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NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD 08 SEPTEMBER 2020 VOL 46 NO 62

PARLIAMENT OF ZIMBABWE

Tuesday, 8th September, 2020

The National Assembly met at a Quarter-past Two o’clock p.m.

PRAYERS

(THE HON. SPEAKER in the Chair)

          Hon. Biti having entered the Chamber wearing a hat.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Hon. Biti before you enter the House, you should take off your hat.

          HON. BITI: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.

 ANNOUNCEMENTS BY THE HON. SPEAKER

DEATH OF HON. MIRIAM MUSHAYI

          THE HON. SPEAKER: It is with profound sorrow that I have to inform the House of the death of the Member of Parliament for Kuwadzana Constituency, Hon. Miriam Mushayi, on Monday, 7th September, 2020.   May I therefore invite all Hon. Members to rise and observe a minute of silence in respect of the late Hon. Member.

          Hon. Members observed a minute of silence.

EXTENSION OF TIME FOR THE PRIVILEGES COMMITTEE TO INVESTIGATE THE ALLEGED ACTS OF

MISCONDUCT BY MDC-A MPS

THE HON. SPEAKER: I have to inform the House that the Privileges Committee that is inquiring into the alleged acts of misconduct by the MDC-A Members of Parliament has requested an extension of the time assigned to conclude the investigation. This has been granted and the Committee is now expected to report its findings and recommendations on the 31st of October 2020.

HON. DR. LABODE: On a point of Privilege Mr. Speaker Sir.

HON. SPEAKER: Good to see you on your feet Hon. Labode. We thank God.

HON. DR. LABODE: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. My point of privilege relates to the adopted Parliament testing and isolation policy which is not in line with the national and WHO policies on isolation. My concern Mr. Speaker is that 23 Members of Parliament tested positive, among those, there are about nine or so who have already tested positive four weeks ago and isolated. According to WHO, once you have tested positive and you have actually isolated for two weeks, you are supposed to be free of COVID because you now have antibodies in your body that protect you. What has happened is, these same people, according to the Speaker, will be tested and the outcome will be about 30 including those who are free. How do you know you are free? It is a fact that if the COVID enters your body, your antibodies start fighting for you and they remain in your body for almost five weeks.

This is why at the beginning of COVID, we had no recoveries because we had not realised that people are not recovering because they have antibodies in them. Immediately we stopped, the Ministry of Health and Child Care says after 14 days, if you have no symptoms, you are free you do not need to be retested.  If we continue increasing the number of Members who are going away for isolation as the Parliament policy, we will end up closing Parliament. This will be so because the ones whom you will have tested will not test negative because they have immunity, they have developed those antibodies.

THE HON. SPEAKER: You mean they will not test positive.

HON. DR. LABODE: They will test positive.

HON. SPEAKER: Second time?

HON. DR. LABODE: A lot of them did even now. A point in case is Hon. Mbondiah. She was sick, isolated for three weeks and came to Parliament and tested positive. She went back home and the doctor said why are you being isolated? Because you had already stayed home and you were actually sick, which means your antibodies were fighting in the system, you should not actually catch or spread that disease again as a person.

I want to explain that this vaccine that you hear is being developed in Europe is being taken from the antibodies of those who were cured and in Europe they are injecting those in hospital to ensure that they develop antibodies so when they come in contact with Covid they will not be infected.  The good example is: when you come in contact with a person suffering from tuberculosis and you do not fall sick – when you vaccinate your child for BCG if you see some swellings, it is the antibody of that aunt who had T.B whom you did not know.  It is very good actually, do not complain about it, it is your antibodies fighting, your soldiers in the body fighting.  When you are infected with Covid, your soldiers become alert because they know you, they have fought a war with you.

What I am saying is, we should have a cohort.  That is my proposal.  If we follow the national policy, we should take all the people who are negative in two weeks time and they are the ones we should test.

Hon. Dr. Labode having been speaking without being connected virtually was asked to connect by The Hon. Speaker.

THE HON. SPEAKER: Link up because you are making a very important statement.

HON. LABODE: I must put a disclaimer, because I had COVID people may think I am saying so because I am still positive.  For the reason that I am diabetic and asthmatic, I did not develop a lot of antibodies so I had a negative result.  It is not something I should celebrate because if I was positive, I would be guaranteed that I had plenty of antibodies.  The fact that I tested negative over a short period of time, three weeks, it means I may not have developed strong enough antibodies.

Hon. Dr. Labode having connected to the virtual platform.

HON. DR. LABODE: So, I was saying that I want to put a disclaimer, just in case some people will think that I am talking of people who have been on isolation and sick because I have been there and I am protecting myself, no.  I am one of those I consider not to be very fortunate because I did not develop enough antibodies so I tested negative after the positive results I have both of them here– [showing the results documents.] – the positive and the negative.

What I am proposing that Parliament should do –

THE HON. SPEAKER: That is what I have been waiting for.

          HON. DR. LABODE: Yes, we should take the cohort of those who are negative in two weeks time and they are the ones we should test.  If we keep testing the people who have already been sick or who tested positive before, I am not going to mention them.  A group of those who are on isolation are among those who tested positive and they were calling me to ask why and I said you are not sick but you have the antibodies, move on with your life.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Have you finished?

          HON. DR. LABODE: Yes, I have finished.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: According to you this is according to how the World Health Organisation (WHO) needs us to interpret its guidelines?

          HON. DR. LABODE: I can read the guidelines actually, I have them here, they were sent all over. “To all provincial medical directors; adoption of the WHO isolation criteria for COVID confirmed patients.  The new recommendation is to apply to all COVID cases regardless of isolation, location or disease severity.  For symptomatic patient, 10 days after the symptoms onset plus three days additional, the person should be considered to be free.  Those without symptoms, the asymptomatic we call them, 10 days positive test for COVID, after 10 days you are free and you shall not be retested.”  This is why we suddenly –

          THE HON. SPEAKER: No, continue reading.

          HON. DR. LABODE: The re-infection is next to impossible, only one case – in Zimbabwe we have not experienced re-infection –

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Can you read.

          HON. DR. LABODE: I want to continue Sir.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Please carry on, do not comment.

          HON. DR. LABODE: The re-infection has been on isolated cases – one in America which has been on discussion yesterday on Cable News Network (CNN) –

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Have you finished reading what WHO says?

          HON. DR. LABODE: “The new recommendation is to apply to all COVID cases regardless of isolation, severity of disease.  The discharge criteria is below;

  • For symptomatic patients, meaning those who are either coughing or whatever – 10 days after symptoms onset plus three additional days.
  • Without symptoms – which include fever and whatever; they shall not be retested but considered to be recovered.

That is what you are seeing when you see the national report saying recovered – they have not tested the recovered.  They would have spent the required time.  For asymptomatic cases, 10 days after testing positive without further retest, you are declared free.

THE HON. SPEAKER: That is the end?

HON. DR. LABODE: That is the end.  It says, ‘new cases shall be implemented immediately signed by the Acting Permanent Secretary Dr. Mhlanga.’  Mr. Speaker, I shall print this and give it to you.

THE HON. SPEAKER: And give it to the chat group.  Thank you very much – [AN HON. MEMBER: Inaudible interjection.] -  I have not commented.  In-lingua parlance, Hon. Sibanda, you do not say ‘o.k’ to the Chair – [HON. P. D. SIBANDA: My apology Hon. Speaker Sir.] – thank you.

Hon. Dr. Labode, thank you for your statement.  We shall engage the Ministry and further seek clarification because at the back of my mind, if I am told that I have tested positive and then I quarantine, I am assumed that after 10 or 14 days that I am well, I am assured that I shall not die but people have died after testing positive.  So, I do not know how we will balance that.  Anyway, we will stand guided by the national policy and perhaps come back and advise the House accordingly.  However, thank you for your observations. Hon. Misihairabwi, are you linked up?

          HON. MISIHAIRABWI-MUSHONGA: Yes, I am now.  Thank you very much Mr. Speaker Sir.  If you allow me, I was going to ask Hon. Dr. Labode just one issue of clarification.  We were told in one of the small committees that had been set up in Parliament, by the epidemiologist that the PCR test that they are doing is to test the virus and the viral load and I hear you speaking of anti-bodies.  I thought the rapid test was the one which shows the antibodies.  So at what point is this PCR showing anti-bodies because I thought it was testing the actual virus and viral load?  So, I am getting a bit confused.

THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, we are now being very unprocedural.  The Hon. Dr. Labode has not made a ministerial statement, so we cannot seek clarification.  What I suggest is, let us be guided perhaps tomorrow by the Ministry of Health and Child Care or alternatively by the National Chair of COVID-19.  I am sure Hon. Member you will appreciate my ruling.

HON. MISIHAIRABWI-MUSHONGA:  I do, it is just that it is a worrying subject, so we all got carried away but I stand guided.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  We all are worried for our lives.  Thank you.

          HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  Thank you Hon. Speaker.  My point of privilege takes into cognisance the fact that a new Parliament building is under construction.  I also acknowledge that the current circumstances have literally forced Parliament to migrate to technological debate.  However, I believe that the current Chamber is not compliant to this new migration that we are making.  I am realising that at times we come to the House coming from some other engagements.  I was asking if it is not possible to try and put adaptors in places where Hon. Members can at least be charging their gadgets whilst they are in attendance to Parliament business so that we do not get to a situation where the gadgets fail maybe whilst a member is debating.  I thank you Hon.  Speaker.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Thank you.  I charge mine once before I come to the House and it is guaranteed for 36 hours. So, yours must do the same.

HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  I am coming from a workshop where I was since morning and I am just realising that the battery will not take me all the way.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  So, there are no sockets where you can charge in this building?

HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  There is nowhere except outside the Chamber.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Thank you Hon. Sibanda for your observation.  I am advised by the Clerk of Parliament that they will make sure they have extensions for charging where ZBC connects so that you have enough connectivity and Hon. Members can charge their gadgets.

MOTION

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON, ZIYAMBI):  I move that Order of the Day, Numbers 1 to 4 be stood over until Order of the Day, Number 5 has been dealt with.

          Motion put and agreed to.

COMMITTEE STAGE

NATIONAL PROSECUTING AUTHORITY BILL [H. B. 20, 2019]

Fifth Order read: Committee Stage: National Prosecuting Authority Bill [H. B. 20, 2019].

House in Committee.

          Clauses 1 to 9 put and agreed to.

          Bill reported without amendments.

          Third Reading; with leave forthwith.

THIRD READING

NATIONAL PROSECUTING AUTHORITY BILL [H. B. 20, 2019]

          THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): Madam Speaker, I now move that the Bill be read the third time.

          Motion put and agreed to.

          Bill read the third time.

MOTION

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

          THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): Madam Speaker, I move that Orders of the Day, Numbers 6 to 17 be stood over until Order of the Day, Number 18 has been disposed of.

          Motion put and agreed to.

MOTION

THIRD REPORT OF THE PUBLIC ACCOUNTS COMMITTEE ON THE BENCHMARKING VISIT TO THE PARLIAMENT OF ZAMBIA

          HON. MPARIWA: Madam Speaker, I move the motion standing in my name that this House adopts the Third Report of the Public Accounts Committee on the Benchmarking Visit to the Parliament of Zambia by a delegation of the Committee.

          HON. MAHLANGU: I second.

          HON. MPARIWA: Thank you Madam Speaker.  On Tuesday, 2 October 2019, Mr. Speaker announced that the Public Accounts Committee would consist of the following Members:

Hon. L. T. Biti, Hon. B. Bushu, Hon. O. Bvute, Hon. W. Chikombo, Hon. B. Chikwama, Hon. P. Dutiro, Hon. R. Maboyi, Hon. W. Madzimure, Hon. A. Markham, Hon. C. Matewu, Hon. E. Masuku, Hon. N. Matsikenyere, Hon. M. Mbondiah, Hon. F. Mhona, Hon. P. Mpariwa, Hon. E. Mushoriwa, Hon. D. Nduna, Hon. A. Nkani, Hon. Dr. M. Nyashanu, Hon. J. Nyokanhete, Hon. M. Raidza, Hon. B. Rwodzi, Hon. T. W. Sansole, Hon. C. Sanyatwe, Hon. Z. Sibanda, Hon. G. Sithole, Hon. S. Sithole, Hon. P. Togarepi, Hon. V. Muradzikwa-Zengeya

          Hon. L. T. Biti to be Chairperson

          Terms of Reference of the Public Accounts Committee -

Standing Order No. 16:

          “There must be a   Committee on Public Accounts, for the examination of the sums granted by Parliament to meet the public expenditure and of such other accounts laid before Parliament as the Committee may think fit.”

          Introduction

Nine members of the Public Accounts Committee from the Parliament of Zimbabwe, accompanied by three staff members conducted a benchmarking visit to the Parliament of Zambia from 18 to 22 March 2019. Of the twelve, five were female. The overall objective of the benchmarking visit was to share experiences in the work of Public Accounts Committees with the intention of adopting best practices and ultimately enhancing Parliamentary oversight over use of public resources.

          During the visit, the delegation had the privilege of paying a courtesy call on the Hon. Speaker of the Zambian National Assembly. Fruitful meetings were held with   Chairpersons of Committees whose work relates to the Public Accounts Committee, staff from the Auditor General’s Office and other Government departments whose work complements the work of the Public Accounts Committee in Zambia. The delegation’s findings and recommendations are presented in detail later in this report.

          Composition of the Delegation 

The delegation to Zambia comprised the following Members and staff of Parliament:

Hon. Bramwell Bushu, Hon. Wellington Chikombo, Hon. Berta Chikwama, Hon. Memory Mbondiah, Hon. Paurina Mpariwa (Leader of DelegationHon. Dr. Mathew Nyashanu, Hon. Marko Raidza, Hon. Wesley Sansole, Hon. Chipo Sanyatwe, Mr. Asha Jenje, Mr. Christian Ratsakatika (Secretary to Delegation)Ms. Better Sibanda

          Objectives of the benchmarking visit

The main objective of the benchmarking visit was to learn how Parliament of Zambia in general and the Public Accounts Committee in particular, manage the work of the Committee. Other focus areas included how the Committee follows up the implementation of its recommendations.   During their stay in Zambia, the delegation was privileged to meet with Speaker of the National Assembly, Chairpersons of Committees, officials from the Auditor-General and Office of the Controller of Internal Audits. The delegation also had meetings with other oversight institutions such as the Drug Enforcement Commission and Anti-Corruption Commission. Although Zimbabwe and Zambia have a lot in common, there are some institutions and practices the delegation learnt. Below are summaries of the information gathered by the delegation during its interactions?

          Courtesy Call on the Speaker of the National Assembly

The delegation paid a courtesy call on the Speaker of the National Assembly, the Rt. Honourable Mr. Justice Dr. Patrick Matibini. In his welcome remarks, the Speaker acknowledged the strong bilateral relations that exist between Zimbabwe and Zambia dating back to the pre-independence period. He stated that the two countries shared a lot and gave geographical examples of Victoria Falls and Kariba dam. He highlighted that the countries belonged to regional groupings such as the Southern African Development Community (SADC), Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) and at continental level to the African Union (AU), Pan-African Parliament (PAP) and Southern African Development Community Parliamentary Forum (SADC – PF). Honourable Matibini observed that Hon. Advocate J. F. Mudenda was very passionate about transforming SADC-PF into a regional Parliament.

Figure 1 - Rt. Honourable Mr. Justice Dr. Patrick Matibini, addressing the delegation.

          The Speaker of the Zambian Parliament commended study visits that have been undertaken before between the two countries. He described the visits as healthy engagements for sharing parliamentary practices and experiences. The Speaker referred to the annual Zimbabwe-Zambia (Zim-Zam) Senior Parliamentary Staff Seminar as another example of the useful forum for engagement between the two countries.

          Hon. Matibini informed the delegation that Zambia had gone through four Constitutional Commissions since independence. He indicated that the last Commission established in 2016 had brought about amendments, which among other things provide for 156 Members of Parliament and a right for the President to nominate eight Members who are usually appointed to ministerial positions. He also informed the Committee that the Constitution had also provided for the appointment of a woman to the position of Vice-President. The Speaker explained that he had risen to his current position from the bench and did not belong to any political party and that the first Deputy Speaker also did not belong to a party.  The delegation was however advised that the second Deputy Speaker belonged to the ruling party.

          The Speaker pointed out that the Public Accounts Committee was the busiest of the National Assembly of Zambia’s Standing Committees. He informed the delegation that two Committees, Local Government Accounts and on Parastatal Bodies had been established in order to mitigate the Public Account Committee’s huge workload. He concluded by observing that management of resources was a major challenge faced by most of the African countries and implored Public Accounts Committees to ensure the optimal use of resources.

          Interaction with Hon. Kunda, Chairperson of the Public Accounts

Hon. Kunda shared the following information with the Committee. The Public Accounts Committee in Zambia runs with the life of Parliament. The Committee has a membership of ten (10). National Standing Order No. 153(2) provides for the election of the Chairperson of the Committee, who should come from the opposition party.

