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NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD 07 AUGUST 2019 45-78

PARLIAMENT OF ZIMBABWE

Wednesday, 7th August, 2019

The National Assembly met at a Quarter-past Two o’clock p.m.

PRAYERS

(THE ACTING SPEAKER (HON. MUTOMBA) in the Chair)

THE ACTING SPEAKER’S RULINGS

POINT OF ORDER BY HON. T. KHUMALO ON THE LAW USED

BY THE CHAIR TO BAR MEMBERS OF THE OPPOSITION FROM

ENTERING THE CHAMBER

        THE ACTING SPEAKER:  At the commencement of

yesterday’s sitting Hon. T. Khumalo rose on a point of order asking which law the Chair used to bar Members of the Opposition from entering this Chamber.  The law that was applied is Standing Order 110 of the Standing Rules and Orders of the National Assembly.  I must briefly state that on that note, Hon. Sikhala correctly guided the Chair that there is a distinction between the Chair, the persona and the individual.  Summarily, when sitting in this Chair, regardless of the change in faces, decisions made and pronounced from this Chair are final as stated by Standing Order 206 of the Standing Rules and Orders of the National Assembly.  There is no room for appeal to a new face in the Chair.  This matter is accordingly concluded and there shall be no further points of privilege or points of clarity raised on it.

POINT OF ORDER BY HON. CHIKWINYA ON THE PROCEDURE

APPLIED TO WITHDRAW THE ADVERSE REPORT ON THE

MAINTENANCE OF PEACE AND ORDER BILL [H. B. 3, 2019]

THE ACTING SPEAKER: Yesterday, the 6th of August, 2019,

Hon. Chikwinya rose on a point of order seeking guidance on which

Standing Order was used to withdraw the Adverse Report on the Maintenance of Peace and Order Bill [H. B. 3, 2019] (hereinafter referred to as the “Bill”).  The Parliamentary Legal Committee

(hereinafter referred to as the “Committee”) held four meetings to consider the Bill.  I will speak to three of the meetings that took place in order to contextualise the procedure that was applied.

         After having noted what they viewed as constitutional violations, the Committee resolved to meet the Minister of Home Affairs and

Cultural Heritage, Hon. Mathema.  This meeting took place on the 19th of June, 2019.  Minister Mathema was away on official duty but was represented by the Minister of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs, Hon. Ziyambi, who was the Acting Minister of Home Affairs then.  In that meeting, the Minister conceded to a number of the Committee’s concerns and promised to bring a Notice of Amendments to address

them.       

         The Committee proceeded to issue an Adverse Certificate and report on the Bill, after further deliberations in a meeting of the Committee held on the 24th of July, 2019.  Accordingly, an announcement was made in this House on the same day indicating that an Adverse Report had been received from the Committee.

         On Tuesday the 30th of July, 2019, the Committee of the Whole House sat to consider the Adverse Report issued on the Bill.  On that day, Hon. Samukange, the Committee Chair rose to withdraw the Adverse Report.  At that point, Hon. Biti suggested that instead of withdrawing the Adverse Report, the Committee of the Whole House should adjourn so that the Parliamentary Legal Committee could go back and consider the amendments proposed by the Minister.  This suggestion was dully taken and resulted in a meeting of the Committee held on the 1st of August, 2019, during which the Committee considered amendments proposed by the Minister to resolve the Committees’ apprehensions.  In this meeting, the Committee determined that the

Notice of Amendments submitted by the Minister satisfied their views.  The Committee then resolved to withdraw its Adverse Report having been satisfied by the Notice of Amendments.

         Accordingly, when the matter arose again in Committee of the Whole House on the 1st of August, 2019, Hon. Mataranyika moved a motion that the Adverse Report be withdrawn on the basis that the Committee had received the Notice of Amendments which satisfied their constitutional concerns.

         The Committee of the Whole House considered the report in terms of Standing Order 170 of the Standing Rules and Orders of the National Assembly.  During the deliberations of the report, Hon. Mataranyinka moved a motion in terms of Standing Order 173 (a) of the Standing Rules and Orders of the National Assembly.  The question as to whether or not there was debate was also put and there was no debate.  In terms of Standing Order 175, the Chair of the Committee of the Whole House then reported progress to the Chair of the National Assembly.  The

House duly adopted the recommendation of the Committee of the Whole House.  Thus the Adverse Report was withdrawn with leave and this is correctly reflected in the Hansard of the National Assembly dated 1 August, 2019.

ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE ACTING SPEAKER

APOLOGIES RECEIVED FROM MINISTERS

  THE ACTING SPEAKER: I have only received one apology

from the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National

Housing, Hon. July Moyo

       *HON. MADZIMURE: I rise on a point of privilege.

      THE ACTING SPEAKER: What is your point of privilege Hon.

Member?

*HON. MADZIMURE: Mr. Speaker, it is now seven weeks since I requested the Minister of Home Affairs to come to this House and clarify on the progress made so far to ascertain the whereabouts of Itai

Dzamara – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] - Mr. Speaker Sir. We want to know whether he is still alive or not so that his family can get closure on this issue.  The whole country wants to know what happened to Itayi Dzamara because it is the right of Zimbabweans to be protected by the law. Can the Minister do that now so that the people of Zimbabwe know.

   THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS AND CULTURAL

HERITAGE (HON. MATHEMA):  Thank you Hon. Speaker.  Like I

said before, we are still continuing with the investigations so there is nothing I can say.  I thank you.

THE ACTING SPEAKER: I have received other apologies from the following Ministers.  I want to announce other apologies from

Ministers Hon. Member.  – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.]

-

Hon. Minister Ncube for State Security; Hon. Ndlovu, the Minister of Industry and Commerce; Hon. Haritatos, the Deputy Minister of Lands, Agriculture, Water, Climate and Rural Resettlement; and Hon. S. B. Moyo, Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Trade.

HON. K. PARADZA: Thank you very much Mr. Speaker.  I rise on behalf of 350 Members of Parliament here.  I want to thank His Excellency the President Hon. E. D. Mnangagwa that for the first time since independence, our Hon. Members are going to have diplomatic passports – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.]

Mr. Speaker, therefore we would like to whole heartedly thank His Excellency for extending this privilege to all Members of Parliament whether from the opposition or ruling party, they are going to get diplomatic passports starting next week.

Both sides of the House started singing different songs.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Hon. Members, may we have

order in the House.  I am going to send you out.  I am actually seeing what is happening in the House.

HON. K. PARADZA: Thank you Mr. Speaker.  As I said that this is the first time since independence and it was only this Parliament within the region and within the continent or even throughout the world that Members of Parliament did not have diplomatic passports.  So as I said, we would want to thank the President for that gesture.  However, Mr. Speaker Sir, there is a caveat to this. All those who are going to abuse these passports; they are going to be withdrawn.  Thank you Mr.

Speaker Sir.

+HON. S. K. MGUNI: I will talk representing people in

Matabeleland North. This last Saturday, the 3rd of August, 2019 this year we had three different elections, firstly we had elections for a Member of Parliament in Lupane.  We were contesting against many political parties and one of them being MDC Alliance, MDC-T and the other political parties that are in Zimbabwe.  I would like to congratulate Matabeleland North.  We also had elections for councillors in Nkayi which is also in Matabeleland North.  All the other opposition political parties were contesting including MDC-Alliance led by Chamisa,  ZANU PF,  MDC-T and LEAD.

We would like to congratulate ZANU PF again because ZANU PF won the elections.  As I said, we had three elections; we had another election in Bubi.  These were elections for councillors and again ZANU PF won the elections.  I would like to congratulate ZANU PF and our leader, President E. D. Mnangagwa.  I would like everyone to see the

President E. D. Mnangagwa’s vision because that is the party that can lead the people.  I would like to congratulate our President for being such an excellent leader, the new councillors and the new MP Mbongeni.  Thank you.

     HON. MUSIKAVANHU: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir, I rise on a

point of privilege to thank His Excellency the President Cde. E.

D.Mnangagwa for taking the noble decision to declare the ElNino induced 2018/19 drought a national state of disaster.  This decision by the President is going to enable upwards – [HON. MEMBERS:

Inaudible interjections.] -

        THE ACTING SPEAKER: Order Hon. Members.

         HON. KASHIRI: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir, the point of privilege I am making is to the benefit of all Zimbabweans. It would be appreciated if the opposition were to listen. The decision by His

Excellency the President Hon. E. D. Mnangagwa is going to result in the

United Nations coming in to support us with US$33m for drought relief

– [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

        THE ACTING SPEAKER: Hon. Members, I am going to send

some of you out of the House. You do not have to point, I have got eyes to see and I see who is making noise.

         HON. KASHIRI: Mr. Speaker Sir, the wisdom by His Excellency E. D. Mnangagwa to declare a state of national disaster has opened doors for the World Food Programme to come on board and also to assist the nation with more than US$30m in support of food relief, drilling of boreholes and provision of clean water. I stand to applaud His

Excellency for this good measure.  I thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.

  *HON. MUSHORIWA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  We now

have something like eight weeks after the Speaker gave a ruling that the Minister of Local Government was to come and answer to our questions, of which this matter was later brought up again by Hon. Hamauswa the issue of the water crisis in Zimbabwe.  This is affecting rural and urban communities.  We are appealing that the Minister comes to this House and address the nation on the plans of Government regarding this. The budget which was presented in this House this week does not have a provision of clean water supplies.  I am appealing that this matter be expedited.

       THE ACTING SPEAKER: Hon. Mushoriwa, the Minister has

actually extended his apology, he is not in the House.

       HON. MAMOMBE: On a point of privilege Hon. Speaker.

    THE ACTING SPEAKER: What is your point of privilege?  No

more points of privilege.

      HON. MAMOMBE: It is very important that I rise this Mr.

Speaker. The Hon. Minister of Foreign Affairs has never stepped in this House.  We have questions in terms of our foreign affairs issues; we should get an apology or an explanation why the Hon. Minister is not coming to Parliament.

              THE ACTING SPEAKER: Your point is noted. Hon. Member,

the Hon. Minister of Foreign Affairs has actually extended his apology –

[HON. MEMBERS: Everyday!] –

       HON. DINAR: On a point of privilege Mr. Speaker Sir.

    THE ACTING SPEAKER: What is your point of privilege?

         HON. DINAR: A ruling was made that a response was going to be made in three weeks, now it is three months. The Hon. Minister is present today...

    THE ACTING SPEAKER: I am going to send you out right

away.

                                                                                    MOTION

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

        THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND

PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): Thank you Mr.

Speaker Sir, I rise to move that Orders of the Day Nos. 1 to 2 be stood over until Order No. 3 has been disposed of.

        Motion put and agreed to.

SECOND READING

MAINTENANCE OF PEACE AND ORDER BILL [H. B. 3, 2019]

Second Reading:  Maintenance of Peace and Order Bill [H. B. 3,

2019].

SECOND READING

MAINTAINANCE OF PEACE AND ORDER BILL [H. B. 3, 2019]

     THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS ND CULTURAL

HERITAGE (HON. MATHEMA): Thank you Hon. Speaker.  Section

117, of our Constitution exhorts the Legislature, among other things,  to make laws for the peace, order and good governance of Zimbabwe.  It is not by chance that these three things, peace, order and good governance keep company with each other in the same sentence.  I will go further and say peace and order are the pre-conditions for enjoying all the other blessings we desire for ourselves – family, prosperity, community, the pursuit of knowledge and happiness, freedom, self determination and security to property.

No matter what our differences maybe, peace and order afford us the time to think and urge among ourselves, how we may improve if we have gone wrong.  As Aristotle once said, “the use of rational speech is more distinctive of human beings than the use of their limbs”.  I will not rehearse for Hon. Members the history of how law and order legislation has been used and abused since colonial times in our country, how the

Law and Order Maintenance Act was succeeded by the Public Order and

Security Act (POSA) and how it is now proposed to be replaced by this Bill before you.   Suffice to say that POSA itself under went several amendments to moderate its provisions since it was enacted in 2002.

                 Most notably, in 2007, the Public Order and Security Amendment

Number 18 of 2007, which was partly the result of an inter-political party consultation process.  This Bill too has been subjected to searching cross-party scrutiny by the Parliamentary Legal Committee resulting in several amendments that are embodied in the Order Paper.  Some concessions were made by the Government with a view to strengthening the constitutionality of the Bill, others were made in the spirit of wanting to achieve consensus across political party lines.

         I will also not go into any detail about the particulars of the Bill; the Explanatory Memorandum appended to the Bill is sufficient for that, though I will highlight a couple of its salient features.  As a matter of general principle, no reasonable person can dispute the need for a wellregulated community to make some legal provisions for the orderly and dignified conduct of public assemblies and processions as long as the legal measures in question fairly respect the rights, freedoms and interest of participants and non-participants alike.

         Part of the inspiration for POSA was the Public Order Act of England and Wales, enacted in 1986 mostly on the basis of recommendations by the UK Law Commission.  That Act requires at least six clear days’ written notice to be given to the police before most public processions, including details of the intended time and route and giving the name and address of at least one person proposing to organise it.  It creates offences for the organisers of a procession if they do not give sufficient notice or if the procession diverges from the notified time or route.  It also empowers the police to impose conditions on processions to prevent serious public disorder, serious criminal damage or serious disruption to the life of the community.  There are provisions also to prevent hate speech at public assemblies.

         If we were to consider these provisions in the light of our own Constitutional freedoms, a critic using an unreasonably strict interpretation might conclude that they offend against the freedom of assembly and freedom of speech but as will be pointed out below the rights and freedoms of demonstrators are not the only rights and freedoms at stake here.

         Another more direct inspiration for POSA and for its proposed replacement, the Maintenance of Peace and Order Bill is the Regulation of Gatherings Act of South Africa.  we challenge any critic of our proposed law to compare our provisions with those of the South African Act and to point out to us in what particular way the South African Act better than ours with respect to the following matters:- the notification of public gatherings, police powers to prohibit and regulate public gatherings, the use of force by police to disperse unruly gatherings, the zone within which gatherings may not be allowed around certain public buildings and offences and penalties for non-compliance with the Act.  In every case, it will be found that our provisions are reasonable and comparable and in some cases even more favourable.

         As regards Clause 14, (Persons to carry identity documents) of the Bill, we  have concluded in the Notice of Amendments to be presented before you at the Committee Stage that no police officer ought to demand the production of an identity document from anyone except upon reasonable suspicion that that person has committed some offence.  Very often, the mere production of such an ID will dissolve suspicions of criminality and hence make an arrest unnecessary.  I wish also to

draw your attention to Clause 18 which specifies the circumstances under which the Defence Forces may be summoned to assist the police.

This provision is included incompliance with Government’s obligations under Section 213 of the Constitution. Our Government has welcomed any criticism of the Bill made in an open and constructive spirit with aview to improving it but cannot do anything about vague and unspecific accusations made primarily with the object of discrediting our country, unjustifiably in the eyes of the international community.  As with any law, a balance must be struck between the rights and freedoms of individuals and the interests of the community at large.

Many kinds of meetings have been put outside the scope of this Bill as you can tell by consulting the Schedule to the Bill.  The State is concerned only with those gatherings, processions and marches primarily but not exclusively of a political nature in which partisanship and bad feeling may get out of hand to the detriment of the rights and freedoms of others.  Considerations of public health may also make it incumbent upon Government to regulate gatherings.

In conclusion, the Government objects strongly to the characterisation of the Bill as ‘undemocratic’ without specifying in what specific respects the Bill is ‘undemocratic’ or how it violates the charter of rights and freedoms in any way not contemplated in a democratic society.  The rights and freedoms of demonstrators are not the only rights and freedoms to be considered when a gathering has the potential to become disorderly.  Other human beings have rights and freedoms too, in particular those who may be victimised in their persons and property by unruly demonstrators.  To quote in part from Section 87 of our Constitution:

“(2) The fundamental rights and freedoms set out in [the

Declaration of Rights and Freedoms] this Chapter may be limited only in terms of a law of general application and to the extent that the limitation is fair, reasonable, necessary and justifiable in a democratic society based on openness, justice, human dignity, equality and freedom, taking into account all relevant factors including – (b) the purpose of the limitation, in particular whether it is necessary in the interests of

defence, public safety, public order, public morality, public health, regional or town planning or the general public interest; and (d) the need to ensure that the enjoyment of rights and freedoms by any person does not prejudice the rights and freedoms of others.”

The same provision of the Constitution urges lawmakers to consider whether there are any less restrictive means of achieving the purpose of the limitation.  This we have striven to do in the amendments to the Bill that are embodied in the Order Paper.

I therefore urge Members on both sides of this House to support this very necessary measure to secure peace and order in our beloved country.

Mr. Speaker Sir, I move that the Bill be read for the Second time.

HON. CHIKWINYA:  On a point of order...  

THE ACTING SPEAKER:  Hon. Chikwinya, you will get the chance to debate – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –  HON. CHIKWINYA:  I rise on a point of order purely to try and rail road the procedures of Parliament into the correct direction.

When this Bill was read for the first time, it was referred to the Parliamentary Legal Committee and an adverse report was produced after a meeting of the PLC as you have read earlier in your announcement.  After the adverse report was issued, the Bill was withdrawn and amendments were done to the adverse report.  As alluded to by the Minister in his reading, the amendments do not appear on the Order Paper despite him referring that they are in the Order Paper. 

It is unprocedural that the Minister ambushes Members of

Parliament and expects them to debate this Bill.  We cannot debate a Bill

– [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –   We cannot debate a

Bill whose amendments are supposed to be appearing on the Order Paper but are not there, neither are they in our pigeon holes.  That is number one – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

THE ACTING SPEAKER:  Go ahead Hon. Member.

HON. CHIKWINYA:  Hon. Speaker, this Bill goes at the fundamental roots of our engagement drive for Zimbabwe to become a member of the community of nations.  If we are going to fast track this Bill for petty political reasons, putting cosmetic lipstick into a process which is supposed to liberate and actually deepen our democratic fundamentals, we will be doing ourselves a disfavour.  We therefore need to see the amendments – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible

interjections.] –

Hon. Speaker, Members of Parliament cannot be expected to put up meaningful debate with the Hon. Minister referring to the Order Paper which does not contain the same amendments. I therefore move that this debate be adjourned until the amendments appear on the Order Paper, then we can come here and debate.

HON. CHIKOMBO:  I second.

THE ACTING SPEAKER:  Thank you Hon. Chikwinya.

I have already ruled on the matter and the amendments will be on the Order Paper at the end of the Second Reading. The withdrawal as ruled, was based on the agreement between the Parliamentary Legal Committee and Parliament – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible

interjections.] –

HON. CHIKWINYA: How then are Members of Parliament

expected to debate?  I expect a ruling.  The effect of your ruling Hon. Speaker is that the debate must equally be adjourned until the amendments appear on the Order Paper because as Members debate, they must refer to the Order Paper.  We must not create room for ambushing Members of Parliament.  On what basis are we going to debate – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

THE ACTING SPEAKER:  Hon. Chikwinya, Hon. Chikwinya, I

do understand and appreciate....

HON. CHIKOMBO:  On a point of order Mr. Speaker. We cannot debate something that is not on the Order Paper.  The amendments should be put on the Order Paper and we debate.

         HON. HAMAUSWA: It is stated, refer to the Order Paper meaning that the amendments are supposed to be on the Order Paper.

         HON. S. SITHOLE:  The Americans have poured a lot of money

in this Bill, this Bill will pass I am talking as Cde Sithole S. I am saying so.  We know you have interest you MDC people including the Americans.

  THE ACTING SPEAKER:  Order, order Hon. Members. We are

going to allow the Minister to put the amendments on the Order Paper and the debate will resume tomorrow, 8th August, 2019 – [HON.

MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] – [AN HON. MEMBER: Most indebted Hon.

Speaker.]

   THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS AND CULTURAL

HERITAGE (HON. MATHEMA):  I move that the debate do now

adjourn.

        Motion put and agreed to.

       Debate to resume:  Thursday, 8th August, 2019.

MOTION

FINANCE BILL: BUDGET DEBATE

         First Order read:  Adjourned debate on motion that leave be granted to bring in a Finance Bill.

        Question again proposed.

          HON. MUSABAYANA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir for giving

me the opportunity to add my voice to this very important debate.  Mr. Speaker, I bring greetings from the people of Wedza North

Constituency.  Mr. Speaker Sir, after they went through the Budget Statement, they gave me their recommendations that I am pleased to favour the Ministry with.

         Mr. Speaker Sir, may I humbly submit the following; it was a general feeling by the people of Wedza North Constituency that there should have been a separation of the Mid-Term Budget Review from the Supplementary Budget.  We are cognisant of the fact that the former feeds into the latter, meaning the Mid-Term Budget Review will actually feed into the Supplementary Budget – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible

interjections.] -

  THE ACTING SPEAKER:  Order, order, Hon. Deputy Chief

Whip, please take your seat.   Hon. Members, it is very difficult for interpreters to hear what the Hon. Member is saying, may you lower your voices please.  Hon. Musabayana, may you resume your debate.

       HON. MUSABAYANA:  When you look at the Mid-Term Fiscal

Policy, it is supposed to be evaluated because it was the first time that this frame of austerity for prosperity was implemented – [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] – Mr. Speaker Sir, it is important to evaluate the policy because any policy framework is supposed to take care of the core macro-economic factors, which are economic growth, productivity and production, the employment fundamentals, the trade and above all the inflation.  Mr. Speaker Sir, there was need for us as a House to have time to review how effective the economic policies implemented are towards the economic growth.  We are also supposed to look at its impact in terms of agriculture, mining, manufacturing and our trade.  So, in that regard, it was important that we gave it more time for evaluation before merging it with the Supplementary Budget.  It was also important to put to test this new economic framework in so far as inflation is concerned because we need to check and see if this stabilisation of inflation is sustained into medium to long term and thus make informed decisions to continue or discontinue either framework.

         We may also have challenges with the inter-bank rate because we are not sure that this interbank rate will be sustained, why - because it was introduced in the midst of the tobacco selling season.  So, we also need to put it to test and see if the trend will be sustained after the selling season has been wound down.  What we then need to do is to separate the mid-term Budget Review and the Supplementary Budget.   It is important that we were supposed to reflect on it and be able to apply critical thinking skills as we put it to test and make sure that we can move on with it.  Any model that we have must be put to proper test before we continue with it.

I also want to turn to the Supplementary Budget.  On the recommendations that I have for the Supplementary Budget, we are not sure if the Ministry has moved away from austerity to prosperity to the new theme that we now have.  The first recommendation is on production.  We think that this economy needs stimulation to give impetus to the productive sector.  Our production as reflected in the economic growth figure is said to be below 2% calls for stimulation in critical sectors like agricultural.  According to the FAO Report of 2018, we need at least US$1.2 billion to normalise the agricultural sector but if we look at the $3.3 billion that is in the budget, it is about

US$300.000.000.00 which falls short of the Mozambican Declaration of 2003.  This declaration benchmarked 10% as minimum threshold to improve competence in the agricultural sector.  If you look at the agricultural sector outlook for 2019/20 season, the sad news is that only

50% of seed has been bought to date from the Tobacco Research Board.  This shows that there is going to be slackening in production of the golden leaf.  It is sad to receive such news when there are great opportunities in the next season.  Why do we have great opportunities in the next season? Northern China is experiencing one of its worst drought in 40 years.  Northern China is the main tobacco producer for Chinesse there is huge demand for our tobacco from China.  We had a delegation from China last week which came to assess our preparedness to produce the golden leaf and they highlighted the need to increase production.

We also have more than 40 million metric tonnes which used to be procured by China from the United States of America.  Now, because of the ensuing trade war between China and America, China has cancelled an order of 40 million tonnes, which gap is supposed to be filled by the Zimbabwean tobacco.  So, in terms of our state of preparedness for the tobacco sector we need to chip in as Government and supply more funding to the tobacco sector.  When you look at the tobacco farmers, we are saying they were given 50% forex of which 50% was surrendered at the interbank rate of $3 then but as we speak, the rates of fertilizers have moved up tenfold.  This means that most of the tobacco farmers will not be able to put up a decent crop this farming season.

Now coming to the fertilizers, there is a serious deficit of fertilizers in the country.  For the past 12 years, there have been fertilizer deficit for both basal and top dressing.  Most of the base fertilizer that we are getting is coming from Russia, Ukraine and Turkey.  For this fertilizer to come in here, it has become a $1000 or an equivalent of US$100 more expensive per tonne because of the duties imposed on base fertilizer.  Therefore, we are recommending a waiver or suspension of duty of fertilizer for the next three years.  If we suspend duty on fertilizers they become cheaper.  At the moment, we do not have capacity to produce fertilizer in this country.  ZFC, Windmill and Sable chemicals do not have capacity.  As for ZFC and Windmill, their granulators are antiquated and they have no capacity to meet domestic demand. In tha light there is no point in availing forex to those institutions who do not have capacity to produce the fertilizer.  So, it is better for the economy to import fertilizers duty free. Last year one of the major challenges we had in Command Agriculture was the shortage of fertilizer.  Yes, drought contributed but most of the challenges the economy faced are attributable to the shortage of fertilizers.  The top dressing and even some of the compound fertilizers were not available.  So, we need a waiver on the duty for fertilizers.

I also want to turn to the issue of maize.  The production of maize in this economy is very important because it is one of our key staple food.  Maize also used to be exported when the conditions were right.  So, I am proposing that we need to improve the supply of maize and wheat grains in this country.  To supply more corn and wheat in this economy, we also need to look at the tariff regimes that we have for those commodities.  At the moment, you cannot import flour though there is a serious shortage of flour in the country.  This is because of the duty on flour.  We also recommend that we suspend duty on flour products so that there is improved availability of flour into the country as well as for raw materials that are important for the production of flour.  It is a misconception in this country that flour is the only important ingredient in the production of bread.  There are other improvers  and premixes that are imported for the production of bread and duty should also be removed from the same so that we improve the livelihoods of our people.  I want to recapitulate that we suspend duty on maize and wheat grains and the flour products.

HON. HAMAUSWA:  On a point of order Mr. Speaker Sir, I seek clarity from  Hon. Member.  He referred to some terms that we have never had like raw maize.  The people who are listening in the Gallery and in the constituencies do not understand what raw maize is.  They are expecting to see maize coming to their constituencies and the Hon. Member is talking of raw maize.  We want him to explain what raw maize is.

   THE ACTING SPEAKER:  There is no point of order there.

         HON. MUSABAYANA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir, it is maize

that has not been processed and where value addition has not taken place.  It can be called raw maize or just corn.

         Mr. Speaker Sir, I want to move to the issue of power in this country.  There is serious shortage of power in the country and I appreciate the Minister has wavered duty on solar batteries but it is also important Mr. Speaker Sir that you also look at other products that are related to power generation.  They should be given a relief and I recommend that we not only remove duty but, we must also suspend even VAT on alternative power products so that we boost availability of power in this country.

