.  They were saying to themselves, we believe people around Bulawayo have become unfriendly and not very accepting to us.  I listened very carefully and one of them said if you come into an area, you take peoples’ jobs, you leave them without a livelihood, they will turn to resent you.  So, my response was the general public sees what is happening in Zimbabwe. 

The fact is we are undermining our own values, particularly in this context, in the area of employment.  I come from Gwanda; I have seen people in Gwanda that necessarily do not understand local languages. Having worked for a long time – my own personal experience is of an enumerator who pitched up at home, and could not speak a single word of the local languages. I asked that person where he came from and he told me he came from Nyanga and I said why are you here then when you cannot speak the local language? Mr. President, the person said he got a phone call from his uncle who was in charge of the programme to come and enumerate.  I set down, wrote him a letter and said take this letter to the person who invited you.  I think he took the letter since he did not come back again.

Mr. President, that showed a skewed situation in the country.  You cannot blame Government, may be if we were to blame Government, we should blame Government only for failure to institute a culture of understanding social dynamics but I noticed that the problem particularly of employment comes even in industry.  People have a tendency of employing their relatives.  We have a tendency of importing our relatives from certain areas of the country - for example if I were to use Gwanda, we are forgetting that we make our money in Gwanda, we should actually share that money with the local people in Gwanda in the first instance.  There are of course exceptions to that perception Mr. President and I accept them.

However, I implore all of us, this cry comes out very often from Matabeleland and please, do not ignore it.  As leaders, if we learn to ignore the concerns of certain regions, we are creating a future problem.  Therefore, I submit that the very same values which may not have come out very clearly when the mover of the motion moved her motion should be taken into account and seriously considered.  We do meet these questions regularly, why is this.  A few weeks ago, I met a police officer at a very good meeting. He made an excellent presentation.  Unfortunately when he spoke, he had to use an interpreter and after that I asked him, how long have you been here? He said five years and I said why can you not speak the language and he had no answer.  I then told him that learn Shona in two days. I am telling you, if you want me to explain, I will tell you how I did it. I got to Kwekwe, I was looking for a place soon after I finished Form Four.  I could not read that word which is written “varume.  I tried to read it in English and it was reading varum.  Eventually, before I messed myself, I walked over to somebody and said, can you help me find the toilets and he said there it is, 10 metres away from me.  It made me take a decision that I will learn this language.  This is the culture I would want us to develop, particularly when we find ourselves in such an environment. 

Mr. President, with those words, my major thrust was to persuade all leadership to understand the importance of living to our value expectations which may not be comprehensively understood nationally but which are succinctly defined in our Constitution.  With those words Mr. President, I hope I have made an important contribution to this debate which I believe that in certain circumstances was misunderstood.  I thank you.

*HON. SEN. SHOKO:  Thank you Mr. President.  I would like to make my contribution on a motion raised by Hon. Khumalo.  From my observation, there are a lot of facets which were raised in this issue and I will only pick on one of them.  In our Constitution, there is talk about devolution. We adopted it when we were crafting this new Constitution and it was agreed upon by all people concerned. 

Looking clearly at devolution, it means districts or provinces will be self governing and making their own decisions.  In other words, there is decentralisation of power to the advantage of these provinces.  Now, what is surprising is that as a Government, we are not following what we have raised on the policy of devolution.  It shows we are disregarding the Constitution, despite the fact that we are saying the Constitution is the supreme law of the country. 

I believe that if we were to follow the devolution, we would develop the economic development of these constituencies. Lack of devolution has led to other provinces lagging behind. As a result, they are always complaining that they are neglected.  They feel they are treated as second class citizens in their motherland.  The other sentiments raised are that there are some blue-eyed provinces. 

Let me turn to Matabeleland South.  If you scrutinise Matabeleland South, it is rich in minerals, especially gold.  Artisanal miners are all over the place mining for this precious metal.  If you go to the capital city of this province which is Gwanda, there is no development; it is stagnant.  From the time it was developed by the whites who were ruling us, it is still lagging behind.  The question is, where is the money or wealth realised from mining going to?  I know some of you may think that I am short-sighted.  There are some developments which are there, a small building there and so on but we are 38 years independent.  Where is the wealth coming from gold and other minerals going to? 

