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NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD 12 FEBRUARY 2013 VOL. 39 NO. 8

CORRIGENDUM

In Hansard Volume 39 No. 6, column 553, the speech by Mr.

Muchauraya was wrongly attributed to Mr. Gwiyo.

In Hansard Volume 39, No. 7, Colum 631, the speech by THE DEPUTY

MINISTER OF WOMEN’S AFFAIRS, GENDER AND COMMUNITY

DEVELOPMENT should read as follows:

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF WOMEN’S AFFAIRS,

GENDER AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT:   I wish to add

my voice to this historic debate that is before the august House today.  I want in particular to add my voice on the progress that our great nation Zimbabwe has attained at this particular moment in the history of our country.

I would want to really celebrate, particularly, the fact that we are definitely on a pathway where, all Zimbabweans have heeded to the call which was made by our Principals in their wisdom; in particular, that, when they agreed to the Global Political Agreement, they said that they were determined that they shall set their differences aside and work together in order to solve the problems that bedevil our country.  In this particular matter, those very issues have indeed been set aside. I am particularly elated that we would have a Draft Constitution that actually has the word ‘happy’ in it, that actually obliges all State institutions and organs to work in order to fulfill national objectives that are in policy making and also in implementation, that will lead the establishment, enhancement and promotion of a sustainable, just, free and democratic society in which all people enjoy prosperous, happy and fulfilling lives. I want to congratulate the people of Zimbabwe for coming up with such a process and this product.

I must, as a matter of necessity and a matter of justice speak and refer to one group of people in the society of Zimbabwe.  These are women Mr. Speaker, Sir.  Zimbabwe has a very unique situation in the sense that they are not only 52% of the population, but that the women of Zimbabwe themselves are very hardworking and are important in our country.  The women of Zimbabwe also went to the liberation front and also fought the liberation war but alas Mr. Speaker, Sir, Zimbabwe continues to be a country whose present constitutional dispensation can be regarded as one of the worst Constitutions in the world as far as its treatment of women, the reason being that it does not accord women the status of equal citizens.  In fact the present Constitution gives license to discriminate against women.

Therefore, I want to particularly celebrate the step that Zimbabwe has taken in pushing to make sure that Zimbabwe departs from this particular sad moment and that in fact it is interesting to note that the Principals Mr. Speaker Sir, in Article 6 of the Global Political Agreement that gave birth to this constitution making process, singled out only one sector of Zimbabwean society and mentioned it by name.  They did not mention any other group at all in the preamble in Article 6 that gave birth to this process.  They mentioned women only and they said that they were determined and that the new Constitution that arises from this process deepens our democratic values and principles and I quote “particularly, enhances the equal citizenship and dignity of women”.  I am therefore, celebrating again Mr. Speaker Sir, the fact that the women of Zimbabwe have indeed stood up to this particular task.  They were not found wanting and they did not miss this opportunity because in this Mr. Speaker Sir, it is most interesting to note that in the process of the Constitution Making the majority of the people who turned out in the Select Committee’s outreach meetings were women.  We have been told by the Co-chairpersons the statistics. There was a total of 441 238 women who turned up across the countryside at meetings. There were 416 272 men who turned out at outreach meetings.  What is most interesting is the difference that there were 23 966 more women than men who walked with their feet and spoke with their feet and spoke with their presence in these meetings.  Thus, there was 23 966 more women who turned out at outreach than men of Zimbabwe and the total number of youths who attended these meetings was 253 240.  That means apart from the fact that of course there are some women who are also youths, there were 187 998 more women than youths who turned up in physical presence at these meetings.

Mr. Speaker Sir, I thought it will not do justice for the history of Zimbabwe not to record the very vocal, the very eloquent and the vociferous statement that the women of Zimbabwe made in this particular process.  Mr. Speaker Sir, cynics might want to explain away the overwhelming presence of women in this process by saying that possibly women are the majority of the unemployed and so they have a lot of time on their hands and that is why they turned up for meetings.  Mr. Speaker Sir, I would hasten to state that, that would clearly be not the case because this turnout has shown that instead, the women of Zimbabwe are very conscious of the importance of themselves in the life of their nation.  Indeed they care about their country.  They are interested in how their country is run and that they are determined to play a part in the solution, through this particular process and to also reverse the unfortunate and unacceptable constitutional state of their status.