       HON. CHIKWINYA:  On a point of order Mr. Speaker.

Yesterday, Members raised a pertinent item with the Chair where it was ruled that during the debate of such nature, with regards to finance and matters of budget, the Minister must be in the House.  At that particular moment, the Minister gave an apology because he was meeting foreign dignitaries and therefore requested 40 minutes and he surely came back.  May we be told of the reason why the Minister has not respected the House today to the extent that he is out when we are discussing a matter of prominence and pertinence which pertains to the budget which he crafted?  Thank you. – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] -

       THE ACTING SPEAKER: Order in the House.  The Hon.

Minister of Finance and Economic Development gave an apology to me.  He is coming back.  He is attending to other pertinent business.  There he is.

         The Minister of Finance and Economic Development walked into the House.

   HON. MUSABAYANA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  On the

issue of power in this country, it is sad that we have such serious power shortages in this country.  I was shocked when I heard Hon. Biti the former Minister of Finance and Economic Development saying that there was US$6.5 billion that he left in the coffers.  Mr. Speaker, that is the highest level of irresponsibility and ignorance.  How could you keep US$6.5 billion in the coffers yet there are serious challenges with power in this country?  If Hon. Biti had committed US$6.5 billion to develop or to commit it to the development of Batoka Gorge whch requires onlu US$4.5 billion we would have gone a long way in terms of solving our power challenges by generating 2200 megawatts.

Mr. Speaker Sir, it is also said that Hon. Biti left $6.5 billion in the coffers yet the roads are in dire state of disrepair that they are today.  Mr.

Speaker Sir, I think Hon. Biti is the worst Minister who has ever occupied office in this country.  – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible

interjections.] -

HON. NDEBELE: Mr. Speaker Sir, on a point of order.   You have allowed him to go on a tirade against Hon. Biti and he is flouting all rules in the rule book.  If this continues to happen, we will sing, we are able to sing.  So, I am inviting you to ask him to withdraw what he has been saying about Hon. Biti. The Hon. Member needs to concentrate on the figures.  He needs to speak to the budget.  Ukasa withdrawer, you will not be able to debate.

THE ACTING SPEAKER:  I understand the Hon. Member was only responding to what Hon. Biti said. – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

HON. MUSABAYANA: Thank you Mr. Speaker.  I would like to withdraw the statement that I made that Hon. Biti was irresponsible in leaving US$6.5 billion in the coffers yet we do not have power in this country.

HON. NDEBELE: On a point of order.  You cannot allow him to repeat the same offensive statement, he is not withdrawing.  You need to take charge of this House makudhererwa pano apa.

HON. MUSABAYANA: Thank you Mr. Speaker, going forward,

I want to recommend to the Hon. Minister of Finance and Economic Development that he must not be over-centred on balances in the coffers.  We must focus on deploying resources to the needy areas of the communities.  We must deploy resources to capital needs like the construction of infrastructure like roads; the construction of power infrastructure like the hydro power stations like Batoka which I said should have been fixed during Hon. Biti’s time and sadly he failed to do

  1. I thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.

THE ACTING SPEAKER:  Order, order.  May the owner of the car AES 6137 go and remove it, it is actually obstructing other cars that would want to go out.

HON. NDUNA: Thank you Mr. Speaker.  I want to add my voice as follows.  I am going to make proposals as follows  ...

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:   May you approach the Chair

Hon. Nduna please.

    HON. CHIKWINYA: Thank you Hon. Speaker for allowing me

to also add my voice on the budget.  Hon. Speaker, first and foremost, I want to – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – First and foremost, I want to approach my debate to this agenda item on points of procedure, Section 141 of our Constitution– [HON. MEMBERS:

Inaudible interjections.] – Hon. Speaker, I want to approach this debate firstly, on a point of procedure.  Matters to do with revenue collection and expenditure are largely to do with the people’s money, including taxes.

         In terms of Section 141, when Parliament is debating such laws we must be given an opportunity to consult our constituencies. I will read to you Hon. Speaker Section 141, “Parliament must facilitate public involvement in its legislative and other processes in the processes of its Committee to ensure that interested parties are consulted about Bills being considered by Parliament”.  Now, Hon. Speaker, the Hon.

Minister has not given us ample time to consult our constituencies with regards to matters of this budget.  We are expected to pass this budget by tomorrow as read out by the Leader of the House when he suspended the

rules.

         We will be doing ourselves a disfavour and we will be contravening Section 117 of the Constitution that says Parliament derives its power from the people and therefore, we must be given an opportunity to consult our people. Secondly, as a matter of procedure and process, the – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

   THE ACTING SPEAKER: Order Hon. Members, please can you

lower your voices.

         HON. CHIKWINYA: Every time a budget is presented, it must be premised on assumptions.  I have gone through the budget statement by the Hon. Minister.  There are no assumptions of this budget which must then shape and inform the budget.  You must be able to say if we are going to earn RTGS1.2billion through gold, what are the assumptions?  If we are going to earn RTGS1million tonnes of maize, what are the assumptions, are we going to have drought or rainfalls?  There are no assumptions to this budget and it is a fundamental departure from all the budget presentations which have been presented before Parliament.  Thirdly Hon. Speaker, and this is quite fundamental, when we passed the budget in December 2018, our rate was 1:1 between the US and the RTGS.   So, one million dollars which we passed for a particular vote in December 2018 does not even reflect as one million dollars today.  It was then devalued by a factor of nine or the prevailing interbank rate.  However, in his presentation, the Hon. Minister in the Blue Book combined these figures. He takes the budget as of December and the budget as of July and combines the figures as if the value of the money was the same.  It is not the same.

         What the Hon. Minister was supposed to do was to give us a budget performance as per the RTGS budgeted value in December and how it performed.  I am obliged to agree with Hon. Musabayana to say that we need to separate the budget review and the supplementary budget.  What is supposed to happen by procedure is that we are supposed to review the budget and we are given its performance that we had budgeted 4 billion and we have so far consumed 4.2 billion, we are in shortfall of 200 million and this is what we managed to achieve.   That being reduced to the current interbank rate, it is only after having seen that we can then approve that Minister for us to get to December again, we need to supplement this much and to these sectors, we have not done that.   I will go to the 5 key issues which I have managed to identify Hon. Speaker.

         The budget has a deficit of the social services.  Yesterday, speaker after speaker mourned; in fact there was a pledge by one of the Hon. Members to say before we even discuss the supplementary budget, let us first of all address the fundamentals.  What is the biggest revenue source? We found it to be the civil servants, we are over taxing them.  How much are they getting and it was resolved yesterday that before we discuss anything about this budget, let us make sure that the civil servants have earned enough money for them to survive.  Let us make sure that the war veterans have earned enough money for them to survive, the social services, it was resolved yesterday that before we even pass this budget – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

    THE ACTING SPEAKER: Order, please lower your voices Hon.

Members.

  HON. CHIKWINYA: It was resolved yesterday Hon. Speaker

Sir, that we must take a look at what our pensioners are going through –

[HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

          THE ACTING SPEAKER: Hon. Members, can we have order in

the House, please lower your voices.

HON. CHIKWINYA: It is fundamentally right for the Hon. Minister of Finance to declare a surplus.  The Hon. Minister of Finance has bragged and said he is the first Minister of Finance to be able to declare a surplus.  We are declaring a surplus when our social services have gone down, when people are dying out of lack of medicine in our hospital, when our roads are full of portholes, when we cannot pay for electricity and our houses are going for more than 18 hours without electricity, when there are fuel queues.  So, what kind of a surplus do we have in a budget?  The fundamental question is therefore Hon. Minister, despite all the social ills which you have created with your austerity for posterity principle, if you have a surplus, why do you need a supplementary budget? – [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] – You are bragging that you have a surplus why then do you need a supplementary budget for?  You are like a father who goes to the bank and say I have enough money in my account but your children have got nothing to wear and nothing to eat, are you a real father?  You must be able to safeguard the social net; this budget is not safeguarding the social net.  We cannot pass a budget that does a 500% increment in ZESA, 100% increment in all other services but a 48% increment in civil servants’ salaries, that is an inhumane budget and a toxic budget – [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] –

         Hon. Speaker, this budget is overlapped by over taxations. My biggest problem with the Hon. Minister of Finance is that when he is speaking to this Parliament, he is not seeing representative of

Zimbabweans, he is speaking to IMF and the Briton Woods institutions, and I beg the Hon. Minister to come back and face realities of Zimbabwe.  I beg the Hon. Minister to be able to relive the life of a woman in Mbizo, in Dotito, a woman who is failing to access bread, who is failing to access sanitary pads.  This budget must be able to respond to issues raised by parliamentarians, it was raised by Members of Parliament across the political divide that sanitary pads must be for free.

      HON. MADZIMURE: On a point of order Mr. Speaker Sir.

       THE ACTING SPEAKER: What is your point of order?

         HON. MADZIMURE: Hon. Paradza is sitting directly facing you and he has been saying iwe gara pasi, iwe gara pasi, and you are facing him and you have not reprimanded him.

       THE ACTING SPEAKER: Hon. Paradza, may you please stop

doing that.

  HON. CHIKWINYA: Thank you Hon. Speaker. Zimbabwe is not

Switzerland.  We cannot sustain our budget by over taxation; I will refer you to Annexure 16 of the Budget; approved fees Ministry of Transport and Infrastructure Development.  For a transport operator who owns an 18 seater mini bus, he has to go through eight forms of taxes before he even picks up passenger; he has to go through the light motor vehicles for 10 dollars, he has to go through abnormal size permit for 150 dollars; he has to go through the vehicle licence fee for 300 dollars.  In total the eight licences which he has to go through just at registration amounts to RTGS$1475 before he has even picked up one passenger.  We cannot over tax our people.

         Hon. Speaker, I will move over to the issue of accountability.  The Public Accounts Committee sat about two weeks ago and one of the major highlights which were produced is that in December of 2017, three billion dollars was allocated to the Command Agricultural Programme and it was used within a space of three months.  How do we continue as Parliament to give an opportunity to the Minister to give money to a programme that is unaccounted for?  Every year we are sinking in money to the Command Agriculture Programme not that it is bad, we want our farmers to be able to progress but we need accounting.  The Ministry officials failed to account for three billion. When asked in this Parliament, the Hon. Minister referred to Members of the

Opposition as baboons and monkeys because he was failing – [HON.

MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] -

             THE ACTING SPEAKER: That was withdrawn, Hon. Member.

        HON. CHIKWINYA: Thank you Hon. Speaker. We must come

to a point whereby we go Vote by Vote not at Committee stage but even at this Second Reading Stage to the extent that the Minister must be able to justify that, of the two billion which we gave to the Ministry of Defence what was it used for.  This is the process which we go through every time we have a pre-budget process and it takes me back to the issue of - yes, Hon. Minister, we understand that you are in a hurry to pass this Mid Term Budget because the House is on fire, but we also risk doing more damage if we do not consult.  The Hon. Minister was supposed to come to us and say of the money which you gave me in

December, this is what I have used and we see if our budgeting formula in principle is working.  Now, he is coming here seeking more money without being accountable.  We cannot be a Parliament which continuously pumps out money through the tax payers without consulting them.

         I will go to the non-performance of the energy sector.  The Hon. Minister boasts of 800 million dollar surplus in terms of RTGS reduced today’s interbank rate, it comes to 80 million.  If I was him, I would take 60 million and pay it towards power so that at least we encourage production.  What we are currently doing is to suppress production and in a country like Zimbabwe, if we suppress production, we cannot generate revenue.  Industries are spending 18 hours closed because there is no power.  Why can we not deliberately use the surplus to pay for ZESA import through ESKOM and Cabora Basa so that at least industries begin to work and then we have production where we have been collecting taxes.  Why do you want to collect taxes on pay as you earn, you cannot run a country on pay as you earn where there is 90% unemployment.  I therefore beg for the Minister to reconsider that.

Fuel has gone up for more than five times in two months but every time it goes up the queues remain the same.  What is the Minister doing with this Mid Term Budget for him to be able to announce in this House and say that, ‘with this money which you have given me, I am dedicating towards the fuel sector, fuel queues are going to disappear’.  I asked this question in this House and I was promised by Hon. Chasi that from the day he was appointed fuel queues were going to disappear within two weeks – up to now queues are running in kilometres.

As we pass this budget, we must be alive to the effect that once we are dedicating people’s money towards this project, of what positive effect for that matter is it going to give to the people of Zimbabwe? In his response Hon. Minister, when are we going to have power in our houses, when are we going to have disappearance of fuel queues through the money which he has come to Parliament to seek?  We are the Parliament; how much money does he want for him to be able to make the queues to disappear?

Hon. Minister Ncube, by his own admission, he is quoted as saying, “ when I came to become Finance Minister, I thought it was a job with regards to finance and economics but I have to come realise that it is all about politics”.  He was right, I agree with him.  Let us be able to relieve pressure on this Hon. Minister.  He must go back to his principal and advise him that the underlying fundamentals of this country are the bad politics of this country.  We can debate budgets and budgets, day in and day out but without solving the fundamental politics of this country these budgets will come to no fruit.  There must be dialogue between contesting parties. It is a fact that there are disputed elections and in the absence of a dialogue between the contesting parties, these budgets may come in their billions but they will not pass.  Even if these budgets come in their billions, the people of Zimbabwe will not be able to enjoy because we are budgeting for nothing since the political   fundamentals have not been addressed.  Hon. Mthuli Ncube, his principal and the

Cabinet must be able to sit down with all political parties.

HON. KASHIRI: On a point of order! The Hon. Member should stop politicising the budget. Let him debate on facts according to the budget not to politicise the budget in here.

         THE ACTING SPEAKER: Hon. Member, please, refrain from

politicizing the budget.

         HON. CHIKWINYA: Thank you Hon. Speaker.  In a matter between Jonathan Moyo versus the Speaker of Parliament of 2010, the matter of 2009, Justice Chidyausiku ruled that Parliament is the biggest assembly of politicians. Therefore, we cannot divorce matters to do with the budget and public finance with politics because politics is the underlying factor.   I therefore conclude by saying, I beg that the Hon. Minister of Finance must be able to come and tell us how much money, not in percentage format; we are seeing this trend whereby the Minister says I gave civil servants 63 million. If you look on the face of it, it is as if it is a lot of money but if you divide the 63 million by the total number of civil servants, each civil servant got 26 dollars.  If you look again at the cushioning allowance where the Hon. Minister says again 400 million divided by the number of civil servants, each civil servant got

320 dollars which is nothing.  We do not want cushioning allowance.

The Hon. Minister must stand up at the appropriate time and tell us that the lowest paid civil servants are going to be above the tax threshold.  You cannot have a civil servant who is not being taxed.  They have raised the tax threshold to 700 dollars, so expect a teacher to earn 400 dollars which is half of the tax threshold.  Next time we want the Hon. Minister not to tell us the blanket sum which has been given but the individual sum to be given to each lowest paid worker in Government.

We also want this increase to be based on the prevailing bread basket rate, we want the trade unions to be consulted.  We want all worker representatives and the employer representatives to be consulted so that when we adjust this budget, we are responding to the needs and the practical issues which the people of Zimbabwe are facing. I thank  you.

         HON. NDUNA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir, for giving me this opportunity to seek clarification and also make proposals – [HON.

MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –

THE ACTING SPEAKER:  Hon. Nduna, can you please go

ahead.

HON. NDUNA: Hon. Speaker, there are just a few issues that I want to propose to the Minister.  The first issue that I want to applaud him for is the issue of removal of duty on equipment that is used by the war veterans that are disabled....

THE ACTING SPEAKER:  May you address the Chair Hon.

Nduna.

HON. NDUNA:  Mr. Speaker Sir, I say this as it is enshrined in Section 3 of the Constitution that realises and recognises the war of umvukela.  I applaud him but I go further to say; if he can remove completely the duty on equipment used by people that are differently abled. I dare not say disabled because there is 15% in this nation of people that are differently abled. Of that 15%, only 1% of that are able to access money in order to purchase any equipment in particular that which they need to use for their own upkeep – the wheel chairs, braille, visual impairment and for those that are light in skin (albinos) need creams and lenses for their eyesight.  I implore the Minister; I could go on my knees to ask him to completely eradicate duty on that equipment.  I have already put the numbers Mr. Speaker Sir.  I am willing to support this Supplementary Budget if it comes with that face.

The second issue that I want to applaud the Minister on is the issue of infrastructure development.  On Vote 11, he has increased the supplementary by $761 million.  He has taken it to a billion something up from $400 million.  Applaudable as that may be, I go further to propose the following, there is what is called the maintenance reserve account which has arisen because of the Plumtree-Mutare 821 kilometres that was DBSA loan financed to the tune of US$206 million.  We have not yet exhausted repayment of that debt.  I ask with the powers that are vested in the ‘gold finger’, the Minister of Finance that he implores the Minister of Transport to unlock the value of that maintenance reserve account so that the money can be utilised immediately before it loses value.

I say this because at some point, it was ring fenced and it was

US$32 million when I ceased being the Chairperson of the Transport

Committee.  The finances have since transformed and there is now RTGS Dollar according to the Statutory Instrument.  It therefore means that the value could have depreciated.  I implore the Minister of Finance not to get money from elsewhere but to use what he has in order to get what he wants and here is the proposal that I make.  It was US$32 million then and I am quite sure it is way above US$40 million as we speak.  That is as it relates to infrastructure development.

There are six issues that I also propose to the Minister that can move this economy forward as it is related to infrastructure development. As long as we have robust, resilient, effective, efficient and smart infrastructure in terms of transport infrastructure, we can certainly get ourselves out of this doldrums of economic quagmire.

There are six issues which if addressed, can make sure that the aviation industry can move this economy forward.  Aware Mr. Speaker Sir, that we are part, sorry Madam Speaker Ma’am – my apologies, I recognise you Madam Speaker Ma’am.  Aware that in the tourism sector we are part of the grand team – the KAZA team, Transfrontier Park, we are also part of the Gonarezhou Transfrontier Park and one of the Seven Wonders of the World – the majestic Victoria Falls; we can use that as a pedestal and as a platform for economic enhancement.

Already Madam Speaker Ma’am, the Minister of Finance has employed $150 million Chinese EXIM Bank financed expansion, rehabilitation and maintenance of the Victoria Falls airport from 500 arrivals – he has taken it up to a 1.5 million arrivals.  He can utilise that in order to enhance the tourism economy and industrial economy of this country.  Aviation needs not make any profit as opposed to some school of thought that says if Air Zimbabwe does not make a profit, it means it is not working.  Simple, it is working, in the whole of Africa; it is just the Ethiopian Airlines that has ever made a profit because it is hinging on the manufacturers of the Boeing aircraft and the Ethiopian Airline has got a turnover of US$11.5 billion much more than GDP – [HON.

MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER (HON. MAVETERA):  Order

Hon. Members, may the Hon. Member be heard in silence.

HON. NDUNA:  Much more than the GDP of this whole nation –

just an airline.  So I am just proffering solutions to the proposals to the Minister of Finance, in that as long as we have the robust resilient aviation sector, we can move the economy forward.  How much we then get out of it assuming Air Zimbabwe has got a turnover of US$11.5 billion alone – obviously, arising from what you are requesting to get from this economy - $14.1 billion against a target of $18.8 billion; certainly, we can move mountains.

It is therefore my clarion call and fervent view that we address the following in the aviation sector so that we can get the Minister to put his money where his mouth is.  Currently, we have got about three crews of pilots that can fly the Embraer ERJ 145.  Before we lose those pilots, it is my thinking and my clarion call to you Hon. Minister of Finance, to address the skills flight at Air Zimbabwe.  It is no longer called Air Zimbabwe.  It is called Zimbabwe because as long as we loose those captains, we have lost third generation of our aviation captains.  Let us protect them by making sure we ward off the issue of skills flight.

The deterioration of the aviation infrastructure cannot be over emphasised.  We have got one of the biggest and largest workshops of the Boeing aircraft in Zimbabwe.  We need to make sure that it does not further deteriorate.  I am alive to the situation where the Department of

Civil Aviation – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Hon. Members, order!  .....

HON. NDUNA:  Formally, DCA...

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Excuse me Hon. Nduna.  Hon.

Members, may we keep our voices low.  If we are not interested with what is happening here we have always said we go outside.  Let the

Hon. Member be heard in silence.

HON. NDUNA:  Thank you Madam Speaker Ma’am.  We can

make sure that we revitalise, and rejuvenate. The b check says it is the c check and the d check on other regional planes.  Madam Speaker

Ma’am, we can embrace the triple P partnerships with Ethiopian Airlines.  If you want to see far, you need to stand on the shoulders of giants.  I pray to the Hon. Minister of Finance and Economic

Development to make sure that with the same power that he has taken to repudiate or repeal the Indigenisation Act; you implore the Ministry of Transport to be embedded with giants such as the Ethiopian Airlines in order that we get what we want from what we have.  We utilise the hangers that we have.  We utilise their turnover for the enhancement of our deteriorating aviation infrastructure.  Aviation moves economies and it is the second largest economic developer, second only to ICT.

The third issue is addressing our training schools.  We used to have the largest and the most robust resilient training institution at the Charles Prince Airport.  The Civil Aviation Authority took charge of eight planes, fixed for the school development and for the flying training school.  All of them have since disappeared without even flying once.  I ask that the Minister of Finance and Economic Development looks closely at such issues so that we quickly enhance our aviation sector.

The forth issue that needs to be addressed in the aviation institution is the struggling of the general aviation industry. If you fly to TanzaniaDar es Salaam today, you will not go to Dodoma on a large boarded aircraft. You take small aircrafts like those stationed at Charles Prince Airport and you go to such places like Dodoma, Kilimanjaro or any other place but here in Zimbabwe, I have to go to South Africa in order to fly to Mozambique.

Madam Speaker, the ERJ 145 is an American aircraft.  It takes about 50 passengers.  So, it is an aircraft that we can buy.  Apparently if you think aviation is too expensive, it is less than half a million to get such an aircraft but what it is going to generate is far much more than that.  It builds economies.  So, this is why I stand here to make a clarion call that you put your money where your mouth is Hon. Minister for the good order of the people of Zimbabwe and also of the people of Chegutu West Constituency.

The fifth issue that we need to deal with is the ailing national airline.  It is a flagship carrier, there is no way we can address it without engaging in triple P partnerships.  Triple Ps by the way, in their very nature, have no government capital outlay completely and whoever does not adhere to the ethos and values of triple Ps because they do not want to produce a concept paper that ultimately finds its way to the Attorney General and goes to Cabinet for ratification and comes to this House to just ascent to that triple P, they are not doing this country any good.

So, it is my clarion call and hope that ….

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER (HON. MAVETERA):  Order,

Hon. Sikhala and Hon. P. D. Sibanda, can you please go back to your

seats.

HON. NDUNA:  It is my clarion call and hope that we quickly and expeditiously open doors and make sure that all those triple Ps that are in a hanging balance are expeditiously conducted so that we unlock value

in this economy.  I have not asked for money from you Hon. Minister of Finance and Economic Development.  I have just asked for you to get more money from what you have already.

The last issue that I want you to understand….

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  You are left with five minutes

Hon. Nduna.

HON. NDUNA:  It is the poorly manned airspace.  I was one day in Airbus 380 and there was a clear screen that showed the route where we were going. When we left South Africa enroute to Malawi on the South African Airlines, we did not get into the Zimbabwean airspace, we circumvented it and we went into the Mozambican airspace and for the sole reason that they want there to be radars in any airspace.  It is my hope that the Minister of Transport came to this House once and said the expansion of R. G. M Airport is going to come through with a package that includes the radars.  Airlines like Air France and British Airways shun our airspace on over flights.  Zimbabwe is the shortest route from any northern part to South Africa. The economy of South Africa has grown because of Zimbabwean air space but we cannot get monies of the over flights because we have not adhered to the ethos and values of monitoring our airspace using radar and it does not cost much.  It costs less than $20 million on the highest scale and less than $5 million on the lowest scale for us to monitor our airspace.

Madam Speaker Ma’am, I ask that I go into the issue of the mining sector.  The Minister already is getting a lot from the small scale miners.  The royalties that he has increased from one percent to two percent should be reviewed. You cited arbitray, I ask Hon. Minister you review those royalties and get them back to one percent.  The year we called for chikorokoza chapera and the Minister of Home Affairs went about crisscrossing the width and the breadth of this nation, arresting artisanal miners; that is the day we fell from 18 tonnes deliveries to 1 tonne.  We are about to go that route again if you increase the royalties.

I ask therefore, that instead of increasing the royalties to two percent, you monitor what happens on the millers.  The artisanal miner has no problem, he will take his ore to the mill, he will monitor the mill because what he wants is to get what he can from what he presents to the mill.  Do not hate the man, hate the game.  Take your money from the mill and give the artisanal miner his money.  When those artisanal miners are 40 meters underground, they cannot perform any delinquent behaviour, they do not rape, getting involved in child abuse or buttering wives.

Madam Speaker, I ask that he in fact brings the Mines and Minerals Act to this House expeditiously so that we repeal it and we can address it so that we stop having illicit outflows and revenue leakages.  We are aware of 2017UB on Illicit Outflows Report, we lost about 80 billion as a continent of our minerals and we are about to lose more if we go on this trajectory.  I think we need to make sure that we have a coordinated, collaborated and networked approach to deal with egovernance in revenue generation in the mining sector as opposed to dealing with legacy oriented, pregnant with inconsistencies, moribund, rudimental, antiquated and very old manner of dealing with revenue modern day generation issues.

Let us make sure we put in computerisation in the generation of our finances in the mining sector.  Otherwise, I have no other words except to thank you and make sure that I support you if you take on board these proposals.  I thank you Madam Speaker.

HON. NDIWENI:  I rise to add my voice to the debate on the mid-term budget.  My talking point is with reference to Section 76 of the Constitution which gives right of health to every citizen.  The Budget allocation to the Ministry of Health and Child Care, for lack of a better word, is unsatisfactory.  Looking at the figures in the Blue Book, we realise that there has been a 67% adjustment on the allocation to the Ministry of Health and Child Care.  If we compare with other ministries, we realise that there is no uniformity.  Commenting as a lay person in economics and considering that officials from the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development had originally done due diligence to the 2019 budget which we approved in 2018, who have then realised that there have been changes in fundamentals for the second half year of

  1. Definitely these changes affect all ministries and not some to the exclusion of other ministries. Therefore, with my layman thinking, this budget would just need to be multiplied by a factor which covers all ministries.  I feel that if due diligence was done on this budget and there are fundamental changes to the budget that affects all ministries, then if we realise there is need to up it, let us use a factor for all ministries to avoid favouring other ministries at the detriment of other ministries.

Health care is divided into largely two major blocks, which are medicine (procedures) and drug supply.

HON. CHIKWINYA:  On a point of order Madam Speaker.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Yes, what is your point of order Hon. Member?

HON. CHIKWINYA:  Hon. Speaker, I intend to leave this House but I am not sure which route to take because I had taken that route thinking that I am correct, can you please advise.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  You will only be able to do

that when the speaker has finished speaking.