If we also look at a place like Beitbridge which is the main inland port which receives most of the exports and imports from our country, it is also a cattle and goat breeding area.  Some of their goats are so big that you may think they are the Shona type of calve because they are very big.  This is a very wealthy province yet you ask yourself despite that natural wealth and the economic activity involved in that province, there is no similarity.  There should be some similar development so that people will benefit.  The simple reason why there is no development is because there is no devolution.  When people are making their own decisions in their own provinces, they make decisions which are good for themselves and to their benefit. 

I may look at different provinces such as Masvingo, Manicaland, Mashonaland Central and Mashonaland West. Just because we are not implementing devolution, there is little development and progress yet in those areas there are natural resources.  In Matabeleland North, there is tourism, coal, woodlands and game parks but does that reflect on the livelihood of those people?  They are poor because we are not following up on devolution.  Devolution means decentralising of the centres of power and development of the economy.  

If you want to get a liquor licence for a bottle store, you definitely have to come to Harare regardless of where you are.  Whether you are in Gwanda, Beitbridge, Bulawayo or Hwange, you just have to come to Harare for a simple liquor licence for a bottle store.  As far as I am concerned, it does not show good governance and it does not show progress.  When we talk of devolution we are saying self determination leads to progress and development in that particular province because decisions are made quickly and done to the advantage of the province.  The prevailing situation is that you may want to get a final say from Harare but all we know about communication, the machines may be out of order.  There is no fax, airtime or network coverage and therefore decisions are not made or there is a delay.

I remember when I was in Bulawayo, I wanted to change some letters on my birth certificate.  I went to the Registrar General’s office and I showed them where I wanted some changes effected. I was told that if I wanted to change anything on my birth certificate I had to come to Harare.  That minute mistake, my name had been written Gedion instead of Gideon. What was on my identity card was different from what was on my academic certificates.  What was needed was for me to remove the “e” and put an “i” and for that minute thing, the document had to be taken to Harare.  You can imagine the process you have to go through.  I told this officer at the RG’s office that we are going to implement the policy we are talking about and it will take six months up to a year.  He advised that the only way for me to speed up the process was for me to go to Harare and he advised me to take the document to Harare.  I took all the documents and went to Harare - I was going to be served that same day, he even gave me the office which was supposed to attend me in Mudede’s office, number 6.  To tell you the truth, the mistake was rectified in less than an hour and I went back to Bulawayo a content man.  This is a sign of the advantages of devolution; it is a sign which shows the disadvantages of not implementing devolution.  This devolution is not affecting only the Matabeleland South I have talked about or Bulawayo Metropolitan neither Matabeleland but it is affecting all the provinces of Zimbabwe.   In all these areas these people want to have liquor licences, but if they have to get them, they should come to Harare.

          Therefore, I am saying let us follow our supreme law of the country, the Constitution and we are going to develop our economy because we will be dealing with the people within our constituencies and provinces.  The problem in sending this document to such a faraway place is that they may not understand what you are talking about and yet the resident officer will understand the problem because they are within your vicinity.  Mr. President, thank you for giving me time to make my contribution on the motion raised by Hon. Sen. D.T. Khumalo.

          *HON. SEN. MAKORE: I am very grateful for what you have done Mr. President for giving me the opportunity to make my contribution on the motion raised by Hon. Sen. Khumalo.  As far as I am concerned, this is a Constitutional matter and we are talking about the supreme law of the country which is the Constitution. Listening to Hon. Senators who have debated before me, I have noticed that this is a very pertinent and important motion. When we talk of the languages, they are also talked about in the Constitution and we have 16 languages, including the sign language.  When languages are developed, this leads to the development of a peoples’ culture and a people’s economy.  The languages belong to all the people of Zimbabwe.  The languages are not regional.  Language Hon. President is a factor of communication and when you are communicating, you share the same meaning and you share the same developmental issues.  I will state once again that languages belong to all parts of the country.  My wish is that these languages should be taught as lessons in schools because there  is always a problem when people are discussing in another language and there is somebody who does not understand that language. As far as that person who does not understand the language, they will feel that the case is trivial, inconsequential or it would mean that they are looking down upon other people.  I believe that the Constitution empowered the people of Zimbabwe. 