I would also hasten to add that in February 2012, that is last year,

Zimbabwe being party to the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) presented its second, third, fourth and fifth reports to the CEDAW Committee.  At that presentation in Geneva, Zimbabwe caused concern to the CEDAW Committee.  The CEDAW Committee raised concern with Section 23 (3) of the present Zimbabwe Constitution which gives licence to discriminate against women.  It in fact gave Zimbabwe about 18 months to rectify this situation and Mr. Speaker Sir, I am indeed encouraged and indeed happy that this process has taken us this far and now the draft constitution does in fact give Zimbabwe an opportunity to actually rectify that anomaly and to meet its obligations in terms of

CEDAW.

With that, indeed we would have a Constitution that eliminates discrimination against women.  Further again the SADC Protocol on Gender and Development which this very Seventh Parliament ratified in terms of Article 111B of our present Constitution, there is Article 4 that requires that all SADC member States such as Zimbabwe, must by the year 2015 ensure that Zimbabwe has a Constitution that enshrines gender equality and eliminates discrimination.  It is therefore, in light of these imperatives that it is to be celebrated that this Draft Constitution that has come out of this process does indeed put Zimbabwe well on the path to fulfilling its obligations in terms of the SADC Protocol on gender and development.

I will therefore, Mr. Speaker Sir, want to add my voice to celebrate this process and the stage that we have arrived at and to indeed venture to say that the COPAC draft and the COPAC process that has been tabled before the House is a tonic and maybe indeed the panacea to the ills that have bedeviled the very unacceptable status of women of Zimbabwe itself.  It even goes so far, and we should celebrate, as to make a breakthrough and to depart from the very unfortunate legal tradition that has been used in the interpretation of statutes whereby the masculine is said to include the feminine.  This Draft Constitution departs from that tradition and indeed makes a breakthrough in referring to women specifically and using very gender sensitive language in referring to people as either “he” or “she” and not anymore including the feminine in the masculine amongst all the other things that it does.

I would hasten to say that this Draft Constitution may very well be the best thing that has happened to the women of Zimbabwe as far as their legal status is concerned since the Legal Age of Majority Act was passed in 1985 in order to stop African women from being regarded as perpetual minors.  That did not go far enough because at law Mr. Speaker Sir, the women of Zimbabwe are still not considered as equal and this Draft Constitution does indeed give a chance to complete that process and to make Zimbabwean women full citizens at last.

I wish to just end by also paying tribute to all the people who sacrificed their time and their effort and indeed their determination in this particular process.  This process has not come cheap.  At least one person paid for this with his life.  There was one person called Chrispen Mandizvidza who paid the ultimate price at Mai Musodzi Hall in Mbare during the outreach process in Harare in September 2010; but it is to be celebrated that this was a process in which he would not have lost his life in vain because in this very difficult and painful process,

Zimbabweans have found each other.  We have found each other and we have come to respect each other; and indeed we are moving forward together as a nation; and that indeed we may live happily ever after, hand in hand in the light of this Draft Constitution.  I thank you Mr.

Speaker Sir.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PARLIAMENT OF ZIMBABWE

Tuesday, 12th February, 2013.

The House of Assembly met at a Quarter-past Two O’clock p.m.

PRAYERS

(MR SPEAKER in the Chair)

ANNOUNCEMENTS BY MR SPEAKER

INVITATION BY THE ZIMBABWE OPEN UNIVERSITY

  1. SPEAKER: I have to inform the House that the Zimbabwe Open University is inviting hon. members to a meeting to share information on how hon. members can study through its University. The meeting will be held on 14th February, 2013 at 1000 hours in the House of Assembly Chamber.

WORKSHOP ON THE DRAFT CONSTITUTION

  1. SPEAKER: I also wish to inform the House that the Constitution Select Committee is inviting all hon. members to a workshop on the Draft Constitution to be held at the Rainbow Towers Hotel tomorrow, Wednesday, 13th February, 2013 at 0830 hours in Jacaranda Rooms Nos. 1 and 2.

FIRST READING

INCOME TAX BILL [H.B.5, 2012]

THE MINISTER OF FINANCE presented the Income Tax Bill [H.B.5, 2012].

Bill read the first time.

Bill referred to the Parliamentary Legal Committee.