               Figure 2 – The delegation interacting with Hon. Kunda

          The process followed in scrutinising the Auditor-General’s Reports begins with tabling of the Report in September or October, followed by entities submitting their responses and appearing before the Committee for oral evidence. After tabling and adoption of the Report in the National Assembly, the Executive should table a Treasury minute within six days. The Public Accounts Committee has a sub-Committee of four (4) Members who follow up on outstanding issues. The sub-Committee has powers to invite controlling officers over queries. An action taken report is submitted and outstanding issues are kept alive.

In Zambia, there is live coverage of proceedings by the Parliament’s radio station when controlling officers appear before the Committee. Such meetings are open to the public and media.  The Budget Committee and the Public Accounts Committee complement each other. The Budget Committee preoccupies itself with the analysis of estimates of revenue and expenditure and the Public Accounts Committee examines the use of resources allocated for specific programmes. Some controlling officers have been fired and some of them jailed for misconduct following exposure by the Public Accounts Committee.

          The Auditor General in Zambia has powers to refer cases for investigation by relevant investigative bodies if there are cases warranting investigation. Some Government officials had either been suspended, pending investigations and others fired following recommendations arising from the reports of the Public Accounts Committee.

Meeting with the Hon. Muchima, Chairperson of the Committee on Local Government Accounts

The Chairperson of the Committee on Local Government Accounts, Hon. Muchima shared the following information with the delegation. The Committee on Local Government Accounts is a newly constituted Committee which had been established to deal with the work previously dealt with by the Public Accounts Committee. The Committee had a membership of ten (10). There were hundred and sixteen (116) Councils in Zambia which were now subjected to audits by the Auditor-General.

          The Constituency Development Fund (CDF), introduced by Parliament was a popular development fund that complemented Government’s rolling out of development programmes. Before the enactment of an Act that governs the disbursement of the CDF, some Members of Parliament had been imprisoned for abusing the fund. Each constituency is entitled to one hundred and sixty thousand 160 000) kwachas but Members were lobbying for an increase to five hundred thousand (500 000) kwachas. The CDF and the Equalisation Fund allocated to councils are audited by the Auditor-General and the audit report is submitted to the Committee for its analysis and councils found wanting is reported to the arresting authorities.

          Courtesy call on the Zimbabwean Ambassador to Zambia – Her Excellency, Ambassador G. Takawira

The Ambassador briefed the delegation on the good relations between Zimbabwe and Zambia and her briefing touched on the following areas. There was a peaceful environment in the country and there were a number of economic development initiatives. A shopping mall known as East Park that had been developed within one and a half months and several other malls had been built in 2018. Zambia’s focus was on economic development and this included road construction, electricity generation and the development of solar power.

          The Embassy felt the impact of Zimbabweans coming into Zambia, particularly students who faced challenges in accessing foreign currency for their studies. Universities were however accommodating as they were allowing the affected students to write their examinations. Zambia had been requested by the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to supply manpower in the areas of drivers, maids and cooks. To avoid exploitative conditions of service, the workers’ passports were to be kept at the Zambian Embassy in UAE.  Investment opportunities for Zimbabwean companies exist and South African companies had already exploited some opportunities by coming in and building shopping malls and establishing retail shops such as Jet, Game, Shoprite and many others.

          Interaction with the Deputy Auditor-General, Mrs. S. Rose 

The delegation gathered that auditing of local authorities was relatively new in Zambia as it had commenced in 2016. For the expanded scope of work, the Auditor-General’s Office required new staff to audit 116 local authorities. The current staff compliment of 551 was by far short of the establishment of 689 required. As a result of the manpower challenges, thirty (30) local authorities had been audited in 2017 and forty (40) in 2018.  Staff turnover existed and officers often left for positions in parastatals and Government but rarely for the private sector.

          The Auditor-General’s office had developed a strategy to progressively audit all the 116 local authorities in the next four years. The Office was up to date with the compilation of its Reports and expected the 2018 report to be presented in September 2019, in accordance with the Constitutional provision.

          The Office of the Auditor-General normally organised orientation meetings for the Public Accounts Committee at the beginning of the life of Parliament, to acquaint Members with the duties of the Office. Meetings were also held between the Committee and Office of the Auditor-General soon after tabling of the main report to help Members understand the report. Any report compiled by the Auditor-General was presented to the President of Zambia and the Speaker of the National Assembly. The Office carried out an average of three to four Value for Money Audits a year and had 22 reports since 2004 when value for Money audits commenced.  Forensic audit reports were not tabled in Parliament but sent to law enforcement agents or the responsible authority.

Figure 3 – The delegation posing with the officials from the Auditor General’s Office

Interaction with the Acting Controller of Internal Audit -  Mrs. Elizabeth Lusambo

The delegation learnt of the existence of the Office of the Internal Audit and gathered the following information. The Office had been a department in Treasury until 2018 when it was transformed into a division reporting to Treasury through an Act of Parliament.  The position of Controller of Internal Audit was at Permanent Secretary level and the Office was represented in all ministries. The division was also responsible for all internal audits in parastatals and local authorities. The division sat in the Public Accounts Committee meetings alongside the Auditor-General and other permanent witnesses.

          The functions of the Office of the Controller of Internal Audit were as follows:

  1. a)to provide quality control services;
  2. b)to conduct risk based financial, compliance and performance audits;
  3. c)to submit quarterly reports to the Secretary for Treasury and copied to the Minister of Finance for purposes of tabling in Cabinet;
  4. d)to coordinate the operations of all audit committees; and
  5. e)to conduct any audit requested by the Secretary to Treasury in public bodies;

          The Office of the Controller of Internal Audit was regarded as the first line defence in risk management followed by the Office of the Auditor-General. About one third of the audit findings emanated from the internal audits. Reports produced by the office of the

Controller of Internal Audit was submitted to the Secretary for Treasury for auctioning through its initiative, the Office of Internal Audit with the Cabinet Office had been able to establish an Internal Audit Oversight Committee under the Executive arm. The mandate of the Oversight Committee mandate included insisting on verifiable evidence on action taken by audited entities to address audit queries. The results of work of the Internal Audit Oversight Committee had been evidenced by the reduction in the number of audit queries.

          Interaction with the Drug Enforcement Commission – Mr. C. Silulimba  – Acting Director General 

 

                Figure 4 – The delegation with officers from the Drug Enforcement Commission

The Acting Director General briefed the Committee on the structure and functions of the Commission which falls under the Ministry of Home Affairs. As such, the Commission was represented in all the country’s provinces. The Commission was a statutory body constituted through an Act of Parliament. Its mandate is to deal with issues of illicit drugs and money laundering crimes in Zambia. Before the creation of the Commission, the police had dealt with the issues but it had been realised that there was need for a specialised section.

The mandate of the Commission was drawn from the Narcotics Drugs and Psychotropic Substance Act and Prohibition and Prevention of Money Laundering Act. The major mandate was to prevent and control illegal cultivation, production, trafficking, abuse of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances as well as to prohibit and prevent money laundering activities. The Commission’s major function was to investigate and prosecute illicit drugs and money laundering cases. The Commission was also mandated to provide education and counselling services to the public.    

          The Commission worked with various agencies and collaborated well with the legislature. It also worked with regional and international organisations especially in the area of training. An anti-money laundering Committee chaired by the Attorney-General with Members from Police and Intelligence Center had been established and it liaised with other agencies when investigating money laundering cases locally or in other countries. One such stakeholder identified by the Unit was the Auditor-General. If the Auditor-General found that there was a case that warranted an investigation, the Auditor-General engaged the Unit. This engagement was formalised through a memorandum of agreement signed between the two parties.

          Sitting in the National Assembly

The delegation sat through the Vice President’s question time in the Chamber. This was followed by questions with notice and presentation and debate on Bills. The delegation was impressed by the clarity of the audio system which ran with the visuals of the proceedings in the Chamber through television screens installed in the Chamber.

          Interaction with the Deputy Director-General of the Anti-Corruption Commission, Rosemary Kundawo 

Mrs. Kundawo briefed the delegation on the Commission’s mandate and activities. The Anti-Corruption Commission was established in 1982 following the promulgation of the Anti-Corruption Act in 1980. The mandate of the Commission was to investigate and prosecute corruption cases. The objective behind this was to educate people and try to prevent incidences of the vice. The Commission was run by 5 Commissioners and a management team headed by a Director-General. Directorates of the Commission included the investigations, prosecutions and community education units.

In performing its duties, the Commission received reports and if there was need for an inquiry, the Director-General authorises an investigation. The onus lies with the prosecution to prove cases beyond doubt. Newspaper reports were an important source that supplies intelligence to the Commission. Deserving cases likely to result in convictions should get consent from Director of Prosecution before an arrest is effected.

Beyond prosecutions, the Commission tried to prevent corruption by putting in place measures in the system so that corruption was mainstreamed. The Commission also tried to build integrity through Integrity Committees that implemented programmes that seek to address issues such as misapplication of resources, unvouchered expenditure and other audit queries relating to various organisations.  Public education programmes were meant to ensure that people are aware of the impact of corruption or how to act when they have information on corruption.

          The Commission worked closely with other institutions such as the Drug Enforcement Commission, the Police, Financial Intelligence Centre and the Auditor-General’s Office. Its engagement with the Auditor-General was guided by the memorandum of understanding signed by the two organisations The Commission was working on demystifying the notion that offences reported in the Auditor-General’s reports are issues for the Anti-Corruption Commission.

Among the high profile cases handled by the Anti-Corruption Commission was a case involving the arrest of a Minister? Cases took time to conclude as they required thorough investigations as evidenced by the case involving one of the late former Presidents, whose investigations started in 2002 but was only finalised in 2016. The Commission was working on ensuring forfeiture of property acquired by proceeds of crime. Prevalent cases handled by the Commission related to procurement contracts in the construction sector.

          Observations by the Committee

The following are the Committee’s observations in line with the objectives of the benchmarking visit:

Whilst Zimbabwe has one Public Accounts Committee, Zambia had three Committees established to analyse the three volumes of the Auditor-General’s Report. As such, the Committees were able to deal with all the entities reported in the Auditor-General’s Reports. In Zimbabwe, the Public Accounts Committee’s resolution to establish three subcommittees had not been realised due to a shortage of staff to service the sub-committees. The Public Accounts Committee in Zimbabwe, under the current arrangements can hardly complete the analysis of all the entities in a session.

Whilst in Zimbabwe, its practice that the Chairperson of the Public Accounts Committee is always a member from the opposition party, in Zambia, National Assembly Standing Order No 153(2) provided for that arrangement. This becomes binding unlike practice which can easily be set aside.

In Zimbabwe, the Committee sits once a week when Committees are sitting. This has led to constant requests for extra sitting days even when Committees are adjourned. In Zambia the Committees sit continuously, soon after tabling of the Auditor-General’s Reports. Once the Committees have completed their analysis and received oral evidence sessions, they then compile their reports.

In Zimbabwe, the Auditor-General has no powers to refer matters to the investigative authorities. Zambia had the relevant provision and the involvement of the Anti-Corruption and Drug Enforcement Commission had resulted in suspensions, dismissals and prosecutions of Government officials found guilty of the misuse of Government funds or property.

In Zimbabwe, Ministries have internal audit units but unlike in Zambia, there is no office of the Controller of Internal Audits. The existence of the office in Zambia and sitting in the Public Accounts Committee meetings adds value to audit processes and the work of the Public Accounts Committee.

Recommendations

Parliament should make the necessary arrangements to address the needs of the Public Accounts Committee in relation to operationalising the sub-committees in the short run. Serious consideration should be done by the Committee on Standing Rules and Orders to create two more Committees; one for Local Authorities and the other Committee for State Enterprises and Parastatals.

Parliament should amend its Standing Orders so that the practice of the Chairperson being a Member from the opposition party in Parliament has legal effect.

The Public Accounts Committee’s sittings must be continuous to allow them to complete analysis of the reports and receiving of evidence before devoting the remainder of the session to report writing.

The Audit Office Act should be amended to give the Auditor-General power to refer relevant cases to the investigative authorities.

The Executive should expeditiously establish the Office of the Controller of Internal Audits, as alluded to in paragraph 201 of the 2019 Mid-Year Budget Review Statement. Treasury could borrow from the model of the Zambian Office.

Conclusion

The benchmarking visit was valuable to the Committee as it exposed the delegation to practices and offices that were not common in the two countries. The delegation felt challenged particularly in the area of suspensions, dismissals and prosecutions of officials. Whilst the legal framework to sanction officials is in the Public Finance Management Act, the Committee has not witnessed serious action taken against public officials who commit offences.

          HON. TOGAREPI: I move that the debate do now adjourn.

          HON. MPARIWA: I second.

          Motion put and agreed to.

          Debate to resume: Wednesday, 9th September, 2020.

MOTION

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

          HON. TOGAREPI: I move that the rest of the Orders of the Day be stood over until Order of the Day Number 20 has been disposed of.

          HON. MPARIWA: I second.

          Motion put and agreed to.

          MOTION

LIAISON AND COORDINATION COMMITTEE ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE FIRST SESSION OF THE NINTH PARLIAMENT

HON. TOGAREPI: Madam Speaker, I move the motion standing in my name that this House takes note of the Liaison and Coordination Committee Annual Report for the First Session of the Ninth Parliament.

          HON. MPARIWA: I second.

          HON. TOGAREPI: Introduction

The First Session of the Ninth Parliament which covered a period from 18 September 2010 to 1 October 2019 was officially opened by His Excellency, The President, Hon. E. D. Mnangagwa on Tuesday 18 September 2018. This was after the watershed 2018 Harmonised General Elections held on 31 July 2018 which ushered in the Second Republic of Zimbabwe. The President’s key message during the State of Nation Address which marked the official opening of the 1st session of the ninth Parliament was Government’s drive to continue with the reengagement efforts, accelerating the macroeconomic stabilization efforts, creation of fiscal space, currency reforms and enhancing foreign currency availability, improving liquidity, increasing the country’s investment attractiveness and reducing the budget deficit, among other key focus areas. The State of Nation Address also outlined the legislative agenda of Government for the First Session Ninth Parliament.

Immediately after the official opening and apart from the six Thematic Committees for the Senate and the post audit Public Accounts Committee, 19 Portfolio Committees for the National Assembly were appointed in line with the newly established Ministries. Given the complexities of the present day government processes and activities, Parliaments the world over are able to effectively perform their long established legislative, executive oversight and representative roles through a system of Committees. In an objective and non-partisan approach, Committees are able to conduct detailed analysis of governmental processes and provide recommendations which guide the Houses in arriving at informed decisions. Given the small size in terms of membership, they are also able to interface with the public and facilitate public input into governmental processes. It is, therefore, imperative that Committees from time to time should report on their activities to enable the Houses to make timely interventions on Government processes and activities.

This Report, therefore, in summary, outlines the activities by the Committees during the First Session of the Ninth Parliament, successes, challenges and impact in order to redirect efforts and as well as providing lessons during the Second Session of the Ninth Parliament.

2.0    Operational Activities

In broad terms, the Constitution of Zimbabwe provides for the Terms of Reference (ToR) for Parliamentary Committees. In specific terms the ToR for Parliamentary Committees are spelt out in the Standing Orders.

2.1    Terms of Reference for Portfolio Committees

The ToR for Portfolio Committees are provided in National Assembly Standing Order No. 20 as follows:

  1. Subject to these Standing Orders, a portfolio committee must

(a)                       Examine expenditure administration and policy of

government departments and other matters falling under their jurisdictions as Parliament may, by resolution determine;

(b)                       consider and deal with all Bills other than a Constitutional

Bill and statutory instruments or other matters which are referred to it by or under a resolution of the House or by the Speaker;

(c)                       consider or deal with an appropriation or money Bill or any

aspect of an appropriation or money Bill referred to it by these Standing Orders or by or under resolution of this House; and

(d)                       monitor, investigate, enquire into and make recommendations

relating to any aspect of the legislative programme, budget, policy or any other matter it may consider relevant to the government department falling within the category of affairs assigned to it, and may for that purpose consult and liaise with such department;

(e)                       consider or deal with all international treaties, conventions

and agreements relevant to it, which are from time to time negotiated, entered into or agreed upon.

2.2     Terms of Reference for Thematic Committees

The ToR for Thematic Committees are provided for in Senate Standing Order No. 19 as follows:

          19.Subject to these Standing Orders, a thematic committee must examine government policies which fall under or relate to the designated theme or themes and other matters falling under their jurisdiction as the Committee on Standing Rules and Orders may determine.

2.3 The First session of the Ninth Parliament signified a critical period during which Parliament as an institution was in the process of formulating its 2018- 2023 Institutional Strategic Pan which is deliberately aligned to the life of the 9th Parliament. The activities of the

Committees during the First Session were, therefore, largely influenced by the experience of the preceding ISP for the period 2013- 2018. The most critical was the need to continue with the unfinished business of alignment of laws to the 2013 Constitution and enactment of laws to improve the ease of doing business in Zimbabwe. The need to enhance the capacity of Committees and its Members in the ever-increasing complexity in government processes was also of paramount importance.

