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SENATE HANSARD 20 NOVEMBER 2018 VOL 28 NO 19

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PARLIAMENT OF ZIMBABWE

Tuesday, 20th November, 2018

The Senate met at Half-past Two o’clock p. m.

PRAYERS

(THE HON. DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF SENATE in the Chair)

ANNOUNCEMENTS BY THE HON. DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF SENATE

SWEARING IN OF A NEW MEMBER

          THE HON. DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF SENATE: Section 128 (1) of the Constitution of Zimbabwe provides that before a Member takes his or her seat in Parliament, the Member must take the oath of a Member of Parliament in the form set out in the Third Schedule. Section 128 (2) states that, the oath must be taken before the Clerk of Parliament.

          I, therefore, call upon the Clerk of Parliament to administer the oath of a Member of Parliament to Hon. Sen. Ndabazekhaya Cain G.  Mathema.   

NEW MEMBER SWORN

          HON. SEN. NDABAZEKHAYA CAIN G.  MATHEMA subscribed to the Oath of Loyalty as required by the law and took her seat – [HON. SENATORS: Hear, hear.]-

VERIFICATION OF BIO-DATA INFORMATION

          THE HON. DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF SENATE: I wish to advise all Senators who submitted their bio-data forms to the Public Relations Department to kindly visit the Public Relations Officers who will be stationed at the Members’ Dining Hall from 1400 hours to 1630 hours during sitting days and verify the information before it is uploaded on the Parliament website.

MOTION

PROTECTION OF CATTLE AGAINST TICK-BORNE DISEASES

          HON. SEN. CHIMBUDZI: I move the motion standing in my name that the House: -

          AWARE that 70% of the diseases affecting cattle in Zimbabwe such as babesiosis, anaplasmosis and theileriosis are caused by ticks;

          ALSO AWARE that tick-borne diseases cause weight loss and consequently impact negatively on livestock production;

          FURTHER AWARE that the animal Health Act [Chapter 19:01] and Statutory Instrument No. 250 of 1993 provide for dipping of livestock, especially cattle, to protect them against tick-borne diseases;

          NOW THEREFORE; calls upon the Ministry of Lands, Agriculture, Water, Climate and Rural Settlement to

a)    ensure proper maintenance of dip tanks and increase the number of dip tanks in areas mostly affected by tick-borne diseases;

b)   enforce registration of calves within the stipulated period of two weeks;

c)    monitor and control movement of livestock; and

d)   encourage farmers to regularly dip their livestock in order to prevent tick-borne diseases.

HON. SEN. CHIEF NGUNGUBANE: I second.

HON. SEN. CHIMBUDZI: I am asking your permission Mr. President to read my notes because there are figures that I will not be able to articulate off-hand.

The live stock in Zimbabwe: Historical background

          The major livestock in Zimbabwe are; cattle, poultry, pigs, goats and sheep.  In rural areas, 50 to 60% of rural households own cattle, 70 to 90% own goats and over 80% own chickens.  Small scale farmers own most of the cattle (90%), goats (98%) and pigs (80%) as important sources of animal protein, draught power, income and social safety net during emergencies, especially drought.

Mr. President, livestock is very important in reducing poverty and food security. Since 2002, Zimbabwe has experienced general decrease in livestock population.  Between 2002 and 2005, cattle population on large scale farms declined from about 25% of the national herd to less than 13% of the national heard(Anseeuw et al; 2011) and to less than 21 689 (less than 1%)  in 2009.  Dairy herd also declined from 104 483 in 1994 to 43 159 in 2004 and to 22 000 in 2009, leading to decline in milk production.  By 2009, the livestock population of Zimbabwe consisted of 5.1 million cattle, 21 689 dairy, 397 800 sheep, 3.2 million goats and 202 234 pigs.

          The major constraints facing the livestock subsector are;

·       low calving rate 45%;

·       high mortality of 4.4% as compared to the desired rate of 3% pe annum;

·       degradation of grazing pastures due to overstocking and recurrent droughts;

·       limited access to markets due to restrictions of movement of animals;

·       unavailability of breeding stock and experienced breeders;

·       high incidence of disease;

·       lack of access to inputs and services;

·       lack of farmer skills;

·       inefficient weight gain or prolonged phase to market weights; and

·       lack of suitable finance to expand production.

Animal Health: with reference top cattle

Mr. President, Zimbabwe lost 3430 cattle due to tick-borne diseases between November 2017 and May 2018 with Mashonaland East recording the highest deaths.  According to the Veterinary Services Department, farmers are losing cattle to theileriosis popularly known as january disease, babesiosis, heart water, anaplasmosis and sweating sickness.  The january disease is the major killer, theileriosis has killed 1751 cattle, babesiosis 235, heart water 816, anaplasmosis 596 and sweating sickness 32 countrywide.

          Mashonaland East has the highest cases of tick borne diseases recorded.  The Department of Veterinary Services said that there were 2 698 cases with 1 441 deaths recorded.  Chikomba areas has been severely affected with 1 249 cases and 761 deaths reported.

          Mr. President, on the importance of dip tanks in Zimbabwe; it is recorded that 70% of the diseases affecting cattle is due to tick borne diseases such as babeosis, anaplasmosis and theileriosis hence; it is important to control ticks by dipping.  Tick infection and tick borne diseases are important conditions which affect livestock health and productivity in Zimbabwe.  This means that increased availability of dip tanks increases health and productivity in animal and suppress livestock deaths.

          Mr. President, challenges faced by farmers in controlling animal diseases:

-         There have been prohibitive charges, costs of veterinary products, dipping fees and ancillary charges which hampered farmers from dipping their cattle.