MOTION

RESTORATION OF FIRST REPORT OF THE PORTFOLIO

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC SERVICE, LABOUR AND SOCIAL

WELFARE ON THE STATUS OF RESIDENTIAL CARE

INSTITUTIONS IN ZIMBABWE ON THE ORDER PAPER.

MRS. ZINYEMBA:  I move the motion standing in my name that the First Report of the Portfolio Committee on Public Service, Labour and Social Welfare on the status of residential care institutions in

Zimbabwe [S.C. 21, 2012] which was superseded by prorogation of the Fourth Session of the Seventh Parliament be restored on the Order Paper in terms of Standing Order Number 43.

  1. TAZVIONA:  I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

MOTION

FIRST REPORT OF THE PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC

SERVICE LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE ON THE STATUS OF RESIDENTIAL CARE INSTITUTIONS IN ZIMBABWE

MRS. ZINYEMBA:  I move the motion standing in my name that this House takes note of the First Report of the Portfolio Committee on Public Service, Labour and Social Welfare on the status of residential care institutions in Zimbabwe.

  1. TAZVIONA:  I second.

MRS. ZINYEMBA:

ORDERED:      In Terms of Standing Order No. 159

  1. At the commencement of every session, there shall be as many committees Rules to be designated according to government portfolios as the Standing and Orders  Committee may deem fit.
  2. It shall be the function of such committees to examine expenditure administration and policy of government departments and other matters falling under their jurisdictions as Parliament may, by resolution determine.
  3. The members of such committees shall be appointed by the Standing Rules and Orders Committee, from one or both Houses of Parliament, and such appointments shall take into account the expressed interests or expertise of the  Members and Senators and the political and gender composition of

Parliament.

  1. Each Select Committee shall be known by the portfolio determined for it by the Standing Rules and Orders Committee.

Terms of reference of Portfolio Committees – Standing Order No.

160

“Subject to these Standing Orders a Portfolio Committee shall:

  1. Consider and deal with all bills and statutory instruments or other matters which are referred to it by or under a resolution of the

House or by the Speaker;

  1. Consider or deal with an appropriation or money bill or any aspect of appropriation or money bill referred to it by these Standing

Orders or by under resolution of this House; and

  1. Monitor, investigate, enquire into and make recommendations relating to any aspect of the legislative programme, budget, policy or any other      matter it may consider relevant to the government department falling within the category of affairs assigned to it, and may for that purpose consult and liaise with such department; and
  2. Consider or deal with all international treaties, conventions and        agreements relevant to it, which are from time to time negotiated, entered into or agreed upon.

         On Tuesday, 6th September 2011, the Speaker announced that the Committee on Standing Rules and Orders nominated the following members to serve on the Portfolio Committee on Public Service Labour and Social Welfare

Hon. Goto R.

Hon. Tazviona R.

Hon. Chirongwe R.

Hon. Gwiyo C.

Hon. Mahlangu T.

Hon. Chibaya A.  Hon. Khumalo T.

Hon. Khumalo S. S

Hon. Garadhi  Hon. Mudau M.

Hon. Chivamba K.

Hon. Zinyemba M. to be Chairperson

    1.       Introduction

The Portfolio Committee on Public Service, Labour and Social Welfare undertook an inquiry into the living conditions of people living in residential care institutions that are both  government and privately owned homes. In 2009, the Committee managed to visit

Chinyaradzo and Upenyu Hutsva Children’s Home and Visits to other homes could not be undertaken due to lack of funding. The Committee therefore had no option but to suspend visits to other homes. The remaining tours to Mary Ward Children’s home and

Rugare Old People’s Home in Kwekwe; Percy Ibboston and

Luveve Remand Home, Luveve Girls Training Centre,

Ekhuphumuleni Geniatric Nursing Home, John Smale Children’s

Home and St Francis home in Bulawayo; Jairos Jiri Naran Centre and Blue Hills Children’s Home in Gweru were conducted in

October 2011. In Zimbabwe, care institutions are governed by the

Child Protection and Adoption Act which is administered by the Ministry of Labour and Social Services. The Ministry responsible for Social Services also has the responsibility for implementing the disabled Persons Act and the Social Welfare Assistance Act. However, the Ministry has not been effectively discharging this

mandate due to lack of funding.