3.0    Capacity Building for Committees

Elections in the recent times have become highly competitive and as such, there was high turnover of Members of Parliament during the 2018 Harmonised Elections. Of the 270 National Assembly Members, 110 were in the 8th Parliament while 160 are new Members. This represents a turnover rate of 59.26%. Of the 80 Members in the Senate, 41 were in the 8th Parliament while 39 are new Members. This represents a turnover rate of 48.75%. This called for a greater need for capacity building since parliamentary experience is unique. The Administration of Parliament designed a training plan for all Committees of Parliament in order to enhance their capacity.

3.1    Training for Chairpersons

                The training programme commenced with a training for all Committee Chairpersons in November 2018. This was critical given that Committee Chairpersons give general guidance and strategic direction in the execution of Committee business. The attendance by Chairpersons was overwhelming which demonstrated the eagerness by Chairpersons to execute their mandate.

The Programme aimed at acquainting the Chairpersons with the oversight function of Committees in relation to the budgetary processes, law making and consideration of international treaties. Chairpersons were also trained on how to develop Committee work plans and how to conduct the Committee business in general. The Programme also touched on specific issues such as the conduct of public hearings and procedures for handling petitions. Following the training, the majority of them were able to preside over Committee meetings and public hearings with much confidence.

3.2    Induction for Committees

The Administration of Parliament designed a training programme for each of the 27 Committees, including the Parliamentary Legal Committee. During these workshops, Committees were afforded an opportunity to meet representatives of Ministries and State Enterprises and Parastatals which they oversee.

The induction programmes focused on the legislative and oversight role of Committees as they relate to the overall mandate of Parliament. It also touched on specific areas relating to the Budget Process and Handling of Petitions.  Committees were acquainted with the various techniques which they can employ in the execution of their mandate as well as issues of etiquette and decorum expected of the Hon. Members, especially in their interaction with stakeholders. Ministries and Parastatals were given an opportunity to present on their overall mandates, including giving an overview of the Acts which they administer. Since most Committees had already formulated their work plans, these presentations assisted Committees in fine-tuning their work plans.

Committees expressed appreciation on this initiative. The only criticism was that for some Committees the induction workshop came rather late towards the end of the session due to many competing programmes and other factors. For instance, about five

Committees had their induction workshops as late as in June and July 2019. These Committees were the Portfolio Committees on Environment, Climate Tourism and Hospitality Industry, Transport and Infrastructure Development. Mines and Mining Development, Youth, Sports, Arts and Recreation and the Public Accounts Committee.

        3.2    Benchmarking Visits

Apart from the in-country training workshops, the performance of Committees can also be enhanced by exchanging knowledge and experience with similar Committees in other parliaments, especially in the region where we share a lot in terms of the historical background. Due to financial constraints, only six Committees were able to conduct benchmarking visits during the first session.  The Public Accounts Committee conducted a study visit to Zambia and was sponsored by the World Bank. The Portfolio Committee on Primary and Secondary Education also visited Zambia and Kenya and was sponsored by UNICEF. The Portfolio Committee on Budget, Finance and Economic Development proceeded to Kenya while the Joint Portfolio Committees on Foreign Affairs and International Trade and Industry and Commerce visited Rwanda. The Thematic Committee on HIV/AIDS visited Uganda. these last three Committees were sponsored by Parliament. A number of Committees needed to undertake Benchmarking visits but could not do so due to funding constraints.

However, it was of concern to note that all the six Committees were not able to submit reports to the respective Houses on time. In most cases Committees tend to focus on a number of activities at a time and this contribute to their failure in tabling reports on time. Procedures require that a Committee should table its report to the respective Houses within two weeks of concluding an enquiry. Likewise, Committees are expected to table their reports on benchmarking visits within two weeks after returning from such visits. This will allow the respective Houses to debate the contents of the reports and adopt good practices arising from such reports. Most Chairpersons could not present reports on time due to competing Government business as business by back benchers only takes precedence on Wednesdays in the National Assembly and Thursdays in the Senate.

          The Joint visit to Rwanda by the Portfolio Committees on Foreign Affairs and International Trade and Industry and Commerce was meant to learn from the experiences of the Rwanda’s Development Board and Rusumo one stop border post following the introduction of the Zimbabwe Investment and Development Agency (ZIDA)Bill (H.B. 2, 2019) in Parliament. The study visit assisted the two Committees in the analysis of the  ZIDA Bill and also informed some of the amendments that were adopted by the National Assembly during the Committee stage of the Bill.

The two study visits to Zambia and Kenya by the Portfolio Committee on Primary and Secondary Education were meant to assist the Committee in the analysis of the Education Amendment Bill (H, B. 1, 2019). The Committee introduced a number of amendments to the Bill during its Committee stage and these were accepted by the National Assembly. The then Minister of Primary and Secondary Education Hon. Prof. P. Mavhima expressed his greatest appreciation to the Committee for coming up with well thought proposals to the Bill.

One of the key recommendations made by the Public Accounts Committee after its visit to Zambia was the need to amend the Audit Office Act to allow the Auditor General to refer cases to investigative authorities. Currently, the Office of the Auditor General just submits its reports to Parliament and investigative authorities can only conduct investigations on matters raised at their own discretion. The Committee also recommended the need for Parliament to facilitate the work of the Committee through establishment of PAC Subcommittees in the interim whilst in the long run consider the establishment of three different Committees, one being responsible for central government, the other looking at Parastatals and the other one focusing on local authorities. Currently the PAC provides financial oversight on 21 Ministries, about 92 local authorities and over 90 parastatals. The three Committees of PAC are, therefore critical if the Committee is to effectively play its oversight role over public resources.

          Following its study visit to Kenya, the Portfolio Committee on Budget, Finance and Economic Development recommended the need for the establishment of the Parliament Budget Office to backed by law. It also recommended the need for Parliament to adopt the practice whereby Portfolio Committees submit their reports on the analysis of the Budget to the Portfolio Committee on Budget, Finance and Economic Development which will then compile a comprehensive report which will be presented in Parliament. This will allow Members to debate the key budget priorities for the country unlike the current practice where each Committee tends to only focus on a specific sector.

        3.3    Conferences and Workshops

Apart from induction workshops, a number of Committees attended various workshops and conferences on issues related to their sectors. These activities are also key in enhancing the capacity of Committees in executing their oversight function.

The  Portfolio Committee on Higher and Tertiary Education, Science and Technology Development in collaboration with key stakeholders namely United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO), the Zimbabwe Council for Higher Education (ZIMCHE), the Youth Empowerment Transformation Trust (YETT), Saywhat Zimbabwe and university students’ representatives organized a workshop on Sustainable Development Goals 4 and 5 on achieving inclusive and equitable quality education and gender equality respectively. The workshop was conducted as part of the Committee’s enquiry into quality assurance in higher and tertiary education in Zimbabwe. The workshop was complemented by verification visits to local universities and colleges. The Committee intended to conduct benchmarking visits to learn from other countries but the visits were affected by lack of funding. This has derailed the Committee in finalizing its report.

 The Portfolio Committees on Foreign Affairs and International

Trade , Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs, Women Affairs, Community, SMEs Development and Defence, Home Affairs and Security Services in collaboration with the United Nations Commission on Human Rights (UNCHR) had a workshop on Nationality and

Statelessness. The workshop was critical in raising the awareness of the Committees on the need for the country to ensure policy, legal and administrative frameworks on statelessness are aligned with international instruments in order to prevent and eradicate statelessness. The Committees resolved to take up the issues in the Second Session work plans. Some of the key areas identified were the review of the Birth and Death Registration Act and the accession and ratification of the 1961 UN Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness.

          The Portfolio Committee on Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs conducted an All Stakeholders Conference on Electoral Reforms. The workshop agreed on the need for an inclusive engagement that would lead to transparent, democratic electoral processes. The Minister of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs was requested to urgently come up with a bill that would address stakeholder concerns with the current legal framework governing elections in Zimbabwe. The Committee together with the Thematic Committee on Human Rights had a sensitization workshop on the work of the National Peace and Reconciliation (NPRC). The workshop agreed on the need to extent the 10-year lifespan for the Commission which is provided for in section 251 of the Constitution. The Constitution was passed in 2013 and the enabling legislation was only enacted five years later in 2018. Subsequently, the matter was brought before the Courts which rules that the lifespan for the NPRC should be 10 years from the time the enabling Act came into effect.

The Portfolio Committee on Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs attended a workshop on the African Continental Free Trade Area in February 2019. A call was made on the need for Zimbabwe to ratify the Protocol on the African Continental Free Trade Area. This was eventually brought before Parliament and ratified. There Protocol was equally debated in both Houses which were a clear indication that the Members were adequately capacitated on the instrument.

The Joint Portfolio Committee on Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs and the Thematic Committee on Human Rights participated in a Conference on Parliamentary engagement on Human Rights held in Geneva in June 2019 A call was made for Parliaments to include human rights at the top of Parliamentary agenda.

The Committee on Mines and Mining Development had a workshop on the proposed Mines and Minerals Amendment Bill where it was resolved to speed up the process of bringing the Bill before Parliament. The Bill was prioritized by the Inter-Ministerial Committee on Bills, but progress in that regard was hampered by staff challenges in the Attorney General’s Office.

3.4    Sector Specific Training

In view of the growing complexities in governmental operations and the increasing demand for public accountability from the citizens in the 21st century, there is a greater need for parliamentarians to be equipped with the various skills to effectively hold government to account and ensure effective service delivery. The Portfolio Committee on Finance and Economic Development was trained on Budget Analysis. Other sector specific trainings were deferred to the 2nd session of the 9th Parliament.

         3.5    Recommendations
3.5.1 Recommendation 1: The Administration of Parliament should, as a matter of urgency, facilitate sector specific training for all the Committees. This will enhance the performance of Members of the various Committees in their oversight mandate.
3.5.2 Recommendation 2: In view of the budgetary constraints, at least 9 Committees should be prioritised for benchmarking visits during the 2020 financial year.
4.0 Strategic Goal 1: Aligning of Relevant Laws with the Constitution-Legislative Programme
4.1    Bills passed by Parliament

His Excellency, The President, Hon. E. D. Mnangagwa laid out the

Legislative Programme on 18 September 2018 during the State of the Nation Address which marked the official opening of the 1st Session of the 9th Parliament. He outlined a total of 30 Bills which was rather a bit ambitious, given the past trends in passing Bills. A total of 21 Bills were brought to Parliament which was a significant number when compared to previous years. However, 50% of the Bills were submitted to Parliament right at the end of the session. A total of 7 Bills, including the Finance and Appropriation 2019 were passed into law. Three of the Bills, namely, the Tripartite Negotiating Forum Act No. 3 of 2019, the Companies and Other Entities Act No. 4 of 2019 and the Consumer Protection Act No. 5 of 2019 was outlined in the Legislative Programme during the State of the Nation Address.

The two Bills, namely the Finance (No. 3) and the Forest

Amendments were withdrawn. Issues contained in the Finance No. 3 Bill were incorporated in the Finance (No. 2) Bill.  The Forest Amendment Bill was submitted during the end of the 5th Session of the 8th Parliament and was withdrawn after the Ministry responsible for the Bill and the Attorney General’s Office indicated that they were no longer proceeding with the Bill in its current form.

Thus, for the 10 Bills that were submitted on time, only two were

not passed during the session. These were the Education Amendment and the Zimbabwe Investment Development Agency Bill. The two Bills generated a lot of interest and as a result, there were protracted consultations, hence the delays. As for the Education Amendment Bill, there was a disagreement between the Senate and the National Assembly which needed to be dealt with by the end of the first session of the ninth Parliament. The Senate had proposed an amendment of the deletion of the word “sexual” in clause 13 of the Bill which provides for the Minister to make regulations which governs the appointment of sexual and reproductive health officers in schools. The amendment was rejected by the National Assembly and it proceeded in terms of the Fifth schedule of the Constitution. It stipulates that where a disagreement is not resolved within 90 days it will be transmitted to the President for assent in the form it was passed by the National Assembly.

There are a number of reasons which contributed to the poor

performance by Parliament in passing the Bills outlined in the Legislative Programme and these cannot be squarely blamed on Parliament. As pointed out earlier on, about 50% of Bills were submitted at the end of the session and as such, it was not possible for them to be passed within the same session.

Standing Order No. 135 of the National Assembly Standing Orders provides for referral of Bills to a relevant Portfolio Committee after publication in the Government Gazette. The Committee has 14 days within which it is expected to conduct its analysis including any consultations required by the Constitution and report to the House at the Second Reading stage of the Bill. During the 1st session, Portfolio Committees had serious challenges in observing the stipulated timeframe. This contributed to the delays in passing bills. Section 152 (3) of the Constitution read together with Standing Order No. 136 of the National Assembly Standing Orders requires all bills to be examined by the Parliamentary Legal Committee (PLC) before receiving their final voting in either of the Houses.  In terms of Standing Order No. 33, the PLC has a total of 26 business days to examine any Bill referred to it by the House and an additional six days where a Bill is referred after amendments during the Committee stage. It can also seek an extension of 26 business days. The PLC sought extension on three bills because of the technical nature of the Bills concerned.

In some instances, Parliament endured inordinate delays by the

Attorney General’s Office in proofreading of Bill proofs. This could point to inadequate capacity in that office. Parliament of Zimbabwe in its 2018- 2023 Institutional Strategic Plan, sets itself to achieve timely passing of laws that are consistent with the Constitution as one of its key result areas. Apart from implementing strategies that enhance the capacity of Committees and its Members, Parliament has a strategy to strengthen collaboration with the Executive in order to increase the number of bills that are outlined in the Legislative Agenda that are passed by Parliament. The Executive during the 8th Parliament established the Inter-Ministerial Committee to track progress on Bills and the Counsel to Parliament sits in their meetings on behalf of Parliament. In cases of complex and technical bills, Portfolio Committees should engage technical experts to assist them in analyzing bills.

4.1.1 Recommendation 1: There is need for Parliament to enhance
the capacity of Committees and its Members in the analysis of Bills.
This is part of the strategies in the ISP 2018- 2023 to ensure the timely
passage of Bills and this should be given high priority.

                4.1.2 Recommendation 2: Committees should on a quarterly basis follow up with the relevant Ministries and ensure Bills outlined by His Excellency, the President in the legislative agenda during the State of the Nation Address are brought to Parliament on time.

4.1.3 Recommendation 3: The Ministry of Justice should, as a matter of urgency, review the capacity in the Attorney General’s Office in respect of legislative drafting skills and ensure the capacity is enhanced.

5.0    Governance Systems Enhanced

5.1    Committee Enquiries

Section 119 of the Constitution of Zimbabwe provides that all state institutions at every level are accountable to Parliament. As part of its executive oversight, Parliamentary Committees conduct enquiries into government policies, programmes and activities and make recommendations for improved governance systems. Committees embarked on a number of enquiries. Apart from 8 reports on Bills, only 10 reports were tabled during the First Session of the Ninth Parliament. Of these reports, 6 were on general enquiries while 4 were on petitions. A list of the tabled Reports has been annexed to this Report.

There is a concern that Committees are taking too much time to conclude enquiries and submit reports to the respective Houses. Given that the greater part of the First Session of the Ninth Parliament was devoted to induction programmes and the Ninth Parliament experienced high turnover in terms of the membership of Parliament, these could have contributed to the low performance by Committees. As a matter of practice, each Committee is expected to table at least one report in a session. The 18 reports, tabled during the First Session, therefore, fall short of the expected 26 reports. At the end of the First Session, Committees were still finalizing reports on 15 petitions, 15 general enquiries and 4 Bills. As for petitions, Committees were failing to submit reports within the stipulated timeframe of 26 days. This timeframe had proved to be an ambitious one and might need to be reviewed.

Section 141 of the Constitution compels Parliament to consult the

public on Bills and other parliamentary processes. As part of Committee enquiries, a total of 192 public hearings and 143 field visits were undertaken during the First Session. The First Session also recorded the highest travel by Committees when compared to previous sessions. Unlike in previous sessions, the bulk of the travel was fully funded by Parliament and this is commendable. Parliament as an institution, should take charge of its processes and need not to rely too much on external funding.

In addition to public hearings and field visits, a total of 615

meetings were held at Parliament while 13 were aborted due to lack of quorum. On average, each Committee had about 23 meetings during the first session. Annexed to this Report is the attendance by Members in the various Committees. Each Member should serve on at most two Committees and each Committee sits once a week. Committees have challenges in meeting more than once in a week except when they are out on public hearings or field visits or workshops. In view of the huge oversight mandate of Committees, there is need to rationalize the membership of Committees to ensure that Committees are able to meet several times in a week. Some Members have also in violation of the policy on membership to Committees been sitting on several Committees. This had also contributed in other Committees failing to raise quorum.

          5.1.1 It is recommended that during the appointment of Committees for the 2nd session of the 9th Parliament, the Standing Rules and Orders should adopt a policy of one Committee for each Member. This will allow flexibility for Committees to sit more than once in a week and consequently allow more time to expedite the huge workload for Committees.