-         Lack of water, broken down infrastructure, broken water pumps and general lack of supervised veterinary services in the rural areas;

-         Because of the shortage of dip chemicals during the 2017 to 2018 rain season, the farmers had to go for erratic dipping which could only cater for a few individualised beasts;

-         Low turnout at dip tanks which leaves other beasts at risk as some farmers are not willing to take their cattle for dipping at the communal dip tank as they prefer conducting the operation themselves and may do it in the wrong way and this is not effective in controlling ticks;

-         The veterinary officers on the ground realised that there are fake chemicals on the market and some farmers cannot tell the difference as the packaging is the same;

-         Unable to offer the weekly recommended dipping due to lack of resources.

Mr. President, policies put in place by the Government towards reducing the spread of animal diseases:

-         Statutory Instrument 280 of 1984 prohibits movement of sick animals.  This is intended to reduce the spread of animal diseases from one region to another, even among our neighbouring countries.

-         Public Health Act Statutory Instrument 50 of 1995, governing slaughter and human consumption.  This is designed to ensure that the health of consumers is protected.

Mr. President, on the importance of livestock to the Zimbabwean society:

-         It is an important source of income for some households;

-         Livestock provides meat and milk while poultry eggs readily available in small amounts that can meet the demands of households;

-         Central to major social support systems and ceremonies meaning that in many African societies, livestock are the basis for traditional social systems, for example paying dowry;

-         Livestock provides a variety of benefits including hides and skins which can be used by different companies like Bata, hence fulfilling the dependent circle between multiple interdependence sectors of production;

-         Mainly in communal areas, cattle are an important resource which is highly used in food production especially for ploughing and tilling the land towards grain production.

I thank you Mr. President.

          HON. SEN. CHIEF NGUNGUBANE:  Thank you Mr. President for affording me this opportunity to support the motion raised by Hon. Sen. Chimbudzi.  As she had earlier on alluded to, one way or the other, Members of this House are owners of livestock, whether in a particular sector or inclusive.  Livestock Mr. President is a business.  Some farmers have made a living out of farming and livestock rearing animal husbandry.  I remember very well that there was an auction held here in Harare of a farmer from Esigodini who had his bull auctioned for US$24 000.  This is a clear testimony that farming is indeed a business.  The majority of people out there take farming to be a hobby, especially keeping of livestock, mainly cattle.  You ask them why do you keep cattle and the answer is, it is because this is what I was taught by my parents.  Some indeed have quite a number of livestock that you would envy that if only these cattle could be mine but the owner of the farm or the cattle has no shoes – he is walking barefooted.  I think it is important that education is raised.  I will not dwell much on that Mr. President.

          Tick borne diseases like any other diseases have desire consequences to cattle.  As she has earlier on alluded to that, this year along, Zimbabwe has lost more than 3 000 cattle to tick-borne diseases and the number is too high and one beast lost is one too many.  As farmers and as legislators, we should come up with mechanisms that would help reduce this number.  As I have earlier alluded to, the issue is about education.  Most of the farmers do not dip their cattle for various reasons, one way or the other.  The people in the livestock industry recommend that cattle should be dipped every two weeks during the dry season.  This is from about May to about this time of the year and once a week during the wet season.  However, this is not the case on the ground.  As you can see, when you move in the villages and in the farms, the ticks that are on the animals bear testimony that these animals are not being taken to the dip tanks.  As a result, we are losing a lot of cattle.

Mr. President, the dipping chemicals are very expensive.  Most of the farmers with the spate of price increases cannot afford to purchase.  As I was preparing this motion Mr. President, I went to the veterinary shops today to find out how much basic dipping chemicals cost.  The one litre was ranging from anything between $80 to $100.  The smaller one $40 to $50 and I am not mentioning the other ancillary chemicals that you would need and how many of these farmers can afford these expensive chemicals.  My plea to this House and to Government is to say, please, Government must subsidise.  It is a business and Government stands to benefit.  We are warming up as a nation to the EU.  We had the EU Observer Mission coming to observe and it is a step in the right direction.  However, you know that the EU has a market for our cattle.  If we are to maintain that quota Mr. President, we should ensure that we produce quality cattle with the best breed.

I am very disappointed to note that when these prices went up, the Ministry of Industry and Commerce through SI 122 of 2018, produced a list of goods that travelers could bring in under the duty rebate and it is disappointing to note that out of the 71 items, the issue of dipping chemicals is not on the list and it is a great cause for concern.  You are allowing farmers to be at the mercy of business people who are charging prices willy-nilly and in certain instances they demand that certain services should be paid for in United States Dollars.  So, I appeal to the relevant Ministry to enable that dip-tank chemicals and any other auxiliary chemicals used in the treatment of livestock be put on the list of goods that one can bring duty-free to enable farmers to address the issue of tick-bone diseases.

Mr. President, the other point is that the infrastructure out there is fast becoming dilapidated.  We do not know when these dip-tanks were last built.  We have farmers who have moved into farms, the A1 and A2, but the challenge is that there is a serious shortage of dip-tanks.  I know that Government cannot do it alone.  Government, in partnership with farmers should ensure that these dip tanks are built to enable the cattle to have dipping chemicals regularly.

For those in rural areas, you would find that some of these dip-tanks are cracked and no longer user-friendly for the movement of cattle.  So it is important that as community leaders, Members of Parliament, we conscientise people to repair those dip-tanks.  It is for our own good and our own assistance.  I would also like to challenge the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development through the RBZ to allocate more foreign currency to this sector.  I know that the Governor of the Reserve Bank has allocated foreign currency to fuel to ensure a consistent and affordable supply on the market.  I know that foreign currency is very scarce but we are talking of an industry which has the capacity to generate millions, if not billions in revenue.  So, I challenge them to say, this is a worthy investment where it will reap good returns.