2.        Objectives of the Tours

The main objectives of the tours were:-

  • To understand the living conditions of people living in various residential care institutions;
  • To identify the challenges being encountered in the residential care institutions, problems faced and;
  • To gather stakeholders views on the day to day running of the residential care institutions.

3.      Methodology

3.1 The Committee received written and oral evidence from Ministry of Labour and Social Service on the state of living conditions in the residential care institutions.

3.2 The Committee also received oral evidence from the Ministry of Finance regarding the funding of vulnerable persons in care institutions.

 

3.3 The Committee undertook fact finding visits to Upenyu Hutsva

Children's Home and  Chinyaradzo Children's Home in Harare in

2009 and visits to the following institutions were  made  from the

13th to 16th October 2011:-

  • Mary Ward children’s home and Rugare old people’s home in

Kwekwe;

  • Percy Ibboston and Luveve remand home, Luveve girls training

center,                                                                                                               Ekhuphumuleni geriatric nursing home, John Smale children’s home and St  Francis home in Bulawayo; and

  • Jairos Jiri Naran center and Blue Hills children’s home in

Gweru.

4.0 Committee's Findings

 4.1  Background of the institutional homes that were visited

4.1.1 Upenyu Hutsva Children's Home is a wholly owned by the Government. The institution was established in 1952 and was formerly known as Highfield Probation Hostel and Remand

Home. It was initially established as correctional institution for African children offenders and  juvenile delinquents.  The institution was designed to provide prison type accommodation for  children between the ages 12 to 18 years.

4.1.2 The institution changed its name to Upenyu Hutsva Children's Home in 1987. The   maximum holding capacity for the institution is 132 children.  As of August 2009, the

institution had 80 children because those were the only kids referred by the probation Officer.

4.1.3 The Committee was informed by the Superintendent that the institution also runs a primary school which was opened in 1962 with an enrollment of 152 children. Children enrolled at the school include those from the surrounding community in order to foster the principle of community integration and participation in the home's programming.        

4.2 Chinyaradzo Children's Home, run by Child Protection Society was registered in 1967.  The maximum capacity for the institution is 58.  At the time of the visit the home housed 58 children. The Home is made up of five family units – fenced in one place and more exceptionally, two family units that are in the local township of Highfields fostering Community integration of children in need of care.  The Home is involved in livelihood training through poultry and peanut butter projects.  They also have a garden from which they are getting vegetables.  The institution depends solely

on well-wishers since it is owned by a local Non-Governmental Organisation.

4.2.1 The Committee was informed that there are some projects that are being undertaken at Chinyaradzo Children's Home which include peanut butter and poultry.  They received a donation of two and a half hectares of land from the council which is being prepared for irrigation.

 

4.3 Mary Ward Children's Home is a- non-profit making social welfare organization founded   by the Mary Ward sisters in 1993. It was established as a response to the rising numbers of orphaned children in Zimbabwe. Its main aim is to provide a friendly atmosphere for the orphaned, abandoned, neglected and abused children regardless of their race, nationality and religion by giving them a home and a sound basis “for an independent life”. These children are placed in the home by the Department of Social

Welfare. The Home gives the children a sense of security and

belonging, dignity, affection and educational superiority which are necessary for the development of any child. The Home strives to ensure that all the basic needs of the child are met, for example; adequate and decent shelter and clothing; balanced diet and motherly care.

4.4 Rugare old people's home in Kwekwe was established in 1986 and it was registered  in 1987. Anglican and Roman Catholic Priests used to own the home.  The home was  established as a community initiative. Currently the home houses 9 elderly men and 2            elderly women. Some of the old people who are housed at this institution were    abandoned by their children. The institution depends solely on well-wishers and churches in the community. They get free graves from the city council to bury the old people when they die.

4.5. Percy Ibboston and Luveve Remand Home is a wholly Government owned institution. It is governed in terms of the

Children’s Protection Act and Adoption Act (Chapter 33) and the            institution is certified by the Minister of Labour and Social Services.  It is a correctional institution for Zimbabwean children offenders and juvenile delinquents.  The institution was designed to provide prison accommodation for children between the ages 12 to 18 years. The home also caters for orphans. Children are committed to the home by the probation officers and courts. The Committee was informed that the home has a role as a place of safety for the children who might have been abused by the society. Some of the children in the home would have been found in places restricted by law for adults such as bars, cinemas, and brothels or gambling places which are totally illegal. Luveve Remand Home is used to cater for a maximum of 35 children of both sexes. It is served as a temporary place of safety. The Remand home facilitated the movement of the children to the courts and whenever they were needed for investigations.