6.0    Budget Oversight by Committees

6.1    Submission and analysis of monthly, quarterly and annual financial reports

The Constitution of Zimbabwe mandates Parliament to oversee all State revenues and expenditure to ensure efficient, effective and economic utilization of public resources. Accordingly, sections 32, 33, 34 and 35 of the Public Finance Management Act [Chapter22: 19] require Ministries and other public entities submit financial reports to respective Portfolio Committees on a monthly, quarterly and annual basis. Parliament with the assistance of Technical partners developed Quarterly Reporting Guidelines to assist Ministries in preparing such reports. Relevant officials across Ministries were sensitized on these Guidelines. Despite all these efforts the compliance rate by Ministries remained a cause for concern to Parliament. The Parliamentary Budget Office developed a tracking tool to monitor compliance by Ministries. This had assisted Committees in following up with Ministries on outstanding Statutory Budget Performance Reports. However, responses from Ministries have not been forthcoming.

During the year 2019, 10 out of 20 Ministries submitted quarterly reports for the first to the third quarter which represents a compliance rate of 50%. Apart from the low rate of submission by Ministries, most of the reports contain scanty information to enable meaningful analysis by Committees.

The Parliament Budget Office analysed a total of 12 financial reports for the first quarter and 10 of them were presented to Committees while during the second quarter they analysed 6 reports and four were presented to Committees. After analysis of such reports, it is incumbent upon every Committee to liaise with the Budget Committee and make time for them to present their analysis to the Committee. It is quite a great disappointment to note that after some Ministries had submitted quarterly reports and analysis duly carried out and presented to respective Committees by Parliament Budget Office, no single report on quarterly budget performance was presented to the House during the First Session. Some Committees tended to prioritize other activities ahead of quarterly Budget Performance Reports. This could point to the need for training Committees on Budget analysis to equip them with the requisite skills. Without reports proffering recommendations on management of public funds by Ministries, it rendered the whole exercise futile and also discourages Ministries from submitting such reports. The graph below shows the number of reports submitted by Ministries and those that were analysed by the Parliament Budget Office.

6.1.1 RECOMMENDATION 1: PORTFOLIO COMMITTEES SHOULD RELIGIOUSLY

FOLLOW UP WITH MINISTRIES AND AND ENSURE MONTHLY QUARTERLY AND ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORTS ARE SUBMITTED TO PARLIAMENT WITHIN THE STIPULATED TIMEFRAMES PROVIDED FOR IN THE PUBLIC FINANCE MANAGEMENT ACT.

6.1.2 Recommendation 2: Portfolio Committees should scrutinise quarterly and annual financial reports and table reports in the House without fail.
6.1.3 Recommendation 3:The Administration of Parliament should prioritise the training on Budget Analysis during the Second Session of the Ninth Parliament.
6.2    Participation in the Budget Formulation by Parliament

A national Budget is a key instrument by Government to meet the needs and expectations of its people. Apart from Budget monitoring by Parliament, it is also important that Parliament through its Committees effectively participate in the Budget formulation by the various sector Ministries. As Members of Parliament are first and foremost representatives of the people, Portfolio Committees are expected to consult the public on its expectations on the Budget. Parliament and the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development jointly organize a Pre-Budget Seminar during which Committees are afforded an opportunity present on the outcomes of their consultations with the public on the ensuing year’s Budget. It is acknowledged with great appreciation that the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development really takes this exercise seriously.

In 2018, 59 out of 102 recommendations from various Committees were taken on board. This represents an uptake of over 50% of the recommendations submitted. After the 2019 Budget presentation, Parliament successfully convinced the Minister of Finance and Economic Development to increase the Budget allocation for the Ministry of Health and Child Care and this was subsequently increased by US$16 million from US$409 million to US$474 million. The allocation for Parliament was also increased by US$23 million from US$57 million to US$80 million.

It has been observed that during the pre and post budget analysis, the focus of Portfolio Committee is on the respective sector allocations and not on the overall Budget. Parliament will be more effective if the focus is on the Budget as a whole. This would help in aligning the Budget to the national priorities. There has also been a challenge in planning pre-budget consultations by Portfolio Committees. The Ministry of Finance and Economic Development delays in producing the expenditure targets for the various Ministries and Government departments. At the time Committees were conducting budget consultations in November 2018, Ministries were yet to get expenditure targets from Ministry of Finance and Economic Development. Despite these challenges, debate on the 2018 National Budget was very intense. The National Assembly had to adjourn in the early morning hours when they were debating the Finance Bill and this resulted in comprehensive amendments that were accepted by the Minister of Finance and Economic Development.

6.2.1 Recommendation 1: Parliament should adopt a budget consultation process where only the Portfolio Committee on Finance and Economic Development is allowed to conduct country-wide Budget consultations whilst the other Portfolio Committees conduct sector specific stakeholder consultations. Their reports would then feed into the Report of the Portfolio Committee on Finance and Economic Development. This Report would then guide in the debate on the National Budget.
6.2.2 Recommendation 2: Ministry of Finance and Economic Development should revise its Budget cycle and ensure Ministries have expenditure targets by mid -October of each year to facilitate budget consultations by Committees.

7.0    Technical Support to Committees

The human capital resource in Committees has over the years been a serious challenge. When the Committee system was expanded from 12 to 26 in 2009, the technical support to Committees was not reviewed to take into account the increase. This was due to the general freeze on recruitment. During the year 2018, Treasury heeded to the request by Parliament to review the staff establishment for Parliament to take into account the expanded Parliament. The Administration of Parliament is currently in the recruitment drive. In 2019, additional 13 Committee Clerks and 5 Researchers were recruited to support the work of Committees. Parliament is close to achieving one Committee Clerk per Committee and this is quite commendable. What remains now is the need to build the capacity of the newly recruited staff for them to effectively support the work of Committees. Recruitment of additional Committee Clerks, Researchers and additional officers for the Parliament Budget Office was initiated in 2019 and is expected to be concluded during the first quarter of 2020. Currently some Committees, especially those served by new officers are not getting the maximum support they should get in order for them to effectively discharge on their mandate.

8.0    An Assessment of the Outcome of Committee Activities

8.1    Analysis of Bills

Of the 10 Bills that were considered by Committees, the respective Committees successfully proposed amendments that were incorporated in the following five bills.

o   Tripartite Negotiating Forum (H. B. 5, 2018) Companies and Other Business Entities (H. B. 8, 2018) Consumer Protection (H. B. 10, 2018) Education Amendment (H. B. 1, 2019)

o   Zimbabwe Investment and Development Agency (H. B. 2, 2019)

Amendments proposed by Committees emanated from the recommendations proposed by the public during the public hearings. This is a clear indication that Committees do not take the submissions received from the public for granted. This is also the whole essence of section 141 of the Constitution which require Parliament to consult the public on bills and other parliamentary processes.

8.2    Committee Enquiries
8.2.1 Public Accounts Committee

The Public Accounts Committee conducted an enquiry into compliance with the Constitution and other legal instruments in relation to the management of public finances by the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development. One of the recommendations was for the Ministry to institute disciplinary measures against officials who were willfully neglecting their duties.

After tabling the report during the end of the First Session, the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development submitted to Parliament the Financial Adjustment Bill (H. B. 19, 2019) to Parliament which seeks condonation of expenditure incurred without Parliamentary approval. The Accountant General unexpectedly retired from the service and there were a number of staff movement within Treasury. Since the Committee’s report, the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development started tabling loan agreements in Parliament as required by the provisions of section 327(3) of the Constitution. After relentless efforts in making Ministries submit forensic audit reports carried out in some public entities in terms of sections 10, 11 and 12 of the Audit Office Act (Chapter 22: 18), the Committee requested the Hon. Speaker to make rulings which compelled the respective Ministries to submit reports in question. Subsequently, the ZINARA and NSSA Reports were tabled in Parliament. This also prompted Government to take action in response to the findings in the reports. The majority of the Management in ZINARA separated with the organization either through resignations or dismissals. The Board also responded to some of the observations and indicated that it would ensure that the entity stick to its mandate of revenue collection and not contract for works on behalf of road authorities.

8.2.2 Portfolio Committee on Defence, Home Affairs and Security Services

The Committee conducted an enquiry into a petition by Gwanda residents on issuance of primary documents. The Report was duly tabled and the Ministry responded to the recommendations made by the Committee and this is quite commendable. The Ministry responded to the need to streamlining requirements which the majority of the people were failing to meet by developing operational manual which provide standard streamlined requirements for obtaining primary documents. The Ministry responded to the need to provide special dispensation to people befallen by natural disasters by conducting a special exercise to replace documents for victims of Cyclone Idai in Chimanimani for a period of 30 days. There were indications that the same programme would be carried out in Chipinge District which was also affected by the same cyclone. The Ministry also agreed to the need to conduct mobile registration as an ongoing exercise.  Additional centres were also established at Chikwalakwala in Beitbridge and Halale in Kezi in response to the need to cut distances travelled by the public seeking primary documents.

8.2.3  Portfolio Committee on Information, Media and Broadcasting Services

The Committee interrogated the Ministry regarding entities under its purview that had long outstanding boards. Following the oral evidence session, the Ministry appointed boards for Broadcasting Authority of Zimbabwe, Transmedia, Zimbabwe Newspapers and the Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation.

9.0    CONCLUSION

Whilst all the Committees were conducting a number of enquiries throughout the First Session, the majority of them were not able to conclude enquiries and submit reports in Parliament. Without reports being compiled and presented in Parliament, it will be difficult to assess the outcome and impact of such enquiries. It is however, understandable that this the majority of the Members and some Chairpersons were fairly new in Parliament and the modest performance during the First Session is therefore, commendable. Following the induction workshops organized for each and every Committee, it is expected that more reports would be tabled during the second session. Committees should be reminded that they are the delegates of Parliament and as such, are encouraged to pursue one enquiry at a time and timeously present Reports in the respective Houses. The Houses are urged to effectively uitlise the sitting times and avoid adjourning the business early as was being experienced during the First Session of the Ninth Parliament. This would allow Chairpersons more time to present Committee Reports. Committees are also urged to follow up with Ministries and other public entities on recommendations emanating from their reports. This will ensure improved service delivery to the public which is the ultimate goal of the oversight function of Committees.

  1. First Report of the Thematic Committee on Human Rights on the Zimbabwe Human Rights Commission [S.C. 1, 2019]
  2. First Report of the Portfolio Committee on Public Service and Social Welfare on Petition regarding Delays in the Operationalization of Statutory Instrument 125/2013 Children’s

(Non-Public Service Probation Officers) Regulation [S.C.3, 2019]

  1. Report of the Portfolio Committee on Local Government, Public Works and National Housing on Gwanda Residents. Petition on violation of Rights to Human dignity, water and clean environment [S.C. 5, 2019]
  2. Second Report of the Portfolio Committee on Health and Child Care on the state of medicines and drug supply in the Public Health Institutions of Zimbabwe [S.C.6, 2019]
  3. First Report of the Public Accounts Committee on compliance issues for the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development [S.C.7, 2019]
  4. First Report of the Thematic Committee on Gender and Development on Cancer treatment and control in Zimbabwe [S.C. 8, 2019]
  5. Second Report of the Thematic Committee on Human Rights on the familiarization visits to Featherstone, Ngundu, Beitbridge, Gwanda and Plumtree Police stations and Border Posts [S.C. 9, 2019]
  6. First Report of the Thematic Committee on Indigenization and Empowerment on the implementation of Empowerment Programmes in the mining sector [S.C. 13, 2019]
  7. Report of the Public Accounts Committee on Compliance Issues for the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe [S.C.16, 2019]
  8. Report of the Portfolio Committee on Defence, Home Affairs and Security on the Gwanda Community Youth Development Trust Petition on the Access to Primary Documents
  9. Report of the Portfolio Committee on Budget, Finance and Economic Development on Mr Charles Mandizvidza Ganagana’s Petition to Parliament of Zimbabwe on Progress made on the Implementation of the Recommendation of the Commission of Inquiry into the Conversion of Insurance and Pension Values from the Zimbabwe Dollar to United States Dollar

ANNEX 2

PORTFOLIO COMMITTEES- ATTENDANCE FOR THE FIRST SESSION, NINTH

PARLIAMENT

1.INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE

Name of the Member Total

Number of

Meetings

Called

Meetings Aborted due to lack of quorum Meetings Successfully held Meetings Attended Meetings Absent with leave Meetings Absent without leave
Hon Sacco J.

(Chairperson)

23 0 23 16 7 0
Name of the Member Total

Number

of

Meetings

Called

Meetings Aborted due to lack of quorum Meetings Successfully held Meetings Attended Meetings Absent with leave Meetings Absent without leave
Hon Banda S. 23 0 23 22 1 0
Hon Bhila R. 23 0 23 16 5 2
*Hon Chikomba. L 23 0 23 1 0 22
Hon Chikudo R. 23 0 23 6 11 8
Hon Chimina L. 23 0 23 14 6 3
Hon Gwanongodza E. 23 0 23 15 6 2
Hon Mafuta V.S. 23 0 23 17 3 3
Hon Matambanadzo M. 23 0 23 14 2 6
Hon Mavenyengwa R. 23 0 23 10 9 4
Hon Mguni S. K. 23 0 23 15 4 4
Hon Mhere E. 23 0 23 7 7 9
Hon Moyo C. 23 0 23 14  7 3
Hon Mukapiko D. 23 0 23 16  5 2
Hon Mukunyaidze S. 23 0 23 10 4 9
Hon Mushoriwa E. 23 0 23 15 5 3
Hon Musikavanhu D. A. 23 0 23 18 5 0
Hon Ndhlovu A. 23 0 23 12 4 7
**Hon Nyashanu. Dr 23 0 23 0 0 23
Hon Nyoni I. 23 0 23 20 3 0
Hon Rungani A. 23 0 23 9 6 8
Hon Samson A. 23 0 23 15 5 3
Name of the Member Total

Number

of

Meetings

Called

Meetings Aborted due to lack of quorum Meetings Successfully held Meetings Attended Meetings Absent with leave Meetings Absent without leave
Hon Sansole T.W 23 0 23 4 7 12
Hon Svuure D. 23 0 23 14 6 3
Hon Tarusenga U.D 23 0 23 12 5 6

Note

*Hon Chikomba ceased to be a Member of the Committee on 31/01/2019

**Hon Nyashanu ceased to be a Member of the Committee on 22/11/2019

2.BUDGET, FINANCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

3.NAME OF MEMBERS Present Absent with leave Absent without Leave No

Quorum

No. of meetings held
Hon. Mhona F.T 24 2 0 1 26
Hon. Bvute O 16 8 2 1 26
Hon. Chidakwa P 22 4 0 1 26
Hon. Dube G 22 3 1 1 26
Hon. Gandawa A.M 23 3 0 1 26
Hon. Khumalo M 18 6 2 1 26
Hon. Madzimure W 23 2 1 1 26
Hon. Dr. Mashakada T 10 6 10 1 26
Hon. Mavetera T. A. 22 4 0 1 26
Hon. Mkaratigwa E 21 4 1 1 26
Hon.   MisihairambwiMushonga P 1 5 20 1 26
Hon. Moyo P 23 2 1 1 26
Hon. Moyo T 22 4 0 1 26
Hon. Musabayana D* 18 - - 1 26
Hon. Musakwa E 20 4 2 1 26
Hon. Mushoriwa E 23 2 1 1 26
Hon. Nkani A 24 2 0 1 26
Hon. Dr. Nyashanu

M

19 5 2 1 26
Hon. Togarepi P - - - 1 26
Hon. Sansole T.W 20 4 2 1 26
Hon. Sibanda D 20 5 1 1 26
Hon. Sithole G 19 2 5 1 26
Hon. Soda Z 21 3 2 1 26
Hon. Tarusenga U.D 22 2 2 1 26
Hon. Watson N 21 4 1 1 26
Hon.  Zhou T 21 4 1 1 26

*Hon Musabayana David was promoted to Deputy Minister during the First Session

4.HIGHER AND TERTIARY EDUCATION, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT:

Name of Member Present Absent

With

Leave

Absent

Without

Leave

Meetings Attended to Date No

Quorum

Meetings

Total

Number of

Meeting

Called

Hon.

MolokeleTsiye

(Chairperson)

20 1 7 20 3 28
Hon. Banda,

S1.

11 0 4 11 3 15
Hon.

Chinyanganya, M.

23 1 4 23 3 28
Hon. Jaja, J 26 0 2 26 3 28
Hon.

Hamauswa, S.

26 0 2 26 2 28
Hon. Karikoga, T. 10 1 18 10 3 28
Hon. Maboyi, R, M. 20 0 8 20 3 28
Hon.

Mamombe, J.

15 0 13 15 3 28
Hon. Maphosa, L. 15 0 13 15 3 28
Hon. Moyo, T. 16 0 12 16 3 28
Hon. Mushayi, M. 22 0 6 22 3 28
Hon, Rwodzi,

B2.

5 0 7 5 1 11
 

Hon. Singo, L.