          I am talking about devolution in languages.  We are talking about the Government systems; we are talking about the wealth and we also look at the social services.  The economy is very important, because the impression given to people is that all the wealth which is created throughout the country and all the provinces, the wealth is directed to the capital city, Harare. 

          However, we need to look at the local government systems and when the local government has power on devolution then they will be able to progress and develop their areas.  We will rub out this notion that all the wealth which is generated in provinces is taken to Harare, hence we need to take this issue of devolution seriously.  In that way, when people are empowered, when they can make their own decisions, they will chart a course of development and be advantaged.  At the moment some regions seem to think that because they are in the minority, they are trampled upon, they are not equal to other people - but we are talking about equality, oneness, participation in the development of our country and provinces.  When we talk of governance, we look at the local government system and the Constitution says, we talk of metropolitan provinces and the Provincial Council is also included in the Constitution and there a lot of things which should be done by the provinces.   They also talk about development in terms of roads, school buildings, creating of wealth and distribution of money or wealth which is generated in that area.

          When people are making their decisions, they know that they have to develop their country but at the same time, some of the money will be taken to the capital city.  We have a feeling that people are resisting devolution because they feel these provinces will retain all the finances generated in their provinces.  However, we are saying there will be rules and regulations to be followed and the wealth will be shared equally throughout the country.  We are talking about administration of production. It does not mean to say that if a province does not have any generation of wealth it will suffer, but they will benefit from what is developing in other provinces.  In Manicaland, Mashonaland Central, Matabeleland - they all want devolution, this is something which we have to look and examine carefully.  We should be well focused and prepared for the future. 

          When there is devolution of power, people will work hard because they know that they stand to benefit.  As far as we know, Zimbabwe is a land of milk and honey, but we have not been fully exploiting the resources for our benefit.  I think we should be working hard and benefit from all natural resources.  When we look at the natural resources, we are looking at the industries which have shut down, the health services institutions and people should communicate to work in unison.  When we talk of devolution it also means that any member in that community or province will be able to say we are now able to benefit from our own natural resources.  We used to envy our neighbors who were benefiting but when we are talking of devolution we are saying residents of that province will produce more.  When people have a feeling that they are being trampled upon, they do not work hard because they feel that they are being disadvantaged. 

          I can take the analogy of a home situation, if parents are quarrelling in the home, they do not even have time to enjoy their food or anything in the home because they are disadvantaged.  When we talk of inclusiveness, devolution, we are empowering the people of Zimbabwe, they will work because they know they stand to benefit.  All this is coming from the Constitution, our COPAC which worked to produce this Constitution - I am glad that I was one of the participants - not only a participant, but a leader in the process and I am saying, let us quickly implement the devolution.  Let us quickly implement power sharing, let us quickly implement the dissemination of power to other provinces and people will benefit from the Constitution which is a home grown Constitution.  Let us decentralise power, because we will be saying we are now benefiting from what we used to see happening in other areas.  I thank you.

*HON. SEN. MACHINGAIFA:  Thank you Mr. President.  It is my pleasure to make a contribution on this motion that was raised by Hon. Sen. Khumalo.  It is a very pertinent issue discussing devolution.  Mr. President, devolution is very important and it is very necessary.  We need to implement it for the benefit of the people because there are some suspicions that some provinces are benefiting at the expense of the economic generators.  We have had people talking about the different languages and that an officer operating within an area but cannot communicate in the language of that area, you wonder how they were employed and how they got to that place.  Suppose you want to dig a trench in an area where we have the Kore Kore people and these Kore Kore people do not want to participate in the digging of the trench.  Somebody from Gwanda will come and say, I can do any job that is there.  We have people coming in and saying, we are the Kore Kores why do we have this Ndebele from Gwanda digging this trench for us.  You cannot complain because you have been given chance and turned it down. 