          An Hon. Senator talked about the Public Health Act – Mr. President, it is important that there is regulation on the dipping chemicals or other chemicals that come into the country.  Some chemicals are smuggled across our porous borders, which are an avenue for smuggling.  The porous border has been used as a conduit by people who bring in these chemicals and they are not regulated whilst some of the chemicals are counterfeit.  So, there is need for serious monitoring of our country’s borders.

          We also need to reduce the distance through which the livestock are driven from the cattle pens to the dip-tanks.  Most of the animals are driven for long distances and in this dry season, you find that some of them will fall and fail to reach the destination where they are supposed to access these services.  So it is important that Government, through all stakeholders, construct dip-tanks that are easily accessible to our animals.  Last but not least Mr. President, as a country, we should offer incentives to the farmers who are into animal husbandry to make sure that the industry grows and becomes sustainable.  I also think that Veterinary Officers should be mobile.  You find most of these in rural areas and they are not mobile. If there is disease outbreak, it takes time for them to respond unless you provide transport. 

So, let us make their work easier as they help us to produce better cattle.  I propose that the Government should provide at least motor cycles as a starting point for easy mobility.  People should have their registration books updated if there is any animal that would have died or sold, when a cow is born and so on. 

As a country we should find out how many cattle we have and how many we are producing, at what rate are we losing these cattle to tick-bone diseases and other diseases that come.  Finally, the Minister of Finance and Economic Development is presenting his budget sometime soon in this House.  I appeal that the Ministry allocates more than adequate, not adequate allocation towards agriculture.  This is because agriculture is the backbone of this country.  In particular, on the field of animal husbandry, one way or the other, some of us were sent to school, and fees being paid were derived from cattle sales.  Mr. President, I would like to thank you for affording me this chance to debate this motion in support of the mover.  I thank you.

HON. SEN. CHIMBUDZI: I move that the debate do now adjourn.

HON. SEN. MUZENDA: I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume: Wednesday, 21st November, 2018.

MOTION

REPORT OF THE 139TH ASSEMBLY OF THE INTER-PARLIAMENTARY UNION (IPU)

HON. SEN. MUZENDA: I move the motion standing in my name:

          That this House takes note of the Report of the 139th Assembly of the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU), Geneva, Switzerland: 14 to 18 October, 2018.

          HON. SEN. CHIEF MTSHANE: I second.

          HON. SEN. MUZENDA: Thank you Mr. President. 

1.0    Introduction

1.1    The 139th Assembly of the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU) was held in Geneva, Switzerland, from 14 to 18 October 2018 under the overarching theme “Parliamentary Leadership in Promoting Peace and Development in the Age of Innovation and Technological Change”.  

Hon. Advocate Jacob F. Mudenda, Speaker of the National Assembly, led a Parliamentary delegation comprising the following Members and Officers of Parliament to the 139th Assembly of the IPU and Related Meetings:-

 

Hon. Chief Mtshane Khumalo;

Hon. William Mutomba;

Hon. Tsitsi Muzenda;

Hon. Robson Mavenyengwa;

Hon. Amos Chibaya;

Hon. Tinoda Machakarika;

Mr. Kennedy Chokuda, (Clerk of Parliament);

Mr. Ndamuka Marimo, (Director in the Clerk’s Office);

Ms. Martha Mushandinga, (Principal Executive Assistant to the Hon. Speaker);

Ms. Rumbidzai P. Chisango, (Principal External Relations Officer); and

Mr. Robert Sibanda, (Aide to the Hon. Speaker.)

1.2    Hon. Advocate Mudenda was elected President of the Africa Geopolitical Group while Hon. Tsitsi Muzenda was elected President of the Standing Committee on Sustainable Development, Finance and Trade, taking over from Hon. Jenifer Mhlanga who was appointed into the Executive. We extend our warm congratulations to them and wish them success in their new roles.

2.0    Emergency Item

The proposal put forward by the delegations of Seychelles, Fiji, Tonga, Samao and the Federated States of Micronesia regarding climate change entitled “Climate Change-let us not cross the line” was adopted and added to the Assembly’s Agenda.

3.0    General Debate

3.1    The General Debate on the theme “Parliamentary Leadership in Promoting Peace and Development in the age of Innovation and Technological Change” provided an opportunity for Member Parliaments to exchange views on both the negative and positive impact of technological change and recommendations for parliamentary action to promote peace and development through science and innovative technology.

3.2    Hon. Advocate Mudenda, Speaker of the National Assembly, joined the distinguished delegates in contributing to the general debate on the theme.

3.2.1 The Hon Speaker underscored the critical role played by Parliaments in ensuring the protection of fundamental human rights and freedoms as well as the rule of law in constitutional democracies as a way of ensuring socio-economic development through the application of science and technology. In this regard, he called on Parliaments to jealously and religiously promote, protect and advance the respect for fundamental human rights and freedoms which must anchor the socio-economic development agenda.

3.2.2 With regards to technological advancement, the Hon. Speaker urged Parliaments to encompass a robust legislative agenda which is cognizant of the ever emerging innovative technology in our societies. Accordingly, Parliaments must lead to the application of modern information and communication technologies that enhance parliamentary e-governance. Furthermore, Parliaments must craft laws that respond to demands of a digital technological world economy.