19 0 9 19 3 28
Hon. Sithole, J. 21 0 7 21 3 28
Hon. Soda, Z3. 12 0 7 12 2 19
Hon. Tsunga, R4 15 0 5 11 2 20

5.PORTIFOLIO COMMITTEE ON WOMEN AFFAIRS, COMMINITY, SMES DEVELOPMENT LCC REPORT: 20 SEPTEMBER 2019

               

Name of Member Total number of meetings Present Absent  without  leave Absent  with leave No

Quorum

Meeting

Hon.Madiwa C.

(Chairperson)

22 17 0 5 0
Hon.Chihururu C. 22 18 2 2 0
Hon.Chikuni E. 22 17 3 2 0
Name of Member Total number of meetings Present Absent  without  leave Absent  with leave No

Quorum

Meeting

Hon. Chikukwa 22 6 12 4 0
Hon.Chingosho C. 22 19 1 2 0
Hon.Chipato  A. 22 19 1 2 0
Hon.Chitura L. 22 17 1 4 0
Hon.Dube B. 22 14 3 5 0
Hon.Gozho C. 22 17 2 3 0
Hon.Jaja  J. 22 18 1 3 0
Hon.Karenyi L. 22 15 3 4 0
Hon.Kwaramba 22 6 10 6 0
Hon.Makonya J. 22 16 2 4 0
Hon.Mangora B. 22 13 3 6 0
Hon.Maphosa L. 22 18 1 3 0
Hon.Matsikenyere 22 14 3 5 0
Hon.Molokele D. 22 13 3 6 0
Hon.Mpofu R. 22 14 4 4 0
Hon.Ncube E. 22 12 9 1 0
Hon.Ncube F. 22 18 0 4 0
Hon.Ncube O 22 12 4 6 0
Hon.Ndlovu S. 22 17 2 3 0
Hon.Nhari V. 22 12 3 7 0
Hon.Nyamudeza 22 18 1 3 0
Hon.Nyere C. 22 18 2 2 0
Hon.Sanyatwe C. 22 9 10 3 0
Hon.Shava J. 22 15 2 5 0
Hon.Shirichena 22 9 3 10 0
Hon.Shongedza E. 22 18 1 3 0
Hon.Zhou P. 22 19 1 2 0

NB:

Hon. Kwaramba G joined the Committee later during the Session.

Hon. Chikukwa M joined the Committee later during the Session.

6.PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON ICT, POSTAL AND COURIER SERVICES

Name of the

Member

Total

Number of

Meetings

Called

Meetings Aborted due to lack of quorum Meetings Successfully held Meetings Attended Meetings Absent with leave Meetings Absent without leave
Hon Hwende C.

(Chairperson)

30 1 29 22 8 3
Hon Chidziva H. 30 1 29 17 13 9
Hon Chinanzvavana 30 1 29 16 14 8
Hon Chipato A. 30 1 29 18 12 5
*Hon Chombo M. 30 1 29 15 15 2
Hon Dinar 30 1 29 23 7 2
Hon Gandawa A 30 1 29 19 11 4
Hon Kureva 30 1 29 24 6 3
Hon Machingura R. 30 1 29 19 11 3
Hon Madziva S. 30 1 29 21 9 4
Hon Makoni R. 30 1 29 23 7 2
Hon Mandiwanzira 30 1 29 16 17 5
Hon  Masango P 30 1 29 22 8 4
Hon Mugidho 30 1 29 21 9 5
Hon Murire J 30 1 29 18 12 4
Hon Musabayana 30 1 29 21 9 4
Hon Myambo  A. 30 1 29 24 6 2
Hon Ndiweni D. 30 1 29 20 10 2
Hon Nyokanhete  J 30 1 29 24 6 2
Hon Phulu K 30 1 29 11 19 11
Hon Saruwaka T.J 30 1 29 23 7 2
Hon Tshuma D. 30 1 29 20 10 3

*Hon Chombo M. Joined the Committee on 25 February 2019

6. LANDS, AGRICULTURE, WATER AND RURAL RESETTLEMENT

Name of Member Present Absent

With

Leave

Absent

Without

Leave

Meetings Attended to Date No

Quorum

Meetings

Total No. of Meetings Called
Hon Wadyajena J. M. (Chairperson) 26 0 0 26 0 26
Hon. Chibagu G 17 4 5 17 0 26
Hon. Chibaya A. 14 6 6 14 0 26
Hon. Chidamba 16 0 10 16 0 26
Hon. Chikwama B. 21 2 3 21 0 26
Name of Member Present Absent

With

Leave

Absent

Without

Leave

Meetings Attended to Date No

Quorum

Meetings

Total No. of Meetings Called
Hon. Dube P. 22 1 3 22 0 26
Hon. Dutiro P. 20 3 3 20 0 26
Hon. Houghton J.R. 22 2 2 22 0 26
Hon. Kachepa  N. 20 3 3 20 0 26
Hon. Karumazondo T. 20 3 3 20 0 26
Hon. Kashambe M.T, 23 0 3 23 0 26
Hon. Kashiri C. 20 3 3 20 0 26
Hon. Khumalo S. S 25 1 0 19 0 26
Hon. Machakarika T. 13 8 4 13 0 26
Hon. Mafuta V. S. 19 2 5 19 0 26
Hon. Makonya J. 20 2 4 20 0 26
Hon. Mamombe J. 18 8 0 18 0 26
Hon. Masiya D. 20 2 4 20 0 26
Hon. Masuku E. 25 1 0 25 0 26
Hon. Masuku P. 19 3 4 19 0 20
Hon. Mayihlome L. 22 2 2 22 0 26
Hon. Mlambo M. 20 1 5 20 0 26
Hon. Mugweni C. 20 2 4 20 0 26
Hon. Muponora N. 22 2 2 22 0 26
Hon. Murai E. 19 2 5 19 0 26
Hon. Musikavanhu D.A. 15 5 6 15 0 26
Hon. Ncube F. 20 2 4 20 0 26
Hon. Ncube O. 23 0 3 22 0 26
Hon. Nhambo F. 25 1 0 25 0 26
Hon. Nyabani T. 21 2 3 21 0 26
Hon. Porusingazi 17 5 4 17 0 26
Hon.  Seremwe B 22 2 2 22 0 26
Hon. Sewera J. 21 3 2 21 0 26
Hon. Sithole G. K 16 3 7 16 0 26
Hon. Sithole James 21 2 3 21 0 26
Hon Tekeshe D 21 4 1 21 0 26
Hon. Zengeya M. V. 19 2 5 19 0 26
Hon. Zhou T. 22 1 3 22 0 26

7.ENVIRONMENT , TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY

Name  of Member    No of Meetings  present  Absent

With

Leave 

Absent

Without

Leave 

Meetings attended  No

Quorum

Meetings

Total No of Meetings
Hon.Chinanzvavana (Chairperson) 18 5 0 18 0 23
Hon. Chikukwa M 15 7 1 15 0 23
Hon. Chidhakwa J. 0 2 21 0 0 23
Hon. Chitura L. 17 4 2 17 0 23
Hon. Dube P. 20 1 2 20 0 23
Hon. Dutiro P. 6 4 13 6 0 23
Hon. Houghton J. 20 3 0 20 0 23
Hon. Kabozo S. 10 7 6 10 0 23
Hon. Kwaramba G. 13 6 4 13 0 23
Hon. Labode R. 9 10 4 9 0 23
Hon. Madhuku J. 9 9 5 9 0 23
Hon. Madiwa C. 5 7 11 5 0 23
Hon. Mangora B. 19 4 0 19 0 23
Hon. Maronge C. 13 7 3 13 0 23
Hon. Mashakada T. 3 0 20 3 0 23
Hon Mashonganyika 4 1 4 4 0 23
Hon. Mavenyengwa 11 7 5 11 0 23
Hon. Mhere E. 11 8 4 11 0 23
Hon. Moyo P. 11 7 5 11 0 23
Hon. Munetsi J. 20 2 1 20 0 23
Hon. Murambiwa 20 3 0 20 0 23
Hon. Musabayana 6 1 16 6 0 23
Hon. Mutambisi C. 9 10 4 9 0 23
Hon. Ndlovu N. 12 8 3 12 0 23
Hon Ndlovu S. 18 5 0 18 0 23
Hon. Nyamudeza S. 17 1 5 17 0 23
Hon. Nyere C. 19 2 2 19 0 23
Hon. Sacco J. 2 0 21 2 0 23
Hon. Saizi T. 17 3 3 17 0 23
Hon. Seremwe B. 15 4 4 15 0 23
Hon. Shava J. 11 8 4 11 0 23
Hon Shirichena E. 7 0 3 7 0 23
Hon. Shongedza E. 18 3 2 18 0 23
Hon Zemura L. 19 1 3 19 0 23

NB   Hon Mashonganyika joined the Committee on the 27th May 2019.     Hon Shirichena joined the Committee on the 20th May 2019.

8.DEFENCE, HOME AFFAIRS AND SECURITY SERVICES

Hon Members’ Names  Present Absent with leave Absent without leave No Quorum

Meetings

Total Number of meetings held
Hon Members’ Names  Present Absent with leave Absent without leave No Quorum

Meetings

Total Number of meetings held
Hon Brig Gen (Rtd) Mayihlome L. 29 2 0 0 31
Hon Banda G. 0 0 31 0 31
Hon Chamisa S. 24 3 4 0 31
Hon Chidakwa J. 25 3 3 0 31
Hon Chidziva H. 20 7 4 0 31
Hon Chimbaira G. 21 5 5 0 31
Hon Chinotimba J. 23 5 3 0 31
Hon Chipato A. 25 6 0 0 31
Hon Brig Gen (Rtd) Gwanetsa K.K. 27 3 1 0 31
Hon Maj. Gen (Rtd) Khumalo S.S. 27 4 0 0 31
Hon Machingauta C 20 8 3 0 31
Hon Mahlangu S. 1 2 29 0 31
Hon Maphosa L. 0 0 31 0 31
Hon Masenda N.T. 22 8 1 0 31
*Hon Mguni O. 11 1 * 0 31
Hon Mguni S.K. 27 4 0 0 31
Hon Muchimwe P.T. 27 4 0 0 31
Hon Col (Rtd) Dr Murire J. 22 7 2 0 31
Hon Nguluvhe A. 30 1 0 0 31
Hon Rungani A. 26 5 0 0 31
Hon Members’ Names  Present Absent with leave Absent without leave No Quorum

Meetings

Total Number of meetings held
Hon Sewera J. 31 0 0 0 31
Hon Sibanda D. 18 5 8 0 31
Hon Sikhala J. 7 0 24 0 31
Hon Zwizwai M. 19 3 9 0 31

NB: HON MGUNI O. PASSED ON DURING THE COURSE OF THE FIRST SESSION

9.TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT

Name of Member Total number of meetings held Meetings aborted

due to no quorum

Meetings successfully held Total number

Present

Absent with leave Absent without leave
Hon Gorerino O. (Chairperson) 23 0 23 19 3 1
Hon Banda C. 23 0 23 17 4 2
Hon Chihururu C. 23 0 23 17 5 1
Hon Chibhagu G. 23 0 23 19 4 0
Hon Chidamba S. 23 0 23 18 3 2
Hon Chimina L. 23 0 23 12 9 2
Hon Dinar K. 23 0 23 10 10 3
Hon Dzepasi G. 23 0 23 18 4 1
Hon Garwe D. 23 0 23 17 4 2
Hon Gozho C. 23 0 23 17 4 2
Hon Gumbo S.** 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hon Gumbwanda K** 14 0 14 12 2 0
Hon Kapuya F. 23 0 23 13 8 2
Hon Karenyi L. 23 0 23 11 10 2
Hon Karumazondo T.M. 23 0 23 19 3 1
Hon Kashambe M. 23 0 23 19 4 0
Name of Member Total number of meetings Meetings aborted Meetings successfully Total number Absent with leave Absent without
held due to no quorum held Present leave
Hon Machakarika T. 23 0 23 3 18 2
Hon Mafuta V.S. 23 0 23 16 5 2
Hon Mukapiko D. 23 0 23 14 8 1
Hon Makonya J. 23 0 23 16 5 2
Hon Masuku E.* 10 0 10 5 1 4
Hon Masuku P. 23 0 23 18 3 1
Hon Mbondiah M. 23 0 23 16 5 2
Hon Mchenje S. 23 0 23 16 5 2
Hon Mugweni C. 23 0 23 14 5 4
Hon Mukunyaidze S. 23 0 23 15 5 3
Hon Muponora A. 23 0 23 19 2 2
Hon Musanhi K. S. 23 0 23 2 18 3
Hon Ncube S. 23 0 23 17 4 2
Hon Nduna D.* 13 0 13 8 4 1
Hon Nhambo F 23 0 23 15 5 3
Hon Nyathi R. R. 23 0 23 16 5 2
Hon Nyoni I. 23 0 23 17 4 2
Hon Omar J. S. 23 0 23 7 1 15
Name of Member Total number of meetings held Meetings aborted due to no Meetings successfully held Total number

Present

Absent with leave Absent without leave
quorum
Hon Phuti D. 23 0 23 15 6 2
Hon Sibanda M. 23 0 23 13 9 1
Hon Sibanda O. 23 0 23 14 7 2
Hon Singo L.* 14 0 14 11 3 0
Hon Zengeya V.* 14 0 14 11 3 0

´Please Note

**Hon Gumbo S. never attended Committee meetings since the start of the 9th Parliament till she passed away.

**Hon Gumbwanda K. passed away in June 2019.

*Hon Nduna D. left the Committee in March 2019.

*Hon Singo L., and *Hon Zengeya V. joined the Committee in February 2019.

10 ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT

Name of the

Member

Total

Number of

Meetings

Called

Meetings Aborted due to lack of quorum Meetings Successfully held Meetings

Attended

Meetings Absent with leave Meetings Absent without leave
Hon. Gabbuza J.

G.(Chairperson)

27 02 25 20 05 02
Hon. Chimbaira G. 27 02 25 17 05 05
Hon. Chombo M. 27 02 25 13 07 07
Hon. Dzuma S. 27 02 25 14 09 04
Hon. Garwe D. 27 02 25 04 02 21
Hon. Hwende C. 27 02 25 09 06 12
Hon. Khumalo M.1 10 01 25 05 01 03
Hon. Mamombe J. 27 02 25 0 0 27
Hon. Matsunga S. 27 02 25 13 05 09
Hon. Mkaratigwa E. 27 02 25 15 07 05
Hon. Mlambo M. 27 02 25 12 03 12
Hon. Mnangagwa

T.

27 02 25 06 04 17
Hon. Mudarikwa S. 27 02 25 09 01 17
Hon. Mugidho M. 27 02 25 04 06 17
Hon. Musakwa E. 27 02 25 20 03 04
Hon. Musiyiwa R. 27 02 25 24 01 02
Hon. Mutseyami P. 27 02 25 09 01 17
Hon. Ncube E. 27 02 25 13 04 10
Hon. Ndebele A. 27 02 25 04 05 18
Hon. Ndiweni D. 27 02 25 20 06 01
Hon. Ndlovu N. 27 02 25 09 05 13
Hon. Ngome J. 27 02 25 0 0 27
Hon. Nyabote R. 27 02 25 17 0 10
Name of Member Total number of meetings held Meetings aborted due to no quorum Meetings successfully held Total number

Present

Absent with leave Absent without leave
Hon. Dr. Nyashanu M. 27 02 25 06 02 19
Hon. Porusingazi E. 27 02 25 10 01 16
Hon. Samambwa E. 27 02 25 0 01 26
Hon. Tsuura N. 27 02 25 18 04 05

Note

* Hon. Khumalo M. was nominated to serve the Committee on 30 May 2019.

11. YOUTH, SPORTS, ARTS AND RECREATION

Name of the

Member

Total

Number of

Meetings

Called

Meetings Aborted due to lack of quorum Meetings Successfully held Meetings

Attended

Meetings Absent with leave Meetings Absent without leave
Hon. Tongofa. M

(Chairperson)

25 2 23 22 0 3
Hon. Kureva. E 25 2 23 19 0 6
Hon. Murai. E 25 2 23 12 0 13
Hon. Mbondiah. M 25 2 23 20 2 3
Hon. Chidziva. H 25 2 23 15 0 10
Hon.Chipato. A 25 2 23 20 1 4
Hon. Mago. 25 2 23 21 0 4
Hon. Mukuhlani. T 25 2 23 16 5 4
Hon. Tungamirai 25 2 23 17 3 5
Hon. Banda. G 25 2 23 12 6 7
Hon. Masuku. E 25 2 23 20 3 2
Hon. Phuti. D 25 2 23 13 5 7
Hon. Dinar. K 25 2 23 18 3 4
Hon. Mavetera. T 25 2 23 21 2 2
Hon. Machakaire.  25 2 23 11 7 7
Hon. Machando. 25 2 23 20 1 4
Hon. Samambwa. 25 2 23 20 2 3
Hon. Zengeya.