When we talk of the languages, in my personal capacity, I am capable of communicating in eight languages because I made up my mind that I should learn my local languages.  If you are not prepared to learn the language, you will not be able to speak it.  You may want to learn Shona, at times, you may make mistakes and people will be mocking you but you will succeed.  You may want to learn Ndebele, in the learning process, people may mock you because of the mistakes you will be making, but in the end, you will be able to learn the language.   When you look at languages, there are many things that have been implemented.  During the colonial times, when we talk about our names, there were many distortions.  Some people were even failing to get the family tree because you were supposed to accept what would have been put down as it is.  We have no Tshuma, no Moyo, no Sibanda because that is a totem but the surname is your grandfathers name.  In my case, I am Tapera Machingaifa, if you want to look for my family tree, you look for the Machingaifas and you will get them, but if you look for my totem as Tshuma, you may not be able to trace my ancestry because it is based on totem.  If we look at totems, we will be able to develop. 

When we grew up, there was a shop selling some 10 ounce khakis, shorts, some shops selling English khakis so that each shop was specialising in certain specialised material.  What is happening is that shops are now selling all goods and all types and there is no specialisation.  I have heard in the past people saying, we should talk about devolution and we should hold competitions so that those people good at animal husbandry should teach us on how they are doing it.  If you want to buy cattle, you will go to those people specialising in animal husbandry.  We also have areas where we have good farmers in maize growing and you want maize, you go to those people.  In some provinces, they grow sugar and as a result all the money goes to those people and they benefit.  This is not a flyby night programme, it needs love, understanding and loving that process - definitely, we will achieve our goals.

I will talk about Gwanda and Hon. Sen. Sibanda, he said Gwanda was never developed since the Europeans left that place.  The Whites came to that place as hunters and they did not develop it much because what they wanted was hunting so they had to prepare the ways for channelling out the wealth that would have been obtained in that province.  If you have cracked feet and you want to clean them, you just have to wash and scrub them.  Definitely, the cracked feet will be smooth.  I know, if we work as a nation and agree on one thing, we are going to progress.  This is not a political issue, we need to work together as the people of Zimbabwe.  Thank you Mr. President.

*HON. SEN. MASHAVAKURE:  Thank you Mr. President.  I am enjoying the debate on this motion.  I came in late and you were already debating but the sweetness of this debate, I liken it to the  non-alcoholic drink, Coke zero.  We may talk until the cows come home, but the root cause of this, if you look at the African history, especially in most of these areas, you will notice that the development done by the whites or by the colonisers, they are the ones still in existence.  In Mberengwa, there was no town called Mataga or Murombedzi.  There were only growth points.  If you carry a survey, some countries developed their countries, Nigeria has Abuja, Botswana has Gaborone.  If we were to go to Kenya, the only town that we know is Nairobi and if we go to South Africa, there is Johannesburg, Pretoria and Cape Town that were founded by the Whites.  When we became independent, we went on to develop those areas developed by the whites and we also maintained the culture that had been developed by our colonisers.  That is why in Zimbabwe we are still talking of devolution.  Let us look at the names given to these provinces, they are tribal; Matabeleland, Mashonaland, Manicaland; all these are tribalistic names and yet people living in those provinces are not the people who named those provinces.  My feeling is that immediately after independence, we should have changed those names, for example Midlands, I would prefer it to have a local name like Guruguru or Runde; Matabeleland North, we could have called it Mosi-oa-tunya and Matabeleland South we could have called it Njelele, giving them names which are not tribalistic.  It is unfortunate that we adopted the culture which was brought by the Whites and to date we are still holding ourselves along tribal lines; Shona or Ndebele.

          When we look at what was happening in the past, we had Hove who bit Nkomo during that time in the elections but the people of that time were not tribalists; what they wanted was capabilities of an individual and that deserved to be a leader in the country.  Disaster was introduced by the Whites who then created a divide and rule attitude.  This was done so that people would not feel that they are the same; they are not mwana wevhu, umntwana womhlabathi, the son of the soil, they should be divided along tribal lines.  In some areas, this was done around 1920, which was aimed at unification of the Shona dialects, done by professors.