HON. NDIWENI:  I am alluding to the fact that healthcare is divided into procedures and drugs.  Maybe on that note, in future we would like to appeal to the Executive to have a structure in the Executive where medicine is represented by a professional called a doctor and drugs represented by a professional called a pharmacist.  By the way, let me put a disclaimer Madam Speaker, I am not soliciting for a job in the

Executive.  I am just speaking of the ideal.  With all due respect Madam Speaker, my colleagues in the medical profession are aware that medicines is not pharmacy and vice-versa.  For as long as this arrangement that I talked of, of the two major blocks not being represented in the Executive, we will continuously have challenges in drug supply which will boils down to challenges in the health care of the nation.  Our budget is silent on drug supply.  Looking at the expenditure estimates, this item could be hidden somewhere either in programmes or in goods and supplies but I pray for a day when NATPHARM will have a standalone budget for drug supply for the nation.  We cannot continue to leave our drug supply to donors.  We are almost mortgaging the health of the nation to donors.  I would like to appeal to the Minister of Finance and Economic Development that where health is concerned, allocation is not sufficient but actual disbursement.  I will give an example of Ngomahuru Hospital that we recently visited.  They applied for a budget of $1.5 million and they were allocated $400,000.00 but what has been disbursed to date is $110,000.00 of which money they have not had access to.  Your budget on health has no provision (I stand to be corrected because I perused and I could not pick it) for our contribution to the Global Fund which supplies the bulk of our ARVs.  Can we afford to lose US$400 million support because of failure to contribute US$6 million that we are supposed to contribute?  I plead with you Hon. Minister to please have a heart and exercise a deliberate bias towards the provision of funds to all health departments in the healthcare system.

A human body needs to be healthy and before we even think of other ministries, money, energy or transport, the human body needs to be healthy.  So we should try and prioritise health.

On a positive note, it has not all been gloom due to His

Excellence’s intervention and sustained effort.  On a recent tour of major hospitals country-wide we can report that there is a marked improvement of drug supply with availability ranging from 54% to 75%.

We commend His Excellency the President for his intervention Madam

Speaker Ma’am.

       Hon. Alice Ndhlovu having moved to another seat

       THE TEMPORATY SPEAKER: Order Hon. Ndlovu, can you

move back to your seat.  Thank you.

  HON. NDIWENI: The only appeal that we can report back to you

Madam Speaker Ma’am from our professionals on the ground, is that this should not be a one off effort.  The Ministry should be able to take over the button from where the President will leave and run off with the button so that we make the present scenario sustained.  Let us prioritise Hon. Finance and Economic Development Minister, Health, health, health as our President would always say.  I pray that my plea receives a favourable response from the Hon. Minister of Finance and Economic Development who happens by the way, to be my schoolmate from sometime back.  I thank you Hon. Madam Speaker Ma’am.

  HON. MASANGO: Thank you Hon. Speaker Ma’am.  I thank

you for letting me add my voice to the Supplementary Budget.  Firstly, I would like to thank the Minister of Finance and Economic Development for recognising the shortfalls on war veterans’ welfare.  Looking at Vote 4, Hon. Members have really done a great job on advocating for the welfare of our freedom fighters and truly speaking, there is no other way to say thank you for the sacrifices that they made.  They surely deserve more.

         Madam Speaker Ma’am, have you noticed that most of the times, when you converse with a war veteran, you feel that they have this seething anger.  These people went through thick and thin during the liberation struggle and vakaona zvisakaonwa.  They lived like animals while in the bush.  They suffered what is termed psychological trauma.

Taking this into consideration Madam Speaker Ma’am, I feel that we have overlooked one important thing which should have taken precedence soon after demobilisation – counselling.  It is not late to make provisions in the budget for all surviving war veterans to go through psychological counseling.

HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  On a point of order Madam Speaker.  The Hon. Member has since done her maiden speech and in terms of the rules, she does not have to read when she is debating.  She is currently literally reading word by word.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Thank you.  Hon. Masango,

may you kindly refer to your notes and not be reading.

HON. MASANGO: Thank you Madam Speaker Ma’am.  It is not

late to make provisions in the budget for all surviving war veterans to go through psychological counseling because they really need it.  On their medical supplies and services, the proposed amount has to be increased to take into consideration counseling services.  We took for granted kuti vadzoka kumusha and we were happy for them not taking into cognisance that they were still suffering but it is better late than never.

Now looking at Vote 6 on Animal production and Health - We are looking forward to having CSC revamped and working.  When we talk of CSC, we know that we are talking of good healthy cattle.  I feel that the supplementary budget for the control of animal diseases is commendable because the country experienced more cattle deaths countrywide this past year due to tick-bone diseases known as January disease.  This disease could not be controlled due to unavailability of dipping chemicals.  Most farmers cannot afford to buy these despite the fact that Hon. Members have been trying to encourage them to sell at least one mombe so as to buy dipping chemicals to save the remaining herds.  In most areas, this was not a welcome idea because farmers were used to having a day for communal cattle dipping without them buying

the dip.

On Vote 11 – Programme 3, sub-programme 2 – in developed countries, the cheapest mode of transport is by rail.  Right now, every constituency is crying out for more ZUPCO buses which are now very affordable.  If we reintroduce the trains, for example from Norton to Harare; Chitungwiza to Harare and so on, we will reduce congestion and the transport blues being experienced at the present moment will be a thing of the past.  By so doing Madam Speaker Ma’am, we will end up channeling the available buses to the rural areas.

On Vote 14 – Programme 2, sub-programme 2 – I applaud the Finance Minister on the supplementary budget on communicable diseases.  I am looking specifically at availing ARVs to the people as per need.   Those who were donating ARVs will soon stop, so we will have to get used to standing on our own.  So, I am of the idea that this Vote is specifically for getting ARVs.

Madam Speaker Ma’am, I am now going on to Vote 29.  I feel the amount to be voted for has to be increased because when we talk of JSC, automatically we see a magistrate and when we talk of NPA, we see a prosecutor.  A magistrate and a prosecutor are both lawyers.  So on the budget Madam Speaker Ma’am, we have to look at their salaries.  Those in JSC are being given accommodation where there are Government flats but those in NPA are not.  We cannot be seen to capacitate JSC and leave out NPA because they both have a very big role and play an integral part in the fight against corruption.  We must not be a parent who favours one child.  If you go around the NPA offices right now

Madam Speaker Ma’am, you will be heartbroken – their offices are not furnished.  The prosecutors cannot even access Wifi because they would say it is for magistrates.  We are encouraging them to work as rivals but knowing that they are working to reach one goal.  For effective prosecution, Madam Speaker Ma’am, their whole budget has to be increased.

Lastly, I commend the Minister of Finance and Economic

Development on Vote 30.  Our President His Excellency E. D. Mnangagwa in his SONA address, expressed his displeasure on corruption.  There is no day that goes by without him saying that we have to uproot this cancer.  So financially, empowering the Zimbabwe

Anti-corruption Commission gives credence to His Excellency’s wish of a non corrupt nation.  I thank you Madam Speaker Ma’am.

*HON. KARENYI: Thank you Madam Speaker.  I would like to thank you for giving me this opportunity to add a few words on the

Supplementary Budget that has been brought to us.  Firstly,  Madam Speaker, I want to highlight that our nation is experiencing economic hardships and things are difficult for those in both rural and urban areas because of the price increases.

Let me go to page 96 Madam Speaker. It is talking about the increase in toll gate fees. For the small car that I drive, the fees went up from 2 to 10 dollars.  I think this is too exorbitant for individuals because the person who has to pay 10 dollars is the same person who does not have a salary increment. It is the same person who is hard hit by economic hardships.  So, it is my plea that we reduce the toll gate fees because people cannot afford it. We all know that life is difficult.  In my opinion I think 5 dollars would be more ideal.  It would be better to raise it from 2 dollars to 5 dollars, that is my opinion.

         I also want to talk about the budget which is not clear in terms of health.  I think it is a good idea if more money would be allocated towards the health sector.  There is a singer who sang a song ‘mukuru ndiani anemari neanehutano’.  I was at Harare Hospital last week and I realised that in the children’s ward, when a child is admitted the mother of the child has nowhere to sleep.  Once we increase money in the health sector the mothers will have a place to sleep whilst looking after their children, including the provision of blankets.     Furthermore Madam Speaker, the mother of the admitted child has no share in terms of provision of food.  If a person comes from Mutoko and is admitted at Harare Hospital, where will the mother get food to eat?  So, when we increase allocation of the budget it will take care of this.

         Madam Speaker, I want to talk about the salaries people are getting especially civil servants.  I did a budget for an average civil servant.  Taking into account the budget for the civil servant who at the time is earning around 600 to 700 dollars; I included rent, electricity, water, fees and food that I consider as basics and the money for that budget was 1500.  This is just basic living without any luxuries.  So what I am saying is that there should be an increase in salaries for civil servants to ensure that our children are taught in schools and that nurses perform their duties well in hospital.  Where I come from in Mutare, there are people who work close to urban centres.  The teachers wait for buses that they can afford which means if a bus passes through around 12 noon the teacher will abandon the kids at 12 because they cannot afford a commuter omnibus to go back home.  We need to increase the salaries to ensure that our children get the requisite education.

         Madam Speaker, I want to refer the House to page 30, it is talking about vulnerable households that need food aid. I realise that the Minister is trying to increase the allocation in order to provide social services to the vulnerable.  My concern is that we want our people to be availed food to sustain them because other areas are poverty stricken and are experiencing hunger.  My challenge is that when we distribute this food, it is not being distributed in a fair manner. Food is being politicised – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –        HON. NDUNA: On a point of order Madam Speaker.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER (HON. MAVETERA): What

is your point of order?

         HON. NDUNA: Thank you Madam Speaker. My point of order is

this is the only place that we call home for more than 8 hours. It is a pedestal or platform to enhance both our visibility and the electoral visibility; we come here to represent them.  It is not time to wax lyrical and be further from the truth on issues to do with very key pertinent issues Madam Speaker.  I ask that the Hon. Member debating gets her facts right instead of prevaricating, even if she is not under oath.  She should still come here and debate with dignity without prevaricating.  I ask that she withdraws the mantra or the issue or the thought even the slightest thought that this food and grain is distributed along partisan lines.  The people of Chegutu West Constituency certainly will not take kindly to such an assertion knowing fully that there is no political divide and they will get food hand-outs when the time comes from across political divide.  I ask that she withdraws.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Thank you Hon. Nduna, Hon

Karenyi please proceed.

         *HON. KARENYI: Thank you very much. I am not saying this as a way of getting sympathy from this House.  I am taking a look at the documents before Parliament.  The Human Rights Commission presented a report and all of us realised that this food is distributed along partisan lines.  For that reason, I want this august House to make sure that if the Minister is going to avail this money, food is going to be distributed fairly.

    HON. CHINOTIMBA: On a point of order Madam Speaker.

           THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: What is your point of order?

         *HON. CHINOTIMBA: To be honest, the Minister should give us money when we request for it as Members of Parliament. My point of order is that the Ministry of Finance does not distribute food; it is the Minister of Social Welfare that distributes food.  She cannot talk about food distribution to the Minister of Finance and it is not for her to supervise whether the food is availed or not availed.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Thank you Hon. Chinotimba.

           *HON. KARENYI: Madam Speaker, let me continue by referring

you to page 33.  I reiterate that the Minister has been able to give us help so that we can be able to import grain.  That on its own is a good programme but as a Member of Parliament who carries out her representative function in this august House, I would like to remind Hon. Chinotimba that when the food comes to  Buhera South,  it should be distributed on a non partisan basis since it belongs to all Zimbabwean citizens.

         On page 57, it shows that the Minister wants to put aside some funds to assist the victims of Cyclone Idai, among the places listed is my birth place Chimanimani.  This is a noble idea which intends to ensure that bridges and other infrastructure are restored to their original stage.  Once the Minister has disbursed the money, he must follow up and monitor that the aid is reaching its intended target group.  According to   my knowledge, I know that we have received a lot of money and other various goods but the big question is, has it been properly accounted for.

This ensures that no donations are diverted along the way to the intended target group.  The donor community is brought in by the current government but it is not the donors’ intention to let its donations be stolen.  The donor community requires transparency and accountability in the distribution of its donations.

The increase in driver’s licence fees, although it is a noble cause, it could further compound the already cancerous corruption.  Secondly, the generality of the prospective drivers cannot raise the new fees as they fall within the vulnerable group.  A 100% rise of the fees that is from 20 dollars to 40 dollars would have been more reasonable.  Once these fees are affordable, a lot of people would be encouraged to drive legally and this will reduce the high road carnage we are currently experiencing.

The Minister also talks of a surplus, where is this money going to and what is is it being used for.  On page 62, number 93, he talks of support for governance reforms, the Minister is endeavoring to increase the allocation to the independent commissions, so that there will be able to discharge their duties properly.  I urge the ZACC to have teeth and should not look at the political factional battles.  We know that we have 15 billion dollars that we cannot account for. To date, no one has been arrested for that theft which has led to the Minister requesting for a supplementary budget when we have abundant resources that are not being fully utilised and accounted for.

The Judiciary Service Commission is going to be allocated additional funding which they should put to good use and dispense justice to all Zimbabweans fairly.  I applaud the Minister for putting this funding for independent commissions to ensure that they discharge their duties properly.  This commission must implemented its duties independently.  The issue of selective application of law must stop and if we fund them fully they will do their work well.  The Government must not interfere with these commissions so the they do their work well.  We know of people who are being arrested without committing a crime so if they run independently they will run efficiently. The Gender Commission, once issued with adequate resources, will be able to discharge its duties.  If you go to the parastatals, if it were to be led by a woman, you would find that it would have less thefts.  You will observe that Air Zimbabwe’s fortunes will be turned because there will be a woman at the helm of the parastatal. Once the Gender Commission is funded, it will be able to conduct outreach programmes to enlighten the women folk about their human rights and make women aware that they should be able to stand and carry out their development role.  All the parastatals have all gone down because of corruption.  Look at ZUPCO and ZINARA; they have experienced challenges because of men.  It is because of men that they have failed.  If women are capacitated all parastatals will run efficiently.

We also have the Human Rights Commission.  If this Commission is given more teeth, there will be development in the country.  If these commissions are availed funds, there will be development.

In conclusion, if these things are done; development will take place.  There is need for accountability and monitoring.  If we are accountable and do away with corruption, Zimbabwe will develop. If we also cut down on the large delegation on foreign travel, Zimbabwe will develop. We need political and economic reforms in this country. W also need investor confidence so that people will come and invest in Zimbabwe.  The issue of legitimacy is also a challenge in Zimbabwe so we need dialogue an economic reform for our country to move on.

There is also another issue which is not accepted everywhere – Zimbabwe is not progressing well because there is no consensus in term of governance.  For this country to attract foreign direct investment, there is need for rule of law and good governance so that we have investors.  We need to consider human rights values that will make Zimbabwe develop.

Economic reforms are also needed – whether we like it or not; without economic reforms, Zimbabwe will not move.

I want to end by saying the issue of legitimacy can only be solved by dialogue.  Dialogue is the only way that Zimbabwe can develop and progress.  Thank you Madam Speaker.

*HON. P. ZHOU:  Thank you for affording me the opportunity to debate.  Some of us do not have this book.  They got finished before we got them.  My request is that as I debate, may you avail the book to us?    I think we need about 25 copies.

I want to add my voice an opinion on the Bill.  Firstly, I would like to thank the Minister that since he brought in the Bill, I have heard other members talking about war veterans, civil servants and pensioners.  I would also want to contribute on the same issues.  Life has become difficult and there is need for money.  We cannot add nine or ten percent that is at the interbank rate but it should be increased to ensure that these people are able to buy the basics – which we call the bread basket of the month especially the pensioners and the war veterans because that is the most critical age.  They experience a lot of health challenges such as diabetes and blood pressure.  When they go to the pharmacies or the doctors’ surgeries, their health bills amount to about $300.  Our request is that the budget for this should be increased.

On the budget allocated to the Ministry of Women Affairs – there has been an increase but that money towards small to medium enterprise, women empowerment, even money that was allocated to the bank should be increased because a woman in Zimbabwe as has been proved, is good at paying back a loan.  That is why we say equip, educate or develop a woman and you have developed a whole nation.

We request that the money be increased.

We also wish the Minister to increase the allocation towards smart energy.  Electricity is a challenge and that is a challenge to women mostly.  Gas and solar will assist the women in cooking and lighting.  I think the allocation of funds towards those ministries should be increased in order to alleviate the burden on women.

On the issue of sanitary pads, it is a difficult budget for a family especially where there are four girl children to be able to experience hygiene when these are not affordable.  The menstrual process should be considered seriously and we should consider that for men to be there, it is because of menses.  So we should not be embarrassed to be women because that is why you are here as male Members of Parliament.  The

Minister should increase allocation towards sanitary pads to ensure that they are easily accessible and affordable.  Hon. Members advocated for the removal of duty on sanitary wear.

I also looked at the Budget in terms of the Ministry of Local Government.  There was an increase of $2.3 million.  There was an original estimation of $2.3 million and this was increased to $77 million; an addition of about $75 million.  I am happy with this development because there was Cyclone Idai.  Now you are prepared for disasters that may come anytime.

The Budget for the Ministry of Health has also increased, particularly the one for St Luke’s Hospital.  It was $2 million but you quickly reacted.  We thank you for that Minister.  The budget for Lupane District Hospital has also been increased from $10 million to $26 million.  I went to Lupane and it was a painful site.  If you continue adding such allocations, the hospital will be in good working order and will provide medical services.

On the Vote for Ministry of Education, I am happy with the allocation that you have given to curriculum development but that money is inadequate because it has been raised from $4.6 million to $6 million.  I say so because curriculum development is important in order to improve the syllabuses that our children are using.  They need new books that are being written to know what is happening in the country, for example, how sanctions came into being.  They also need to know how the new dispensation came into effect.  Current affairs should also be in the curriculum that is needed – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – Hon. Speaker Ma’am, protect me please.  I also want to thank the Minister for adding more money to the Anti Corruption Commission. Our request is that those convicted on corruption charges should not be treated on partisan lines, it should look at corruption on both sides.  I thank you Hon. Speaker Ma’am.

       *THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER (HON. MAVETERA): You

indicated that there are some Hon. Members who did not manage to get copies of the Budget Statement,  I request that you go to the Journals

Office and get the books.  I thank you.

   HON. SACCO: Thank you Madam Speaker Ma’am.  I would like

to make my contribution towards the debate.  I am worried about the  -

[HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

  THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order Hon. Members.  Can the

Hon. Member be heard in silence.

   HON. SACCO: Thank you Madam Speaker Ma’am.  Vejecha

ndivo varikungondiviringa zvavo – [Laughter.] -  Madam Speaker Ma’am, my concern is on the issue of the budget given to industrialisation.  The original amount allocated was US$4.5 million at that point, an additional amount has been allocated or proposed for RTGS$18 million.  If you combine the two, we are getting a total of $22 million, which has now been rebased in Zimbabwean dollars.  However, that $22 million for industrialisation is equivalent to US$2.2 million, which is now less than the amount initially allocated for industrialisation.  This is not enough, we are not prioritising industrialisation.

Our industries are in a poor state, we have moved across the country looking at the state of our industries.  Hon. Minister, through

Madam Speaker Ma’am, this is not an adequate allocation for the industrialisation of our country.  It means that our industry is not being treated as a priority. We cannot continue being a super market economy where cheap goods are dumped from outside into this country – [HON.

MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] – We are not supporting our own industries.

As a point in question, one Hon. Member here spoke about removing duty on fertilizer for example. We toured Sable Chemicals; what they just need is an allocation of foreign currency – by the way, this is also partially owned by the Government.  What they require is foreign currency allocation to import ammonia gas to make fertilizer here in this country.  However, we are not allocating foreign currency to Sable Chemicals, rather we are giving middle men money to import fertilizer which is actually more expensive – [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] – We need to protect this country…

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order Hon. Sacco.  Just to let

you know, the current debate is on the Budget Statement.  So, Hon. Members will be given an opportunity to be able to debate specific votes during the Committee of Supply.  For now, let us be specific on the Budget Statement. Thank you.

HON. SACCO: Thank you Madam Speaker Ma’am, may be let

me rephrase it.  I believe the amount being allocated for industrialisation is not enough.  I am referring to specifics like Sable Chemicals, Dorowa Minerals which can produce phosphates for this country and is not being funded while we are importing.  My point is, for import substitution, we need to concentrate on allocating monies to industry so that we can produce locally and protect our jobs and in some cases, produce even cheaper than what we are importing – [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] – So I believe that on industrialisation, our allocation is not adequate.

I would like to move on to the issues of Cyclone Idai.  I would like to start by thanking His Excellency the President and the Government of

Zimbabwe on the interventions so far for the cyclone affected areas.  My constituency was affected a lot by this cyclone – [AN HON. MEMBER: Which constituency is yours?] – I come from Chimanimani  East

Constituency.  Madam Speaker Ma’am, I feel that the budget that has been allocated for Cyclone Idai intervention is not enough.  I have been going through the figures, for example under the Ministry of Transport and Infrastructure Development, road construction for Cyclone Idai has been allocated an equivalent of only US$24 million.  However, if you pass through the roads that are being talked about like Birchenough,

Jopa, Bvumba, Cashel, Chimanimani Eastern border, Emergency Road

Interventions, Honde Valley, Kopa Mutsvangwa, Kopa-Vimba, Kurwaisimba, Muchadziya, Machongwe, Kopa-Jopa and so on, there are many roads to be repaired.  However, the figure here is only US$24 million.  This is not adequate.

We feel that more funds should be allocated towards Cyclone Idai especially looking at contributions and well-wishers who have come on board towards Cyclone Idai. I believe more can be done for that.  We still have people who are living in tents in Chimanimani, Chipinge and other places.  Those people, we are now going into the rainy season.

Whilst I realise that money has been allocated under Local Government, I still believe it is not enough.  We have people living in tents, who are exposed to the elements and going into the rainy season, we really need to move with speed Madam Speaker.

One other issue I wanted to raise was that we complain that we do not have foreign currency in our country and yet we allow our resources to be smuggled out of this country without any intervention.  Gold is mined across the country even in Chimanimani.  When we approach Fidelity Printers to come and create mobile buying units, they tell us that they are not capacitated.  Can the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development allocate funds to Fidelity Printers to create buying points across the country to absorb and pick up all that gold that is being mined across the country to benefit this nation.  As we speak, it is being smuggled out to our borders and nothing is happening – [HON.

MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] –

Still on issues of Cyclone Idai, education has only been allocated

ZW1.9 million to reconstruct schools in Cyclone Idai affected areas.  This will not get us anywhere if we look at what we really need in the cyclone affected areas.  Can attention be given to that as well.   

One other point is Chimanimani had been allocated a district hospital in the last budget and if that hospital had been constructed we would have saved many lives, but as we speak, I do not see it mentioned anywhere.  Can that also be included so that we improve our facilities for our people to have the relevant health facilities as required.

I would like to move on to ICT, Vote 23.  On ICT, I notice there is a glaring absence…

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Hon. Sacco, like what I said, we are going to discuss about Votes on Committee of Supply.

HON. SACCO:  Noted Madam Speaker Ma’am.  We have a

challenge in areas that are outlying on our borders, areas that are in remote areas, areas that are not covered or are not economically viable for our network providers to supply cellphone coverage.  Certain areas may not be viable for Econet, Net One and Telecel to put up boosters, but POTRAZ should have funding where they come in and put up boosters so that we can have infrastructure sharing where the networks can share.  So, my concern is, I do not see any allocation towards

POTRAZ being capacitated for certain areas like Chikukwa in Chimanimani and in other areas, there is no network and it is not viable for network providers to come in.  Can allocations be made towards POTRAZ to cover areas like these across the country?

We were in Rwanda recently, Madam Speaker, where we noticed that they are now on 4G and their economy is ticking because they can manage to have services on line.  Things are moving because the whole area of the country is covered by network and 4G.  We need to move with the times as well and identify areas which are still not covered by network and capacitate that.  So my plea is that more money should be given to ICT to cover those areas.

My last point, Madam Speaker, is that when our initial budget was done, it was done in United States dollars.  We have moved now from the United States dollar to the RTGs regime.  What is worrying me is that we are noticing that prices have been increased in line with the interbank rate, but we have not seen a similar increment on civil servants wages on salaries, even MPs here, we have not seen an adjustment.  If we are working with the interbank rate; if a civil servant was being paid US$500, why can we not then convert that as US$500 multiplied by 10 to become $5 000 because the cost of services has gone up.  So, I am concerned and I would like the Hon. Minister to take into consideration the welfare of our civil servants and even employees in the private sector.  Prices have gone up but wages and salaries have not.  So, can we please look into that and make the necessary adjustments.  I thank you Hon. Speaker.

HON. MASENDA:  Thank you Madam Speaker, for giving me

the opportunity to add my voice to this budget that has been provided.  I would want to start with Vote number 8 – Lands, Agriculture, Water, Climate and Rural Development.  There is need however, Madam

Speaker, to make sure that water is available in every corner of the country.  We are experiencing a great drought in Zimbabwe and it is important that there is provision of water, particularly in the rural areas where there are no dams and the boreholes are broken down.  So, there is need to ensure that boreholes are up and running and that everyone has water available.

In my constituency for example, Madam Speaker, I have a ward, a former rural resettlement where I have in excess of 25 000 people, that is Ward 14, Hurungwe East Constituency where there are no dams because no dams were ever constructed in that area. Water is a problem to the extent that you find that there is one borehole that is providing water to more than 4 500 people, 3 000 cattle, sheep and goats and to more than four schools.  They depend just on one borehole.  Therefore, the budget should support provision of water in the rural areas.

I would also want the Supplementary Budget to support the rehabilitation of small to medium dams that were destroyed by the former white settlers when they were leaving the farms.  They set up dynamite and destroyed the dam walls such that there is no water to get to the people.  So, I would also want the budget to look at that – rehabilitation of small to medium dams.

I would also want the budget to support the building of water weirs.  Small catchments where water can be harvested or water can be harnessed such that people and their animals have water.  People can be able to do small gardening projects for them to be able to feed themselves.  I would also want to make sure that there is provision in the budget for vaccines that can be used to treat diseases in animals, chicken, sheep and goats such that people have a livelihood.  They derive their livelihood from the existence of cattle, sheep and goats but these are dying because there are no vaccines to treat them.  So, the budget should focus on the provision of such funds so that vaccines are made available.

I go specifically to primary school education, Vote 15, page 58 – Teaching and Learning.  I would like to applaud the Minister for making provision in both the infant education, junior education and secondary education so that provision of teachers and accommodation is made possible for teachers that teach in the rural areas because it is very difficult for a teacher who has got a degree to go and stay in a grass thatched dagga and pole house or round hut.  I appreciate the Minister’s concerns to the extent that he made provision for the teaching and learning in the rural areas as well.