Children are enrolled at school but before enrollment the child is helped to form positive constructs on behavior through parent guiding, psychosocial support and counseling

  • Churches are also engaged to offer spiritual guidance to these children.
  • Vocational training and extra moral activities such as sports and visiting holiday resorts are imparted to the children and is done through programmes such as orchard and garden maintenance where they are taught the skills of growing and maintaining fruits and vegetables.
    • Luveve Girls Training Center caters for children in difficult circumstances aged between 12- 18years but due to pressure they sometimes enroll children aged between 10-17 years. There are 44 girls housed at Luveve training Center and 14 of them attend school at Luveve School. The home is involved in livelihood training through poultry. They also have a garden from which they

are substituting their income.  The institution depends solely on well-wishers and banks.

  • Ekhuphumuleni Geniatric Nursing Home is a non-profit making, registered welfare centre that caters for recuperating elderly people aged 60 years and above. It caters specifically for the elderly who will have been discharged from Mpilo Hospital. The home has 35 patients even though their bed capacity is 62. Their youngest patient is 65 while the oldest is 97. The home receives a grant for staff wages from the Ministry of Health and Child Welfare and a bed subsidy for each patient. In October 2010 they received

US$1000.00 for running costs. Ekhuphumuleni also trains Red Cross care givers in geniatric care. However it is important to note that USD1000 allocated to the home is insufficient due to the needs of the patients who are of old age and therefore need constant medication. The institution mainly depends on donor funding and has a staff complement of 47. The Home has not been receiving their monthly grants from the Ministry of Labour and Social Services. The old people are entitled to monthly allowances from the Ministry of Social Services. In 2010, they received a total of US$900 from the Ministry.

  • John Smale Children's home is administered by government. It is an orphanage home but it also keeps vulnerable children. Children attend schools in the surrounding community and they also go to surrounding churches.
  • St Francis Home has 34 patients. It has a capacity to house 60 children. At the time of the visit the home had 15 girls and 19 boys. Some of the children are mentally and physically handicapped. It is sponsored by government. The institution caters for children aged from 5-16 years. Some of the parents visit their children and make some contribution towards food.
  • Jairos Jiri Naran Center was established in 1950 and was once an isolation hospital for those with TB. It was later changed to a school for the deaf with 148 children, 75 of whom were boys and

73 were girls. The Jairos Jiri Center in Kadoma caters for the blind while the one in Harare is for the physically handicapped. At school they use the same curriculum with those in schools with normal children. Children are being taught speech entities, social manners, auditoria teaching in order to perceive sound and sign language. There is vocational training which offers training in sewing, home economics, wood work and poultry farming.

4.11. Blue Hills Children's Home is a wholly government owned institution.  The Institution was established in 1960.  It was a correctional institution for Zimbabwean children offenders and            juvenile delinquents.  The institution was designed to provide prison type accommodation for children between the ages 12 to 18 years.  In 1980, they started enrolling orphans and children in the street.  The maximum holding capacity for the institution is 60 children for both girls and boys. They used to cater for children in conflict of the law but these days they are sent to Hwahwa because at Blue hills they do not have  transport to ferry the children to the courts.

5.       The following challenges were noted:-

5.1 Upenyu Hutsva Children's Home is experiencing severe shortages of funding since it is wholly government funded. The

Superintendent attributed the low funding to donor fatigue as most donors are not willing to donate to government institutions because of the protocols that need to be followed.

 5.2 In most cases, the food lacks the balanced diet that is essential for the growth and  development of children. Blankets are also very few, such that in times of winter  they are not enough.  The Committee was informed that the children have to make do with only one pair of  uniform till the end of each year.

 

5.4 The Committee was also informed that there is no clinic at Upenyu

Hutsva children’s home and at Rugare old people’s home. The situation is worsened by the fact that these institutions do not have transport to take sick children to the clinic. The nearest clinic is approximately 7 kilometers away. In addition, the situation is made worse by the rejection by council clinics, of medical assistance orders from the Social Welfare department when treating these old people at Rugare. The medical assistance orders are only accepted at government hospitals of which are approximately 15km away from the home.