          When you look at these dialects, they are Shona, Karanga and Zezuru but when we look at these dialects, you wonder what it is.  When we go deeply into it, there is no language called Shona but we had these Korekore, Shona and Buja.  We are now made to say we are proud of being Shona and yet there were no people called the Shona.  In 1956, there was further cutting down of these derogatory terms and by 1964 we had some areas who had teaching languages like Dombodema which was teaching Kalanga.  Those areas were forbidden from learning the languages of their area and all the people were forced to either speak Shona or Ndebele and not their local languages like Kalanga, Venda or Tonga.  Due to this, we were given the impression that the Shona and Ndebele are the best languages.  So we were made to believe that when you get to an area, you should speak their language, so what would  happen to the people who are Venda, Tonga and other languages who live in those areas because they are forced that if you live in Matabeleland, speak Ndebele.  If you live in Shona provinces, speak Shona, which means all other languages were ignored.

          Zimbabwe is 390 kms2, which is made up of 10 provinces and yet Canada is 9.6 million kms2 and they only have 10 provinces like Zimbabwe, which means on average, the provinces are almost as big as Nigeria.  Texas in America is also like one of our countries but as African countries, we are interested in fragmenting our countries.  So in the provinces, we are saying we want devolution; we need to change this culture which was introduced by the colonialists.  We have at times looked at our provinces and demarcated them and these demarcations are continuously done.  We have had some provinces which were either cut down or increased.  What we need is a province which has a clear marked boundary.

          I was looking at Califonia, the Governor of Califonia was saying Califonia is the sixth biggest economy in the world but he is trying to work on devolution yet it is the sixth biggest economy in the world and America is a federation.  What I am saying is in Zimbabwe, let us create permanent boundaries of our provinces and demarcate them instead of continuing with the demarcation every now and then because of one reason or the other.  We have noticed that we are doing these demarcations because we want wealth.  We noticed that Chivhu was in Midlands and certain areas were removed because there was wealth, like we could be having Zimplats in our province but it was removed because somebody wanted to have wealth in their own province. 

          When we go to our Constitution, it says that the Minister of Finance and Economic Development should give 5% to provinces but the Constitution does not explain further whether the Minister of Finance and Economic Development should give 5% of total budget for the provinces to share so that in our case, we have $4 billion, so provinces will be getting $20 million when we follow that devolution.  The second aspect or meaning of this is that when they talked of that 5%, they will be saying each province should benefit 5% of that budget, so each will be getting $200 million.  Here, we wonder whether we were going to have enough cash to go around according to the Constitution.  We also realised that even some people who were in that Constitution making process were not aware of what they were saying when they talked about this 5%. 

          These debates are good but we need to clearly look at our languages and see what we are talking about because we talk of the 16 languages but some of these languages are missing.  Other indigenous minor languages are not included but we only have such languages of migrant workers like Chewa. When you go to South Africa, they have 11 official languages yet we have migrant workers who are Shona or Ndebele but they did not include those languages in their official languages but in Zimbabwe we have adopted migrant workers’ languages as one of the official languages.  At times this is a disadvantage to the people of that country.  This may cause a misunderstanding.

          The planning of this country and the development is skewed because we copied what was done by the Whites.  There was the mining of asbestos in Zvishavane but it was processed in Bulawayo where there was Turnal.  When we look at sugar, it is in Masvingo at Mkwasine and Triangle but it is refined in Harare and Bulawayo instead of in Masvingo, Hippo Valley.  We were talking about the diamond in Chiadzwa and the polishing was done either in Harare or Bulawayo.  What I think is we need to have somebody who can get rid of this culture of appreciating the colonial culture and we feel like we cannot remove it because it was introduced by the Whites and I am saying all you are saying is good. We need to have introspection and thoroughly examine this colonial culture which we are retaining. When we are in our  provinces, we should talk about our languages and appreciate them, but what we have done is that we were divided into Shona and Ndebele and this is what we are following, yet these other cultures which fall within those areas were not taken as languages at all but they are taken as minorities, and therefore inconsequential.