I go to Defence, Vote number 4 – Defence and War Veterans on page 14 and 17 of the Blue Book.  To add my voice to the fact that war veterans are living in abject poverty,  there are people who were in the war for four, five or six years and when they left the assembly points, they only had clothes that they were wearing and they went back to their rural homes where they had no support from Government. I see from the provision that there is very little provision for the welfare of the people who fought to liberate this country.  I would urge the Minister of Finance and Economic Development to have a relook at this and ensure that the war veterans are well provided for.  There are people who were fortunate enough to get land but they were just put in the middle of nowhere, with no support, nothing, no tillage support, no fertilizer support and no chemicals.  Some of them have to walk long distances to get to the next bus stop because they were put in the middle of nowhere.   There are no roads, no infrastructure, no clinics and no hospitals around the places they stay.  I would like the Minister of Finance to ensure that he has a relook at better provisions for the war veterans.

I would also like to make a comment on Vote 11, Transport and Infrastructure which is on pages 43 and 44.  I applaud the Minister for making provisions for roads in rural areas but I am saddened by the fact that in my constituency, there is no road that has been provided for.

This makes me feel very sad because when people were resettled in year 2000, that was the last time that the road was ever graded.  It is a 120km road – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] – Madam Speaker, I seek for your protection.  I need to be protected.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER (HON. MAVETERA):  You

are protected Honourable.  Order Hon. Members.  May the Hon.

Member be heard in silence?

HON. MASENDA:  I would also want to urge the Minister to have a look.  It is a stretch of 120km and most of the small bridges and culverts have collapsed because all the people around there grow cotton, tobacco and maize.  The roads are now eroded by the heavy 30 tonne trucks that deliver the inputs as well as coming to collect the output from the people.  I would urge the Minister to have a look at providing that road with gravel.  We are not looking at having tar mark but gravel, well structured, with culverts and with small bridges because sooner or later, there will be no access to collect the white gold – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] – Madam Speaker, there is too much interference.  I need your protection.  I also have noted that on the provisions on transportation and infrastructure development, there is little provision for rail rehabilitation.  Transportation is very costly these days, if you use buses or kombis.  I would recommend that there be money provided for rehabilitating the existing railway lines so that we have our trains up and running to alleviate the problem of the high cost of transport.

I come to Vote 33, Zimbabwe Lands Commission...

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order.  Let me guide you in

terms of that.  If you look at our Order Paper, the debate we are having now is on the Budget Statement.  On Committee of Supply, that is when we debate vote by vote.  For now, we need to be generalising especially the revenue raising measures that have been stipulated in the Budget Statement and even some expenditure highlights.  That is what we need to concentrate on now.  We are going to get to a stage which we call Committee of Supply, where we are going to go vote by vote.  Each Member will be commenting on it to find out if it is high or low.  All you are discussing now, we will talk about it that time.  For now, let us be specific on the overall Budget Statement.  Thank you.

HON. MASENDA:  Thank you for your guidance Madam

Speaker.

HON. MUSHORIWA:  On a point of order Madam Speaker.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order Hon. Masenda.  What is

your point of order Honourable?

HON. MUSHORIWA:  Madam Speaker, I think we have heard you trying to correct Members from this side in terms of what needs to be done in terms of debate.  I suggest that can there be an induction course for this side so that they go through the process.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Thank you.  Hon. Masenda, may you proceed?

HON. MASENDA:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  I am going to

my last point.  I appreciate the increase in the provision for the Zimbabwe Land Commission.  It is important that land distribution and redistribution be carried out in an effective manner.  The Lands Commission cannot execute its duties effectively if they have not been provided with enough funds.  It is also important that the Land Commission carries out its audit and it needs money.  I also would like to applaud the Minister in providing funds which will provide land audit and transportation of the officers who execute the work.  I wish to thank you Madam Speaker for the opportunity you have given me.

+HON. N. NDHLOVU:  Thank you Madam Speaker for giving me this opportunity to add my voice to the Mid-Year Fiscal Review and Supplementary Budget.  Let me go to page 54, which speaks about the devolution of power.  Madam Speaker, in 2013 we passed a new Constitution which clearly speaks on the devolution of power and establishment of provincial councils.  Surprisingly, Madam Speaker, it is now seven years since the Constitution was passed and governance is still centralised instead of devolution Madam Speaker, when I look at provincial councils, the councils were allocated $310 million.  What I do not know is how this money will be used and when because the money cannot be utilised since the Provincial Councils Bill has not been tabled in Parliament.  There is no particular Act which defines the terms of reference of the councils.  Madam Speaker, what I would like to know is that since this is the seventh year, what assurance is there that these monies will be used in the provincial councils.  We know that every year end when budgeted money is not utilised within that particular year, then that money is forfeited.  With that in mind, I would like to ask the

Minister to clarify to Parliament when the Bill is coming to Parliament.

Madam Speaker, there are a number of people who were promised positions in the councils just like legislators who are given particular terms.  These council employees were given contracts.  My concern is that their term might expire before the Bill is tabled in Parliament and before assuming office.

Let me go to page 37, item 115 where we talk of infrastructure projects.  My question is when we talk of buildings, there are people who are disabled, are you considering them when putting up structures because I have a very good example which is the Parliament of Zimbabwe.  At times there is no electricity and that also affects the elevators.  People who are disabled are unable to attend committees because they cannot access the 5th floor where the committees will be sitting.  These buildings cannot accommodate the disabled.  Please consider them because they are people just like us.  They also vote for us and we do not look at whether the vote came from a disabled person or not.  Please consider them when putting up buildings.

Now looking at page 69 item 219 where there is talk of ease of doing business reforms.  They say it is now going to be easy for people to get papers to carry out their business.  This issue of saying to someone first go to Karigamombe, Munhumutapa or elsewhere, I understand now that everything will be done under one roof called the one-stop-shop.  I think this is very good even for investors because they can access all their documents in one place.  My worry however is that after getting his papers, he is going to face the environment outside and come face to face with the fact that there is no water, no electricity and there are no roads.  He will then discover that there is nothing in the country for him to carry out his business properly.  What are you going to do after that?  I think I have a resolution that I would like to give as a Member of

Parliament.  I think I have a right to assist the Minister of Finance and Economic Development.  Minister, you can come up with all these other reforms but you are not going anywhere if you do not come up with political reforms.  – [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear] – you know in life you can get sick and go to a doctor complaining of stomachache today, backache tomorrow and headache the next day.  If your blood is not tested you are not helping yourself in any way.  The blood that I am talking about is that you should look at our political reforms and also the issue of legitimacy.

In conclusion, I am now going to page 62.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order, order Hon Ndlovu.

There is someone with a point of order can you sit down.

HON. MUSABAYANA:  Madam Speaker, I rise on a point of order.  We will not allow the Hon. Member to abuse this august House by trying to grand stand and talk about legitimacy.  They lost the elections and they lost their court case so they cannot use this debate for the budget to talk about legitimacy.  There is no legitimacy issue in this country.  I thank you.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Hon. Ndlovu, could you speak

to the budget issues.

+HON. NDLOVU:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  I said I will go to page 62, item 193 which talks about commissioners funding.  I see they are listed here and there is ZEC and others.  On ZEC, it should be allocated a big chunk of money.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Hon. Ndlovu, the issue of ZEC will be discussed at the Committee of Supply.  That is where you will discuss the issue.

+HON. NDLOVU:  I was saying since it is under commissioners..

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  No, it is not there.

+HON. NDLOVU:  Yes it is there.  I was saying that it should cater for all the parties, that is why it should be given a big chunk.  Noone should complain.  On this issue of commissioners, for transparency’s sake could you also include people from the civic society, the Christian society and those educated people from the universities.  I thank you.

HON. MAMOMBE: On a point of order. Thank you Madam Chair.  In this august House, every time we speak about reforms, legitimacy and governance issues, we have noise from Members on the right side.  Are we supposed to be afraid to talk about the challenges that we have, are we not supposed to talk about reforms, legitimacy issues or the governance crisis that we have?  We cannot be suffering in silence.  We have to talk about it if we are to move as a Parliament.  If we are to debate we have to do so freely, stating what it is like.  So, we should not be limited by these Hon. Members.  We should be free to debate.  We are all Hon. Members here.  Everyone is free to debate.  They talk about whatever they talk about and we should also be allowed to talk about what we want to talk about.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order Hon. Members, order.  Let me respond to you Hon. Mamombe.  In this House, we have got different reports.  In terms of the election report, I am sure we got it in our pigeon holes and there is a time and a chance for everything.  At this moment, we are debating the budget and we need to be specific about that.  For us to be digressing and then we report about – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] - Order Hon. Members, order.  We have the Zimbabwe Human Rights report that was tabled here in Parliament and we also have the Zimbabwe Elections Report for 2018 which was actually tabled.  So, if it is anything which is at that juncture, we are allowed to debate but at the right time.  So for now, let us concentrate on the debate which is before us. – [HON. MEMBERS:

Inaudible interjections.] –

         Hon. Johanna Mamombe, I take note of that.  Hon. Members, I think there is some certain decorum that we are supposed to observe as Hon. Members.  We call each other as Hon. Members and we are not supposed to harass anyone if it is for sexuality  – [HON. MEMBERS:

Inaudible interjections.] –

         Order, order, Hon. Tsunga, I never recognised you.  So, when it comes to those issues, I will recognise you and you say your point of order.  There is a procedure in this House.  Let us proceed.

         You never raised a point of order Hon. Members.  Let me tell you the procedure.  When you feel that there is a word that should be withdrawn, – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – Order, order.   Hon. Samambwa, order.  Hon. Members, I think it is quite important for us to be able to observe all the rules that we have.  The procedure is, when you feel someone has to withdraw, it is not about you shouting – you will have to raise a point of order.  I thank you.

  HON. MUDARIKWA: Thank you Madam Speaker.  I want to

thank you and also add my voice on the current debate.  Our economy – the Zimbabwean economy is basically mining and agriculture.  These are the two major drivers of our economy. I want to thank the Minister for acknowledging in his report that now royalties are also deductible.  That is going to increase foreign direct investment in Zimbabwe.  We also want to look at how we can assist in gold production.  Hon. Minister, the idea of increasing royalties on gold, let us work on the original 1%.  What we need to do is to increase the capacity of our gold miners so that they produce more.  When we have more gold which then earns our country foreign currency, we will not be worried about 1%.  One percent of an elephant is worth something than 1% of a rat.  So, the whole situation is, we want to continue producing gold as artisanal miners and they have produced more than these big formal companies.

         Hon. Speaker, artisanal miners do not declare dividend that goes out of the country.  When artisanal miners get their money, they spend it here. So, it is money that is within.  Big mines at the end of the year declare dividends and if there is any increase in royalties, it must be on those big mines because they all take a substantial amount of the money out of the country.  So, we need to support the artisanal miners and we also need to support diamond mining in an artisanal way.

Artisanal mines must move in and produce diamonds in Chiadzwa.  It is happening in West Africa, it is happening everywhere where there are alluvial diamonds.  There is no point in bringing people from all over the world to go and work on alluvial diamonds.  Alluvial diamonds can be done by our people in those areas so that we can remove poverty.  The biggest enemy of Zimbabwe is poverty and what is poverty according to the dictionary.  It is your inability to utilise resources around you for your personal, national benefit.  We have done it in Chiadzwa and we have never had a personal or national benefit from those diamonds.  This idea of foreign investors aiwa, there are certain things that we can do on our own and we are blessed when we look at diamonds and gold panning.  This is the skill we inherited from Munhumutapa and we must be proud of those skills.  So, we need to improve on the generation of revenue.

         The other issue that I would want to address on is agriculture.  We can produce more as long as our people have enough resources.  The prices of fertilisers have gone out of this world.  Agribank must be capacitated, and the other bank which was opened by NSSA must be given to Agribank so that farmers can have a benefit.  NSSA does not need to run banks because when we have farmers with capital, then they can produce for the country.  Security for agriculture, we can use our cattle – Zimbabwe has five million cattle, and if you multiply by 2 000, it is $10 billion which can easily be invested in agriculture.

It is very nice to have a poor country and have rich people. They can easily contribute than having a very rich country with very poor people.  The State will have too many responsibilities.  I want to appreciate the issue of artificial insemination.  Madam Speaker, the size of our cattle, I was flying one day in a helicopter and when you are up there, you think that they are goats yet they are cattle.  They are now so small.  So, there is a need for us to improve because what is the improvement of wealth if we cannot improve the wealth of our people.  Our people have 10 cattle and we must improve on the quality so that those people can contribute and pay for school fees and everything.

         The issue of climate change is one of the most dangerous things that we are facing.  We must move and assist and explain to our farmers the dangers associated with climate change.  Madam Speaker, speaker after speaker before me were talking about the critical shortage of electricity. We must now have a sub-sector policy on renewable energy.

What is the local authority’s policy on renewable energy?  Private sector and parastatals, what are your policies on renewable energy?  The national policy of Zimbabwe comes from the sub-sector policy which then determines our national policy. This whole idea of relying on Harare power station, Munyati and Bulawayo; we went there as a Committee, these power stations must never be used for generation of power.

There must be museums for power generation for our science students who are doing electrical engineering.  They must be there, we must concentrate on critical issues.  The idea of refurbishing, some of you were not here in the august House, Hwange 5 and 6, there was 40 million which came from Nam Power.  We would have raised 80 million to have the new generation system.  If you go today in Hwange 5 and 6, there is nothing and they want another US$40m for refurbishing.  The whole idea of refurbishing is outdated.  Let us have modern ways of dealing with shortage of electricity and more-so, the element of renewable energy.  When we contribute let us give the Minister solutions not just criticisms. We must proffer solutions.

Hon. Speaker, the issue of the welfare of Hon. Members needs to be addressed. I know most of the Hon. Members not by face but by the suit they wear from Monday to Friday [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – You know this Hon. Member wears this jacket, this red tie and checked shirt.

         Madam Speaker, when my father was dying at Parirenyatwa Hospital at his death bed, he said mwana wamushawasha, mwana wadoregodzonga, you must never admire poverty. As a legislative institution of Zimbabwe, we must never, never admire poverty. Let us have a purpose to achieve certain things.  Hon. Minister, do not be worried by certain people who say this and that. For Joseph to be a king, he was thrown into a pit by his brothers. For David to be a king, he fought Goliath. You have a process of changing whatever people throw at you to make it right for the benefit of the people of Zimbabwe. I thank you.

  +HON. O. SIBANDA: Thank you very much Madam Speaker.  I

would like to comment on the budget that was presented by the Hon. Minister. I will start by saying Hon. Minister, thank you very much for the budget statement.  However, there are few issues that I want us to look at.  I represent a rural constituency, 65% of members of this august House come from the rural areas and our problems are unique to the rural areas.

         Hon. Minister, I appreciate you allocated some money to DDF, however that money is not enough.  DDF is responsible for sinking boreholes in rural areas; you will discover that boreholes need spares and repairs.  Drills at the DDF are few in the whole nation; there are only 20 drills which service the whole country.  There are newly resettled people who walk 20 km to access water from different dams.  The other point is that from my constituency in lower Gweru, there were some wetlands but they have since dried, there are no dams, no water, nothing.  Water is a challenge in Zimbabwe.  My desire is that Hon. Minister, you are supposed to allocate a reasonable sum to the provision of water. We are approaching the rainy season and you will discover that if these dams are not serviced we might face a challenge.  The Hon. Minister allocated 40 million to the DDF.  If the DDF is not properly capacitated then all rural areas might face a challenge.  Irrigation schemes support the provision of food in the country.

         Madam Speaker, I am sure you noticed that the President His Excellency Cde. E. D. Mnangagwa is addressing the issue of food shortages.  Looking at areas like Binga, there are some crops that are being produced under irrigation schemes.  However, these people are farming under irrigation schemes.  In my constituency, there are a lot of irrigation schemes that are not operational.  In Lower Gweru, there is no irrigation scheme.  My plea to you Hon. Minister, is that maybe you relook at the money that was allocated to the provision of water.

         All DDF offices in different rural areas do not have proper office infrastructure. There are no proper bridges in different rural areas to accommodate school going children.  My other point is that there are no more tillage tractors. Our cattle can no longer be used for tilling.  I would like to implore the Minister that the DDF budget be relooked at and reviewed to around 500 million because 40 million can only be allocated to one particular province, for example the Midlands province.

         Madam Speaker, DDF has around three graders which are warehoused at BARZEM; they only need three million to be released. I would like to implore you to look at these graders, the CAT graders that are housed at BARZEM.  The whole tendering process was done but what is needed is only 3 million to release those graders so that they are taken to different constituencies.

The other point is that let us look at Cyclones or  Elnino which is a result of climate change.  Climate change does not have a reasonable provision from the budget.  We also need to look at cloud seeding, there is nothing on cloud seeding in the budget, if we embark on cloud seeding, then we get water, for us who come from the rural areas we need water.  We are different from urban dwellers that get their water from taps.  I know that the Hon. Minister comes from Lupane, a rural area and I know that the problem that I am talking about is not unique to our constituency only but you are aware Hon. Minister.

Maize meal – after tilling our land using tractors, we can fill all

GMB silos without importing maize.  The importation of maize and the

Presidential schemes to relief people are not necessarily programmes that we should embark on.  However, we can work and provide our own maize.

Disabled people –  in my constituency I have more than 2000 disabled people, I know that this is not unique to my constituency but other Hon. Members also have disabled people in their constituencies.  Three million is not enough to cater for them.  My point is that I do not think it is not fair to them because they equally deserve to receive money from the fiscus.  I believe that this should be done in a fair and equitable manner.  Providing for the disabled can unlock blessings even for the nation.

I would like to implore the Hon. Minister to look at sports.  Sports in general unifies people; we were talking about female sports, looking at netball, cricket and the senior football team.  These sporting activities were only allocated 30 million dollars and this money is supposed to cater for those in different areas even in urban areas.  I believe that there should be balls even for Hon. Members of Parliament for different sporting activities.

Let me commend Nakamba, the money that the Hon. Minister of Finance needs is money that can be raised especially looking at the case of Nakamba.  One Hon. Member of Parliament can be empowered with enough funds for sporting activities in his constituency so that our children shun criminal activities.  Instead they can focus on these sporting activities.  The reason why there is an increase in crime rate is because our young people do not have anything to do but if we empower them, give them enough balls, they will be productive.

Lastly, I would like to say to the Hon. Minister of Finance, we are your people, all these man and women in this august House, the challenges they face are challenges that you will also face.  Even when coming up with budgets, a mother plans looking at the children in her family.  I would like to implore the Minister of Finance to look at your children in this august House.  You should also consider their cars, their welfare, their pay, we are your people, and we are your children.  Look after us Hon. Minister.  I thank you – [THE HON. MEMBERS: Hear,

hear.]-

*HON. MUTAMBISI: Thank you Hon. Speaker. I would want to

thank the Minister of Finance especially the additional allocation that he made to the special needs in primary and secondary education Ministry.  I observed the amount that he has allocated.  It is my considered view that he has allocated very little with regards to the requirement of those less fortunate children especially those that are visually impaired that require braille alphabetic use.  They also need special care toilets and parents are having serious challenges in coming up with toilets that are user friendly to this specific group of children.

 I will move to the issue of the resources for the new curriculum.  A lot of new things are now required as regards the new curriculum, parents are finding it difficult to give their children the necessary requirements.  We would want the Minister to add more money to the schools so that they can become self sustaining on the issue of resources in terms of the new curriculum.

On page 52, he talked about the construction of schools.

Construction material has gone up which is now expensive, schools may not be completed either this year or next year.  The pupil/teacher ratio is now at 60 which is too heavy.  If other schools were to be constructed, it would help through de-congesting the schools.

Lastly, I would want to talk about the issue of the burden that teachers are now carrying.  Teachers that commute are now unable to do so; they can no longer sustain the cost of living.  They need a living wage so that they can become respectable and that they should not be worse than an artisanal miner.  I thank you.

HON. P. D. SIBANDA: Thank you Hon. Speaker.  For starters, allow me, Hon. Speaker to say that in my view and this is my view;  this is one of the most nonsensical budget statements that I have seen over a long time that I have started to – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.]-

         THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER (HON. MAVETERA):  Hon.

Sibanda, may you please withdraw that statement?

  HON. P. D. SIBANDA: Before I withdraw, the Hon. Minister of

Finance is an economist.  He understands that when we are saying that something is nonsensical, it is not an insult. He understands very much – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.]that is an economic term.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  May you kindly withdraw?

HON. NDUNA:  We need breathlysers in this House.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  I have not recognised you

Hon. Nduna.

HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  I will withdraw Hon. Speaker but what I wanted to say –[HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –  I

withdraw Hon. Speaker but as I withdraw, I want to say that the Hon. Minister of Finance, being an economist that he is, he understands a working definition of that word in economics what it simply means is that …

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  May you kindly withdraw.

HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  I have already withdrawn.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  No more explanations to that.

May you kindly proceed?

HON. P. D. SIBANDA: Hon. Speaker, I know he has decided not to listen to me because he knows that he has got graves and tombs in his statement.  There is nothing that is going to bring development in here.

HON. NDUNA:  We need breathlysers in this House.

HON. P.D. SIBANDA:  Iwewe you were never voted for -

[Laughter.] -

HON. NDUNA:  We need breathlysers in this House Madam

Speaker Ma’am.  You need to make a ruling on people that come into this House drunk.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Thank you.

HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  When we are talking about a budget statement, it is a very critical and very important part of a nation’s calendar because it speaks to development needs of a society.  When you find a budget statement which does not speak to the prevailing needs of any economy, I do not want to use that word again that I used earlier on for fear of fouling you but honestly speaking, I will show you the graves and tombs that are in this budget statement.

HON. KASHIRI: On a point of order Hon. Speaker.  The Hon. Member is not supposed to school us about budget but he is supposed to debate –[HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.]

HON. P.D. SIBANDA: The first thing that I want to speak to about this budget is that when we passed the budget sometime last year, it was a budget of over $4 billion...

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  May you withdraw again. You

said the Minister did not want to listen to you because he had gone outside.

HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  I withdraw Hon. Speaker.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  He has come back.  So you

are supposed to withdraw that.

HON. P.D. SIBANDA:  I have withdrawn Hon. Speaker.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Thank you very much. Please

continue.

HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  There has been a lot of changes in our economic fundamentals between the last time that we passed the 2019 Budget and this time when the Supplementary Budget is being presented.  When you look at all these figures that are being mentioned and thrown around by the Hon. Minister – what they are simply meant to do is to try and deal with the inflational pressures that have happened to the Budget that we passed last year.  It is also meant to deal with the issues of the exchange rate after we have moved away from the fictitious and scandalous 1:1 rate that we used to have in the last year.  Basically, there is nothing that this Budget is going to improve in terms of our economy.  It is merely meant to deal with the scandals and skeletons of last year that the Hon. Minister and his financial authorities had put before us.

Let us go to paragraph 32 of the Budget Statement where the Hon.

Minister seems to be telling us and the nation that he is dealing with the domestic debt.  I say so because in reality, he is not doing anything.  He is actually increasing the debt burden of this country.  If you look at paragraph 32, the second bullet where he says – the high impact measures that he has put in place include restructuring of overdraft facility, cash advances and Treasury Bills held by RBZ into long term marketable instruments.

This literally means that the Hon. Minister has said that I do not want to deal with this obligation.  I am passing it on to future generations.  But when he passes it on to future generations, he is not passing it costlessly.  It is going to cost the nation because by restructuring, he is accepting that he is going to pay huge interests rates to whoever the country owes. It means that we are going to see the level of our debt burden increasing rather than being reduced.  In my view, it would have made sense for the Hon. Minister who is always preaching about surplus to come here and say I have decided to extinguish all the debt that we have rather than for him to restructure the debt and increase the cost of repaying that debt to the nation.

I also want to take you to bullet number three of the same paragraph 32 – he talks about a stop to any Treasury Bills issuance for

ZAMCO.  I think it is important for us to understand what ZAMCO is.  ZAMCO is a repayment plan that was made by this Government to pay back the loans that were stolen by the people that are in high offices.  If the Hon. Minister was honest, he was supposed to come here and show us the list.  The people that benefited from this ZAMCO facilities are the people that are in offices including the Mangundyos of this world.  They are involved in the ZAMCO.  Their own loans that they took from CBZ and other banks are being paid by us the tax payers through the ZAMCO facility.  For him to tell us that he is stopping issuing of Treasury Bills  - for me it is not enough.

I am of the view that what he was supposed to do is to simply say – I have identified all the people that had none performing loans and that those people should pay back the loans to the institutions that they owe and not to simply stop whilst he is still holding the debt on behalf of the nation that the tax payers should continue to pay.  That does not add value to our economy.

I want to take you to paragraph 81 on page 29...

HON. NDUNA:  I am impressed that you can see as drunk as you

are.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Hon. Nduna withdraw that.

HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  That is getting too personal, you are getting too personal.

HON. NDUNA:  I said I withdraw.  You can do what you want though.

HON. P. D. SIBANDA: Before I go to paragraph 81, allow me to deal with paragraph 76 up to 79 to just show the wrong priorities that the Hon. Minister has.  The Hon. Minister is talking about the welfare of civil servants and pensioners.  What he has simply increased on that Budget – I want you to make a comparison of the increases or provisions that have been made.  For the welfare of civil servants and pensioners,

he has put up only 30%.  We are talking about 30% at a time when inflation has actually risen to beyond 500% between the time that this budget was put in place and now. So, in real terms Hon. Speaker, there is nothing that has been added to civil servants. Civil servants will continue to wallow in poverty because the Minister of Finance has not given them anything. The 30% that he has put up, if I am going to compare it with some pockets where the pockets of access and leakages by the Executive, you will understand that there is nothing that has been put in terms of the welfare of the people.

         If I go to paragraph number 81 which talks of Government operations. These are Government operations that are not listed or enumerated, they have been given a whopping 175% increase from the supplementary budget but when you are talking about the welfare of the civil servants who are keeping the Government machinery moving, he has only given 30%. Then you ask yourself, what are those operations of Government that are getting this 175 % allocation through this supplementary budget, you will not know. The reason is that these are the pockets where those that are in offices have access to money and put them in their pockets. That is the reason why it is not stated what these operations are and that is why these operations are given so much huge amounts of money.

         Hon. Speaker, I will take you to paragraph 114 which speaks about capital development projects. If you go to 114, you will realise that agriculture is given about $2, 9; let us say $3 billion. Given that $3 billion on the background of another $3 billion that disappeared into the same sector, what surprises people like me …

         THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Paragraph 114 talks of $2,950

billion not $3 billion.

     HON. P. D. SIBANDA: $2,950 is just as good as $3 billion.

            THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: It is not because $50 million is

a lot of money. So, just say $2,950 I am sure you are referring to a certain paragraph, so just be specific.