Muradzikwa

25 2 23 20 2 3
Hon. Paradza. J 25 2 23 20 0 5
Hon Saruwaka T 25 2 23 19 3 3
Hon Kankuni 25 2 23 15 6 4
Hon Taruvinga F 25 2 23 14 6 5
Hon Wadyajena 25 2 23 1 0 24
  1. INFORMATION, MEDIA AND BROADCASTING SERVICES
Name of the

Member

Total

Number of

Meetings

Called

Meetings Aborted due to lack of quorum Meetings Successfull y held Meetings Attended Meetings Absent with leave Meetings Absent without leave
Hon. Sibanda

P.D

(Chairperson)

27 3 24 18 9 0
Hon. Bhudha Masara S 27 3 24 4 13 10
Hon Chikwinya

S

27 3 24 18 7 2
Hon. Dinar K. 27 3 24 10 2 15
Hon. Dube G 27 3 24 4 4 19
Hon.

Hamauswa S

27 3 24 20 4 3
Hon Khumalo

T

27 3 24 1 1 25
Hon.

Mamombe J

27 3 24 6 12 9
Hon. Masiya D 27 3 24 17 5 5
Hon. Mpofu A 27 3 24 22 3 2
Hon.

Mudarikwa S

27 3 24 2 2 23
*Hon. Ndebele

A

18 3 15 2 1 15
Hon. Nguluvhe A 27 3 24 23 3 1
*Hon. Nyabani

T

13 3 10 7 4 2
Hon. Omah J 27 3 24 8 4 15
Hon. Paradza K 27 3 24 16 8 3
  1. FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND INTERNATIONAL TRADE
Name of member Present Absent with leave Absent without leave Meetings attended to date No

Quorum

meetings

Total no of meetings called
Hon Paradza K.

(Chairperson)

19 3 0 19 0 22
Hon Chikomba

L

12 1 9 12 0 22
Hon Chihururu

C

15 4 3 15 0 22
Hon Chikudo

R

13 5 4 13 0 22
Hon

Chinanzvavana C

14 5 3 14 0 22
Hon Chimbaira G 14 5 3 14 0 22
Hon Dube G 16 4 2 16 0 22
Hon Gandawa A. M 15 3 4 15 0 22
Hon Gozho C 16 3 3 16 0 22
Hon Gwanetsa

K

14 2 6 14 0 22
Hon Kabozo S 18 1 3 18 0 22
Hon Karikoga

T

13 3 6 13 0 22
Hon Maboyi R M 19 2 1 19 0 22
Hon Maphosa

L

16 3 3 16 0 22
Hon Masenda

N. T.

19 3 0 19 0 22
Hon Mchenje.

S

10 1 11 10 0 22
Hon Moyo C 15 3 4 15 0 22
Hon Moyo

Priscilla

12 6 4 12 0 22
Hon Mpofu A 17 1 4 17 0 22

14.MINES AND MINING DEVELOPMENT

Name of member Present Absent with leave  Absent without leave Meetings attended to date No

Quorum meetings

Total no of meetings called 
Hon. Mkaratigwa E.  17 8 0  17 0 25
Hon. Bhilla R. 16 1 8 16 0 25
Hon. Bhudha-Masara S. 17 4 4 17 0 25
Hon. Chikomba L. 19 5 1 19 0 25
Hon. Chikwinya S. 10 10 5 10 0 25
Hon. Chombo M. 21 2 2 21 0 25
*Hon. Dube M. 5 1 2 5 0 25
Hon. Dzuma S. 21 3 1 21 0 25
Hon. Gabbuza J. 7 10 8 7 0 25
Hon. Kachepa N. 11 2 12 11 0 25
Hon. Kurumazondo T. 20 1 4 20 0 25
Hon. Kashiri C. 17 3 5 17 0 25
Hon. Khumalo T. 10 5 10 10 0 25
Hon. Machando P. 21 3 1 21 0 25
Hon. Machingauta C. 5 10 10 5 0 25
*Hon. Madhuku J. 10 2 1 10 0 25
Hon. Majaya B. 15 5 10 15 0 25
Hon. Matambanadzo M. 13 7 5 13 0 25
Hon. Matangira T. R. 16 5 4 16 0 25
Hon. Matsunga S. 19 1 5 19 0 25
Hon. Matsikenyere 0 0 0 0 0 25
Hon. Mawite D. 21 4 0 21 0 25
*Hon. Mliswa.T

 

14 2 0 14 0 25
Name of member Present Absent with leave  Absent without leave Meetings attended to date No

Quorum meetings

Total no of meetings called 
Hon. Mpofu M. M. 20 4 0 20 0 25
Hon. Mudarikwa S. 18 5 2 18 0 25
Hon. Mugidho M. 10 3 12 10 0 25
*Hon. Mugweni C. 5 4 4 5 0 25
Hon. Murai E. 21 0 4 21 0 25
*Hon. Musabayana D. 11 0 3 11 0 25
Hon. Musakwa E. 16 8 1 16 0 25
Hon. Mutseyami P. C. 18 4 3 18 0 25
Hon. Ncube E. 2 3 20 2 0 25
Hon. Ndebele A. 14 4 7 14 0 25
*Hon. Nduna D

 

13 1 1 13 0 25
Hon. Nyabani T. 20 2 3 20 0 25
Hon. Paradza J. 22 2 1 22 0 25
Hon. Samambwa E.

 

22 0 3 22 0 25
Hon. Samson A.

 

20 1 4 20 0 25
Hon. Sanyatwe C.

 

0 0 0 0 0 25
Hon. Saruwaka T.

 

14 6 5 14 0 25
Hon. Sibanda P. D.

 

5 5 15 5 0 25
Hon. Sithole S.

 

12 10 3 12 0 25
Hon. Svuure D.

 

21 3 1 21 0 25
Hon. Taruvinga F.

 

5 10 10 5 0 25
Hon. Toffa J.

 

16 5 4 16 0 25
Hon. Zhou T.

 

20 2 3 20 0 25

Note:   Hon. Madhuku, Hon. Mugweni, Hon. Musabayana joined the Committee;

Hon. Mliswa and Hon. Nduna were moved from the Committee and;

Hon Chombo Mand Hon Musabayana D were appointed Deputy Ministers.

Note: Hon. Madhuku, Hon. Mugweni, Hon. Musabayana and Hon. Mavetera joined the Committee later while Hon. Mliswa and Hon. Nduna were moved from the Committee (Those removed are not recorded in this report).

  1. LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING
Member Present Absent with leave Absent without leave Meetings

Attended

17-9-19 

No

Quorum

Meetings

Total No. of

Meetings

Hon Chikukwa M.R (Chairperson) 20 5 0 20 0 25
Hon Bushu B 19 5 1 19 0 25
Hon Chamisa S. 15 0 10 15 0 25
Hon Chidakwa J 15 3 7 15 0 25
Hon Chidhakwa P 20 4 1 20 0 25
Hon Chingosho C 19 2 4 19 0 25
Hon Chinotimba 15 8 2 15 0 25
Hon Chinyanganya 21 3 1 21 0 25
Hon Gabbuza J.G 10 13 2 10 0 25
Hon Gwanongodza

E

12 5 8 12 0 25
Hon Kapuya F 5 1 19 5 0 25
Hon Kureva E 13 1 11 13 0 25
Hon Machingauta C 15 5 5 15 0 25
Hon Madiwa C 13 10 2 13 0 25
Hon Mangora B 17 8 0 17 0 25
Hon Marikisi N 18 7 0 18 0 25
Hon Markham A 18 6 1 18 0 25
Hon Matewu C 21 2 2 21 0 25
Hon Mawite D 14 9 2 14 0 25
Hon Mnangagwa T.M 14 2 9 14 0 25
Member Present Absent with leave Absent without leave Meetings

Attended

 

No

Quorum

Meetings

Total No. of

Meetings

Hon Mpame C 15 9 1 15 0 25
Hon Mpofu M.M 17 7 1 17 0 25
Hon Mpofu R 21 2 2 21 0 25
Hon Mushayi M 18 7 0 18 0 25
Hon Nyathi R.R. 17 4 4 16 0 25
Hon Raidza M 19 4 2 18 0 25
Hon Samambwa E 5 6 14 5 0 25
Hon Shumbamhini 18 4 3 18 0 25
Hon Sibanda O. 8 3 4 8 0 25

Hon Sibanda O joined the Committee later

  1. PUBLIC ACCOUNTS COMMITTEE
Names of Members Present Absent with leave Absent without leave  Possible attendance  No quorum

meeting  

Total number of meeting held
Hon. T Biti (Chairperson) 30 3 1 34 0 34
Hon. B. Bushu 23 9 2 34 0 34
Hon. O. Bvute 15 14 5 34 0 34
Hon. W. Chikombo 14 13 7 34 0 34
Hon. B. Chikwama 22 9 3 34 0 34
Hon. P. Dutiro 16 4 5 25 0 34
Hon. R. M. Maboyi 12 7 6 25 0 34
Hon. W. Madzimure 30 4 0 34 0 34
Hon. A. Markham 29 5 0 34 0 34
Hon. E. Masuku 15 4 2 21 0 34
Hon. C. Matewu 28 6 0 34 0 34
Hon. N. Matsikenyere 15 11 8 34 0 34
Hon. M. Mbondiah 18 16 0 24 0 34
Hon. F.  Mhona 8 16 1 25 0 34
Hon. P. Mpariwa 16 18 0 34 0 34
Hon. E. Mushoriwa 29 5 0 34 0 34
Hon. D. T. Nduna 11 4 1 16 0 34
Hon. A. Nkani 19 9 6 34 0 34
Hon. M. Nyashanu 22 9 3 34 0 34
Hon. J. Nyokanhete 29 5 0 34 0 34
Hon. M. Raidza 28 5 1 34 0 34
Hon. B. Rwodzi 14 6 5 25 0 34
Hon. T. W. Sansole 23 7 4 34 0 34
Hon. C. Sanyatwe 16 8 10 34 0 34
Names of Members Present Absent with leave Absent without leave  Possible attendance  No quorum

meeting 

Total number of meeting held
Hon. Z. Sibanda 18 9 7 34 0 34
Hon. G. Sithole 21 8 5 34 0 34
Hon. S. Sithole 2 6 8 16 0 34
Hon. P. Togarepi 1 0 28 29 0 34
Hon.V. Zengeya

Muradzikwa

22 9 3 34 0 34

NOTE: The following Members joined the Committee after the official appointment of

Committees.

Names of Members  Date Joined 
1.Hon. P. Dutiro 18/12/18
2.Hon. R. M. Maboyi 07/02/19
3.Hon. E. Masuku 18/12/18
4.Hon. F. T. Mhona 07/02/19
5.Hon. D. T. Nduna 07/05/19
6.Hon. B. Rwodzi 12/02/19
7.Hon. S. Sithole 07/05/ 19
8.Hon. T. Togarepi 04/12/18

17.PRIMARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION

Name  Total number of meetings Total number present Total number of absent with Leave Total Number of Absent without Leave
Hon.

Misihairambwi P.

(Chairperson)

16 13 3 0
Hon. Chanda G. 16 13 3 0
Hon. Chombo M. 16 11 4 1
Hon. Dzepasi G. 16 14 2 0
Hon. Gumbwanda K. 13 11 2 (Deceased)
Hon.Madhuku J. 16 14 2 0
Hon. Mathe S. 16 10 5 1
Hon. Matsikenyere N. 16 11 5 0
Hon. Maronge C. 16 16 0 0
Hon. Mkandla M. 16 14 2 0
Hon. Moyo T. 16 12 3 1
Hon. Murambiwa O. 16 16 0 0
Hon. Musiyiwa R. 16 14 1 1
Hon. Mutambisi C. 16 12 4 0
Hon. Nkomo M. 16 13 3 0
Hon. Nyabote R. 16 11 5 0
Hon. Sanyatwe C. 16 10 6 0
Hon. Shirichena E. 16 12 4 0
Hon. Sithole J. 16 15 1 0
Hon. Zivhu K. 16 1 12 0

NB: Hon .Chombo and Hon. Nyabote joined the Committee during the session.

18.JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS

NAME OF MEMBER  PRESENT  ABSENT WITH 

LEAVE 

ABSENT 

WITHOUT

LEAVE

MEETINGS

Attended up to

September

NO

QUORUM

TOTAL No.

OF

MEETINGS

1.Hon. Mataranyika

M.D. (Chair)

20 4 0 20 0 24
2.Hon.

.Chikwama B.

15 5 4 09 0 24
3.Hon.

Chinyanganya M.

15 7 2 15 0 24
4.Hon. Dube B. 19 3 2 19 0 24
5.Hon. Gonese I. 16 5 3 16 0 24
6.Hon. Kashiri C. 17 7 0 17 0 24
7.Hon.

Machingura R.

10 9 5 10 0 24
8.Hon.

S.

Madziva  10 9 5 24 0 24
9.Hon.

P.

Masango  15 5 4 15 0 24
10.Hon. E. Masuku  4 5 15 4 0 24
11.Hon.

Mash onganyika D

10

 

5 9 10 0 24
12.Hon.

Matsikenyere N.

14 4 6 14 0 24
13.Hon. Mavhunga M 9 1 14 09 0 24
14.Hon. Mavetera T  1 4 19 1 0 24
15.Hon. D. Mawite  19 0 5 19 0 24
16.Hon. C. Mpame  12 10 2 12 0 24
17.Hon.

Misihairambwi P

7 1 16 7 0 24
18.Hon. Munetsi J 16 4 4 16 0 24
19.Hon. Murire J. 11 5 8 11 0 24
NAME OF MEMBER  PRESENT  ABSENT WITH 

LEAVE 

ABSENT 

WITHOUT

LEAVE

MEETINGS

Attended up to

September

NO

QUORUM

TOTAL No.

OF

MEETINGS

20.Hon.

Mutambisi C.

17 6 1 17 0 24
21.Hon. Nduna D 18 2 4 19 0 24
22.Hon.        Ndebele A.  13 9 2 13 0 24
23.Hon. Ngwenya

S.

 14 7 3 14 0 24
24.Hon. Phulu K 16 4 4 16 0 24
25.Hon. Raidza M.  15 5 4 15 0 24
26.Hon. Sanyatwe C.  13 6 5 13 0 24
27.Hon. Sikhala J. 8 5 15 09 0 24
28.Hon. Sithole S. 13 8 3 13 0 24
29.Hon.        Sibanda D.  11 3 10 11 0 24
30.Hon.

Shirichena E.

17 6 1 17 0 24
31.Hon Zemura L. 13 8 3 13 0 24
32.Hon. Zhou T. 12 8 4 12 0 24

NOTES

Hon Tatenda Mavetera joined in May 2019.

Hon Elizabeth Masuku joined in May 2019.

19.PUBLIC SERVICE, LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE

                Name Total

Number

of

Meetings

Called

Meetings Aborted due to lack of

Quorum

Meetings Successfully held Meetings Attended Meetings Absent with leave Meetings Absent without  leave
Hon. Ncube E.

(Chairperson)

34 0 34 30 4 0
Hon. Chanda G. 34 0 34 27 3 4
Hon. Chibaya A. 34 0 34 6 5 23
Hon. Chikuni E. 34 0 34 28 6 0
Hon. Chimina L. 34 0 34 5 3 26
Hon. Gonese I. 34 0 34 23 9 2
Hon. Kankuni W. 34 0 34 28 4 2
Hon. Mago N. 34 0 34 31 3 0
Hon. Mahlangu S. 34 0 34 25 4 5
Hon. Mkandla M. 34 0 34 30 4 0
Hon. Marikisi N. 34 0 34 26 4 4
Hon. Moyo P. 34 0 34 18 8 8
Hon. Mpariwa P. 34 0 34 10 4 20
Hon. Muchimwe P. T. 34 0 34 27 4 3
Hon. Mushayi M. 34 0 34 13 4 17
Hon. Ncube F. 34 0 34 17 4 13
Hon. Nkomo M. 34 0 34 27 6 1
Hon. Shamu W. K 34 0 34 22 5 7
Hon. Sithole J. 34 0 34 23 5 6
Hon. Shumbamhini H. 34 0 34 29 4 1
Hon. Svuure D. 34 0 34 14 9 11
Hon. Tarusenga U. D 34 0 34 20 6 8
Hon. Tekeshe D. 34 0 34 24 3 7
Hon. Tsuura N. 34 0 34 23 7 4

Note * Hon. M. Mushayi was nominated to serve the Committee on 29th November 2018.