          I know languages are shabby in those areas and therefore, we need to make a thorough inspection and correct all the problems we have in the languages. We know we are denying our people to speak their language, like people of the Karanga. They are denied to speak their language but they are told that they are Shonas. Please, let us correct this problem and the problem which was implanted in us by the colonialist. I thank you.

          HON. SEN. MOHADI: Thank you Mr. President. I also want to add my voice to this motion which was moved by Sen. Khumalo. It is creating a lot of interest amongst us because it talks about our grassroots, where we are coming from and where we are going. At the moment, we are mixed up because culturally, we are no more the real people of the grassroots. We have tremendously changed to what we do not know. So, there is much need for us to unite as Zimbabweans according to those regions that we have so that we re-unite and start working together because if there is no togetherness, I do not see us progressing.

          Mr. President, I will take you back to 2013, to our Constitution which was of our own making. The implementation of this Constitution has taken too long because we agreed in the Constitution that we go back to our local languages. The Constitution was supposed to be interpreted in local languages and it has not been done. Now it is five years and nothing has happened. That also constitutes to our Parliament here. We were supposed to be having interpretation of those 16 languages, and till now nothing has happened.

          It is very easy for each and everyone to express herself/himself in his/her own mother language. Sometimes we are forced to speak in English that has been borrowed and we speak broken English for that matter because it is not our mother language and you cannot even express yourself. Just because issues or things cannot work out themselves, we are forced to do so because we cannot just come to Parliament, sit down and listen to those who are lucky or who have been privileged to speak Ndebele or Shona that can have interpretation services here in Parliament. So, we have problems when looking into this motion.

          Mr. President, one of the speakers talked about resources and he mentioned mainly about resources in Gwanda. In Gwanda, there is a lot of gold which is being mined there and it is all up to us to think about it. If we have this gold, where do we take it to? Is it only meant to better our homes only without bettering our towns and whom do we expect to come and do that for us if us the citizens do not mind about also injecting what we are getting, the little resources, putting something aside in order to develop our own towns and cities.

English says that charity begins at home. If we collect all the resources and put them at our homes and forget about developing our towns and cities, it will take long. Let us sit, plan and think together seriously how best we can better ourselves and also better the places where we are living. With those few words, I thought I should just add a few words because this motion has been debated and we are repeating. We are just taking chances of saying that we had a break and after this break we seem to be debating as though this motion is new. There is nothing new but it. I just thought I should add a few words. I thank you. 

HON. SEN. KHUMALO: I move that the debate do now adjourn.

HON. SEN. MARAVA: I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume: Wednesday, 9th May, 2018.

MOTION

REPORT OF THE 41ST PLENARY ASSEMBLY OF THE SADC PARLIAMENTARY FORUM

          Third Order read: Adjourned debate on the Report of the 41st Plenary Assembly of the SADC – Parliamentary Forum, held in Mahe, Seychelles, from 4th to 15th July, 2017.

          Question again proposed.

          HON. SEN. MOHADI: I move that the debate do now adjourn.

          HON. SEN. MUMVURI: I second.

          Motion put and agreed to.

          Debate to resume: Wednesday, 9th May, 2018.

MOTION

ICT LITERACY PROGRAMME

          Fourth Order read: Adjourned debate on motion on need to address the ICT divide between rural, urban, young and old in the country.

          HON. SEN. MAVHUNGA: I move that the debate do now adjourn.

          HON. SEN. MOHADI: I second.

          Motion put and agreed to.

          Debate to resume: Wednesday, 9th May, 2018.

MOTION

CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS OF THE ELDERLY

          Fifth Order read: Adjourned debate on motion on the rights of the elderly as prescribed by Section 82 of the Constitution.

          Question again proposed.

          HON. SEN. SHOKO: I move that the debate do now adjourn.

          HON. SEN. MOHADI: I second.

MOTION

CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS OF THE ELDERLY

          Fifth Order read:  Adjourned debate on motion on the rights of the elderly as prescribed by Section 82 of the Constitution of Zimbabwe.

          Question again proposed.