5.6 The environment at Upenyu Hutsva children’s home and Blue Hills Hostel is not conducive for children due to the unhygienic conditions. The Committee was informed that some of the children have scurvy.  The living conditions were not fit for humans as the home was very dirty and the children’s diet was mainly starch for example porridge and sadza with relish.

 

5.7 Shortage of manpower at Upenyu Hutsva is also a major challenge that the institution is facing. They do not have general hand staff and as such, all the work is done by the children and thus leaving the children with less time to rest and to do their home works 

5.8 The Committee was also informed that due to lack of professionals at Upenyu Hutsva Children’s home, no proper records of the number of children are kept and no proper and retrievable finance records are also kept. This situation makes the work difficult for the Superintendent as he also has to take responsibilities of monitoring, evaluation and authentification of records in addition to his other duties.

5.9   Chinyaradzo Children's Home is facing a couple of challenges which include unavailability of government funding in the past years and problems in acquisition of birth certificates for children at the home because most of the children are orphans and in most cases there are no records of their deceased parents.

5.10 The Committee was informed that Maryward Children’s Home had not received any   budgetary allocation from the Government. The home does submit monthly claims but Government does not disburse the fund on time. In 2012 the home only received the

grant once. They received USD 1000 in 2009 and during the year 2011 nothing was released.

5.11     The Committee was informed that World Food Programme used to donate beans, maize and cooking oil at Maryward, but has since stopped in 2009.

5.12. The Committee was told that workers at Rugare Old People’s Home are not being paid. The only remuneration they get, comes from Board members who contribute $10 every month towards the payment for the workers. The Government does not provide any funding to pay salaries at the Home.

5.13. These old people who are mainly women, bury the one who will have died although they are     provided with graves by the council.

5.14   When children at Luveve Girls training center fall ill, they do not get assistance from council clinics because they need cash up   front .They can only get assistance at Mpilo hospital where government medical assistance orders are accepted. After

treatment, they are being given prescription to buy tablets from private pharmacy and they won’t have money.

5.15   In the residential care institutions that were visited, the Committee was informed if they   delay to pay city councils bills, water will be disconnected. Luveve remandees has an  outstanding water bill of US$13 000.

5.16    In all children’s homes visited, the director of Social Services does not give parental support to these children. They are not receiving their monthly grants from the Ministry of Labour and Social Services and there is shortage of Probation Officers as some of the children are not being referred to these institutions.

5.17   At St Francis home, they do not have a stove and they fetch firewood from the surrounding bushes and they become a threat to City Council because they are causing environmental degradation.

5.22   Most of patients at St Francis home are not able to chew because of their health status so there is need for the food to be crashed.

5.23   The electric pots at Jairos Jiri Naran Center are not functioning well. They do not have funds  to repair the beds and the kitchen pots. The total cost to repair the pots is US1500.

5.24   At Jairos Jiri Naran Center, there is need for computers, tractors and they feel that during  land   reform, they were supposed to be given a farm.

5.25    Blue Hills Children's Home is experiencing severe shortages of funding since it is wholly government funded hence there is donor fatigue as most donors are not willing to donate to government institutions because of the protocols that had to be followed.

6.0      Ministry of Labour and Social Services

Background on the establishment of Home

6.1    The number of orphans in Zimbabwe has been increasing because of the consequences of AIDS. The initial reaction of many well wishers to orphan crisis in Africa focused mainly on the construction of orphanages. It was later on discovered by the

Ministry of Labour and Social Services that this was an economically unsustainable and culturally inappropriate response to the crisis. The Ministry later realized that it was better to reinforce the traditional family system and improve the capacity of local communities to provide care.

6.2       Funding of the residential care institutions

6.2.1.       The Department of Social Services is starved of resources since the dollarization and recently    has been losing a number of professional staff. This has negatively affected children in care and other children in difficult circumstances.

6.2.2 Social Protection Programmes are designed to assist vulnerable members of society and indigent families. These include children, adults and disabled persons. The department prepares a budget estimate like any Government department and they are allocated resources by the Government.

6.2.3  The placement of children in the institutions is the responsibility of probation officers from the department of Social Services under

the Ministry of Labour and Social Services which is affected by resources to carry out proper investigations.