4.0    The Forum of Women Parliamentarians

4.1    The Forum of Women Parliamentarians contributed to the draft resolution before the Standing Committee on Democracy and Human Rights entitled “Strengthening inter-parliamentary cooperation on migration and migration governance in view of the adoption of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration

4.2    In addition, the Forum of Women Parliamentarians held a panel discussion on “Gender Equality in Science and Technology”. In acknowledging that innovations transform societies by providing possibilities to improve individual empowerment and well-being, Parliamentarians noted the under-representation of women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). The need for women to have access to digital tools and to funding for training and undertaking as well as engaging in scientific careers in these fields was emphasized.

5.0    The Forum of Young Parliamentarians of the IPU

5.1    The Forum of Young Parliamentarians took stock of national efforts to enhance youth participation in human endeavors including lowering the age of requirement to run for Presidential office through constitutional reform. Participants emphasized the importance of political parties and their youth wings as stepping stones for youth participation in formal politics. The young Parliamentarians proposed initiatives such as capacitation sessions, limitations on political financing, parliamentary awareness raising activities and support for youth wings of political parties in order to increase youth participation.

 6.0   The work of other Standing Committees of the IPU

6.1    The Standing Committee on Peace and International Security held panel discussions on the following topics:

1. Comprehensive Disarmament and non-proliferation: The Committee noted that the International Community is currently addressing the use of conventional weapons through conventions such as the Arms Trade Treaty(ATT). Parliamentarians were called upon to hold governments to account in their efforts to implement the Treaty.

2. Combating Sexual Violence in UN peacekeeping operations and beyond: The Committee noted that sexual violence is now considered an international crime, hence the United Nations has put in place mechanisms where victims’ rights and dignity are prioritized. Accordingly,  delegates called for a zero tolerance approach and Parliamentary action that may include regular briefings on peace operations and regular assessments of existing national legislation to determine its applicability to sex crimes committed by its citizens while in the service of UN peace keeping Missions; and

3. Non-admissibility of using mercenaries which undermine peace and violate human rights: The Committee underscored the need for better legislation in order to prohibit the use of mercenaries and foreign fighters as well as to regulate the work of private companies. Legislation should address mercenaries’ impunity and promote respect and ethics among mercenary soldiers.

6.2    The Standing Committee on Sustainable Development, Finance and Trade deliberated on the following topics:-

1. Parliamentary Meeting on the Occasion of the United Nations Climate Change Conference: The Committee deliberated on the draft outcome document to be presented at the Parliamentary Meeting on the occasion of the UN Climate Change Conference scheduled for 9 December 2018 in Poland;

2. The Role of Fair and Free Trade and Investment in achieving SDGs, especially regarding Economic Equality, Sustainable Infrastructure, Industrialisation and Innovation: The Committee noted the nexus between trade and investment and that both are crucial to the achievement of SDGs. Trade is often neither free nor equitable and export-import relations are sometimes imbalanced. Parliamentarians were, therefore, called upon to prevent the spreading of systems that exacerbate inequalities and to promote a process that can help develop fair and free trade;

3. Taking forward the IPU resolution entitled “Engaging the Private Sector in Implementing the SDGs Especially Renewable Energy”: The Committee noted the benefits renewable energy could produce at environmental, social and economic levels. In this regard, regulations, enabling frameworks and comprehensive policies are crucial in order to effectively achieve a sustainable energy transition.

6.3    The Standing Committee on the United Nations Affairs deliberated on the following topics:

1.                 Would a UN Intergovernmental tax body help resolve outstanding issues of corporate tax evasion?: Noting problems with the current international tax regime such as the proliferation of tax havens, most delegates expressed support for the creation of an intergovernmental body at the UN that would work to establish a global tax standard on corporate taxation;

2.                 What scope for cooperation between Parliaments and WHO as the leading United Nations Agency for Global Health: The Committee noted the essential role of the WHO in helping countries implement SDG 3 on health. Parliaments play a critical role in legislation and budget oversight to expand the provision of health services to all people, particularly among the most vulnerable and those in the hinterland.

7.0    Resolutions Adopted at the 139th IPU Assembly

·       The resolution on the Emergency Item on “Climate Change – Let us not cross the line” was unanimously adopted.

-         The resolution primarily notes major concerns raised in the Report   of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 % above pre-industrial levels and related greenhouse gas emission pathways.

-         The resolution calls on Parliamentary action to:-

1.    Recognize and decisively act on the IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5%;

2.    Support and lead the development of the Rule Book and Guidelines for implementing the Paris Agreement, including resource mobilization and simplifying procedures for accessing climate change funding in order to build on the Talanoa Dialogue at the upcoming COP24;

3.    Take a leadership role in combating climate change and strengthening partnerships with all countries so as to meet targets set out in nationally determined contributions;

4.    Encourage governments to achieve 100% renewable energy targets; and

5.    Strengthen oversight of national and international commitments, including government implementation of national legislation in order to enhance transparency, accountability and periodic reporting on climate change.

·       The outcome document on the theme of the General Debate “Parliamentary Leadership in Promoting Peace and Development in the age of innovation and technological change” was endorsed by the IPU Assembly.

-         The outcome document recognizes the positive elements of technological developments that include improvements in connectivity and communication, creative innovative solutions to global challenges such as early warning signs to prevent disasters. It also recognizes the ethical and societal challenges associated with technological advancements such as cyber-crime, and the abuse of artificial intelligence.

-         The outcome document accented the critical role Parliaments should play in fostering an environment where science, technology and innovation make a positive contribution to peace, development and human well-being while at the same time limiting the associated risks as well as protecting the environment. It, therefore, calls on Parliaments to:- 

1.    Strengthen legal frameworks favourable to technological and

scientific innovation for peace and development through, among others, strengthening education in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), promoting universal digital literacy and guaranteeing respect for international human rights framework as a beacon that guides decisions on how to address difficult ethical issues.