          HON. SEN. SHOKO:  I move that the debate do now adjourn.

          HON. SEN. MOHADI:  I second.

          Motion put and agreed to.

          Debate to resume:  Wednesday, 9th May, 2018.

MOTION

PROVISION OF ALTERNATIVE RESETTLEMENT AREAS FOR ZWEHAMBA, MAHATSHE AND MATANKENI COMMUNITIES

          Sixth Order read:  Adjourned debate on motion on the call on the Executive to provide alternative resettlement areas for the communities from Zvehamba, Mahatshe and Matankeni.

          Question again proposed.

          HON. SEN. MOHADI:  Mr. President, I move that the debate do now adjourn. 

          HON. SEN. CHIMHINI:  I second.

          Motion put and agreed to.

          Debate to resume:  Wednesday, 9th May, 2018.

MOTION

PROTECTION OF CONSUMERS FROM UNSCRUPULOUS BUSINESS PEOPLE

          Seventh Order read:  Adjourned debate on motion on protection of consumers from corruption.

          Question again proposed.

          HON. SEN. MAWIRE:  Mr. President, I move that the debate do now adjourn.

          HON. SEN. MOHADI:  I second.

          Motion put and agreed to.

          Debate to resume:  Wednesday, 9th May, 2018.

MOTION

REPORT OF THE DELEGATION TO THE WORLD PARLIAMENTARY FORUM ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

          Eighth Order read:  Adjourned debate on motion on the report of the delegation to the World Parliamentary Forum on Sustainable Development.

          Question again proposed.

          HON. SEN. MOHADI:  I move that the debate do now adjourn.

          HON. SEN. MKHWEBU:  I second.

          Motion put and agreed to.

          Debate to resume:  Wednesday, 9th May, 2018.

MOTION

FIRST REPORT OF THE THEMATIC COMMITTEE ON INDIGENISATION AND EMPOWERMENT ON THE CIRCUMSTANCES SURROUNDING THE NON-ESTABLISHMENT OF THE COMMUNITY SHARE OWNERSHIP TRUSTS

          Ninth Order read:  Adjourned debate on motion on the First Report of the Thematic Committee on Indigenisation and Empowerment on the circumstances surrounding the non-establishment of Community Share Ownership Trusts in Mudzi and Mutoko Districts.

          Question again proposed.

          HON. SEN. MAVHUNGA:  I move that the debate do now adjourn.

          HON. SEN. CHIMHINI:  I second.

          Motion put and agreed to.

          Debate to resume:  Wednesday, 9th May, 2018.

MOTION

FIRST REPORT OF THE THEMATIC COMMITTEE ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS ON SDG NO. 3

          Tenth Order read:  Adjourned debate on motion on the First Report of the Thematic Committee on Sustainable Development Goals on SDG No. 3.

Question again proposed.

HON. SEN. MOHADI:  Mr. President, I move that the debate do now adjourn.

HON. SEN. MUMVURI:  I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume: Wednesday, 9th May, 2018.

MOTION

FIRST REPORT OF THE THEMATIC COMMITTEE ON PEACE AND SECURITY ON THE PREPAREDNESS OF THE GRAIN MARKETING BOARD TO HANDLE THE 2016/2017 CROP DELIVERIES AND THE SUCCESS OF THE COMMAND AGRICULTURE PROGRAMME

          Eleventh Order read:  Adjourned debate on motion on the First Report of the Thematic Committee on Peace and Security on the preparedness of the Grain Marketing Board to handle the 2016/2017 crop deliveries and the success of the Command Agriculture Programme.

          Question again proposed.

          HON. SEN. MUMVURI:  I move that the debate do now adjourn.

          HON. SEN. MOHADI:  I second.

          Motion put and agreed to.

          Debate to resume:  Wednesday, 9th May, 2018.

          On the motion of HON. SEN. MOHADI seconded by HON. SEN. MUMVURI, the Senate adjourned at Twenty-Two Minutes to Four O’clock p.m.

             

 

 

 

Senate Hansard SENATE HANSARD 08 mAY 2018 VOL 27 NO 37