6.2.4 The department of social services has 12 institutions which it is fully supporting. This consists of 8 for children and 2 for disabled persons and 2 Repatriation Centres which cater for voluntary repartees. In 2009 the residential care institutions received a total of USD212 820 as government support.

6.2.5 There are 65 private children’s homes and these receive administration grants based on current capacity. For 2009, the Ministry paid USD67 180.00 for administration for the 65 institutions which converts to 24% of total funds released and the rest funding government institutions.

6.2.6 In 2008 no funds were remitted to private institutions because of budgetary constraints.

6.2.7 The Ministry of Finance has not been disbursing funds on time and this makes the work of the Department of Social Services not easy as the institutions will be expecting their monthly grants.

7.0              Observations and Conclusions of the Committee

7.1     The Committee observed that lack of access to identity documents is a major problem for children in care despite advocacy campaigns by Child Welfare Organizations. The majority of institutionalized children remain without birth certificates.

7.2 The Committee noted that the inability of the Department of Social Services to oversee and protect the rights of children in institutional care as it is reflected in the remarkable increase in the time taken to renew court orders. The failure of the department has often resulted in the increase in the number of children unnecessarily admitted to residential care and their prolonged institutionalization because probation officers would have failed to review their cases.

7.3 The Committee noted that majority of the residential care institutions continue to utilise a dormitory type of accommodation thereby depriving children of a family life and may result in permanent psychological damage.

 

7.5     The Committee noted with concern that Non-Governmental

Organisations are assisting Private Institutions only, despite that these NGOs register through the Ministry of Labour and Social Services.

7.6  The Committee observed that private care institutions are in a better position than government care institutions because of funding they receive from NGOs and other donors.

7.7   The Committee noted there is need for separate institutions to cater for children found to be in conflict with the law separately.

 

7.8 The Committee noted with concern that the infrastructure in the government owned residential care institution is dilapidated, the floors, toilets, windows, roofs are all in a sorry state.  Sewage pipes are always leaking and they require constant repairing.

 

7.9  Although there are a few clothes and blankets being donated by OXFAM and UNICEF to some of the residential care institutions, the Committee feels Government should support these institutions.

7.10 The Committee noted that there is need for government to allocate funding to resuscitate government owned institutions. There is need for the installation of new cooking equipments, refurnishing of the hostels as the furniture is beyond use and the carrying out of extensive repairs and maintenance to restore the homes.

8.0       Recommendations

8.1 The Committee recommended that there is need to recapacitate the department of social services through the injection of human and capital resources.

8.2 The Committee recommended that institutionalisation of children must be the last resort. Instead, foster care can be effective if it is adequately promoted and funded by the Government of Zimbabwe. Alternatives such as family support services in the communities or in a family setting, kinship care, supporting child headed

households and domestic adoption, are recommended care options. Government and donor organisations should allocate resources to support alternative care options.

8.3 The government should convert dormitory style institutions to family based units either through re-modelling of existing buildings or through construction of new units.

8.4     The Government should prioritise resources to these care institutions because it is Government’s primary responsibility to meet the core minimum obligation for each child in the residential care institutions .Non Governmental Organisations should complement government efforts.

8.5  Government should mobilise enough resources for the provision of social services to the poor people in the country through encouraging mining companies to sell their produce to formal government markets.

8.6     The government should be consistent in paying out per capita, grants for children and employee salary grants.

8.7 The institutions must stick to their core business for example, remandees institutions should only keep young criminals not mix children.

8.9    Government must put in place structures and systems that will keep accountability to all resources that will be channeled by government and other well- wishers in these residential care institutions.

8.10     Government should encourage people to take care for their   elderly

8.11 The Committee recommends that child offenders committing minor offences should not be placed in remand institutions together with hard core child offenders but instead, they should be integrated back into the community and undergo rehabilitation.

8.12 The Committee recommends that there is need for care institutions catering for children to   move away from dormitory systems and move to individual household systems so as to foster real family

set ups .At Chinyaradzo children’s home and Maryward children’s home they have since moved away from the dormitory systems and it has been successful.

8.13  Old people at Ekhuphumuleni should be treated free of charge in government hospitals and council clinics.

8.14 Government and Council should subsidise or exempt all these residential care institutions from paying rentals and rates.