  HON. P. D. SIBDANDA: Okay, Hon. Speaker $2, 950 billion

against a background of $3 billion that just disappeared in the same agricultural sector. That is not the only concern that I have about hiding this agriculture figure under capital development projects.

What worries me is that in terms of paragraph number 83 that specifically deals with agricultural issues, why do we have to hide this money under capital development projects instead of putting it directly where we have already put a budget for agriculture in terms of paragraph number 83? What is the Hon. Minister hiding by taking that amount of money and hiding it somewhere at the corner of capital development projects when paragraph number 83 deals with agriculture and food security? In my view Hon. Speaker, this is a sign that the $2,950 billion might not be meant for the intended purpose. It might also be going towards the other $3 billion that cannot be accounted for in this House.

Hon. Speaker, I will then want to take you to paragraph 174 and I will not say much about this one because someone has already talked about it. How do you allocate money to a vehicle whose law has not yet been put in place? Under what mechanism are we allocating finances to provincial councils and local authorities when we do not have the enabling Act that allows us to give money to those local authorities and provincial councils? Do you not see that actually creates a gap within which gap people can use to actually steal the money? There is no law Hon. Speaker in place and there is no reason why that law has not been brought to this House. I am sure this House is ready to deal with that Bill if it is brought here but we are seeing some allocations being made. Are we really certain that we will be able tomorrow without the enabling law, to follow up these monies that are being allocated under this Bill?

From there Hon. Speaker, I will take you to paragraph 187. It is all nice to see this so-called mass public transportation system. It is good for us to be seen receiving 47 buses per time in this country. It is good to see our people riding those buses at a ridiculous cost of $0,50c because $0,50c cannot buy anything anymore in this country. You walk in any supermarket and you cannot buy anything for $0,50c. What does this mean Hon. Speaker? Not that I am not happy to see people getting free rides but this free riding is not coming cheap. It is very expensive.

The Hon. Minister one day said they are paying almost $13 million per month towards subsidies of this ZUPCO transportation system. Let me say this Hon. Speaker - the problem with subsidies is that they have got negative implications. Subsidies by nature have negative implications. One of the implications is that they are not sustainable. In a year, it means the Hon. Minister is paying about $140 million towards the subsidy being paid to ZUPCO. There is no transparency in the manner in which those subsidies are being paid. Remember, it is not only the ZUPCO buses that are plying those routes. Private buses as well have been engaged in those routes and they are receiving those subsidies.

This House has never been informed on who exactly are supplying buses to ZUPCO or enjoying this $13 million subsidies per month that is being paid by Government. Subsidies by their nature promote inefficiency and the inefficiency that is going to happen is that a lot of people will actually be siphoning out that $13 million and a lot of people are going to get rich from these subsidies. They are not going to achieve what they are supposed to achieve.

From there, allow me Hon. Speaker to talk about paragraph 249…

HON. KASHIRI: On a point of order Madam Speaker. If I remember well, you reprimanded one Hon. Member from going into detail during budget. We are now wondering Hon. Speaker, the Hon. Member who is presenting is going into specific details. Please, let us have standard. Thank you.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Like what I have said, we are

talking about Votes and Votes are specific to commissions or certain institutes. So, whenever you comment on anything concerning that, I will have to reprimand you but when it comes to issues within the budget which talk about the 34 Votes you can discuss about that. I hope that is clear.

HON. P. D. SIBANDA: Thank you Hon. Speaker. Let me take you to paragraph 249 and I am not so sure which word I can use on this paragraph but the Speaker’s statement says, ‘Mr. Speaker Sir, Excise Tax remains a vital instrument for Government to discourage the consumption of products,” I will not go on to mention the products.  However, it defies logic for a Minister of Finance to say that he wants to discourage consumption in an economy where aggregate demand is actually falling down each and every day.

Most of the manufacturers in this country are closing and the reason is that people have no disposable income to go and buy the things that they are manufacturing.  If you then increase taxes on the basis that you want to reduce consumption in an economy that has already an aggregate demand that is falling each and every day, I do not know what economic sense it makes Hon. Speaker.  In my view, this was the time for the Hon. Minister to reduce taxes so that he can spare aggregate demand and say the little disposable income that Zimbabweans have can be able to buy something.  Through aggregate demand, we are able to make sure that our economy grows and our local firms are able to employ.

As I come to an end Hon. Speaker, let me say this -as I indicated, a budget is an important part of any country’s activities per year.  As a matter of culture, tradition and practice of this Parliament, what we have been doing before is that before a Budget or a Supplementary Budget, we would have a pre-budget seminar.  The reason why we were holding those pre and post budget seminars was to ensure that we sit down and are able to interrogate the Hon. Minister through a workshop or seminar and come to an agreement of whether what he has here will assist the economy or not.  However, failure of us to have that pre or post budget seminar and then pushing us to approve this Supplementary Budget, I think at the end of the day, we will regret.  This budget statement is actually going to add woes and misery to Zimbabweans.  It is not going to improve our welfare.  So, it is my view and submission that this House should reject to approve this budget – [HON. MEMBERS:

Inaudible interjections.] – we should not approve this supplementary Budget until we first have a post budget seminar where we are going to interact on a one on one with the Hon. Minister on issues to do with this budget.  I just want to thank you Hon. Speaker.

    +HON. PHULU: I want to thank you Madam Speaker for the time

you have given me so that I can talk a little bit about the budget.  I want to thank Hon. Minister, Prof. Ncube who is the Minister of Finance and Economic Development for presenting the budget to us.  I do not want to take time because people have already said so many things about the budget.  I will talk about a few things that need to be taken care of in this budget especially when you will be presenting the next budget.

         Firstly, we look at the issue which people have already spoken about, that is the separation of powers.  I think this is a very important issue to talk about.  Parliament was given 68% of the budget, Judiciary was given 128% and the Executive is supposed to be getting more because of its programmes.  At the same time, Parliament and the

Judiciary are supposed to get more money because of their programmes.  When we are looking at the Judiciary, they have to build more courts; these are some of the important programmes which need to be looked into.  When we are looking at the Executive, you will be talking about the corruption issues. In Parliament, we would like to be given some adjustments so that we do our programmes without facing any challenges.

         In constituencies where we come from, we would like you to look into the passport issues, it seems to be disturbing.  People are complaining about this issue, they are always calling us daily.  I talked to one lady who said she came here to renew her passport and this has taken her more than two years still waiting for the passport and the husband is out of the country.  This is also affecting marriages.  We would like this side to be given more money so that people will not face challenges in applying for their passports.

We would like to look into the birth certificate issue. They should be given enough money to cater for birth certificates and each and every district needs to have these offices.  Places like Lupane, Bulawayo and Tsholotsho, people need to get passports and birth certificates without facing any challenges, they have to decentralise.  I would like to talk about the figures of the year on year inflation; even the business community were complaining about these figures, they need to know about the inflation.  Hon. Minister Mthuli Ncube has to look into such issues.  For example, there is a Professor who said he does not want to research on Africa because they do not show the figures or the statistics. By not announcing all these figures, we will not be having any way of getting them, it is a very big challenge to those who are doing research.  Some will be researching on different issues and these may be of help to rural communities but this will lead us to the black market getting information pertaining to figures and statistics.

Looking at our Constitution, it talks more about transparency. Under Section 9 (1) they talk about the principles of administration and its importance in the country.  We would like a decision which talks about the statistics to be erased or reversed or maybe they find another way which will not show that the figures are not supposed to be known by the public.

Mr. Speaker Sir, we talked about pension issues, people are complaining about the pension fund, the challenges they are facing when they go to the banks.  The elderly who are getting their pensions and the war veterans. Yes, I agree with things that were being said by the different Hon. Members who contributed on this motion that we need to take care of our war veterans and especially their pensions.

Sometimes we forget even the elderly people, people who should be considered in their own category whether they are war veterans or not.  We need to take into consideration that we are here because of those elderly people.  These people worked for us to get to the stage that we are as a country.  You realise these elderly people are the ones who took you to school.  As we speak, they are still looking after small children in the villages and townships.

I realise from the figures that were given, we are providing for disability, but my question is those elderly people who are looking after the disabled, they are subsidising you.  Why not take care of the elderly people who are taking care of these children, who will then be forced to use their money in taking care of these children.  Why can we not takecare of the elderly people and a certain vote be allocated to them?

There is a paragraph that I am really worried about on page 28 and page 29 where there is the issue of income adjustment is mentioned.  You indicated that these are meant for the civil servants which I am not really agreeing to, that it will be enough for them.  When we talk about the pensioners, there is only a fleeting reference to them.  What I will say is it is just as good as ignoring them.  Why not allocate specific figures to them, acknowledging that they are there than simply saying we will just cascade to them.  I will say this is more of a condescending attitude and we are using them just as a footnote while there are people who are so important in our country.

I also want to add more on the elderly people that I have been talking about.  When we are talking about safety nets, there is a vulnerability report that we spoke about.  I want to indicate that the vulnerable people will be affected by drought and you realise that as a nation, we now have urban drought.  So many people staying in urban areas are not able to fend for themselves and I will also mention that there is now urban poverty that the nation is faced with.  If you research properly, you will realise the people that are living in urban areas are largely affected more than people who are staying in rural areas.

There is also an issue to do with cars specifically for the disabled. Yes, you mentioned that you will give rebate to such cars.  It is a good thing that you have done Minister, but in paragraph 335, you mentioned that when the person who is disabled purchases that car and the person passes on before five years, you will request for payment of duty.  We need to look on the conditions.  What if the disabled person who has bought the car is the breadwinner in the family? If you are therefore requesting for the person to pay for the duty, where are you expecting them to get the money?  Sometimes the person will not be able to pay and will be putting a burden to the family.  I do not know how we can handle this matter.  I know sometimes it is a way of trying to protect them from maybe people who buy cars for them and if they decide to be mischievous and have a way of killing them.  I think it is a very painful thing what is there in paragraph 335.  We should have a way of changing

it.

I will also touch on the issue that was highlighted yesterday on the prices for the Government.  When the prices go up, we realise that there are people in the rural areas who are unemployed as well as those who are employed.  They will not be able to get the money to afford those services.  So that means that somebody who is a teacher for example is unable to come to Harare twice or thrice a month because the tollgate prices have gone up, servicing cars has gone up as well.  Therefore, I would like to say that the money that people are getting to support those who have spoken before me like Hon. Sacco and others, we need to ensure that their money is backed with the RTGS and the United States dollar so that they are paid the money that is equal to the increase in prices.

I think we must look into the aspect of workers because they are important.  They are very vital as they work for us even up to today.  We should not look down upon them and burden them. When we do the budget and we have a theme of putting foundation on prosperity, we should not leave behind the elderly as well as the workers because we cannot prosper without those people.  I addition, the prosperity that we are seeking, our elders are at the foundation.  The elders did not work yesteryear.  It is quite unfair because even today they are paying for our future because they are teaching the children and taking them to school yet we are supposed to be doing that and the Government is supposed o be responsible.  There is need to respect the elderly.

Please, I emphasise that you should not forget the elderly.  When we speak, we speak of the youth.  We need their empowerment.  We also need the disabled to be empowered.  I also want to emphasise on the issue of war veterans.  There is a form of discrimination that is called ageism which I read about yesterday.  We have a lot of ageism in Zimbabwe.  The issue of taking advantage of the elderly, I think that is why we have bad luck and our rain is not coming.  I think we do not even respect our spirit mediums.  The fact that we are disrespecting our elders is the one that is a road block to us prospering.  I would want to stand on top of the table to emphasise this because I believe it is very vital.

Also, there is the issue of drought.  We were looking forward to issues of cloud seeding and many other things that can be done that were mentioned by the Hon. Members of Parliament.  I think there is need for us to know and have information about our weather.  There is need to put aside money for cloud seeding as well as research so that we know about our weather and we are able to predict what could happen in the near future.

In addition, there is something I realise, Mr. Speaker Sir, on page 48 paragraph 148, it speaks about the Zambezi Water Project.  I realise the money that was set aside for various dams.  That is a good thing, Hon. Speaker, however we would want there to be an increase on that money because water is a problem.  Therefore, we believe that amount is too little as the money is in RTGS, it will not take us far.  The Zambezi Water Project is very important in the Matabeleland region because it is a place where there are water shortages.  Therefore, there is need to allocate a lot more money than what it received.

There is a statement that I say on paragraph 148.  It said that phase two and phase three will be managed by stakeholders.  I am not sure if that is a typographical error.  I think that the Minister should elaborate on who the stakeholders are.  We should also know how much he consulted concerning those stakeholders.  I know some of them, they are friends of mine and I wonder if they know about this or it is an error that phases two and three will be handled by them?  I am wondering if it will be taken away from the Government and given to the stakeholders and you will not give the project anymore money or you mean that you are going to work hand in glove so that they finish up on these phases?  There is need for clarity concerning this issue because I do not understand it and it is worrying me.  I have seen it in this Budget for the first time.  Is it another way of the Government abandoning this project and giving it to the people?  I do not understand it.  I would want there to be clarity and would want to know what the Hon. Minister would say about it.  It is an issue that we need to speak about because this is a very vital project.

There is also the issue of transport.  It was postulated that there will be an urban mass transport system and this is very welcome.  People are facing challenges with the ZUPCO buses because the buses do not stop at the bus stops.  They just pass through and do not come back.  Again, the elderly and the disabled are finding it difficult to use these buses.  There is need for a timetable and bus stops to be set for these buses.  Urban mass transport system is very important and is something that we welcome.  However, we would want you again, to clarify how it is going to function.  We would want to know if it will have its own system and whether it will be run by the central government.  We would want you to devolve this system if there is an opportunity to do so, so that people can find a way of transport.  I would like to thank you Mr. Speaker Sir, for the time that you gave me and the little time that you added on for me.  If i heard time, i would have wanted to speak to the issue of devolution.  I thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER (HON. KHUMALO):  Order

Hon. Members.  Order please!  I want to make a small announcement to make.  It seems, through the debates, people are hungry and we have decided to provide some food at the Members’ Dining.  We have provided Members with food.  It looks like as you debate, some people are very hungry and there are a lot of repetitions.  We think you have to eat.  We will go out in batches so that some remain debating.  We want the Minister, when we finish eating, to respond and we go to the next item.  It looks like we are ready for the responses from the Minister – [HON. MADZIMURE:  We still want to respond.] – You are going to debate but I am saying, when we come back, we need to ask the Minister to respond.  Please, it must be smooth.  Do not make a lot of noise as you go out, those who want to go and eat – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – No, I am saying we have decided to give you food.  You are not paying.

HON. CHIKWINYA:  On a point of privilege Mr. Speaker.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  What is your point of

privilege?

HON. CHIKWINYA:  My point of privilege is that, by today’s

process, are we going to get to the Committee Stage?  If that is going to be yes, I was going to beg leave that one, we have not been given the opportunity to consult and two, our brains, it is not about the hunger, it is literally the brains which have been stretched.  Since tomorrow is a Thursday, we can then go into Committee Stage tomorrow.  It was going to be my plea.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order please.  With the way

we are moving, I think we are able to allow the Minister to respond after, then we will see what happens next.  Let us see the Minister respond and we will see how far we go.  Can we proceed?  Those who want to eat can go but let us not go all of us, we want to continue.  Those who want to debate, be careful, if I omit you here – when your name is here and you are eating, I am no longer going to call your name.  I will just strike you.  So if you want to debate, remain here debating – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – Hon. Members, as you go out, may you respect the rules?

HON. MADZIMURE:  Thank you Mr. Speaker.

     THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER (HON. M. KHUMALO):

Why is everyone standing?

       HON. MADZIMURE: Mr. Speaker, why every member is

standing up to debate is because of the manner in which we do our budget cycle as Parliament of Zimbabwe.  This is why you find every member would want to debate this Bill.  No Member was given an opportunity to understand the Minister’s vision, that is what the Minister wanted to achieve.  In a normal Parliamentary democracy, what should have started should have been a paper by the Minister to Parliament which would then go to the Budget Committee.  In a normal Parliament, the Committee would then consult and various committees would also look at the Minister’s paper to understand the aspirations of Government and then try to compare with the peoples’ aspirations, what they expected to see.  However, in our Parliament it still remains a myth, it is an ambush.  The old Westminister’s style where we see the Minister with a bag which we do not know what it contains is out dated.  It is this Parliament though that is expected to allocate the money.  The question is very clear, the responsibility to allocate money lies with Parliament and if it is Parliament with that mandate then Parliament should contribute towards the line items where the money will be spent.  This is the best and only way to measure progress.  There is no way you can expect us to exercise an oversight role when we have no contribution at all to the people’s aspirations.  We are there to represent the people and when we are out there, people tell us exactly where they want their money to be spent on, constituency by constituency.  That is why the whole idea of CDF was brought up because it was identified that there is a huge gap between the Government’s own interpretation of the people’s needs and what the people actually want on the ground.  This is why you have every Member of Parliament itching to debate because this is their only opportunity to vent out what they know the people they represent want to see in the budget.

         Under normal circumstances, any money Bill should come before the Budget, Finance and Economic Development Committee because it impacts directly on the people that we represent.  If there are taxes, they are going to affect the people that we represent.  In our system however, it is the Ministry bureaucrats who decide on the taxes.  Our people do not know what the taxes are going to be used for.  – [AN HON. MEMBER:  Inaudible interjection] – A very respectable Hon. Member is saying vachaziva.  This is exactly kutonga nedemo where you do not expect people to say anything to contribute towards their own life and democracy.  We fought against the Smith regime because we were being told that mutero wanzi mari yakati namudzviti and that was final.  People had no contribution.  This is exactly the same system that we have where we now have toll gates fees being increased from $2 to $10.  Why?

Where is the money going to and to achieve what, we do not know.

         Under normal circumstances, the Members of Parliament would have contributed to what they want to see and there is nothing of that sort that happened.  This is precisely why even the Minister did not even bother to say what the money that was allocated in December last year, this is what we have achieved.  There is nothing from the Minister’s statement that indicates to us what …

  THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order Hon. Member. Why do

you not get into the debate because time is moving?

         HON. MADZIMURE:  This is exactly the debate, this is the procedure of coming up with a budget and you cannot go to the Votes when you do not understand the framework of the budget. As far as  I am concerned, it does not help me to concentrate on saying on this particular area we allocated so much but you should have allocated so much, to achieve what?  I do not understand it.  So, as a Member of Parliament, I feel aggrieved because the budget cycle formulation that we have in this country does not meet the standards of a developing country.  The budget concentrates on spending money but does very little to address the issues of where the money will come from.  If you look at the situation right now, I am a manufacturer myself.  We do not have power for 18 hrs which leaves us 8hrs with power because it comes back at 10pm.  At 5am it is switched off.  All the taxes that you are talking about, who are you going to tax and all the duties that you are talking about who is going to pay that duty if we are not producing?  We have employees to take care of, how are we going to treat them?  Are we going to retrench them?  We talk of surplus but we have an ESKOM electricity bill that we have not paid.  Why did we not pay so that we keep our industry going? Where I operate from, I am close to a company called Brown Engineering which is one of those companies that were growing and it has been expanding.  It supplies farm equipment and right now they have an order of close to $10 million to supply to Malawi.  What then happens to those contracts?  These are the real issues that we must be talking about and this is exactly what the budget should be addressing. On electricity, by such time we will have paid so much and we are going to have more electricity but there is nothing.  There is a serious disconnect of what is happening on the ground and what is presumed to be happening at government level.

         Then the issue of water is another problem.  You manufacture foam rubber and you use water and all of a sudden, in the process of mixing chemicals you do not have water – you know what happens, it dries up and whatever container you will have been using is sealed.  To undo the damage costs money.  Even yesterday the whole Parliament of Zimbabwe spent the day without water and because of that, there were blockages.  Right now, the City of Harare is dealing with the blockage right at our door step because tissues were being thrown in and no water was flushing.  These are the problems, what measures are there in the supplementary budget to deal with those issues, there is nothing. You then see $2.9 billion going to Command Agriculture which the President said in his own statement that he will not continue sinking, throwing money into a pit.  The President said that and the Minister of Finance concurred and said he was not going to give any money to Command Agriculture because the returns out of that were not commensurate with what had been invested.  It is there and right now, we are talking of a drought when we sunk in $3 billion which is enough to import our own food without producing for three years.  Without producing, we could have got a supply of three years and we give other people the money just to squander and that is exactly what we are doing.  What is it that we achieved with the $3 billion that we gave to the farmers?  But to make matters worse Mr. Speaker, you cannot prove that it was given to the Ministry of Lands, Agriculture, Water, Climate and Rural Resettlement because the Ministry is refusing that it got that money.  It was only given the figure to include in their books.  So, where did the money go?  The $3 billion was close to the US$4 billion that we wanted to spend in that particular year, the evidence is there and what are we trying to do.   

         Mr. Speaker, I am not speculating, I am not lying – the evidence was given under oath and today we have $2.9 billion to be spent in the next four months.  The supply of fertiliser where we have fertiliser supplies, we will not be able to purchase so much fertiliser.  It will be impossible to spend $2.9 billion and I do not know what kind of $2.9 billion we are talking about.  Do we divide by seven or by ten to get to the real value of a US dollar?   So Mr. Speaker, when we debate some issues, you were being associated with this budget and to be called names by the people after having approved such a budget, it is unfair. Whenever you approve a budget, people would want to measure progress and in our case, when we approved the December budget, the standard of living was at a certain level and today the standard of living has gone down to an extent where my child cannot go with a sandwich to school because there is no flour to make bread.  Children are going to school with sadza ne mangai Mr. Speaker, in this modern world.

    So Mr. Speaker, what we are doing here kutamba tsavatsava.

There is virtually nothing that is going to come out of this budget.  I am being realistic.  Mr. Speaker, talking about the issue of even the exchange rate, changing from Zim dollar.  We changed from Zim dollar to the US dollar and now from US dollar to Zim dollar. What is happening on the ground is a clear indication that the Zim dollar is not going to hold.  It will not happen, it will not work and the way we have been converting these things Mr. Speaker, the pensioners, if we look at the percentages which their pensions have been increased, we talk of over 30%.  A person who was getting $80 in August last year could take $50, go and buy groceries or basics that would take that person through the month to the next pay day but today the same $80 might not even take that person to where he/she will collect his or her pay amount.

         Mr. Speaker, here I am talking of policy inconsistencies. As long as we are inconsistent in our policy pronouncements, no one will take us seriously and that is purely why the mega deals of the $15 billion that we were talking about before elections, of the platinum investors from Russia.  Those people will not come to a country where there are so many inconsistencies and you were there in Russia asking them and I think they told you exactly the reason why they were not here.  Otherwise, some of the investors could have hosted you – hosting their future partners in business and that could not happen because they have no confidence at all with our economy.  So, policy inconsistency is our biggest problem Mr. Speaker.

         The issue of accountability is another one.  There was this day when we heard that we got some grant from China of about $15 million and the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development said accept the donation and the donation came in tractors and vehicles.  Imagine directors and deputy directors and secretaries sat down and decided just to share amongst themselves and no record.  Right now as Parliament, we have problems.  We cannot perform our duties because we are poorly funded.  Why are we being poorly funded?  The reason is very simple – they do not want Parliament to exercise its oversight role.  Like right now, we have become a nuisance in as far as Ministry officials are concerned.

We are now asking too many questions and because of that, you will not be able to travel but when it comes to their own travels, they have all exceeded their allocations. They will travel as and when they want to.  How many times have we failed to meet even the Minister of Finance and Economic Development because he is out and if you then carry out an evaluation to say out of all those trips, what is it that we have benefitted?  That is why we do not have electricity because we have not been able to cultivate any relationship with other people, otherwise we could be paying or having money to pay for electricity and business will be going on.

         On the issue of production Mr. Speaker it is a serious matter.  As long as we remain in this darkness, just forget it.

    THE ACTING SPEAKER:  Hon. Member, you are left with five

minutes.

    HON. MADZIMURE: Thank you very much Mr. Speaker, I am

also about to wind up.  Even if you want to extend, you can extend the time.  There is no problem.

         Mr. Speaker, we have a serious challenge – we need to address our fundamentals.  We need to move as a country.  I think one thing that lacks and without that thing, we are going nowhere.  Tikapota tichiita matalks naana Muteki tichisiya kuita zviri relevant, this country will go nowhere.  So, the issue of our country has to be addressed.

       HON. MUSABAYANA: Mr. Speaker Sir, it has been ruled earlier

on that we do not talk politics here.  Nelson Chamisa lost the election, he went to court, and he lost again.  He was given a chance to come on board and he refused. He is not a special or a sacred cow that should be invited.  So, they must keep quiet.  He has been invited and he did not accept the invitation.   They must keep quiet about that please.  They are annoying us about mentioning someone who lost.  He is an ordinary citizen who should not waste our time.  Thank you Mr. Speaker.

  HON. MADZIMURE: Thank you Mr. Speaker.  I did not talk of

Nelson Chamisa, I did not talk of any election but Mr. Speaker, in our language we say kuvhunduka chati kwatara kunge une katurike, he has said it all he is not even confident, I did not question it but he is not confident that the elections were won.  That is why as the Chief Whip, he is thinking that he has to defend the party at any cost and he stood up to reveal the facts that I had not revealed.  I did not say that but he said so, so if that is the case, then talk to Mr. Chamisa.  Mr. Speaker, there must be cohesion in this country and the relevant people in this country must sit down and make sure they talk and the country moves forward.

        HON. TSUNGA: Thank you very much Mr. Speaker Sir, I realise

the Hon. Minister is not in the House, I hope that he is represented by officials from his Ministry and that they will be able to pick the main points from the debate. Mr. Speaker Sir, it is important that we talk about the context under which this supplementary budget and budget statement has been prepared and presented.  It is clear that the Hon. Minister has to be cognizant that the economy is by and large dysfunctional as we speak.

The context of galloping inflation estimated at over year on year 558% with too much money chasing few goods using electronic transfers, RTGS, plastic money and mobile money.  The context of high levels of unemployment averaging 95% depending on where you are coming from, the context of a limping agricultural sector that is underperforming, notwithstanding the huge capital outlay that is poured in to the sector exemplified by the 3 billion dollars that was not adequately accounted for.  The context of law capacity utilisation of our industries, for those that are still functioning because a good many of our industries are either scaling down or shutting down outright; the context of low morale in the civil service with sub-economic salaries and extremely poor pathetic working conditions for our civil servants, the context of high drop out rates in schools particularly for girls; the

context of poor service delivery generally, the health sector, education sector, water supply, provision of electricity, road maintenance, infrastructure maintenance and upgrading; the context also of low perception index of Zimbabwe as an investment destination by both international and foreign investors; the context of poor and declining quality of life for citizens of this country.  The context of manmade and natural internal displacement of our people, if you look at Cyclone Idai, that is natural displacement.  You also look at arbitrary eviction of settlers of indigenous people by Government without providing adequate safety nets and alternative places to stay.