20.HEALTH AND CHILD CARE

Name of the

Member

Total

Number of

Meetings

Called

Meetings Aborted due to lack of quorum Meetings Successfully held Meetings

Attended

Meetings Absent with leave Meetings Absent without leave
Hon Dr Labode, R (Chairperson) 29 0 29 20 8 1
Hon .Banda G 29 0 29 5 7 17
Hon Chibagu, G 29 0 29 19 0 10
Hon Chikombo, W 29 0 29 14 3 12
Hon Chinhamo ,M,P. 29 0 29 24 3 2
Hon Dinar Kennedy 29 0 29 20 4 3
Hon Karenyi , L 29 0 29 15 6 8
Hon Kwaramba ,G 29 0 29 16 7 6
Hon Machingura ,R 29 0 29 21 5 3
Hon Madziva, S 29 0 29 20 3 6
Hon Mahlangu. S 29 0 29 22 3 4
Hon Majaya ,B 29 0 29 14 10 5
Hon Makoni, R,R 29 0 29 25 4 0
Hon

Mashonganyika,D

29 0 29 19 0 10
Hon DR Mataruse, P 29 0 29 21 3 5
Hon Mathe ,S 29 0 29 20 5 4
Hon MolokelaTsiye, F,D 29 0 29 17 9 3
Hon Mugidho,M 29 0 29 15 8 6
Hon Mukuhlani,T 29 0 29 12 3 14
Hon Col (RTD) Dr

Murire ,J

29 0 29 15 5 9
Hon Ndiweni, D 29 0 29 24 0 3
Hon Ndlovu, N 29 0 29 23 1 5
Hon Nhari, V 29 0 29 23 2 4
Hon Paradza ,J 29 0 29 5 4 20
Hon Saiza, T 29 0 29 26 2 1
Hon Shava, j 29 0 29 26 3 0
Hon Shongedza , E 29 0 29 26 1 2
Hon Sibanda D. B. 29 0 29 6 12 1
Hon Toffa, J 29 0 29 15 8 6
Name of the

Member

Total

Number of

Meetings

Called

Meetings Aborted due to lack of quorum Meetings Successfully held Meetings Attended Meetings Absent with leave Meetings Absent without leave
Hon  Tongofa, M 29 0 29 25 2 2
Hon Tshuma , D 29 0 29 12 8 9
Hon Watson , N,J 29 0 29 12 4 5
Hon Zhou, P 29 0 29 19 5 5

Note:

Hon Dinar Kennedy joined at 30 October 2018

Hon Makoni Rosewater joined at 26 October 2018

Hon Ndiweni Dought joined at 04 December 2018 Hon Watson Nicola joined at 13 November 2018 ANNEX 3

THEMATIC COMMITTEES- ATTENDANCE FOR 1ST SESSION- 9TH PARLIAMENT

1.GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

Names of Members Present  Absent with Leave Absent

Without

Leave

Meetings Attended to Date  No of no

Quorum

Meetings

Total No of

Meetings

Called 

Sen. Ncube Siphiwe

(Chairperson)

 

18 2 0 18 0 20
Sen. Chimbudzi A

 

18 2 0 18 0 20
Sen. Hungwe O.

 

 4 0 16  4 0 20
Sen. Moeketsi V.

 

17 1 2 17 0 20
Sen. Mpofu

Sikanyisiwe

 

16 2 2 16 0 20
Sen. Muronzi M.

 

18 1 1 18 0 20
Sen. Nyathi  Rosemary 18 2 0 18 0 20

 

Sen. Timire R.

 

17 3 0 17 0 20
Sen. Wunganayi T

 

18 2 0 18 0 20
Sen. Zivira H.

 

16 2 2 16 0 20
Sen. Chief Nembire 13 4 3 9 0 20
Sen. Chief Chikwaka 11 6 3 11 0 20
Sen. Chief Nhema

 

17 2 1 17 0  20
Sen. Khupe Watson 11 4 1 11 0 16
  1. HUMAN RIGHTS
Name of the

Member

Total

Number of

Meetings

Called

Meetings Aborted due to lack of quorum Meetings Successfully held Meetings Attended Meetings Absent with leave Meetings Absent without leave
*Hon. Sen. Dr. Sekeramayi S.

(Chairperson)

     19        1       18        3       2         -
Hon. Sen. Chief
Charumbira       19        1       18         1        4        13
Hon. Sen. Chinake
V.       19         1        18         16        -         2
Hon. Sen. Gweshe
K.       19         1        18        16        1          1
Hon. Sen. Gumpo
S.       19         1        18         8         1          8
Hon. Sen. Chief
Makumbe       19          1         18         14         4          -
Hon. Sen. Chief
Mapungwana       19           1         18          15         2          1
Hon. Sen. Chief
Masendu       19           1         18          2         3         14
Hon. Sen Chief
Matupula       19        1        18         10          8        -
Hon. Sen. Mavetera
P.        19         1         18          -        -         19
Hon. Sen. Mohadi
T.         19          1         18          10         5          4
Hon. Sen.
Mwonzora D.         19          1         18          10          1          8
Hon. Sen. Muzenda
T.V.        19          1         18          8          8         3
Hon. Sen. Chief
Ngezi        19         1         18         8          7          4
*Hon.Sen. Chief
Ntabeni         19         1         18        6          3          7
Hon. Sen. Chief
Nyangazonke        19         1         18         5          5          9
Name of the

Member

Total

Number of

Meetings

Called

Meetings Aborted due to lack of quorum Meetings Successfully held Meetings Attended Meetings Absent with leave Meetings Absent without leave
Hon. Sen.
Rwambiwa E.        19          1          18        14         3       1
*Hon. Sen. Shumba
C        19         1         18         13         2      2

Note

*Hon. Sekeramayi S. nominated to serve on the Committee on 17 June 2019

*Hon. Shumba C. was nominated to serve on the Committee on 12 November 2019

*Hon. Chief Ntabeni was nominated to serve on the Committee on 12 November 2019

  1. INDIGENISATION AND EMPOWERMENT
Name of the

Member

Total

Number

of

Meetings

Called

Meetings Aborted due to

lack of

quorum

Meetings Successfully held Meetings Attended Meetings Absent with leave Meetings

Absent without

leave

1. Hon. Sen. M.

Mbohwa

(Chairperson)

     22 0 22 20       2 0
2. Hon.                  Sen.

Chief Chikwaka

     22 0 22             16 6 0
3. Hon.                  Sen.

Chirongoma

     22 0 22 18 2 2
4. Hon.                  Sen.

Chief Chitanga

     22 0 22 14             6 2
5. Hon.                  Sen.

Chief Chundu

     22 0 22 16 5            1
6. Hon. Sen. A.

Dube

     22 0 22 18 3  1
7. Hon. Sen. M.

Femai

     22 0 22 17             1  4
8. Hon. Sen. W.  Khupe **      22 0 22 7 4            4
9. Hon. Sen. M.

Komichi

     22 0 22              3             3           16
10. Hon. Sen. J.

Malinga

    22 0 22              4             0          16
Name of the

Member

Total

Number

of

Meetings

Called

Meetings Aborted due to

lack of

quorum

Meetings Successfully held Meetings Attended Meetings Absent with leave Meetings

Absent without

leave

11. Hon.               Sen.

Makone **

    22 0 22              0             1           5
12. Hon. Sen. B.

Mpofu

    22 0 22              8             1 9
13. Hon. Sen. S.

Mpofu *

    22 0 22 11             4           4
14. Hon. Sen. P.

Ndlovu

    22 0 22             20 1 1
15. Hon.               Sen.

Chief Nechombo

    22 0 22 15 2 5
16. Hon.               Sen.

Chief Nembire

    22 0 22             12             5 4
17. Hon.               Sen.

Chief Nhema

    22 0 22 21 1 0
18. Hon. Sen.  Chief

Nyangazonke

    22 0 22              8 9 4
19. Hon. Sen. M.

Phuthi

    22 0 22 17 4           1
20. Hon. Sen. C.

Rambanepasi

    22 0 22 21 0 1
21. Hon. Sen. B.

Tsomondo

    22 0 22  9             7           6
Name of the

Member

Total

Number

of

Meetings

Called

Meetings Aborted due to

lack of

quorum

Meetings Successfully held Meetings Attended Meetings Absent with leave Meetings

Absent without

leave

22. Hon. Sen. H.

Zivira

    22 0 22 17 3 2

Note

*Honourable Sen. S. Mpofu was nominated to serve on the Committee on 6 December 2018.

**Honourable Sen Makone and Honourable Sen W. Khupe ceased to be Members of the   Committee on 28 March 2019.

4.PEACE AND SECURITY

Name of Members Present Absent with Leave Absent without Leave Meetings attended to date No quorum meetings Total No. of meetings

called

 

Hon. Sen. Dr.

Parirenyatwa P.D. (Chairperson)

15 3 2 15 0 20
Hon. Sen. Chabuka K. 13 5 2 13 0 20
Hon. Sen. Chief Charumbira 2 8 10 2 0 20
Hon. Sen. Chimbudzi A. 15 1 4 15 0 20
Hon. Sen. Dube M. R. 17 1 2 17 0 20
Hon. Sen. Komichi M. 10 5 5 10 0 20
Hon. Sen. Makone T. 8 1 11 8 0 20
Hon. Sen. Chief Makumbe 15 4 1 15 0 20
Hon. Sen. Chief

Mapungwana

15 2 1 15 0 20
Hon. Sen. Mathuthu T. 18 1 1 18 0 20
Hon. Sen. Matiirira A. 18 1 1 18 0 20
Hon. Sen. Chief Matsiwo 12 5 3 12 0 20
Hon. Sen. Mkhwebu A. 15 4 1 15 0 20
Hon. Sen. Mohadi T. B. 10 5 5 10 0 20
Hon. Sen. Moyo S.K. 0 2 18 0 0 20
Hon. Sen. Mudzuri E. 1 2 17 1 0 20
Hon. Sen. Mwonzora D. 10 7 3 10 0 20
Hon. Sen. Ncube  S. 14 3 3 14 0 20
  Hon. Sen. Ndlovu M. 10 2 8 10 0 20
Hon. Sen. Chief Ngezi 7 4 9 7 0 20
Hon. Sen. Chief

Ngungumbane

15 3 2 15 0 20
Hon. Sen. Chief Ntabeni 17 2 1 17 0 20
Hon. Sen. Nyathi R. 16 1 2 16 0 20
Hon. Sen. Chief. Siansali 11 4 5 11 0 20
Hon. Sen. Sinampande H. 15 2 3 15 0 20
Hon. Sen. Timveos L. 10 1 9 10 0 20

5.SDGs

Name of the

Member

Total

Number

of

Meetings

Called

Meetings Aborted due to lack of

quorum

Meetings Successfully held Meetings Attended Meetings Absent with leave Meetings Absent without leave
Sen. Chief

Khumalo

Mtshane

(Chairperson)

22 0 22 18 3 1
Sen. Chinake

V

 

22 0 22 22 0 0
Sen. Chief

Chundu

22 0 22 18 2 2
Sen.

Chifamba J.

22 0 22 15 6 1
Sen. Gumpo S 22 0 22 16 4 2
Sen. Gweshe K 22 0 22 20 1 1
Sen.  Hungwe O. 22 0 22 0 9 13
Sen. Khupe W. 22 0 22 14 5 3
Sen. Chief

Masendu

22 0 22 6 7 9
Name of the

Member

Total

Number

of

Meetings

Called

Meetings Aborted due to lack of

quorum

Meetings Successfully held Meetings Attended Meetings Absent with leave Meetings Absent without leave
Sen. Chief Matupula 22 0 22 15 7 0
Sen. Malinga J.T 22 0 22 10 3 9
Sen. Maluleke O. M 22 0 22 19 2 1
Sen. Moeketsi V 22 0 22 13 7 2
Sen. Mpofu B. 22 0 22 7 12 3
Sen. Mpofu S. 22 0 22 15 5 2
Sen. Mudzuri E 22 0 22 7 5 10
Sen. Muronzi M. 22 0 22 20 1 1
Sen. Muzenda T.V 22 0 22 18 2 2
Sen. Chief Nechombo 22 0 22 14 5 3
Sen.

Rwambiwa E

22 0 22 21 0 1
Sen. Shoko G 22 0 22 19 2 1
Sen. Shumba C. 22 0 22 22 0 0
Sen. Tongogara A.K. 22 0 22 21 1 0
Sen. Timire R 22 0 22 18 2 2
Sen

Wunganai T.

22 0 22 20 1 1

6. HIV/AIDS

Name of the Member Total

Number

of

Meetings

Called

Meetings Aborted due to lack of

quorum

Meetings Successfully held Meetings Attended Meetings Absent with leave Meetings Absent without leave
HON. SEN. FEMAI

MORGAN-

CHAIRPERSON

24 0 24 23

 

 

1 0
HON. SEN. CHABUKA KERESENCIA 24 0 24 16

 

8 0
HON. SEN. CHIFAMBA JANE 24 0 24 23

 

 

 

1 0
HON. SEN.

CHIRONGOMA JOSEPH MADZIVA

24 0 24 18

 

 

6 0
HON. SEN. CHIEF

CHITANGA

24 0 24 10 12 2

 

HON. SEN. DUBE ALICE 24 0 24 19

 

 

4 1
HON. SEN. DUBE REASON MILDRET 24 0 24 21

 

 

3 0

 

HON. SEN. KOMICHI

MORGAN

24 0 24 18

 

 

3 3
HON. SEN. MALULEKE 24 0 24 14 7 3
Name of the Member Total

Number

of

Meetings

Called

Meetings Aborted due to lack of

quorum

Meetings Successfully held Meetings Attended Meetings Absent with leave Meetings Absent without leave
OTILLIA MUHLAVA  

 

HON. SEN. CHIEF

MAPUNGWANA

24 0 24 3

 

 

2 19
HON. SEN. MATHUTHU THEMBA 24 0 24 20

 

 

4 0
HON. SEN. CHIEF

MATSIWO

24 0 24 4

 

 

13

 

7

 

HON. SEN. MATIIRIRA ADDRESS 24 0 24 16

 

4

 

 

4
HON. SEN. MAVETERA TICHINANI 24 0 24 21

 

 

1 2
HON. SEN. MBOHWA MAYBE 24 0 24 20

 

2 2
HON.SEN. MKHWEBU,A 24 0 24 24

 

 

0 0
HON. SEN. NDLOVU MOLLY 24 0 24 12

 

 

4 8
HON. SEN. NDLOVU PHYLLIS 24 0 24 20

 

 

3

 

 

1

 

 

 

HON. SEN. ZAMA

NTHUA MKWANANZI

(CHIEF

NGUNGUMBANE)

22 0 24 13

 

 

8 3
HON. SEN. DR. DAVID

PARIRENYATWA

24 0 24 0

 

 

0 24
HON. SEN. PHUTHI MELIWE 24 0 24 14

 

 

9 1
HON. SEN.

RAMBANEPASI

CHRISTINE

24 0 24 21

 

 

3 0
HON. SEN.

SEKEREMAYI TIGERE SYDNEY

24 0 24 0

 

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HON. SEN. SHOKO GIDEON 24 0 24 22

 

 

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HON.SEN.SINAMPANDE HERBERT MADOLO 24 0 24 20

 

 

2 2
HON. SEN. NKATAZO

SIABATWA (CHIEF SIANSALI)

24 0 24 11

 

8 4
HON. SEN. TIMVEOS LILIAN 24 0 24 20

 

 

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HON.SEN.TONGOGARA ANGELINE KUMBIRAI 24 0 24 21

 

 

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HON. SEN. TSOMONDO BYBIT 24 0 24 22

 

 

1 1

Madam Speaker, in summary, we have attached attendance registers of members who were coming to Committee meetings and this reflects on every member’s performance in terms of attendance.  Members can look at that and see how they are performing, whether they are really playing their role in all the duties assigned to Members of Parliament in terms of representation and oversight. They need to look at their performance. Going forward, these reports would be send to various political parties so that they know the type of people they send to Parliament, if they are neglecting their duties or are performing very well.  We expect Members to attend, participate and give their inputs so that what we are expected to do as Parliament is done and done religiously and we perform our duties as provided for in the Constitution.  Where Members will not be attending, I think action should be taken and we will advise responsible authorities that such and such a Member is neglecting their duties.

          We also expect members to keep to the Standing Rules and Orders.  Members at the moment are stipulated to be in only two Committees and not more than two Committees but we still have Members who would want to be in more than two Committees.  I do not see how effective those members will be in terms of attendance, contribution and research when they go to those Committees.  It is very critical that Members attend only two Committees and we hope the recommendation that a Member must be assigned to one Committee will be taken on board so that we increase and improve our effectiveness as Members of Parliament as we do Committee business. I thank you.

          HON. K. PARADZA: Thank you Madam Speaker. I just thought possibly, I should also say something about this because I am the Chairperson of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and part of the Liaison Committee.  Thank you very much our Chairperson Hon. Chief Whip for that comprehensive report, you touched on nearly everything.  Madam Speaker, I have noticed that as Chairperson, sometimes we do not do our work as we are supposed to because of a number of issues.  Those issues include budgetary issues. Sometimes when we want to do outreach programmes or benchmarking visits, like in our case in terms of Foreign Affairs, we deal with foreign relations and also oversight on our foreign policy as a country.  Sometimes there is no money for that and it has been our wish Hon. Speaker that Treasury gives Parliament its budget so that we do our own internal disbursements rather than to wait for Treasury because sometimes most of the trips, I am sure you are aware of it, we cancel those trips because there will be no Treasury concurrence or if there is Treasury concurrence, they take time in disbursing the money.

          So, sometimes the trips are not undertaken or sometimes our delegations go out there without money even for hotels, so it becomes a problem.  So, we need to look into those issues.  Madam Speaker, there is also another issue in terms of what we gathered when we were doing outreach programmes and public hearings.  We noted something which is of a constitutional nature.