2.    Make Parliaments drivers of technological innovation in favour of transparency and inclusion through use of modern information and communication technologies such as video live streaming of Parliamentary session and improved online information access and appropriately funding Parliamentary research services;

3.    Establish strong connections with the scientific community through supporting mechanisms and budgetary measures that guarantee science based policy making to ensure the sustainable well-being of future generations.

4.    Supporting international scientific cooperation in favour of peace and development as scientific methods can be used to build bridges and to bring countries in conflict resolution together. Parliaments can include scientific knowledge in Parliamentary oversight of the 2030 Agenda and implementation process.

       ·            The resolution submitted by the Standing Committee on Democracy and Human Rights on “Strengthening Inter-Parliamentary Cooperation on Migration and Migration Governance in View of the Adoption of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration” was adopted by consensus.

-         The resolution recognizes that migration has been a feature of human civilization from time immemorial and that governed humanely and fairly, migration contributes to inclusive and sustainable economic growth and development in both origin and destination countries as it strengthens the bonds of human solidarity. The resolution notes that people on the move, irrespective of their legal status, are entitled to the full enjoyment of human rights set out in the relevant international treaties and conventions. Accordingly, the Resolution welcomes the imminent adoption of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration.

-         The resolution calls on Parliaments to:-

1.    Ratify relevant international human rights laws, key ILO conventions and other relevant international and regional instruments protecting the rights of migrants, women, children and persons in vulnerable situations;

2.    Expand legal pathways for migration to facilitate labour mobility and skills training, family reunification and migration for reasons such as armed conflict, gender based violence, natural disasters and climate change.

3.    Require government to report periodically on progress on the implementation of national migration policies and to ensure parliamentary tools such as questions to Ministers, public hearings and Committee enquiries to hold government to account for the results achieved..

4.    Actively participate in and support regional integration processes and transnational efforts to coordinate migration policy and to domesticate relevant regional instruments in National legislation.

5.    Actively engage in the achievement of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development as a means to optimize migration, particularly extreme poverty, climate change and natural disasters, and urges Parliaments to promote measures aimed at raising awareness of and maximizing the development benefits of safe, orderly and regular migration.

6.    Participate in the Parliamentary Meeting on the occasion of the Inter-govermental Conference to adopt a Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration in December 2018 in Marrakesh, Morocco.

7.    Actively follow up on the implementation of the Global compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration.

8.0           Endorsement by the Assembly of the Declaration on the 70th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

       ·            The year 2018 marks the 70th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, a historic instrument drafted in the aftermath of the horrors of the Second World War. The fundamental rights in the declaration uphold the inherent dignity of all human beings and their attendant fundamental human rights which contribute to peace, security and prosperity of all Nations.

       ·            Against the backdrop of growing authoritarianism, internal conflict, war, poverty and large scale migration, Parliamentarians reaffirmed their commitment to the Declaration and its underlying principles in the following way:

1.    Guaranteeing that domestic legal framework complies with international and national human rights obligations and creates an enabling environment for inclusive participatory politics, a vibrant civil society and the rule of law.

2.                Ensuring Parliamentary discourse, proceedings and outreach are rooted in and promote equality, liberty and justice.

3.                Raise greater awareness of the Declaration among the people and help them access their rights thereunder.

4.                Acting in solidarity with Parliamentarians worldwide whose fundamental rights are being violated by raising their cases at appropriate fora and supporting the work of the IPU’s Committee on the Human Rights of Parliamentarians.

9.0           Endorsement by the Assembly of the Presidential Statement on recent developments on the Korean Peninsular

·       The Presidential Statement welcomed the recent positive political developments on the Korean Peninsula, notably the Inter-Korean Summit in April 2018 leading to the Panmunjom Declaration for Peace, Prosperity and Unification of the Korean Peninsula, the U.S – DPRK Summit in Singapore in June 2018 and President Moon Jae-in’s visit to Pyongyang in September 2018.

10.0  OBSERVATIONS

·       The General Debate, Committee Reports and Resolutions covered topical issues that require Parliamentary action through exercising its representative, legislative and oversight roles.

·       It is, therefore, imperative for Parliament, through respective Committees to introspect on the resolutions and where possible, come up with action plans to ensure that resolutions agreed upon at international fora are implemented.  There is need for follow up action to make our participation at international fora more meaningful.

11.0  Recommendations

 

ITEM

ACTION

RESPONSIBILITY

TIMELINE

1.

Climate Change

1. Enact appropriate Legislation on Climate Change. ( The delegation has taken note that Parliamentarians have attended the Annual Climate Change Conferences as part of the National delegation)

- Thematic Committee on SDGs, Portfolio Committee on Environment

-Expanded SDGs Committee of all Chairpersons

-Work plan to be determined by the Portfolio Committees by February 2019.

2

Increasing youth representation in Parliament

2.        Parliament must lobby political parties for youth quotas.

3.        Parliament must continue to include youth representation to delegations to International Meetings

- Chief Whips

 

 

-Presiding Officers 

-Ongoing

 

 

-Ongoing

3

 

Migration and Refugees

4.        Parliament through its oversight function to ensure that Government adheres to International Agreements regarding the rights of migrants and refugees.

5.        Parliament must ensure sufficient budget allocation towards migrants and refugees that is consistent with international commitments.

-Committee on Foreign Affairs, Industry and Commerce

 

 

-Portfolio Committee on Defence, Home Affairs and Security Services

-The relevant Portfolio Committees to come up with a work plan by February 2019

 

In the 2019 Budget

 

          HON. SEN. CHIEF KHUMALO: Thank you Mr. President for according me the opportunity to second Hon. Sen. Muzenda on a motion to the 139th IPU Assembly, which was held last month in Geneva.  I will go straight to the resolutions on the emergency items on climate change which was “let us not cross the line” and was unanimously adopted. 