         So, this is the context that the Minister has to take into account in crafting a pro-poor budget and from what I see, this context has been by and large, ignored by the Minister because this budget or supplementary budget is not speaking to this context.  Mr. Speaker Sir, the original budget allocations were in US dollars and that has been alluded to already on a 1:1 with the bond note that is the budget presented in

December 2018.

         I will put it this way; the Government through the Hon. Minister arbitrarily converted the US dollar values to ZIM dollars and the infamous – I think it has become infamous interbank rate ruled and continues to rule. Effectively, therefore, Mr. Speaker Sir, what appears to be an upward review or adjustment of allocations to various ministries and departments is in fact a serious and debilitating downward review because the values now in terms of what can be purchased has actually gone down.  One thousand dollars in December 2018 and one thousand dollars now, the two cannot be compared.  So, this gives credence to the need to keep in my view the original budget.  Do not change it at all and leave it at the values as budgeted in 2018 and only multiply by a factor of 8 or 10 depending on the interbank rate ruling at the time of disbursement.

         If the budget were maintained as is or as was approved and at the time of disbursement, use a factor of 8 to disburse and then they will not be any need to be doing any adjustment at all because it will be sort of self calculating and self adjusting.  So, because that budget was in US dollars, we leave it like that and not change anything.  Only that at the point of disbursement, use the ruling rate to disburse to ministries and departments and then we will be okay because now ministries and departments have lost out.

         Mr. Speaker Sir, I will pin point the negative impact of abandoning the multicurrency situation or regime that obtained prior to SI142, if I am not wrong.  I will not really go into detail because a good many of previous Hon. Members who have spoken before me have given the details. The civil servants have become poorer, I will end at that because the details to that others have already given. I might just add that what civil servants are now doing is to subsidise Government when they go to work and what they are being paid is being paid to go to work and they are not being paid for working.

         So, it is a question of paying them to go to work but not paying them for working and so they are worse off. The pensioners have been condemned to destitution and the details of course, as alluded to, they are sleeping out in the pavement trying to access the monthly payout that they get in installments not enough to take them back home.  The war veterans condemned to paupers that has already been alluded to. The productive sector, industries notable giving the examples of bakeries, have shut down and now we are using pole and dagger ovens as a country and we seem to be celebrating that, it is a step to stagnation as opposed to progress and the quality of life is thus compromised. ZESA is  badly impacted, no wonder Government has sort of, in a hidden way, maybe accepted that the USD ought not to have been done away with because now the Government says hotels and others can pay ZESA in foreign currency for example in Victoria Falls.  Local authorities have been impacted as well, the police and the army are under resourced, workers in the private sector also struggling because more often than not, the private sector takes a cue – what is Government doing for its workers, they sort of draw parallels before they can also set conditions of service for themselves.  So, again it is impacting the private sector except perhaps for the C.E.O and those high up in the hierarchy.

         Mr. Speaker Sir, let me mention about vote number 19 because I have particular interest in that. The Government and Parliament are products of political processes and we must recognise that fact.  There have been delays in disbursing what is due to several Government departments and ministries and of course under the Political Parties Finance Act, we cannot have political parties being stifled in terms of resources that are constitutionally due to them.

         The existence of functional and vibrant political parties is key to the promotion also of a vibrant democracy in the country.  So, delays in disbursing what is due to political parties in terms of the Constitution should be considered as a way of styfling democratic activity in the country. Parliament exists and functions because of the existence of political parties.  Government exists and functions because of the existence and the vibrancy of political parties.  So, I would want the Hon. Minister to let this august House to and the nation to understand why they are deliberate delays in disbursing amounts due to political parties.  In any case, I notice also in the budget that there is an upward adjustment for the vote for political parties in terms of the Political Parties Finance Act.   Zimbabwe is supposed to be a multi party democracy and as such, democracy is compromised if political parties are hamstrung through withholding what is constitutionally due to them.

So, this must be addressed.

         Mr. Speaker Sir, having spoken so much, allow me to make one fascinating observation.  The presentation by the Hon. Minister and the Blue book are not speaking to each other.  This is one thing they must also take note of.  I have made some observations in terms of the calculations and seen that the two are not speaking to each other in terms of the allocations.  So, the figures, both in the supplementary budget presentation and the blue book are not adding up in many instances.  There are glaring arithmetical errors normally attributable to students in elementary school or those students doing elementary statistics.  For example, the revised budget less the original budget should equal the additional allocation, see page 3 of the blue book, you will notice that the OPC, Vote number 1, on the summary, there is a variance of -7, 8 million.  There is also Vote 2 of Parliament of Zimbabwe where there is a variance between the original and the revised.  In brief, Vote 1, has examples, Vote number 2 and Vote number 24, Judicial Service Commission, glaring arithmetical errors.  It is therefore, easy for one to decide against passing this supplementary budget in its current architecture.

         Mr. Speaker Sir, pressure is mounting because of the circumstances obtaining in the country and will continue to mount for Government to do the right things in terms of improving the economy and the well being of our people.  There is a lot of pressure outside.    As has been alluded to, we must continue to engage and to talk to one another, to resolve the crisis, structural and institutional reforms as has already been alluded to; are key to enable the economy to perform – that is very essential.  There must be mechanisms to help this country to transition from its current status and create conditions that are conducive to the birth or re-emergency of a vibrant democracy and for our economy and our nation to grow.

         I will end by saying, if we do not do the above, we will continue with the vicious cycle of poverty and underdevelopment rather than a virtuous cycle of economic progress and development.  The country’s debt situation is a major cause for concern that must be addressed diligently.  One question I would have wanted to ask the Minister, in paragraph 290 of this book, there is talk about the tax thresholds having been increased to 700 at 0% P.A.Y.E.  It goes on to say those earning in foreign currency will continue to pay their taxes without the thresholds identified or pinpointed.  So, it remains difficult to understand what will happen, whether you also get to USD 700 before you are taxed or the tax threshold for US$ earners would be different.  That is paragraph 292 – what are the thresholds?

On paragraph 108, there is also lip service to mining because it does not speak to issues relating to artisanal miners.  Having said that Mr. Speaker Sir – [AN HON. MEMBER:  Zvakwana.] -  Iwewe zvako ndizvo zvakwana – [Laughter.] -

Having said that Mr. Speaker Sir, I implore the Hon. Minister to look very closely to the issues raised and discussed in this debate and ensure that the Budget is pro-poor and addresses the major concerns as highlighted.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER (HON. M. KHUMALO):  I

would like to thank the Hon. Members who have not gone to eat.  They were very quiet and following the debate.  Those who are coming are starting to make noise.

*HON. C. MOYO: Thank you for affording me this opportunity to ventilate my contribution to this important 2019 mid-year budget review and supplementary budget statement. I would like to start by stabilisation.  There is something that I can see concerning the

Transitional Stabilisation Programme.  When I look at inflation, in July

2018 it was at 4.29%.  In 2019 in January inflation was at 15%, February 15.95%, April 70.86%, May 97.85%, June 175.66%.  This is the current inflation rate in Zimbabwe.  Let us look at our neighbouring southern African countries for example South Africa where inflation rate is at

4.1%, Botswana 2.8%, Mozambique 2.3% and Zambia 10.5 %.  Mr.

Speker it is so embarrassing that our inflation rate is so alarming. For us to say the situation is stable with the inflation characterising our country since January to June 2019 which is at 175%, it would be a lie.

We are not realising stabilisation.  Others mentioned the issue of electricity.  Electricity is a challenge.  Where I come from in MpopomaPelandaba, there are people who are losing their lives because of load shedding, this is because they are not used to using candles and gas.  A lot of people are losing their lives. In fact, people are asking what is the real problem in the energy sector because people prepay electricity and fail to get the service prepaid for. The Minister should look into it and ensure that people get the electricity that they will have paid for.

Fuel is going up almost every week.  People are now being forced to use the ZUPCO buses.  They are supposed to be using commuter omnibuses because they are the ones that they prefer but they have to wait until ten or twelve midnight to board the cheap ZUPCO buses.  We have destroyed the commuter omnibus system. So for us to say there is stabilisation, it is a fallacy.  There are no jobs in Zimbabwe, hence we cannot say that the economy is stable. We cannot say that the TSP has brought stability. Let us put money to revive CSC in Bulawayo and ZISCO Steel in Kwekwe.

The supplementary budget must enhance the lives of the people once it has been passed but in this budget is not addressing bread and butter issues.  It is unfortunate that there is no mention of how the external debt would be paid and we cannot leave it like that.  The budget should talk to the issue of external debt.

On page 20 – ZIMSTAT has an Act which was put in 2007.  There are qualified personnel at ZIMSTAT.  They release figures concerning year to year inflation but the Minister is saying no, let us leave this and we look at it in February 2020 but there is an Act that supports the Central Statistical Office.  The mantra that Zimbabwe is open for business is shocking because the inflation rate defeats this whole purpose. We need to look at our year on year inflation rate.  Now that the Minister has said ZIMSTATS should stop publishing the statistics for now and we want investors to come to Zimbabwe – what does that mean?

Let me talk about civil servants; they have been awarded cushion allowance but everyone is experiencing economic hardships.  Are you able to cushion the population of about 14-16 million in Zimbabwe.  You cannot say you are going to cushion yet you are segregating.  You give others money and others do not get. If you want to cushion, you must cushion the whole population. It is not right to cushion civil servants only. The Hon. Minister should clarify on what measures he has put in place to resuscitate the economy than to give unworthy cushioning allowances.

I concur with those who spoke before me who said the military police got more money.  Although the army killed a number of people in August 2018 and January 2019, they should be given adequate remuneration to enable them to look after their families not that you give them 21% at one time.  That will not work in a population of 14-16 million and it will not work, simply.

Let me turn to page 17 on paragraph 46; I am sorry to say that the Minister himself agreed in this august House that the 1:1 ratio got to a  point where it was no longer working.  Some of us actually brought it up to say 1:1 is not going to work but he has now agreed that 1:1 was no longer susstainable.  Since he has agreed that this 1:1 ration did not  work, we gave him advice on the issue of the 2% tax and told him that it will not work.  We also told him that S.I. 142 of 2019 will not work but if the Minister says 1:1 did not work – when we told him, he should listen to us when we give him advice and that will enable the economy to improve. In a nutshell, this supplementary budget will not work as long as do not address the crisis of legitimacy and political reforms. I thank you.

         On paragraph 4,

         Some Hon. Members having crossed between the Chair and the Speaker on the floor.

  THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER (HON. MAVETERA): You

are crossing the Chair. Order Hon. Members.

         *HON. C. MOYO: I am sorry that there are Hon. Members who are coming into this House who have taken some intoxicating drinks, so they are making noise. They are disturbing my debate.

   *THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: You said they have taken

some drinks, are you saying that they have taken alcoholic drinks. Can you please withdraw your statement Hon. Moyo.

 HON. S. BANDA: On a point of order, other Hon. Members are making noise.

         *THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: I have requested Hon. Moyo

to withdraw his words where he said there are people who are drunk in this august House.

      *HON. C. MOYO: Thank you Madam Speaker, I withdraw my

words. It will assist me as I debate in terms of the noise that is here. Let me say that there is Zimbabwe infrastructure bond. Madam Speaker, I think there is need for you to look for a breathalyser.

*THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Okay, thank you and you

may proceed.

*HON. C. MOYO: The reason why infrastructure bond will not work is because of corruption that has characterised our nation. If you look at the issues of corruption, they say Zimbabwe in 2017 was on position 157 out of 175. In 2018, …

*HON. S. BANDA: My point of order is that I do not know whether taking snuff in the House is allowed. I see Hon. Chipato is taking snuff in the House. If she is possessed in the House, what are we going to do?

*THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Thank you for that. When I

witness that I will give a ruling but for now, I have not witnessed anything.

*HON. C. MOYO: On paragraph 120, there is a bond called Vaka Zimbabwe Infrastructure Bond for now up to December. What I would like to say is that this bond will not work because the Hon. Minister should clarify as to how he is going to deal with the issue of corruption.

I said in 2017, Zimbabwe when it came to corruption rankings was on

157 out of 175. In 2018, it was at 160 which means corruption increased.

The Hon. Minister was there, so how then is this going to happen? –

[HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order, Hon. Members. May

the Hon. Member be heard in silence. Hon. Members, we have a long night, so can we all be patient for us to proceed with our work. I said that once I witnessed that I will give a ruling.

*HON. C. MOYO: What I was saying Hon. Speaker, is that the Hon. Minister should give us measures that he is going to put in place in order to deal with corruption that has increased because this affects the Vaka Zimbabwe Infrastructure Bond.

On the issue of power supply strategies, increasing the cost of fuel yet people do not have money does not work. He is saying that there is money that is going to be kept known as the Escrow Account and that money will be set aside for foreign currency. This does not work because people no longer have confidence and trust in the way we are doing business.

Let me talk about the issue of local authorities. The challenges that local authorities are facing is that people are paying using the RTGS system or the bond notes but the local authorities need foreign currency for chemicals. So, that will not work. Like I said, it did not work when we talked of 1:1. Local authorities will wait for foreign currency from the Ministry yet the Ministry does not have that money. In the end it is the populace that suffers. The old people will suffer in rural areas because the city council does not have foreign currency to buy the chemicals to treat the water.

After saying all this Madam Speaker, it is not possible to talk about the supplementary budget because of the changes that we keep making in terms of policies. Today we have another policy and tomorrow we change to another. The challenge that we have is that democracy is not visible. The people that we represent do not see that democracy. There is no transparency in terms of how we are working. We changed the 2018

Budget …

HON. MUSIKAVANHU: Are we now debating general issues or

the budget?

*THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Hon. Moyo, may we please

stick to what we are supposed to be debating.

*HON. C. MOYO: The people we represent Madam Speaker

know that there is a problem. There is a crisis in terms of legitimacy. So, those things go hand in hand, the issue of the budget and the issue of legitimacy as well as confidence. The supplementary will only work when those issues are addressed. Our political reforms have to be done.

Thank you.

HON. MUSIKAVANHU: Madam Speaker, my point of order is that I think that point made by the Hon. Member on legitimacy must be withdrawn.

HON. P. CHIDAKWA: Madam Speaker ma’am, my point of

order is the point made by the Hon. Member on legitimacy must be withdrawn – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.]

    *HON. NYATHI: Madam Speaker ma’am, I want to add my

voice to issues that have been raised by Hon. Members in this august House.  Firstly, I want to thank all the Hon. Members who were contributing, it has reflected that all of us as Hon. Members want this budget to be dealt with for the good of the nation at large.  I am going to be talking about four or five issues that I think have not been adequately addressed so that I avoid repetition.

         I want to look at paragraph 83 which talks about agriculture and food security.  What I liked in the budget is that there is a provision that the GMBs in Zimbabwe should decentralise and have GMB collection depots to enable the farmers to take their grain to GMB.  The other thing I want to stress is that there is drought and I want to thank the Head of State for his vision in terms of Command Agriculture.  Our silos were full and we saved a lot of foreign currency that should have been channeled towards acquiring grain to feed our people in Zimbabwe.  What it means is that, even though we are going to look for foreign currency to augment the grain that is there, Command Agriculture yielded positive results.  It should be allocated more funds to ensure our country can prepare for other incidents that might happen in Zimbabwe especially in relation to climate change where seasons have changed.

We might not get adequate rainfall.

       I move on to paragraph 102, which talks about minerals in

Zimbabwe, especially on the issue of gold.  You will realise that in Zimbabwe, we have a lot of minerals but I want to specifically zero in on gold.  If you look at paragraph 109, it is talking about institutions like

Fidelity Printers and Refiners.  I want to give advice to the Hon. Minister that he should allocate a lot of money to ensure that Fidelity can decentralise and establish more centres so that all gold finds its way to the Government because it is a low-hanging fruit that we have in Zimbabwe.  The moment we curb illicit flows, we will get a lot of the much needed foreign currency.

         I represent Shurugwi North Constituency; there is a lot of gold in Shurugwi.  We have ZB Bank in Shurugwi but people have to travel long distances to sell their gold in areas like Gweru.  This is not ideal in terms of security for those people who will be carrying their gold. Gold is sold to ZB Bank and such banks should facilitate decentralisation to ensure that gold does not change hands or get intercepted by middlemen before it gets to the Government.

         I also want to talk about the issue of energy which was debated by a number of Hon. Members of Parliament, that we have a challenge of electricity in Zimbabwe.  Currently, it would be good for us to start thinking of other measures to ensure that we have energy supply and set aside funding for such measures such as solar and try and harness renewable energy such as wind.  Once we do that, Zimbabwe will not experience the challenges which it is experiencing today in terms of energy.  If there is no electricity, production and development in the country decreases.

         The Head of State is always marketing the country so that investors come to Zimbabwe to ensure that the industry is resuscitated.  The efforts of the Head of State His Excellency Dr. E. D. Mnangagwa require that we as representatives in different constituencies should also invite investors in the areas that we represent to ensure that our country develops.  I know that other people are saying, how  will the investors come when there is no electricity, but that is what we are talking about in order to address the challenges.

         I want to talk about paragraph 51 on the issue of GDP of our nation, that for us to come up with a balance of payment that is favourable, it is important that our country should avail a good allocation towards industry.  Once industry is functional, that will enable us to get more money in terms of exports.  As a result, our country will develop.  If the Minister of Finance is talking about austerity for prosperity, what he is saying is that we were oprating under a negative budget, but now we are supposed to be resilient endure the current hardship to ensure that we move forward to a positive budget.

Most Hon. Members were advocating for our budget to increase but there are no Hon. Members who are giving solutions as to where that money can be found to increase the budget.  I am saying that as

Members of Parliament, we should come up with ideas and advise the Government as to what should be done to develop our nation than for us to just criticise the Government.  The Mid-Year Budget Review and Supplementary Budget was prepared by people who gave enough thought given the situation that we have in Zimbabwe and we need to applaud them for that.  I was hoping that by the time I finish debating; all Hon. Members will applaud for me because I have said very important critical points.  I thank you.

HON. P. CHIDAKWA: Thank you very much Madam Speaker

ma’am for giving me this opportunity to contribute to this budget.  Firstly, Madam Speaker ma’am, I just want to make a point here; there is no legitimacy crisis in Zimbabwe.  Madam Speaker Ma’am, we would like to thank the Minister of Finance and Economic Development for coming up with this supplementary budget statement.  Madam Speaker,

I would like to urge the Minister to seriously consider the welfare of war veterans.  War veterans are the vanguard of this country.  They are recognised in the Constitution of this country and please, this is a very critical issue.  In my constituency, I have war veterans.  These people sacrificed a lot and we would like to see their lives improved.  Please Hon. Minister, can you relook at the welfare of war veterans.

Secondly Madam Speaker, civil servants are doing a very good job in this country.  I know your hands are very tight but please, let us look at their welfare.  Teachers and headmasters were the pride of our communities.  They were men and women of high status.  Please, let us restore their dignity.  Let us see what you can do, what you can squeeze in this dry cow to make sure that civil servants are well remunerated.

Madam Speaker, I would also like the Minister to look at agriculture.  Maize is our staple food.  The problem here is that prices have gone hay wire.  I was doing the mathematics with the price being paid by GMB to the farmers for a tonne of maize and the amount of fertilizer and seed they need.  They will not come out Minister.  We need a subsidy for our farmers so that they can produce.

Madam Speaker, I would also like the Minister to relook at the duties on solar. Yes, you have reduced duty by 15% on batteries, but Hon. Minister please - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.]-  Hon. Minister - shut up! – [Laughter.]-  You, shut up!

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Hon. Chidakwa withdraw.

HON. P. CHIDAKWA:  I have got nothing to withdraw here.

Will you shut up! - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.]-

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Hon. Chidakwa, may you

kindly withdraw.

HON. P. CHIDAKWA:  Thank you very much - [HON.

MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.]-

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  May you withdraw.

HON. P. CHIDAKWA:  No problem I withdraw, but some people must shut up - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.]-  THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Hon. Chidhakwa I am very

worried with your choice of words.  I understand what that means.  May you kindly withdraw?

HON. P. CHIDAKWA:  Thank you very much.  Alright, I withdraw.  Hon. Minister, we have got a problem with electricity.  You can solve your problem by removing all duties on solar equipment.

Once you remove them, then we can have electricity.  Please Hon.

Minister look at that.

I represent a rural constituency.  Madam Speaker, I would like to urge the Minister of Finance and Economic Development to capacitate DDF.  DDF is the cornerstone of all development in our rural constituencies.  Without DDF we do not have water, roads, bridges and buildings.  So Hon. Minister, with all due respect, please can we capacitate DDF with machinery.  60% of the money you are allocating to DDF is going to plant hire instead of going to service delivery.  So, if we can capacitate DDF, that they can have their own equipment, we would have gone a long way in improving the lives of our people.

Finally, I think this is a very good starting point.  Yes, we are rebuilding this country - austerity for prosperity.  With those few amendments, I would urge everybody to vote and approve this budget.  Thank you.

HON. MUSIKAVANHU:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  I would like to - [HON. MEMBERS:  He debated yesterday]-

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  He did not debate yesterday.

HON. MUSIKAVANHU:  Thank you Madam Speaker for the

opportunity to add my voice to the debate on this very important -

[HON. MEMBERS: He debated yesterday.  Arimo muHansard.]-

HON. MUSIKAVANHU:  I did not debate.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Hon. Paradza, order!

HON. MUSIKAVANHU:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  I am

only going to focus on one area of the budget and I am deliberately doing so because I deem it to be the most critical element in view of the drought at hand and that is vote number 8 which is to do with agriculture.

I would like to firstly thank the Minister for acknowledging the urgent need…

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Hon. Musikavanhu, we are

not yet at the Committee of Supply.

HON. MUSIKAVANHU:  Okay, point taken.  The vote for the agricultural…

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Hon. Musikavanhu, we are

not yet at the Votes stage.  Approach the Chair.

Hon. Musikavanhu approached the Chair.

HON. MUSIKAVANHU:  Point taken Hon. Speaker.  I would

like to appreciate the budget that was presented before us by the

Minister - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.]-

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order Hon. Members.  May

the Hon. Member be heard in silence?

HON. MUSIKAVANHU:  My only area of input is that I would like to emphasise a need for improvement at the consideration for irrigation projects in view of the need to increase our food security.  If for example you look at the dams that we have in Masvingo Province, Masvingo holds 54% of the total water in the dams and yet we are only irrigating one crop.  Zimbabwe requires 1.9 million tonnes of maize a year.  We are in a position, if we commit to more irrigation, to meet a third of our maize requirement.  Of the 350 000 tonnes of wheat that we require a year, it is feasible for us to irrigate it all.  The same goes for soya bean where we can irrigate up to 35% of what is required. So, my emphasis, Hon. Speaker, is that we need to allocate more resources into augmenting our irrigation systems.  Thank you.

*HON. TARUSENGA:  Thank you Madam Speaker for

according me this opportunity to debate on the Supplementary Budget.

HON. S. BANDA:  On a point of order Madam Speaker.  I think we respect the dressing that Hon. Members are supposed to wear.  If we wear dresses with no sleeves, I do not know if that is allowed.  Madam Speaker, there is an Hon. Member who is not wearing anything to cover her hands – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –She is now wearing a jacket – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order, which Hon. Member is

that? – [HON. MEMBERS:  She has put on a jacket.] – Okay.  I think it has been overtaken by events.  Thank you very much.  Anyway, according to Standing Order No. 76, there is an expected decorum that you should – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] – Order.  I am saying, we are supposed to observe some certain decorum when we are in Parliament.  So let us kindly observe that.  Thank you Hon.

Members.

HON. D. SIBANDA:  That is exactly what I wanted to point out Madam Speaker, to say the two Hon. Members, I think you should help them to behave accordingly because they are just crossing in front of the

Hon. Member who  was – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:   Order Hon. Members.

HON. D. SIBANDA:  My point of order Madam Speaker was to plead with you to help the two Hon. Members who just stand up and start crossing in front of the other Hon. Member who was giving his point of order.  Remind them that they should respect the House.  Thank you very much.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:   Thank you Hon. D. Sibanda.

Hon. Members, what Hon. Sibanda is talking about is on our Standing Order No. 76,  Part 2, 3 and 4.  Let us be able to make sure that we do not cross the line, especially between the Speaker and the person who will be speaking.  Thank you very much.

*HON. TARUSENGA:  Thank you Madam Speaker for the opportunity to add my voice on the Supplementary Budget.  I am happy to be afforded this opportunity.  Those who spoke before me have mentioned many things.  Nevertheless, I still want to make an addition.  As I was coming to Parliament this morning, I passed through two places in St. Marys where newspapers are sold and talked to the people who were saying something as regards the budget.  I paid a lot of attention as Hon. Members were debating in this august House. There are some gaps which need to be filled and it is those lacunas that I intend to fill.  First and foremost, since 1980 up to date, there are three Ministers of Finance whom I want to give special mention.  The first one is the late Minister Bernard Chidzero, the second one is Hon. Biti and the third one is the current Minister Hon. Mthuli Ncube.  These are the three Ministers that I want to discuss about.  Let me start with the late

Hon. Chidzero.  Whilst on that point, during the era of the late Hon.

Chidzero as Finance Minister ...

*HON. KASHIRI:  On a point order Mr. Speaker.  He has addressed Hon. Biti and he said Mthuli. He needs to amend that.  He is called Mthuli Ncube not Mthuli – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible

interjections.] –

*HON. TARUSENGA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker for protecting me.  I am saying the Ministers I have mentioned performed differently in trying to build the economy and everything else that was taking place.

During the late Hon. Chidzero and Hon. Biti’s time, their budgets were developmental and pro-people.  When Hon. Mthuli became the Minister of Finance, we were optimistic considering the level of his education.

We have realised that his budgets are reducing people’s expectations.  I would like to give an example of workers in Zimbabwe.  If we go to paragraph 290 our budget had the minimum threshold of US$350as at December 2018 but you are now talking of $700 as of today. What it means in real terms is you are telling us that US$350 is now less than to RTGs $700.  But if we take an example of the RTGS700, currently would give us US$78.  This becomes ridiculous. What we are saying then is that your budget is not favourable to the workers.  It is fictitious because when the workers receive $700 as threshold which in reality is equivalent to US$78.  The Minister wants us to believe that the

RTGS$700 is a raised tax threshold whereas in reality workers’ salaries have been seriously eroded.  Further, if one looks at the budget presented, there are a lot of things that are in the budget that do not tally.  So, I am asking the Hon. Minister of Finance and Economic

Development to come up with a good budget.  For you to come up with a good budget to be followed by Hon. Members here, I urge you to ensure that there should be complimentarily between the figures in the Blue book and the statement so that what you are saying makes sense.  I thank you Mr. Speaker.