          Madam Speaker, the people were saying Members of Parliament are not that effective because there is a thin line between Parliament and the Executive.  In other words, they were saying that Ministers should not be Members of Parliament; that is a constitutional issue.  In other jurisdictions like for example in the United States of America, Parliament and the Executive are stand-alone but here you will find that sometimes our job as MPs and this is just a general statement, as Chairpersons and also as MPs, it becomes very difficult.  When we call some of the ministers to come to our meetings, some of them do not come.  They ignore because some of them view us MPs as their juniors.  Like in our party, sometimes Ministers are Politburo members and Central Committee Members, so it is difficult for us to try to discipline them.  I also got this when I was addressing about 18 of our Ambassadors who were going out.

The members of the public were saying there should be separation of powers so that the President appoints his Cabinet outside Parliament from technocrats or whoever.  That is his prerogative. So when Parliament calls these Ministers to come and answer for their ministries, they must know that they are coming to Parliament.  There is no arrogance in that.  I am sure Mr. Speaker, yourself included, you have also noted that sometimes our Ministers bunk Parliament and those were some of the issues which the public were saying we should look into.  We were telling them that it is a constitutional matter and they were saying can we not, if possible, change the Constitution.

There was another issue Madam Speaker on the Bills.  The Chief Whip touched on that.  The Bills are not widely circulated.  So it becomes difficult when we go out there for our outreach programmes.  Most of the time, we see that the public there do not know about the Bills.  We need to deal with that aspect.  These Bills must also be in our 16 local languages but we are not doing that.  We are assuming as Parliament that the public is aware because as long as the Bill is gazetted, we give them three months to look into that Bill.  We assume as Parliament that the people out there have read these Bills, which is wrong.  We need to find a way of making sure that these Bills reach the intended beneficiaries and that the people there read it in their own language.  This is very important and we have observed that Madam Speaker.

The other issue Madam Speaker is that in my case, we deal with re-engagement and one of the issues that are brought up is the issue of delays in our legal reforms.  They always say that Parliament is taking time and so forth. We need this law, where is it? The President has said that we are reforming but you are not reforming.  So they blame the President.  The issue is that it is because of our parliamentary processes.  Sometimes our parliamentary processes take time for Bills to come to Parliament and also the issue of drafters.  We have very few drafters in the Attorney General’s Office.  We need that office to be empowered and to have drafters so that the Bills come here on time and we dispose of that timeously.

The other issue Madam Speaker is the issue of our reports.  Sometimes our reports are overtaken by events and it really does not make sense to even present that report in Parliament after six months.  An issue comes, we go out there and we come and place some notice here in Parliament of which it takes six months for you as Chairperson to present that report.  It is overtaken by events.  So we need to have timeous presentation of reports here in Parliament for us to make sense.

The other issue Madam Speaker is that in my case at Foreign Affairs, we have so many outstanding protocols, international treaties and so forth.  Because of that, a lot of things right now is at a standstill because of these protocols which take time to be implemented.  We take time to ratify these protocols.  Right now, Zimbabwe which is a leading country in the African Union or even within the SADC, we have not up to now ratified the PAP Treaty.  It was signed by the former President in 2003 and up to now Parliament has not ratified that. We have not deposited the instruments with the African Union.  Zimbabwe which is a leading light in the African Union, we are a much respected country.  Even if our delegations, the Chief Whip included go out there, they are asked - Zimbabwe why have you not ratified PAP up to now?  So it does not make sense.  We need to have these international protocols brought here as soon as possible.  I have discussed this with the Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, to put some coordinating office as they are the coordinating ministry so that the officer can follow up on outstanding protocols with each Government department and we deal with them on time.

Madam Speaker, the other issue is on Members.  The Chief Whip touched on that when he was making his conclusion.  We have difficulties in our Committees sometimes.  Mr. Speaker has even complained about it, that most of the time he hears chairpersons only talking.  The other Members do not contribute.  They just come in there, sit and listen but no contributions.  Some of the Members again just come in there, sign the register and they go.  We are having problems.  We need interaction; possibly it is because of what the Chief Whip was saying, capacity building workshops for our Members so that they understand.  This is a general statement for all our committees.  We need to capacitate our Members so that they understand what their committees are all about so that they are able to contribute.  Madam Speaker, thank you very much.  Thank you very much Chief Whip for the comprehensive report.  It is very good.  I thank you.

HON. NDUNA: Thank you Madam Speaker for this opportunity. I want to thank the Hon. Chief Whip for a well-rounded report. Madam Speaker, I am new to Parliament in that I only came in 2013 and I have some institutional memory dating back to the Eighth Parliament where I was Chairperson of the Portfolio Committee on Transport. So these are the issues that I want to touch on because time without number Madam. Speaker, the Hon. Speaker of Parliament, Adv. J. Mudenda has said we need to proffer solutions. We do not only need to proffer solutions to the Executive as individual members of constituencies, MPs and otherwise, but we also need to cascade it down to the Committee level as we interrogate the manner the Executive carries out its mandate.

By the way, we do not seek to govern and he has said that time without number, but we seek to interrogate the manner the Executive carries out its mandate. In so doing, we need to proffer solutions. So I want to touch on that point in particular that my institutional memory in terms of infrastructure development, in particular road rehabilitation, reconstruction and maintenance - there is a  backlog of about US$20 billion and that by any stroke of imagination is not a pittance. That is huge. It is humongous and gigantic monies, to say the least Madam Speaker.

We need to stand up on the pedestal and platform of Parliament in the Portfolio Committees and proffer solutions to the Minister of Finance and Minister of Transport and Infrastructure Development. How do you proffer solutions if you are a Chair or Committee on Transport and Infrastructure Development? You proffer it in the following manner, this is how I see it and how I am going to debate on this report. There are numerous minds out there Madam Speaker and we need to make sure that the miners that are extracting our natural resources such as gold need to plough back in terms of road rehabilitation, reconstruction and maintenance of the same so that we augment and complement the meager resources that the Minister of Finance has and is giving towards the Minister of Transport for that need.

Having said that Madam Speaker, I actually take a cue from Hwange Colliery which has tarred more than 900 km during the time that they have subsisted in the quest to extract coal in Hwange. If all the miners would do that; we would expeditiously, effectively and efficiently tar our roads and give a lot of longevity to our road infrastructure. We will definitely not have a lot of need from the fiscus. We need in order to rehabilitate and construct our roads not only depend on monies from ZINARA which come in two forms. There are called routine and another fund that speaks to and about the fund which is given to local authorities for the rehabilitation of the roads. So those two funds are just but a pittance. We need to make sure that the monies that are derived from the God given natural resources are ploughed back for the good of our infrastructure development.

Madam Speaker, I will also say when we start any session of Parliament like we did the 9th Parliament, the First Session, there is need for continuity. If you have people that have institutional memory, parties need to adhere to the ethos and values of continuity in Parliament and Portfolio Committees that are very key. Certainly, there was need to have a relook in terms of continuity. I stand guided but I am defended by the Standing Rules and Orders book that states that on issues to do with the Chairmanships or composition of Portfolio Committees, there is need to have interest from the Members and there is also need to have expertise.  Certainly, there would not have been any need to remove me from the Chairmanship position because what is currently happening is, there is certainly no continuity in the Portfolio Committees where those Chairpersons outlived their welcome.  They never came back or where they were removed in some instances such as the one that I am talking about.  You continue talking of road carnage – which road carnage was the first report of the Eighth Parliament that would have been talked about.  You want to have continuity so that you go from one stage to the other.

Parliament is piling with reports that are in duplication.  To have an antidote to that, you would want to have continuity not only to the local Parliament but to external delegation.  I remember I was also a member of the ACP-EU, APNAC and a few other delegations but I then found myself not on those.  So there is no continuity.  I urge Parliament to have continuity in any future delegations and appointments as guided by the Standing Rules and Orders book.

As I conclude, I also want to say the Hon. Chief Whip touched on a few petitions, in particular the one from Gwanda that speaks to and about the issue of documentation for those children who do not have identity cards and birth certificates. I ask that by tabling this report, that there be a moratorium for everyone who does not have an identity card or birth certificate because Section 35-38 of the Constitution mandates the Executive that anyone who has been in Zimbabwe for more than ten years is a citizen and needs to be given citizenship, identity cards and birth certificates, otherwise we continue ad infinitum to have people that continue to give birth and to sire children that do not have birth certificates because the parents do not have the same.

Madam Speaker Ma’am, thank you for giving me this opportunity to eloquently, vociferously and effectively contribute to this report on LCC and give the impetus and mouth of all the words that have come from the people of Chegutu West Constituency.  They send their love.  I thank you.

HON. P. D. SIBANDA: Thank you Madam Speaker for giving me the opportunity to debate on this matter which comes from deeply inside my heart.  I think it is a matter that I love.  I love Executive oversight as a role because I think it is important and that it contributes towards the economic development of the country.  That is why I love that topic.

Allow me also to sincerely thank my colleague Hon. Togarepi for that report.  Indeed when I heard him making the contributions, I said this is towards getting to maturity because he was talking about things that really build the pillars of why Parliament as an institution was created.  I also appreciate Hon. Paradza’s input to that report.  I am not looking for Chairmanship, but let me add my point to the executive oversight and how maybe I think we might be lacking as an institution.  I will be assisted in introducing this topic by looking at the four key functions of Parliamentary oversight as they were given in 2007 by Yama Moto.

He says (1) – It is to detect and prevent abuse, arbitrary behaviour or illegal or unconstitutional conduct on the part of Government and public agencies.  He says at the core of this function, is the protection of rights and liberties of citizens.  He also further says “to hold the Government to account in respect of how the tax payers’ money is used;  to ensure that policies are announced by the Government itself and authorised by Parliament are actually delivered and finally to improve the transparency of Government operations and enhance public trust in the Government which is itself a condition of effected policy”.  That is how Yama Moto gives the functions of Parliament in terms of Executive oversight.

The contribution by my colleague was mainly centred on internal rather than external factors, which I believe would be contribution to our ineffectiveness as Parliament in executive oversight but the Chief Whip of the ruling party gave a hint on that.  Maybe there is also a need for us to touch on our laws so that they buttress and improve the legal teeth that we need to have as an institution in order for us to be able to derive that function of executive oversight properly.  In my view, the only legal tool which I can say is lacking from our array of legal tools that are available to us as Parliament is one tool that is called impeachment.  Impeachment is a situation where Parliament can call upon a member of the executive or the entire executive who has gone astray of what is expected of them to step down from their position.

Let me say that in that regard, we are actually worse off than more serious dictatorships like the one in Uganda.  In Uganda, when a member of the executive errs, Parliament makes a recommendation to the President and says this person has erred and that person is brought to appear before Parliament on its own.  If Parliament recommends that the person has got to be fired from that position, the President does not have any option.  They either fire that person or that person resigns.  In our current situation, Ministers can be as errant as they want and we have never brought any single Minister to book, they have nothing to fear.  You cannot recommend that they be fired from their positions. As a result, accountability of Ministers to Parliament remains lesser than what is expected.

I would argue that as Parliament, to some extent, we have got sufficient tools that we can use to put up pressure to the Executive to comply with what is expected of them by law and policy but I think we have been hesitant as an institution in utilising those tools.  I will give you an example that as Parliament, we know that when a member of the Executive does not comply with recommendations of Parliament, they can be found to be in contempt.  The law is there and it says a member of the Executive can be found to be in contempt of Parliament and certain punitive measures which are put in terms of law are there to implement them.

I think in the history of this country Hon. Speaker, Parliament has never utilised that tool at all.  I do not know why we are that hesitant.  I do not know whether our hesitancy is out of ignorance or lack of desire to utilise those tools.  I am not sure.  The furthest point that we have gone in trying to utilise our tools as an institution was, I am sure the last time that someone from GMAZ or somewhere was summoned.  I think we have gone as far as issuing summons only and nothing else.  We have not gone further especially when it comes to the Executive itself.  As a result, the Executive is at liberty to do as they please and that has made Parliament to be generally regarded as a toothless dog.  I think to some extent, whoever says that will be right.

My final contribution Hon. Speaker which I believe is also key is the financial independence of Parliament - one of my colleagues really spoke about it.  I will give you the example of Uganda again; in Uganda once a budget is passed, Parliament collects all its money and puts it in its bag.  It does not go back to the Executive to beg for some money.  Our current situation as Parliament is that we are entirely compromised because each and every time we want money to fund our activities which include executive oversight functions, we will have to go and beg at Mthuli’s office.  Even administration of Parliament is known to go back to beg for money to fund a critical institution like Parliament.  As long as our financial umbilical…

HON. KASHIRI:  On a point of order Madam Speaker.  Madam Speaker, in as much as Hon. Sibanda is making his contribution he needs to respect our Hon. Ministers rather than saying go to Mthuli’s office.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Indeed Hon. Sibanda.

HON. NDIWENI:  Anofunga kuti kuBinga!

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order Hon. Ndiweni!  Thank you very much Hon. Kashiri for raising that point of order.  Hon. Sibanda, may you kindly address Hon. Minister Mthuli Ncube as Hon. Member.  I think that is how we are supposed to be addressing each other in this august House.

HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  My sincere apology Hon. Speaker.  I think I have just been taken away by emotions.

HON. NDIWENI:  Hausi kuBinga iwewe.  Hakusi kuBinga kunoku!

HON. P. D. SIBANDA:  Save to say, Hon. Speaker, I wanted to emphasise a point that if you ask our administration currently, our administration is compromised and that literally also means that as an institution we are entirely compromised.  The key source of our compromise is that we are unable to undertake any one of our functions as an institution, the reason being the fact that we do not have our budget in our hands.  Our budgets are stored at Treasury and therefore we are given monies on a piece meal.  Where Treasury finds that it is not in their interest or that it is not a priority to them at that particular time then Parliament is starved and because of that kind of a situation we become so compromised as an institution the instant we tend to go and beg from the Executive for us to conduct our duty.

If you want to see what I mean Hon. Speaker, just have a look at how budgets have been changed from time and again.  In the last two financial years, I can assure you that budgets have been viremented, including budgets of Parliament.  There are certain areas where Parliament had budgeted for something and that budget had been passed.  Even after that budget had been passed, Parliament was not able to get all the money that had been budgeted for.  The reason is because of the way we are looked at by Treasury.  They look at us as if we are just like a department or we are just like a ministry.  We are not seen as a critical institution which is actually supposed to drive accountability in the Executive and because of that Hon. Speaker, we are compromised.

I therefore make a proposal.  My proposal is that we need to amend the law.  We need to amend the law to an extent that Parliament should be able to collect all its money at one go.  It should have its money, not to be distributed through Treasury.  It should create that financial independence of Parliament away from the Executive so that Parliament can be able to effectively discharge its role of Executive oversight.

I believe Hon. Speaker, the amendments that are coming, I am not sure what level they are but I thought we should have taken advantage of a constitutional amendment to include a section of impeachment.  As long as a person feels that they are not threatened by anything they are there to stay; they can do as they please. I can assure you that person will never feel like they have to account themselves to Parliament or to the people and therefore an impeachment section is required in our law so that we strengthen the Executive oversight of Parliament.  That is my view that I thought I should present Hon. Speaker.  Thank you for giving me an opportunity.

HON. NDIWENI:  Thank you very much Madam Speaker.  I want to thank the Chief Whip for his presentation of a well elaborated report on the LCC.  Madam Speaker, for Parliament to have good oversight it has to have effective committees.  For us to have effective committees, let us go down to the beginning.

When we came to Parliament, every Member of Parliament submitted their CVs.  I for one thought it was very good for Parliament to request CVs so that they realise the capacities of Members of Parliament, but alas the three political parties do not seem to consider the paper work that we brought into Parliament.  I for one am of the opinion that we should use these CVs to create cause.  You see, for a committee to be effective it should have a core number of people that have relevant CVs for that type of committee so that they can perform better.  We should move away from allowing Members to choose committees willy-nilly.

What is happening Madam Speaker is, Members just migrate from one committee to the other just because they know there are some allowances that are paid.  So you realise that the committees that have more allowances tend to have more people than other committees.   There is zero disregard of what you are going to contribute in that committee.  So I personally feel for us to be very effective, either we have to revisit the Standing Rules and Orders to request Parliament to peruse on the CVs, have a co-group in a committee.  If we can do it on the Legal Committee, why can we not do it on the Education Committee, Health Committee and ICT Committee?

We have people with the relevant expertise in Parliament that we should deploy. Deploy them into that one committee if they are three as the core members, then you can add other Members.  I am not saying you should leave other Members that are not interested, but for us to be effective every committee has to have a co-group of people that have relevant expertise and then the other Members to complement them.  That way my feeling is, we are going to have a strong institution, strong Committees that have strong oversight.  This is my contribution Madam Speaker.

HON. TOGAREPI:  I move that debate do now adjourn.

HON. TEKESHE:  I second.

Motion put and agreed to.        

Debate to resume: Wednesday, 9th September, 2020.

On the motion of HON. TOGAREPI seconded by HON. TEKESHE, the House adjourned at a Quarter to Five o’clock p.m.

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