The resolution primarily notes major concerns raised in the report of the Inter-Governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on the impacts of global warming of 1.5% above pre-industrial levels and related greenhouse gas emission pathways. 

          The resolution calls on Parliamentary action to recognise and decisively act on the IPCC special report on global warming of 1.5%, support and lead the development of the rule book and guidelines for implementing the Paris Agreement, including resource mobilisation and simplifying procedures for accessing climate change funding in order to build on the Talanoa Dialogue at the upcoming COP24.  It also recommended taking a leadership role in combating climate change and strengthening partnerships with all countries so as to meet set out targets in nationally determined contributions.  Governments were also encouraged to achieve 100% renewable energy targets as well as to strengthen the oversight of national and international commitments including government implementation of national legislation in order to enhance transparency, accountability and periodic reporting on climate change.

          The outcome document on the theme of the general debate which was Parliamentary Leadership in Promoting Peace and Development in the age of innovation and technological change was endorsed by the IPU Assembly.  The document also recognises the positive elements of technological developments that include improvements in connectivity and communication, creative innovative solutions to global challenges such as early warning signs to prevent disasters.  It also recognises the ethical and societal challenges associated with technological advancements such as cyber-crime and the abuse of artificial intelligence.  The outcome document also accented the critical role Parliaments should play in fostering an environment where science, technology and innovation make a positive contribution to peace, development and human well-being while at the same time limiting the associated risks as well as protecting the environment.  It, therefore, calls on Parliaments to: - strengthen legal frameworks favourable to technological and scientific innovation for peace and development through among others, strengthening education in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). It also seeks to make Parliament, drivers of technological innovation in favour of transparency and inclusion through use of modern information and communication technologies such as video live streaming of Parliamentary sessions and improved online information access and appropriately funding parliamentary research services;  establish strong connections with the scientific community through supporting mechanisms and budgetary measures that guarantee science based policy making to ensure the sustainable well-being of future generations; supporting international scientific corporations in favour of peace and development as scientific methods can be used to build bridges and to bring countries in conflict resolutions together.  Parliaments can include scientific knowledge in Parliamentary oversight of the 2030 agenda and implementation process.

          There was also the endorsement of the Assembly of the declaration of the 70th anniversary of the universal declaration of human rights.  The year 2018 marked the 70th anniversary of the universal declaration of human rights, a historic instrument drafted in the aftermath of the horrors of the Second World War.  The fundamental rights in the declaration uphold inherent dignity of all human beings and their attendant fundamental human rights which contribute to peace, security and prosperity of all nations.  This is against the backdrop of growing authoritarianism, internal conflict, war, poverty and large scale migration. Parliamentarians reaffirm their commitment to the declaration and its underlying principles in the following way;

·       Guaranteeing back the domestic legal frameworks;

·       Compliance with national and international human rights obligations and;

·       Creating an enabling environment for inclusive participatory politics;

·       A vibrant civil society and the rule of law;

·       Ensuring parliamentary discourse, proceedings and outreaches are rooted in and promote equality, liberty and justice.

·       Raise greater awareness of the declaration among the people and hear them access their rights here under.

·       Acting in solidarity with Parliaments worldwide, whose fundamental rights are being violated, by raising their cases at appropriate fora and;

·       Supporting work of the Inter-Parliamentary Union Committee on the Human Rights of Parliamentarians.

Mr. President Sir, with those few words, I do not know whether they are few or many but with those few words, I would want once again to thank you for giving me the opportunity to support the motion raised by Hon. Sen. Muzenda. I thank you.

          HON. SEN. MUZENDA: Mr. President Sir, I move for the adjournment of the debate.

HON. SEN. MOHADI: I second Mr. President.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume: Wednesday, 21st November, 2018.

 

ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE HON. DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF SENATE

GROUND BREAKING CEREMONY OF NEW PARLIAMENT BUILDING

THE DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF SENATE: There will be a ground breaking and laying of the foundation stone at the new Parliament Building in Mount Hampden on the 30th of November, at 1000hrs. All Members of Parliament are invited.

MOTION

PRESIDENTIAL SPEECH: DEBATE ON ADDRESS

Third Order read: Adjourned debate on motion in reply to the Presidential Speech.

Question again proposed.

HON. SEN. MPOFU: Thank you Mr. President. Mr. President Sir and Hon. Members of this august House, I am honoured to present my speech as Senator for Bubi Umguza Constituency. I wish to commence by acknowledging and appreciating the political leadership for our country under His Excellency, the President E. D. Mnangagwa. I want to start by acknowledging and appreciating the political leadership for our country under His Excellency, the President E. D. Mnangagwa for creating an enabling environment for peace, free and fair, credible and democratic elections.

While it has only been a few months now since our recent elections, as Zimbabweans, we need to collectively take stock of what we did write and wrong so that we can identify the need for improvement going forward. Of course as the President mentioned in His State of the Nation Address (SONA), the events of the 1st August, 2018 in which six (6) people lost their lives is deeply regrettable and should never be allowed to happen ever again. All human life is sacred and three months down the line, we are still mourning and praying for the families of all those who needlessly lost their lives on that day.

We are grateful of course for the appointment of an independent Commission led by the former South African President Kgalema Motlanthe which is conducting hearings and probing on what transpired on that fateful and unforgettable day. We hope that all those who will be implicated in the violent disturbances and needless loss of life will face the full wrath of the law.