   *HON. MAKONYA:  Thank you Hon. Speaker for affording me

the opportunity to add my voice to the debate.  If we are to look at the life that we are leading especially when moving from point A to point B, I require transport which is essential.  On paragraph 186 on mass urban public transportation which refers to the ZUPCO buses ushered in by the Government, it is an important historic way of ensuring that workers are transported to and from work.  On close examination, the Minister says that he is subsidising these ZUPCO buses so that they can be able to be refilled and maintained and that he is putting aside $13 million monthly. It is my considered view that this is a lot of money.  The majority of people using that transport especially the ones we see in Mutare are those that travel from the city centre to the rural areas.  These are people like teachers who use those buses to go to their places of work.

However, when looking at this issue, it is not just going to work after having boarded a bus for 50 cents. The issue is that they must get remuneration that is commensurate with them so that they can choose any form of transport that they would want to use and not being confined to no choice at all where one travels in a ZUPCO bus.  That person loses dignity as a teacher and also runs late.  The teachers dignity has been lost.  They are being subjected to a lot of shoving colloquially referred to as pressure and there is a lot of stampeding.  This also exposes them to thieves or pick pockets on the ZUPCO queues.  I was expecting that the Minister of Finance and Economic Development would give them salaries that are able to sustain them.

The Minister must give civil servants a living wage so that they will do as they please.  Even when looking at the subsidy that he is giving, I have observed that this can actually kill our economy.  We are already in a comatose economy and it will be brought into a comatose position.  The money that he is using as subsidy is taxpayer’s money, the same money that they take from the civil servants who are already poor and using it to subsidise others.  Mr. Speaker Sir, when looking at government workers who are boarding buses for 50 cents especially teachers, despite the fact that they will have boarded a bus for 50 cents you see them with bags full of maputi and zap nax which they sell to school children.  They will not be concentrating on teaching after using subsidised transport but will be busy with their small businesses.  I also heard that teachers at Chitakatira are abandoning lessons because the ZUPCO bus leaves Chitakatira at 2 p.m.,  so teachers leave their lessons unfinished in order to catch the bus back into town to enable them to go home on time.  I reiterate that civil servants should be given salaries that are in accordance with the poverty datum line.  They should be given good salaries.

 I will come back to the issue of toll gates. The light vehicles that we use for travelling can be used by the majority of the people and $10 as tollgate fee is a lot of money because that is not a commercial vehicle.  It is not a vehicle where you can carry passengers for higher or for reward as you go to work.  I was expecting that in terms of the tollgates, we ask him to reduce the tollgate fee to $4.  In connection with other vehicles such as kombis, and heavy vehicles such as buses and haulage trucks, these are commercial transport vehicles and they are into commercial business. When I travel from Mutare, I pay $65 and out of the $65 using the fare of a single person the bus would pay all the tollgates.  I require $30 when using a light vehicle from Mutare to

Harare.  I will require $30 to go back and I also need 40 litres of fuel at $360 plus $60 for tollgates.  So, to someone who is earning very little, that will not give them room to do anything with their salaries.

         In terms of Cyclone Idai, I want to thank the Government for their effort but what we want mostly is that we want accountability, especially in money transactions from funds that are coming from America.  Furthermore, we want to see that the restoration of the bridges and all the destroyed infrastructure be conducted before the commencement of the rain season.

As regards electricity, we are saying Zimbabwe is open for business and how can Zimbabwe be open for business when – [HON.

MEMBERS: Inaudible interjection.] –

THE ACTING SPEAKER: Hon. Members order please.  Hon.

Chinotimba, order please.

*HON. MAKONYA: We are having problems as regards electricity.  Government is saying Zimbabwe is open for business and how can this ‘open for business’ operate when there is no electricity and we are in the dark?  How can investors be expected to work in a country where there is darkness.  There are no longer any night shifts because of lack of electricity.  Minister, seriously consider the issue of electricity.  I thank you.

+HON. S. NDLOVU:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir for giving me this opportunity to debate on this Supplementary Budget that was brought by the Hon. Minister of Finance and Economic Development.  First of all, as I looked into it, I noticed that the allocation that was given to the civil servants is too little.  The reason is that all prices went up – food, medication, transport, fuel and honestly, the civil servants will not survive with the salaries that they earn at the moment.  As I was speaking to various heads at different schools, in Bulawayo, they told

me that they no longer drive.  The headmaster also uses a bus which costs 50 cents.  If the bus delays, that means the headmaster will be late for school, the teacher will be late for school as well as the student.  This has affected our education system because people are no longer able to use their cars.

We plead with the Minister of Finance and Economic

Development to look into the issue of civil servants.  They are not even able to pay school fees for their children.  As I speak right now, some boarding schools have closed because they cannot afford meals for the children.  There are Members of Parliament who have collected their children from schools as the schools cannot cater for their meals.  It is not possible anymore and they have to relook at their budgets for next term so that they increase the fees.  We plead with the Hon. Minister to look into this issue so that we can forge ahead with our education as a nation.  It is very difficult especially if you look at education.

MPs who are always burying people in their constituencies.

People cannot afford medication.  There are the elderly who have blood pressure and diabetes and they are affected by this situation.  However, we cannot assist them with anything because we are not able to do so with the salaries that we get.

Another problem that we face is the issue of electricity.  What I would want to say to the Minister is from my own point of view, I would suggest that we consider solar as a nation.  We have solar power as a nation and we should utilise it fully rather than focusing on electricity, I think we should refocus to solar power and even in our hospitals, it would be better if we use solar.  If there is no electricity, it would be better to use solar in these hospitals.

I also want to speak about water.  Water is a big challenge in the urban areas or rural areas.  In Harare, we cannot drink water from the taps.  I know that there are some areas here in Harare which do not have water and it has been like that for years.  I cannot even speak about the rural areas.  I therefore urge the Hon. Minister to consider employing people in rural areas, especially from those communities so that they are educated on how to fix boreholes so that each and every community can have experts in these areas so that they can repair all the boreholes that are not functioning because the water challenges will not end. There are some people who walk for kilometers in order to get water yet there will be a borehole in the community which is not functional.  Therefore, if people are employed in the communities, they will be able to support their families.  The Government should take them for training and they should be able to repair the boreholes that are not functioning at the moment. If you look at the allocation for DDF, it is too little.  The DDF is the one that drills boreholes in different communities.  Our roads are in poor conditions and it is the work of DDF to repair these roads.  However, with the allocation that they were given, I doubt if they are able to do this.  There are places where there is production of cotton, the roads are poor, there is need to repair these roads.

         The other reason why we have challenges with water is the issue of siltation. It is the DDF that has a role of dealing with this and if their allocation is not enough, we will always face challenges. Our roads will be in poor conditions and dams will be affected by siltation and we will not have water as a nation.  The factories have been closed down and there is need for Government to open these factories.  This will ensure that the youth have employment. Children of nowadays do not care about education, they will rather drop out of school in grade 7 and cross the border to South Africa where they will be employed and are able to buy their properties.  There is need for these children to stay in our country and be educated.  This is a thing that we should look into.  There is need for dialogue in this nation. It is not something that should take a long time.  If there was dialogue in this country, challenges would have been a thing of the past.  If we dialogue, then the international community will come and work with us because they know what happens in our nation.  We as Zimbabweans have a duty to fix our nation.  There is need to seriously consider the issue of dialogue and our own children will come back to their home country, most of them are educated and they are waiting for that time when we decide to dialogue.

         We would want them to come back with the expertise that they have.  I thank you.

     +HON. D. SIBANDA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir, I will be very

brief.  I see the Hon. Minister is still around, I want to direct my question to him but I realise that he seems busy, may he please come over so that I speak to him.   The issue that I have is directed to the Minister Hon. Mthuli.  It is important for an Hon Minister to sit down and hear our pleas.  Thank you Hon. Minister, I will be very brief because the previous speakers have mentioned what I wanted to contribute.  Hon. Speaker, in my own point of view, you mentioned that you will increase the salaries of civil servants by 38 percent, yet inflation is around 500 percent.  There is need for the Hon. Minister to clarify on who is getting what. I would want you to go ahead and clarify on how they would survive with the little salaries that you are proposing for them.

         When a father of the family goes to work, they are expected to pay rent, buy food, provide fees and bus fare for the kids, send groceries for those in rural areas as well as buy clothing. I wonder if the Hon.

Minister looks into this when he makes some of these proposals.  That is why I asked him to come and sit down so that we can question some of these things.  Again, if you look into it Hon. Speaker, as we are members of Parliament, we are part of the three arms of the State.  There is the Judiciary, Executive and Legislature. As Members of Parliament, in many cases, even when we want to do some projects in Parliament, we are told that there is no money and there are no funds.  However, when we pass the budget, we were told that Parliament should have its own separate budget.  I know that they always have challenges especially when we need fuel to go back to our constituencies.  I wonder if the Judiciary and the Executive are facing the same challenges.  These are some of the issue that I want the Minister to look into.  Most of the things have been mentioned before by the previous speakers.

         Mr. Speaker Sir the Minister must also go and get educated in other nations like Kenya, South Africa and Uganda so that he comes and implement the same in Zimbabwe. The light vehicles that we use for travelling can be used by the majority of the people and $10 as tollgate fee is a lot of money because that is not a commercial vehicle.  It is not a vehicle where you can carry passengers for higher or for reward as you go to work.  I was expecting that in terms of the tollgates, we ask him to reduce the tollgate fee to $4.  In connection with other vehicles such as kombis, and heavy vehicles such as buses and haulage trucks, these are commercial transport vehicles and they are into commercial business. When I travel from Mutare, I pay $65 and out of the $65 using the fare of a single person the bus would pay all the tollgates.  I require $30 when using a light vehicle from Mutare to Harare.  I will require $30 to go back and I also need 40 litres of fuel at $360 plus $60 for tollgates.  So, to someone who is earning very little, that will not give them room to do anything with their salaries.

         In terms of Cyclone Idai, I want to thank the Government for their effort but what we want mostly is that we want accountability, especially in money transactions from funds that are coming from America.  Furthermore, we want to see that the restoration of the bridges and all the destroyed infrastructure be conducted before the commencement of the rain season.

As regards electricity, we are saying Zimbabwe is open for business and how can Zimbabwe be open for business when – [HON.

MEMBERS: Inaudible interjection.] –

THE ACTING SPEAKER: Hon. Members order please.  Hon.

Chinotimba, order please.

*HON. MAKONYA: We are having problems as regards electricity.  Government is saying Zimbabwe is open for business and how can this ‘open for business’ operate when there is no electricity and we are in the dark?  How can investors be expected to work in a country where there is darkness.  There are no longer any night shifts because of lack of electricity.  Minister, seriously consider the issue of electricity.  I thank you.

+HON. S. NDLOVU:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir for giving me this opportunity to debate on this Supplementary Budget that was brought by the Hon. Minister of Finance and Economic Development.  First of all, as I looked into it, I noticed that the allocation that was given to the civil servants is too little.  The reason is that all prices went up – food, medication, transport, fuel and honestly, the civil servants will not survive with the salaries that they earn at the moment.  As I was speaking to various heads at different schools, in Bulawayo, they told me that they no longer drive.  The headmaster also uses a bus which costs 50 cents.  If the bus delays, that means the headmaster will be late for school, the teacher will be late for school as well as the student.  This has affected our education system because people are no longer able to use their cars.

We plead with the Minister of Finance and Economic

Development to look into the issue of civil servants.  They are not even able to pay school fees for their children.  As I speak right now, some boarding schools have closed because they cannot afford meals for the children.  There are Members of Parliament who have collected their children from schools as the schools cannot cater for their meals.  It is not possible anymore and they have to relook at their budgets for next term so that they increase the fees.  We plead with the Hon. Minister to look into this issue so that we can forge ahead with our education as a nation.  It is very difficult especially if you look at education.

MPs who are always burying people in their constituencies.  People cannot afford medication.  There are the elderly who have blood pressure and diabetes and they are affected by this situation.  However, we cannot assist them with anything because we are not able to do so with the salaries that we get.

Another problem that we face is the issue of electricity.  What I would want to say to the Minister is from my own point of view, I would suggest that we consider solar as a nation.  We have solar power as a nation and we should utilise it fully rather than focusing on electricity, I think we should refocus to solar power and even in our hospitals, it would be better if we use solar.  If there is no electricity, it would be better to use solar in these hospitals.

I also want to speak about water.  Water is a big challenge in the urban areas or rural areas.  In Harare, we cannot drink water from the taps.  I know that there are some areas here in Harare which do not have water and it has been like that for years.  I cannot even speak about the rural areas.  I therefore urge the Hon. Minister to consider employing people in rural areas, especially from those communities so that they are educated on how to fix boreholes so that each and every community can have experts in these areas so that they can repair all the boreholes that are not functioning because the water challenges will not end. There are some people who walk for kilometers in order to get water yet there will be a borehole in the community which is not functional.  Therefore, if people are employed in the communities, they will be able to support their families.  The Government should take them for training and they should be able to repair the boreholes that are not functioning at the moment. If you look at the allocation for DDF, it is too little.  The DDF is the one that drills boreholes in different communities.  Our roads are in poor conditions and it is the work of DDF to repair these roads.  However, with the allocation that they were given, I doubt if they are able to do this.  There are places where there is production of cotton, the roads are poor, there is need to repair these roads.

         The other reason why we have challenges with water is the issue of siltation. It is the DDF that has a role of dealing with this and if their allocation is not enough, we will always face challenges. Our roads will be in poor conditions and dams will be affected by siltation and we will not have water as a nation.  The factories have been closed down and there is need for Government to open these factories.  This will ensure that the youth have employment. Children of nowadays do not care about education, they will rather drop out of school in grade 7 and cross the border to South Africa where they will be employed and are able to buy their properties.  There is need for these children to stay in our country and be educated.  This is a thing that we should look into.  There is need for dialogue in this nation. It is not something that should take a long time.  If there was dialogue in this country, challenges would have been a thing of the past.  If we dialogue, then the international community will come and work with us because they know what happens in our nation.  We as Zimbabweans have a duty to fix our nation.  There is need to seriously consider the issue of dialogue and our own children will come back to their home country, most of them are educated and they are waiting for that time when we decide to dialogue.

         We would want them to come back with the expertise that they have.  I thank you.

     +HON. D. SIBANDA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir, I will be very

brief.  I see the Hon. Minister is still around, I want to direct my question to him but I realise that he seems busy, may he please come over so that I speak to him.   The issue that I have is directed to the Minister Hon. Mthuli.  It is important for an Hon Minister to sit down and hear our pleas.  Thank you Hon. Minister, I will be very brief because the previous speakers have mentioned what I wanted to contribute.  Hon. Speaker, in my own point of view, you mentioned that you will increase the salaries of civil servants by 38 percent, yet inflation is around 500 percent.  There is need for the Hon. Minister to clarify on who is getting what. I would want you to go ahead and clarify on how they would survive with the little salaries that you are proposing for them.

         When a father of the family goes to work, they are expected to pay rent, buy food, provide fees and bus fare for the kids, send groceries for those in rural areas as well as buy clothing. I wonder if the Hon. Minister looks into this when he makes some of these proposals.  That is why I asked him to come and sit down so that we can question some of these things.  Again, if you look into it Hon. Speaker, as we are members of Parliament, we are part of the three arms of the State.  There is the Judiciary, Executive and Legislature. As Members of Parliament, in many cases, even when we want to do some projects in Parliament, we are told that there is no money and there are no funds.  However, when we pass the budget, we were told that Parliament should have its own separate budget.  I know that they always have challenges especially when we need fuel to go back to our constituencies.  I wonder if the Judiciary and the Executive are facing the same challenges.  These are some of the issue that I want the Minister to look into.  Most of the things have been mentioned before by the previous speakers.

         Mr. Speaker Sir the Minister must also go and get educated in other nations like Kenya, South Africa and Uganda so that he comes and implement the same in Zimbabwe. The issue of people not getting their salaries derails progress. Most of the people are unhappy and they are grumbling as they work, even the teachers are not happy as they work.  There is need for the teachers to be motivated by the salaries that they get.  I wonder if you have given them enough salaries for them to be motivated.

 Hon. Speaker, I am saddened by the issue of family planning.  For family planning we are given funds by donors. I wonder why we are not able to do this programme on our own.  Why should we rely on donor funding?  What should we do if they decide not to contribute to our family planning? Those are some of the things that I wanted to contribute. The Hon. Minister should consider the issue of the increase in prices when he proposes some of these things.  I would want to know if the Minister looked into these issues so that in Zimbabwe people are motivated.

I also want to contribute on the issue of electricity.  The Minister should ensure that they pay the money they owe for electricity because I doubt if the Hon. Minister bathes with cold water or if there is load shedding in his own house.  I am sure that all is well with him.

However, some of our children especially the little ones who are in ECD, have to use cold water to bath before they go to school.  We cannot even manage to iron our clothes.  Those are some of the things that the Hon. Minister should consider.  We are facing so many challenges in Zimbabwe.  There is need for the Hon. Minister to look for funds and ensure that this is looked into.  I thank you.

THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND

PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): Mr. Speaker Sir,

we have been debating from 1500hrs and most of the issues that are now being debated have already been said, it is now a repetition.  If we can allow the Hon. Minister to respond to the issues that have been raised in order for us to make progress.

THE MINISTER OF FINANCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (HON. PROF. M. NCUBE): Thank you very much

for the opportunity to listen to these very robust and very informative debates.  I really appreciate all the contributions and I have listened to everything – we have taken note.  Let me start with the comments regarding irrigation development.  Hon. Members might recall that Government in 2018 embarked on a rehabilitation development of at least 200 hectares per district under the auspices of the national accelerated irrigation rehabilitation development programme targeted to be implemented annually over a 10 year period, that was in 2018 when we made that undertaking.

In support of the programme, my Ministry during the year 2018 availed 21 million to IDBZ who are managing the resources on behalf of Government and they are targeting the development of 7 400 hectares covering 104 irrigation schemes.  Notwithstanding the availability of these resources, there was no meaningful progress in terms of completed hectrage with only USD 3 million having been utilised to December 2018 and the balance of 18 million is still with IDBZ and it is available for use under the programme.  So, there is still 18 million dollars available,

With regards to Ruti and Lupane irrigation schemes mentioned by two Hon. Members, they are expected to benefit from the cash currently held in IDBZ.  Furthermore, the 2019 Budget allocations under irrigation development are meant to supplement the already availed resources as well as to rehabilitate Cyclone Idai irrigation schemes.

Let me turn to the issue of support to vulnerable households under the social protection programme. A lot was said and I really appreciate that in terms of the requisite support needed to support our vulnerable citizens.  I note that Hon. Chinotimba raised the issue of allocating additional resources for vulnerable households and other members did the same.  Please note that we had allocated 560 million dollars to cater for 900 000 households which is approximately 4,5 million people.  So, I did mention a figure of 700, I was mentioning what we had covered so far but going forward that figure is ageing closer to the 1 million that Hon. Chinotimba mentioned.

Taking into consideration this request, I have allocated an additional 100 million bringing the total to 825, 2 million. I did that allocation this morning with my staff after listening to the contributions from Hon. Chinotimba and other Members that we increase this budget –[HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear]- Meanwhile, Government is in the process of mobilising additional resources through the consolidated appeals process which we launched yesterday, that is why I took an hour off in the afternoon to go and assist in the launching of this appeal.  Already, as I indicated to this august House yesterday, yesterday alone we raised US$100 million - I repeat, US$100 million from our international development partners.

Let me come to the issue around the Audit Office.  We applaud the work which is being done by this particular office.  Several members applauded the work of the Audit Office and they requested that this budget be topped up so that the office can do its work.  Hon. Members also raised the issue of adequately capacitating the Audit Office for it to effectively undertake its constitutional mandate. I have since allocated an additional $6 million on top of the $3 million bringing the total to $9 million.  After listening to you together with my colleagues, we have made that adjustment.

On war veterans and ex-combatants, several members have raised this issue.  I recall that Hon. Mutseyami and Hon. Chinotimba but a lot of members raised this issue – I just highlighted those two.  They raised an issue pertaining to the welfare of war veterans and I have since taken heed of the comments and suggestions.  Consequently, I have allocated an additional $15 million towards the War Veterans Administration Fund which caters for health, school fees and other welfare issues.  We have increased that budget.  I would like to add two things to that comment, one is that a request was also made on the issue of having import duties for war veterans.  We have listened and we have taken note.  We will look into this issue to see if it can be progressed but on a case by case basis.

Secondly, we will bring an amendment to the Bill that pertains to war veterans affairs that we approved in Cabinet which will try to capture a new package to the war veterans welfare.

Thirdly, I know the Chairman of the Committee on Defence and

War Veterans in this Parliament will be presenting his report from the Committee which again will try to capture issues around the welfare of the war veterans.  All I have done is just to increase the budget by $15 million but going forward, a lot more will come out of this new Bill plus the report.

Let me also hasten to say that this is not a new big National Budget that we are talking about.  This is your supplementary.  In four months that is end of November, I will be back to present the annual budget.  I just wanted to remind you of that.

On industrialisation, I see that among other Hon. Members, Hon. Sithole raised the issue of increasing the allocation for stimulation of industrial production.  I have therefore provided an additional allocation of $20 million for recapitalisation of the IDC with the anticipation to avail additional resources in the 2020 National Budget.  An additional $40 million will also be allocated towards a venture capital fund. I presented the proposal in the National Budget in November 2018, so we are responding to industrialisation in this way – [HON. MEMBERS:

Inaudible interjections] -

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER (HON. M. KHUMALO):

Order Hon. Members, please can you listen.  The Minister was listening to you. Can you also listen to him?

HON. PROF. M. NCUBE: Mr. Speaker Sir and Hon. Members,  I want to add something to supporting industry.  I need to remind Hon. Members that there are several rebates in the tax system that are targeted at supporting industry and production.  I would like to take you through them.  There is a rebate on the following,  imported capital equipment for industry, textiles and clothing manufacturers, duty on imports used by the dairy and processing industry, electoral manufacturers, duty on imports used by the packaging, printing and publishing industry, bottling equipment for sugar, imported milk, for luggage wear, furniture manufacturers, raw wine manufacturers, wheat flour, imports into Special Economic Zones, imports for use of approved projects under the national project status initiative.

Let me highlight those industries in the manufacturing sector who have benefited,  these are Modzone Textiles....

An Hon. Member having passed between the Chair and the Hon.

Member speaking.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order Hon. Member.

HON. PROF. M. NCUBE: Maroon Beverages, Dendairy, Dairiboard, Hunyani and Trade Kings.   These are examples of the companies that benefited from tax rebates or suspension of duties and we can cite with precision. They are creating jobs, improving their earnings, improving their viability and they have improved their profits.  The same applies to the mining sector.  We have done a lot for them but you asked for industry, so I will skip that.

There is something to be said when it comes to the tourism industry so that I get to the right page.  We suspended duty on buses for tour operators.  A total of 19 buses have been imported under this facility which was introduced on 1 January 2019.  There is also a rebate on duty on goods for use by tourism – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order Hon. Members.  Order!

HON. PROF. M. NCUBE: And again there has been a benefit here.  There is also a suspension of duty on motor vehicles imported by Safari Operators.  The companies that have benefited here are Matetsi

Safari, Safari Operators in Victoria Falls and Green Investments in Mana Pools.  Matetsi Safari in Victoria Falls was saved from liquidation due to this suspension of duty.  We are doing a lot to support industry and this should be supported by Members of Parliament.  I can go on and on.  What we are doing now with my staff is trying to quantify the job creation impact of these fiscal rebates and measures but we have got the data on who has benefited and who has not.  We are very clear that this supports production in addition to what we have done regarding IDC capitalisation and the capitalisation of the national venture fund.

Let me turn to cloud seeding which was raised by several Hon. Members in light of the dry spell experience in previous agricultural seasons – I propose to provide an additional $2.5 million towards cloud seeding.

In support for foreign missions, we are aware of the challenges that they face in terms of converting the salaries from RTGS or Zimbabwe dollars into US$. The condition of the missions themselves in terms of the buildings, paying service providers and paying local staff in their missions; I am told the embassies in UK, USA, China, Germany, France and then in the region, I know the condition. We are slowly working our way and making sure we are up-to-date with the salaries of Ambassadors and staff including their vehicles by the way.

We know the Ambassadors who do not have – I will not cite this one. It really made me very sad to see an Ambassador who was walking because they had no vehicle. When we arrived, he had to hire a vehicle and so forth. We are making sure that we deal with the issue of vehicles in addition to renovating the buildings and facilities. We are working on this and we have allocated a monthly running allocation in terms of foreign currency availability. We are trying to deal with this.

On women and youth, I wish to emphasise to Hon. Members that my Ministry remains committed to gender equity issues meant to reduce gender disparity. In this regard, I have taken note of the comments from

Hon. Members and proposed an additional $14 million to the Zimbabwe Women Micro-finance Bank. We worked and decided on this issue this morning after listening to the contributions from the Hon. Members yesterday.  I further propose an additional $15 million to capitalise the Youth Empowerment Bank. So, we have increased the shareholding or rather the capital base for those two institutions.

Let me turn to the water and sanitation in urban areas issue. I think it is Hon. Chombo who raised the need to address water infrastructure challenges currently faced by urban local authorities. You are not the only one, there are few other Hon. Members who raised this issue. I therefore propose to put an additional $20 million to support water and sanitation projects as the sector is also currently benefiting from development partners support.

Let me come to the issue regarding the construction of vending marts. Hon. Members, I also propose an allocation of $20 million towards the construction of vending space for municipal vendors who were removed from streets by urban local authorities. It is an additional $20 million for this facility.

Coming to the Constituency Development Fund (CDF), Hon. Mliswa and a lot of other members raised the issue of the allocation towards the CDF. I therefore propose an additional allocation of $10 million towards the CDF.

Turning to Agribank, I propose an additional $65 million to increase the capacity of Agribank to support agriculture. So, Agribank will receive an addition in terms of recapitalisation of $65 million from what the Members proposed. Also, there was a proposal to involve additional banks beyond Agribank in command agriculture. We are looking into that already. We are speaking to some of the banks and we will announce which banks will join the programme so they can monitor and manage some of the resources that are going towards the beneficiaries of command agriculture.

Let me turn to the Council of Chiefs, Hon. Members, I have taken note of the suggestions to provide additional resources to the Chiefs’ Council, I therefore propose an additional budget of $5 million towards the Council of Chiefs’ needs.

Hon. Members also raised the issues around independent commissions that the budgets for these commissions be increased as well. So, for the National Peace and Reconciliation Commission, I propose an additional $1,5 million in addition to what we have already put in the supplementary budget. These are top ups that we worked on this morning in response to your debates. On the Zimbabwe Human Rights Commission, an additional $5 million beyond what is in the supplementary. For National Prosecuting Authority, an additional $8,9 million. For the Zimbabwe Gender Commission, an additional $1,5 million and the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission, an additional $1,5 million. These are some of the responses in terms of budgets that we have been able to accommodate Mr. Speaker Sir, in line with the requests from members.

Let me turn to some of the issues raised by the Chair of the Budget, Finance and Economic Development Committee, Hon. Mhona on behalf of the Committee. He raised the issue of the 100 000 commercial tyres which has been ring-fenced and we will allow the importation of that and the duty is set at 15% for the next 12 months.

The question is why we did that.

Initially, we are trying to give an opportunity to local manufacturers of these tyres to get up to speed, upgrade their capacity but in the meantime, we know that they cannot meet the demand so we are allowing the importation. Looking forward, we are likely to continue with this provision but we would rather protect the local manufacturer in terms of production.

The issue around reducing Custom Duty on raw materials on the manufacture of motor vehicles, Mr. Speaker the proposal to levy an

Excise Duty on fuel, the committee recommends a reduction of Excise Duty on fuel and so forth but let me reflect on that. No, let me deal with it. The initial levy on petrol and diesel was actually 78% and 60% respectively. Now we are proposing 45% and 40% in respect of petrol and diesel, so it is lower. We have almost halved it so it is lower.

Let me come to the issue of vehicle filters because I dealt with fuel and I felt you were more interested with that. Mr. Speaker Sir, there is a company in Mutare that manufactures vehicle filters and it is already struggling. Therefore, the policy by Government is to support such companies. So, you can see it is targeted. We would like this company to produce and we are trying to protect it – [HON. MEMBERS: Ndeyani?] – It is owned by a Zimbabwean who is employing Zimbabweans and we need to support this company – [HON. MEMBERS: Ndeyani;

Ndeyani?] – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

THE ACTING SPEAKER: Order, Hon. Members please.

HON. PROF. M. NCUBE: There was also an issue around the threshold where again Hon. Mhona mentioned that the Committee recommends a further upward review of the tax free threshold to $1 000 given the need to stimulate the demand. You know we are in August now and left with another four months. We are coming back to the House with the normal annual budget and of course we are keeping our eye on what constitutes a fair level for a tax threshold. So, we have taken note, we have listened but for now, we think we should really stay with the $700.

Also, how we got to it when we moved from $350 to $700, we did a survey with industry and the National Employment Councils (NECS) and we came to the conclusion that $700 seems to be the reasonable level to set it but we stand ready to reveal upwards when we come back in four months. It was informed by a survey and we are ready to share details of that survey.

The issue of tax deductibility of royalties for mining; I thank you for the commendations.  We also felt that this was just too much headache for ZIMRA and us and there was need to make sure that it is tax deductable in line with best practices and the region.  We have done that and that is commendable.

The Committee raised the issue of the financing gap Mr. Speaker Sir, whether we are going to finance it or not.  We have done our research and strategy, we will be able to cover the gap without difficulty.  I can assure the Hon. Members that we will stay within our target of 4% at GDP ratio in terms of the budget deficit.  That will not be a problem at

all.

Let me come to the issue on the inflation publication.  I think some of the Hon. Members got the impression that I said no inflation figures should be published.  That is not correct, there are two key inflation figures that we publish and then we do derivatives of that.  The year on year inflation, 2018 to 2019, what is the inflationary change?  Then there is a running of month to month, which is one month to the next.  What I announced was that we are continuing with year to year inflation but we will seize to publish the year on year inflation, why?

First of all, we did this in 2009 when we moved from the

Zimbabwean dollar to the multicurrency regime because we realised that when we do year on year, we are not comparing like with like, it is two different currency regimes.  Basically, we have two indices, let us take what happened now; before 20 February, 2019, your CPI index is a US$ by default.  Your post February 2019 index is a Zimbabwean dollar index.  So, if you are going to compare them, you must convert them to the same currency bases, otherwise you are not comparing like with like.

So, you have to do what you call index splicing – I used to teach Statistics Mr. Speaker Sir, it is called index splicing, you graft them together.

Mr. Speaker Sir, if you are going to do that, then you are going to have awkward results which are that; if you take the price of Mazoe drink last year, this time, two litres it was US$3.  The price of the same Mazoe today, it is about $24.  Now, ZW$24 at the current interbank rate is 24 divided by 8, which is US$3.  So, it was US$3 last year and it is the same today.  So, if we do year on year inflation, it will be zero percent and you will be unhappy – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – so, that is why it is important to – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Hon. Members, can you learn

to listen please.

HON. PROF. M. NCUBE: Then fail to convey what you would

like to convey – but if we use the month to month, it will still tell you that we have an inflation challenge, why?  The month to month inflation for last year, this time last year was averaging 6.2%.  The month to month inflation for the same period this year Mr. Speaker Sir, doubles that.  So, we know that inflation has gone up.  To me, it conveys the message.  If we do year on year, we get thoroughly confused.

Hon. Members were asking if this surplus was real or not.  There was also something raised about; it is only a surplus because you are using cash budgeting, if you use accrual accounting, there is no surplus.  Let me try to address that Mr. Speaker Sir.  First of all, it is true that the surplus is ZW$800 million.  At the current interbank rate, that is US$100 million.  It is real and I repeat it.  What are we using it for?  We began to use the surplus for – first of all, we are allocating it into the supplementary budget; that is why we are projecting a deficit at year end because we are going to spend it and end up in deficit.  It is very clear.

What are the key shocks?  It is your maize importation, the increase in Parliamentary budgets and everywhere that we have suggested this supplementary budget.  That is going to eat away the surplus, power importation and so on.  You can be sure that by year end, it will dwindle.  So, do not worry that we have it now, we should probably celebrate because we have something to spend going forward –

[HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Hon. Minister, order please.  Hon. Member there, please can you use your notebook to take notes there, we are not enjoying your comments please, otherwise I will chase you out.

HON. PROF. M. NCUBE: Hon. Speaker Sir, Hon. Members, a point was raised regarding our use of cash accounting as opposed to accrual accounting.  Let me hasten to say that, whenever you are doing reforms, you should always use the cash accounting approach and not accrual accounting.  That is what happened when Hon. Minister Biti came in, in 2009.  He used cash accounting; that was correct.  I am using cash accounting; that is correct, why?  Because that is what you do when you are going through a reform programme.

Let me come to accrual accounting, we are aware that going forward, we have to move towards accrual accounting but it is a process.  I want to show Hon. Members here a document that we have prepared in terms of strategy towards that move and is entitled; ‘Migration to Accrual Based International Accounting for the Public Sector’ and this is 2018 to 2025.  It is a public document and I am happy to share with you and show you that we are serious about this.  Mr. Speaker Sir, it will also involve – that we should do an asset valuation of Government assets.  Once we do accrual accounting, the Government must have a balance sheet, the value of its asset.  That is how you do it Mr. Speaker Sir.  So, we are very clear, we have a strategy and a process; we will come back in the fullness of time and report on our progress towards accrual accounting but for now, it is cash accounting; that is what works whenever you are implementing reforms.

Mr. Speaker Sir, I am just double checking that I have covered all the items.  I think we covered everything.  On the duty on solar, Mr. Speaker Sir, we have actually removed duties on everything that is in the solar package if you are importing a solar package.  From the panels, the equipment as well as the duties on that, we have removed that.

Vote 2 which is the Parliament of Zimbabwe.  On this one, I want to break it down.  It is not just about the Vote, it is about welfare.  Let me start with motor vehicles.  This issue has dragged on for too long.  I want to be open with you.  Colleagues this process has too many hands in the pie.  Vanhu varikupindira arguing for this – the dealers, this Committee, that person and so forth.  This is the truth.  That is what has gone on. It has also dragged the issue a little bit, but where are we now.  We have made progress.  The progress is like this; the deposit has been approved in terms of the 20% deposit.  I am told by my officials that everything should be concluded by Friday this week.  So please, make sure that you check with the garages.

Now, I want to address an issue which was raised by some Hon. Members and Hon. Mliswa that the value has shifted from $50 000 down to $25 000.  No, the figure that you saw there, what we have done is - we put a structure, Mr. Speaker Sir.  Now, I must address you as I was addressing them.  My apologies, they are so pushy these people.

So, we put in a structure for 18 months in terms of the funding on the Treasury side.  So the budget you see is just for the 12 months to year end.  Next year there will be another portion to complete the full exposure in Zimbabwe dollars which translates to the full US$50 000.  So you can get your US$50 000 car, no problem.  That is what is going on.  We just split the budget across the two.

Let me come to the issue – there are other things.  There is the

Constituency Development Fund and there is your sitting allowance.  We are still in discussions.  I think you will be pleased with where we will end up in terms of the increase.  We are going to increase it.

You got your once off allowance.  Mr. Speaker Sir, we did the allowance.  Why did we not do it before when we did the collar for civil servants?  It is because you are deemed to rank above deputy directors.  So remember what we were doing, we were dealing with those who were deputy directors and below, you are above that.  That is why you were excluded in the collar adjustment before, but on the cushioning allowance you were included.

I know that there is also the issue of constituency visits.  Again, we are reviewing those budgets.  There are also issues around the support for research and so forth.  I think for some of this, it is worth also yourselves engaging the staff within Parliament.  They know a lot about what we have discussed in terms of your package.  So, there is a lot that we will do.  We have been engaging with the Chief Whips on both sides and the Leader of the House.  We will make sure that your welfare is taken care of – [HON. MEMBERS:  What about the issue of salaries.?]-

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order Hon. Members, please.

HON. PROF. M. NCUBE:  Let me respond through you Mr.

Speaker Sir.  We are looking into this issue of the salaries, the sitting allowances and constituency visit allowance.  We are reviewing the budget upward.  I have had conversations with the Chief Whips, the Speaker and the Standing Rules and Orders Committee – and the CDF too, we are looking into reviewing that budget.  I think they will be happy with the adjustments when we get there.

There is an issue that was raised around debt, that there is not enough information on debt and that I should come to this House and make a full presentation on the debt position.  Hon. Speaker Sir, I want to assure Hon. Members and yourself that I will come before this House to present a report on the debt situation, but in this Budget Statement on page 13– [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.]-

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Hon. Ndebele order please.  I

will fire you there. – [Laughter.]-

HON. PROF. M. NCUBE:  Salaries of civil servants - this was raised by so many Hon. Members, Mr. Speaker Sir.  Let me just repeat what we have done so far since the beginning of the year.  We did the $63 million cushioning allowance for the first three months, then we did the $400 million from 1st April to year end and we did a breakdown in terms of levels all the way down to the lowest paid person, the office orderly.  I can share that detail with you.  It was a cascading scale where the deputy directors had a lower increase as a percentage compared to the office orderlies who had the highest percentage of 29%.  So, the sliding scale, I can give the Hon. Members band by band.

We move on from there.  Last month we did a cushioning allowance of $143 million which was a once off payment which again was well received by civil servants.  I can give you a breakdown.  I cannot give you right away.  I can go back and work it out.  We are still negotiating collar. So, in the next few weeks we will conclude on our deliberations over collar and that again will be announced.  I am sure it will be a happy ending for the civil servants.

In November, Mr. Speaker Sir and Hon. Members, we are going to pay the usual bonus to civil servants.  As you know, this will go a long way to ameliorating their plight and their buying capacity.  So, we are doing a lot for civil servants and that collar adjustment that we are proposing will deal with the salary issue.

Also a suggestion was made – I am going back to the micro issues that maybe we should go back to the United States dollar.  Bad idea.  That is how we moved away from it. It is a bad idea because whenever you have the US$ or foreign currency, it means that you have no governor for the central bank.  The governor of the central bank is the governor in the country from which you are borrowing that currency.  If it is US, then the chairman of the Federal Reserve is your governor, I am dramatising it.  What it means is you have no monetary policy and that is very dangerous.  You cannot adjust to shocks, you cannot do anything, you cannot print, you cannot dribble the system and you abandon the interest rate policy.  What we have done now is to restore full monetary policy.  We can have interest rates, we will announce the monetary policy committee, we have introduced our own currency and it is amazing.  You cannot develop your country without a domestic

currency.  I urge Members to have confidence in themselves.  It is very important.  Zambians have confidence in themselves.  That is why they have the Kwacha.  South Africans have a Rand because they have confidence in themselves.  They know they can manage it, why do we not have confidence in ourselves.  We should have confidence and we will be able to manage and stabilise.

Hon. Members should urge us to say, never again should you allow our dear Zimbabwe dollar to be impacted by your bad policies and we stay on the straight and narrow.  That should be the issue.  Not to go back to US dollar – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] – Please, let us emphasise policies that will strengthen the Zimbabwe dollar and protect its value rather than abandon it and adopt something else – [HON. MEMBERS:  What about money changers?  Why are we seeing bond notes in the streets?] – Let me come to the energy sector.

Mr. Speaker Sir, we are concluding a facility, an arrangement for importing power from ESKOM in South Africa.  We are doing exactly what the Hon. Members are suggesting.  Already, we have agreed to pay US$890 a week towards extinguishing the liability with ESKOM as well as to acquire additional power.  We are putting in place a guarantee of US$15 million to make sure the whole thing works.

HON. S. BANDA:  On a point of order Mr. Speaker.  Mr. Speaker Sir, I love you very much.  I think you and I are getting a bit tired and I was hoping I do not know.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  There is no point of order

Hon. Member, sit down.

HON. PROF. M. NCUBE:  Mr. Speaker Sir, we are going to proceed as well to put in a similar facility for importation of power from Mozambique so that we can continue to be supported by our good neighbours in this regard.  Of course, as we remove duties on solar and I must say yesterday, in Cabinet we approved a national renewable energy policy for Zimbabwe.  It is now a public document which will seek to kick start renewable energy sector in Zimbabwe covering solar energy, mini-hydro, geothermal energy, wind energy and biomass and Hon.

Members could read and look into.  I have listened to the suggestions from Hon. Nduna on various areas and we have taken note.  We will make sure we incorporate this.  Some of them in a sense need a little bit of reflection and they may be reflected in the next budget but we have taken note of all of these.

There was the issue about duty on equipment used by war veterans and infrastructure development.  The issue about the maintenance reserve account and that we should accelerate disbursements.  I will make sure the Minister of Transport is cajoled to move faster.

There are very comprehensive suggestions around the aviation industry, which seem to be very helpful and I think that while we may not accommodate these now, they will go into our thinking as we think of the next budget.  I thank you.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Hon. Minister, may you raise

your voice?

HON. PROF. M. NCUBE:  Thank you.  Let me shout.  There is the issue of the health sector budget, again we have listened but we have done a bit on the health sector budget.  We have been very targeted in terms of infrastructure, in terms of drug acquisition.  Drug penetration has improved up from, 40% to 60%.  We have done a lot and we are doing a lot.  In the budget, I did cite the hospitals where we have finished the renovations as promised in January when I presented the last budget where they look at Mbuya Nehanda, Mpilo Hospital and UBH.  We have done a lot and Hon. Karenyi raised the health issue – [HON. KARENYI:  Because tikagadzira kuzvipatara, the Hon. Vice President vanodzoka vorapirwa paParirenyatwa.] – Understood.

The issue of political parties funding – I think it was raised before, you are not just raising it now.  Of course, I am processing this and it is underway.  It will be released because that is due to the political parties.

It will definitely be released.  A lot was proffered and commented on.  We have taken note and we appreciate.  On investment of rail, if you recall that there are transactions being considered...

HON. MADZIMURE:  On a point of order.  Mr. Speaker Sir, can you ask the Minister to sit down a little bit and ask all Members to stand up and jump because too many of them are sleeping.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  I think he is finishing.  Hon.

Minister, can you proceed.

HON. PROF. M. NCUBE:  On national railways and railways

transportation, I have listened to this and it is a valid point but our strategy in terms of NRZ, Mr. Speaker Sir, was to find a private partner so that it becomes a PPP.  That is what the Minister of Transport has issued out in terms of request for proposals for PPP investors.  We have to wait for that process to be completed before Government can commit more resources itself.  If you remember, there was the diaspora infrastructure group which had offered to be a PPP partner before and had been given an extension to perform among others who have also been invited.  So we wait to hear about progress on this matter before we commit as Government.  Then on DDF, I have listened very carefully and the request for an increase on the budget is accepted. I have agreed that the budget be increased by another $60 million and take it to a $100 million.  On this note, let me sit down and wait for other requests for clarifications.

         HON. CHIKWINYA:  May I take this opportunity to thank the Hon Minister for the response.  My point of clarification is that he did not respond to the issues around devolution which were raised by Hon. Members in terms of actualisation of the devolution process.  I remember an Hon. Member said there are elected members of the provincial councils who have not as yet been sworn because of various fundamentals which have not been put in place.   So, how much money has been budgeted to allow for the actualization of the swearing in and beginning of Provincial councils work?  As we speak, money meant for devolution is going direct to local authorities yet it is supposed to sit on the provincial council rather than directly on local authorities.  That is point number one.  Point number two, we do not want to be attracted to debating issues around the welfare of senior civil servants.  He knows what I am talking about when I say senior civil servants.  Under Vote 2,  he did not come out clear and my biggest problem with the Hon. Minister is that he has made four promises before and non of them have been actualised.  Can the Minister come out clear on this group of senior civil servants, what is going to happen to their salaries, because the issue of referring us to staff is un-procedural. Staff does not deal with policy.  The Minister referred us to the Clerk of Parliament.  The Clerk of Parliament does not interact with Members of Parliament on a matter of policy.  MPs interact with the Minister on matters of policy.  So, can the Minister come out clearly on what is going to happen with salaries, allowances and the CDF?  I thank you.

         HON. NDUNA: I just have two points that I want to seek clarification from the Hon. Minister.  He referred to me when he spoke of royalties and said he wanted to be in sinc with ZIMRA and other cooperating partners.  Has he reverted back to the 1% on artisanal and small scale miners and 3% on the large scale miners?  Secondly, the 15% of our population, whether he has removed the duty completely on accessories, ancillaries, equipment that they use in their day to day upkeep for they are differently abled?  These are the two issues.  Has he removed the duty completely for their equipment importation including those visually impaired, the Braille they can utilise and sunscreen for albinos .  I am alive to mudara ten in Chegutu West who has no legs and want to know if he can get wheel chairs duty free.  I did not hear what he said .  If he can elaborate and if he can please remove the duty, please Madam Speaker Ma’am.

  HON. CHOMBO:  There was one issue that the Hon Minister did

not address on year to year inflation rebasing.  There is going to be information vacuum if he is going to publish the statistics in February 2020.  Is there any way he is going to address that?

  HON. MADZIMURE:  I just want first to buttress what Hon.

Chombo said. The issue of rebasing, leaving the inflation to speculation is the most dangerous thing and it is not good.  My point of clarity is on the budget formulation process where MPs must contribute meaningfully.  Is the Minister going to consider coming to Parliament with a paper of his intentions before the actual allocation of resources is made so that Parliament contributes towards what they think the people they represent really want so that we have got a budget that is targeted at specific projects at constituency level?

     HON. MUSABAYANA:  My point of clarity is on the issue of

duty on fertlisers.  Like I said earlier that there is a serious challenge with fertliser shortages and the prices are not affordable so we need a waiver or suspension of duty of fertilizers.  Someone spoke about capacitating the locals like Sable Chemicals, they use sulphuric acid which is very expensive to import.  They need more than $30 million per annum but they normally get around US$3000 which is not enough and always have shortages.  I also raised the issue of duty on roller meal, maize and wheat because there is a serious shortage of wheat in the country but there is duty on flour.  So, we are saying it is better for now until when we are capacitated and have enough stocks in terms of GMB so that we can produce.  Thank you Madam Speaker.

       THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: May we be guided here.

Points of clarity – we need to be specific to the point.  We do not need to be debating again.  So may you please come to the point.

HON. HAMAUSWA:  My point of clarity centres on the issue of pensioners.  The Hon. Minister did not address issues raised by Hon.

Members concerning the plight of pensioners.  The other issue is that the

Hon. Minister’s response on water infrastructure was not convincing because we are currently facing a disaster in terms of water and sanitation.  So, we would want to know from the Hon. Minister what is really going to happen to urban areas.  We saw dams for the rural areas but nothing was said about Kunzwi Dam for example to cover Harare.

Those are some of the issues that we need clarity on.  The last one is on SMEs.  The Hon. Minister talked about building structures for vendors who were removed from urban areas but in the whole budget, there is no mentioning of SMEs, which I think is not really good because the economy has largely informalised so there is no direct mentioning of how the SMEs are going to be assisted.

HON. SARUWAKA: Thank you Madam Speaker Ma’am.  To the

Minister, I know that a lot of MPs raised the issue about the fallacy of where you said you have made surplus.  I did not hear you responding to the challenges to your surplus where you were saying you made surplus in the year whereas people were saying, with all these debts, how did you make a surplus.  If you answered that, okay, maybe I did not hear.

  HON. PROF. M. NCUBE:  Madam Speaker Ma’am, again let me

thank Hon. Members for those additional questions and requests for further clarification.  Let me start with the request for clarification from Hon. Chikwinya on the provincial councils.  He said that the budget should sit at that level before they go to the rural district.  That is not correct.  On processes like this, 25% of the budget goes directly to the provincial council and 75% goes directly to the Rural District Councils.  He is right that the legislation regarding the provincial council issues needs to be concluded.  It is a matter that is in hand and the process is under way but an allocation has been made already.  That allocation at provincial councils’ level is about $114.4 million and the remainder out of the $703 million is then allocated at rural district level.  The allocation has been made but the process of disbursing and so forth at that provincial level is being concluded parallel with the conclusion of the legislative process around it.

       Then on the allocations in terms of allowances to the

Parliamentarians as I said, we are still debating the actual in terms of the benefits and we will conclude, I can tell you by early tomorrow morning and I think the Members will be happy with that conclusion because we have every intention to review the allowances upwards.

         Then Hon. Nduna raised the issue about duties in terms of the disabled.  We have removed those duties.  In fact, I removed those duties in November last year.  It was just silent in the Supplementary but they are already removed.  Then on the 2% royalty for gold producers, this needs some reflection.  Madam Speaker Ma’am, we have actually set up a US$100 million facility to capacitate Fidelity to buy gold across the country but also to capacitate the gold producers.  It is a loan and how do we service that loan.  So part of our thinking around raising the royalty was to be able to service that loan.  So, it needs some reflection if we were to drop it back to 1%, then we need to reflect on how we can then service that loan which will benefit the gold miners in the first place.

       On the issue of inflation rebasing, we dealt with this one. – [HON.

MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.]

  THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order Hon. Members, I am

sure that we all are of the view of wanting to go home, so may you kindly cooperate so that at least we hear the points of clarity that the Minister is going to respond to.

             HON. PROF. M. NCUBE: Thank you Madam Speaker Ma’am.

Then on the issue of the budgetary process, this is a Supplementary

Budget.  The main budget was approved in January and being a Supplementary Budget, the consultation process was done at the annual budget stage and in another four months, we will be engaging in consultations for the annual budget for 2020.  This is only a supplementary.  So, I think that from the vibrancy of the debate in this House, with the Members of Parliament, we have had a robust debate and it feels that we have really gone into the issues and sunk our teeth into them.  This has been fantastic and therefore the need for further consultation is not necessary.  We have done enough in this House and I appreciate the contribution from the Members.

         The duty on fertiliser inputs, this duty has been removed.  It was removed in January.  So, I confirm that this duty was removed so that the inputs for the manufacture of fertiliser locally are duty free and we will enable that to happen.  The issue for the sector is not duties but it has been the foreign currency for importing those inputs in the first place and the duties have been removed nonetheless.

         Then request for the removal of duties on maize, wheat and so forth, this will reflect on this.  All these are good suggestions but of course, we are importing a lot of maize and we said only GMB can import and of course that maize from GMB is duty free because it is the Government importing.  So, it cannot charge itself tax in that regard but we reflect on all these suggestions and try to incorporate them as we go forward.

         Then we are concerned with the plight of the pensioners and indeed when we do the reviews for civil servants, we will also review the pensioners’ emoluments upwards.

On urban infrastructure, again, some of this urban infrastructure is not really dealt with at Central Government level but rather at local authority level but we are working with the provincial authority in Harare to deal particularly with Kunzvi Dam.  In fact, we have an idea about putting a financing mechanism under a public private partnership to deal with these dams that will supply Harare and the other metropolis around it with water.

On SMEs that perhaps I did not dwell enough on, there is quite a bit on SMEs in the Supplementary Budget but also, in the main budget in January that was supplementing in the first place.  If you read those two together, January and now, there is a lot that has been said and incentive as well for SMEs that have been put in place.  I thank you.

HON. S. BANDA: Thank you very much Madam Speaker.  My question is on employment costs.  The Blue Book already has figures.

There are amounts for Parliament and amounts for war veterans, amounts for police and so on.  As the Minister now is saying, we are still discussing yet we already have figures, what will we be approving?

Secondly, on unallocated reserves, I feel that there are a lot of unallocated reserves – why can they not go to other Ministries and there is also even the issue of Air Zimbabwe to say there is debt reconstruction. Why can it not go there?  Those are my two points of clarification.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  The Hon. Minister is saying

that he does not understand that at all.  So, may you kindly repeat?  You talked about employment cost, what about them? Be specific.

HON. S. BANDA:  Thank you very much Madam Speaker.  In terms of employment costs, if you take for instance the police, in the

Blue Book, there is an increment by 33.8 %. For war veterans, it is 32.7%.  Those are just examples.  The Minister said we are still discussing yet it is already in the Blue Book so what will we be approving if we are going to approve those figures then at the end of the day they are going to change again.

             THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: The second point of clarity?

              HON. S. BANDA: The second point of clarity Madam Speaker is

unallocated reserves in the Ministry of Finance,  I feel they are a big chunk a lot them. Why can they not be allocated to the ministries themselves and even let us say to Air Zimbabwe which has got a huge legacy debt.  Why can some of the funds not go there?

          HON. PROF. M. NCUBE: Thank you Madam Speaker, I thank

the Hon. Member for that question.  In terms of the unallocated reserves, basically these budgetary adjustments that I have just announced prior to this, those extra monies are coming from the unallocated reserves, so I am already allocating the unallocated reserves.  Secondly, what is also in the unallocated reserves is a portion that we have set aside to meet the requirements for the collar adjustments for civil servants.  Regarding the issue of what we are still discussing, it is true we need to fine tune certain things between now and 1100 hours tomorrow morning and we are going to do that and we will come back, I think, with a pleasant and pleasurable result in terms of those discussions. I am receiving some of the information from the Chief Whips, one of the members is feeding us with information and our officials are processing. We will do that overnight and tomorrow we will conclude and I think we will have pleasant a result.  I thank you.

        Motion put and agreed to.

         Bill ordered to be brought in by the Minister of Finance and Economic Development.

FIRST READING

FINANCE (NO.2) BILL [H. B. 13, 2019]

        THE MINISTER OF FINANCE AND ECONOMIC

DEVELOPMENT (HON. PROF. M. NCUBE) presented the Finance

Bill  (No. 2) Bill [H. B. 13, 2019].

        Bill read the first time.

       Bill referred to the Parliamentary Legal Committee.

         On the motion of THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON.ZIYAMBI), the House

adjourned at Twenty One minutes to Eleven o’clock p.m.

 

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