I need to reiterate that not a single one of us in this House is worth the precious life of our fellow citizens. Beyond our party politics, all of us need to put the life and welfare of our people first. As the preamble of our Constitution amply provides, we must be united in our diversity, entrench democracy, good transparent and accountable governance as well as rule of law. I therefore implore all of us to put party politics behind us and prioritise the lives of our people first as well as the socio-economic development of our nation at large.

Still on the subject of elections gone by, while there are of course areas that still need improvement; we also however need to appreciate the much improved electoral environment of 2018 in which all parties campaigned freely without any restrictions. It is an open secret that there is a lot that needs to be done in order to improve the lives of our people and our country in general.

In my view and echoing His Excellency the President’s vision, the top most priority for us is our economy. We need to work on reviving and improving our economy. Industries are opening and many more need to be resuscitated. We are without a doubt far from where we should ideally be as a country but I am glad to see the steps that are being taken by the Government to address the socio-economic challenges that our people face. We need to create an enabling environment where our people are going to realise their full potential.

Our people need jobs and they need to access their money from the banks. They need good quality modern infrastructure, a good quality health care system and all of us must collectively get together to create an environment in which our people can live good quality lives and the basis upon which all this can be achieved is a good vibrant economy.

As the President has consistently said, time for politicking and playing blame game is over. We should all let bygones be bygones and focus on the development of our economy so that we can create an enabling environment that prospers our people. This is the only country that we have as Zimbabweans and we have to work tirelessly to develop and make it the best place for our people to live in.  Zimbabweans are looking forward to us as their elected representatives to get down working and addressing the challenges that beset us as a nation across the political divide.  We all need to hold hands and work together as Zimbabweans to deliver on the various election promises and commitments that we made to our people.

Mr. President, the world’s greatest icon, the late former President of the Republic of South Africa, Cde. Nelson Mandela once remarked - the subject of constitutionalism, “the Constitution of any country is a living document.  The way citizens understand its requirements will and of course must adapt over time.  However, the fundamental principles must be unchanging.  Full understanding of how and why those principles were adopted will help leaders to ensure that they remain true to the solemn undertakings which they have made and to all those who are being led”.  I implore all of us Honourable Senators to commit to give full effect to the operation of our Constitution.  This leads me to the subject of devolution. 

Our Constitution provides for devolution.  His Excellency the President has also consistently made calls for us to give effect to devolution.  Mr. President Sir and Hon. Senators, we can no longer delay.  Of course, we will remain one people and one nation but devolution will enable us to achieve fair and balanced development spearheaded by provincial councils which must initiate economic programmes for their respective provinces.  Of course, this is in sync with Section (2) of the country’s Constitution under which central Government should allow provincial councils to set local development priorities.  This puts the economy ahead of politics.

 Mr. President and Hon. Senators, we must therefore all discard any selfish interests and stand guided by the pressing basic needs of our people who have afforded us the privilege of leading them.  Our loyalty must be unflinching to our people first.  As we swore by the Constitution, we need to entrench democracy, good, transparent and accountable governance and the rule of law.  We also need to perpetually, reaffirm our commitment to upholding and defending our people’s fundamental human rights and their freedoms.  I need to reiterate that we must put the needs of our people first and put aside all politics when it comes to delivering services to them.  That is the least that our people deserve.

Mr. President and Hon. Senators, I want to reiterate my appreciation to all citizens of our beautiful nation and people of Bubi-Umguza, in particular for putting their faith in all of us and especially ZANU PF in particular, to lead them in Government for the next five years.  We never  and certainly do not take this mandate lightly and I, in particular promise to do my absolute best to contribute meaningfully to the President’s vision for a better and prosperous Zimbabwe and Bubi-Umguza Constituency in particular. 

As His Excellency, President Mnangagwa implored us during his SONA, we in ZANU PF will work as servant leaders to tirelessly address the challenges that beset our country generally and all our people in particular.  There are obvious specific tasks which all of us as leaders must urgently address.  We need to provide all our people with basic services that include access to clean water and sanitation.  I implore on all local municipal Government authorities to work hard to provide clean water and sanitation to our people.  It is unforgivable that after so many years of democratic governance, our people are still affected by primitive diseases such as cholera and typhoid.  We must self-introspect as leaders and re-commit ourselves to doing our best to provide clean water and sanitation to our people.  It is also embarrassing and certainly unacceptable that so many years since we attained our democracy, many of our people in the rural areas still use the bush to relieve themselves.  This is unacceptable and I am sure all my fellow Honourable Senators who represent rural constituencies agree that something needs to be done.  We need to speed up the process of modernising our rural economies and infrastructure to improve our people’s basic daily lives.

When it comes to education, we all know that this is a sacrosanct right that everybody is born with, which is firmly entrenched in Section 19 (2) (d) of our Constitution.  We, as Zimbabweans, are generally known for our high literacy and education levels.  It is an open secret that some of the most developed countries of the 21st Century have some of the world’s best education infrastructure.  Education is a very important denominator for any country.  It is indispensable to the advancement of development and technologies.  As we try to address the under development that we are experiencing as a country, we need to reprioritise the place of education in our country so that we should not only produce educated citizens but also employable citizens who are able to respond to and address the needs of our country and our economy in particular. 

If we are to prioritise economic development as a strategic response to the pressing need to leapfrog our economic development in line with our national aspirations as well as regional, continental and international trajectory as expressed by His Excellency the President in his SONA, we need to revisit and acknowledge the importance of education.  It is not enough to have an education system that only produces people who are looking to be employed.  Our educated citizens should also be people who are able to create employment and all of us leaders must collectively get together to bring about such a vision to fruition.

We also need to address challenges that have to do with high student numbers for very few teachers.  The average teacher to pupil ratio should be addressed to that of recommended levels which of course depends on a variety of factors.  Schooling infrastructure needs to be appreciated and our top performing pupils need to be acknowledged.  The morale in our education system needs to be boosted and that is our role as leaders.

 Mr. President, as our Constitution provides and as the President emphasised in his SONA, we as lawmakers must “adopt and implement policies and legislation to develop efficiency, competence, accountability, transparency, personal integrity and financial probity in all institutions and agencies of Government at every level and in every public…..

THE HON. DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF SENATE:  Hon. Member, your time is almost up.  You may proceed but you have four minutes left.

HON. SEN. MPOFU:  All public appointments must be made primarily on the basis of merit.  We must also measure to expose, combat and eradicate all forms of corruption and abuse of power by those holding political and public offices.  To this effect, I want to acknowledge and appreciate all the work that is done by His Excellency to deal with the scourge of corruption that is eroding our moral fabric and has inexplicable and abhorrent negative consequences on our performance as Government.  All manner and forms of corruption must be rooted out.

As the results of our elections demonstrated, we are sadly and unfortunately a polarised society and I want to thank the President for his consistent and persistent calls for unity.  I urge all of us as Members of the Senate to join in these calls for unity.  We are one nation, one Zimbabwe and as the preamble to the Constitution provides, we must be united in diversity.  I therefore implore all of us to promote national unity, peace and stability as expressed in our Constitution.

Moving on from sweeping generalisations, I now want to very specifically outline my constituency development initiatives in the context of the President’s SONA and vision for our country.  I will of course naturally work in tandem with my fellow MP colleagues from Bubi-Umguza to address challenges relating to the improvement of food security, education, agriculture and health.

My particular thrust is in promoting the socio-economic upliftment of women, encouraging and improving education amongst our people especially those of school going age, the improvement of road and transport infrastructure as well as supporting agriculture since my constituency is an agriculture based economy.

As we all know, Bubi-Umguza Constituency does not receive a lot of rainfall.  The outlook is even bleaker for this coming rainfall season as meteorologists have duly advised us that we might not have much rainfall this coming season.  We are of course grateful to the Government’s Command Agriculture supported by a good rainfall season last year which resulted in us having a bumper harvest season.  We recorded surpluses in food crops and this will of course cushion us from the potentially disastrous effects of the impending drought.  Despite the envisaged drought, the surpluses that were recorded in the past agricultural season, we need to actively find innovative and creative ways of cultivating our land which include tapping from underground water sources to irrigate crops and water our animals.

In line with the President’s call during the SONA, we will work closely with local farmers to come up with innovative ways of enabling irrigation of crops to alleviate the perennial challenges of reduced crop yields and poor access to good nutritious food.  We also want to appreciate the commitment of the Ministry of Lands, Agriculture, Water, Culture and Rural Resettlement to assist households to adapt to the uncertainties and effects of climate change on rainfall cycles in order to enable households to farm wisely in the context of changing rainfall patterns.

As we approach the festive season, I call upon all road users to exercise extra care, caution and patience on our roads.  We appreciate the Government’s efforts to resuscitate our road infrastructure.  Our hearts go out to the families of people who lost their lives in the tragedy that occurred in Rusape on 8th November, as well as those who also lost their lives on 16th November in Gwanda.  As I said before, all human life is sacrosanct and the loss of any life in avoidable circumstances cannot be tolerated.  I implore all our traffic police officers to deal with all delinquent and errant drivers and remove them from our roads.  I wish all Zimbabweans a happy and peaceful festive season.  I thank you.

HON. SEN. S. K. MOYO:  I move that the debate do now adjourn.

HON. SEN. MOHADI:  I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume:  Wednesday, 21st November, 2018.

MOTION

NATIONAL POLICY ON PERSONS LIVING WITH DISABILITY

Fourth Order read:  Adjourned debate on motion on the need to formulate a comprehensive National Disability Policy and review the Disabled Persons Act.

Question again proposed.

HON. SEN. ZIVIRA:  I move that the debate do now adjourn.

HON. SINAMPANDE:  I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume:  Wednesday, 21st November, 2018.

MOTION

DEVOLUTION OF POWER

Fifth Order read:  Adjourned debate on motion on the call for devolution.

Question again proposed.

HON. SEN. MWONZORA:  I move that the debate do now adjourn.

HON. SEN.  SINAMPANDE:  I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume: Wednesday, 21st November, 2018.

MOTION

CASH SITUATION IN THE COUNTRY

Sixth Order read:  Adjourned debate on motion on the call to solve the cash crisis in the country.

Question again proposed.

HON. SEN. SHOKO:  I move that the debate do now adjourn.

HON. SEN. PHUTI:  I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

          Debate to resume: Wednesday, 21st November, 2018.

MOTION

NATIONAL DRUG POLICY AND LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK

          Seventh Order read: Adjourned debate on motion on National Drug Policy and legislative framework to effectively regulate drug use.

          Question again proposed.

          HON. SEN. SHOKO: I move that the debate do now adjourn.

          HON. SEN. RWAMBIWA:  I second.

          Motion put and agreed to.

          Debate to resume: Wednesday, 21st November, 2018.

MOTION

SOLUTIONS TO PROBLEMS OF VENDING

          Eighth Order read: Adjourned debate on motion on finding solutions to challenges associated with vending. 

Question again proposed.

HON. SEN. CHABUKA: I move that the debate do now adjourn.

HON. SEN. RAMBANEPASI:  I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume: Wednesday, 21st November, 2018.

On the motion of HON. SEN. MUZENDA, seconded by HON. SEN. MOHADI, the Senate adjourned at Six Minutes to Four o’clock p.m.

 

 

 

Senate Hansard SENATE HANSARD 20 NOVEMBER 2018 VOL 28 NO 19