8.15 Nurse Aids that are working at John Smale and St Francis should be given incentives for their work.

  1. TAZVIONA: Thank you Mr. Speaker, the findings, recommendations and observations of the Committee mainly blame the local government and the central government of Zimbabwe.  What we noticed and observed as a Committee is a sad story.  A lot of people who are in these care institutions, be it children, orphaned children or old people, are not responsible for the mess that they are experiencing now.  The mess only rests with the ineffective and inappropriate policies by the government of the day by then.

Mr. Speaker, for example the effects of ESAP, freezing of the local currency, Land Reform Programme, are responsible for the suffering of most people.  Some of the people in these care institutions narrated that initially they had their own houses.  They are now suffering because of the bad effects of Operation Murambatsvina. Most of the people lost their properties, their income and so forth.

Mr. Speaker Sir, polices and the way that they are implemented can cause poverty and suffering or reduced poverty.  Most people and children have been working flat out wishing for a better life in

Zimbabwe, but because of this, bad effects of Structural Adjustment Programme, unemployment which was brought by Murambatsvina, destroyed houses which were their shelter and really caused suffering.

Mr. Speaker Sir, when the Economic Structural Adjustment Programme (ESAP) was introduced, its main purpose was supposed to improve investment, reduce taxes that foreign companies would pay to the Government, as a result creating a conducive atmosphere for businesses to flourish. instead the result was the opposite. The ESAP was supposed to have enhanced economic growth, investment was decreased and it increased poverty and unemployment.

Mr. Speaker Sir, it is the responsibility of the government to take care of rehabilitation of people in these care institutions. Instead the government of Zimbabwe was not mobilising enough resources such that little took care of those people in those institutions.  There is a legal obligation that the government should pay some salary grants and some per capita grants to these institutions so that they will operate efficiently for the survival of the people in these institutions. So your committee recommends the Government to mobilise enough resources especially through the abundance of mineral resources in Zimbabwe. For example, we have Chiadzwa; all the resources must be channeled to the fiscus so that people in need will be assisted.  I thank you.

  1. MATSHALAGA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir, I too would like to add some few comments…..

An hon. member having gone up and down.

  1. MR. SPEAKER: Order, order, hon. member, whenever you stand up you bow to the Chair. I have been observing you going up and down without doing so.  Matshalaga, continue.
  2. MATSHALAGA: Thank you, Mr. Speaker Sir. I too would like to add a few comments to the very important report. I was touched with some of the scenarios that are obtained in some of the institutions. I think it is important that this House takes note of some of the issues that were being raised and propose appropriate action for the Executive to take.  I also understand from the report that this is an architecture that has developed over many years.  Some of the institutions are irrelevant even in name and they vary from personal institutions to Christian institutions.  Maybe what we need to do is to harmonise a system where we can now provide a social service to the categories of people.  I think the report is clear that it is talking about the elderly people who find themselves without appropriate means and they are in our institutions.  Then you will find there are situations where vulnerable children either orphaned as a result of HIV/Aids or by natural orphanage but the institutions do not seen to be varying from one location to the other.  I think we should note the reference for instance to Jairos Jiri, who was one of the pioneers of these social institutions particularly for the disabled persons.

You will note that originally these institutions ran independently but there is a standard requirement that they be registered by the department of social welfare.  The mere demand that they be registered by a Government institution means that the government should take responsibility somehow and I would as proposed by the report call upon the appropriate authority or ministry to ensure that the department that is responsible for these institutions is properly either re-organised to deliver adequate technical advice and to be resourced.  We know of the resource constraints that they have but we would want a situation where in the next phase the Portfolio Committee report should show evidence of Government responding to some of the pathetic and the inhuman conditions that are being reported.

I also strongly agree that most of the orphans now or the vulnerable children are a result of HIV/Aids and Government has been groping for strategies.  The traditional….

Hon. Mahlangu having not bowed to the Chair.

  1. MR. SPEAKER: Order, order. Mahlangu you bow to the

Chair.

  1. MATSHALAGA: Thank Mr. Speaker Sir. The number of

orphans has increased but as the report notes, the capacity for

Government to provide for these orphans in institutions is unsustainable.  However, what is pleasing is that the report also notes that this is culturally discarded with our own customs and tradition.  Therefore, what is necessary is for Government to promote either what is called community social protection or family-based protection of the vulnerable children.  I however, was concerned about the spurious linkages between vulnerability currently obtaining and issues of ESAP, the Land Reform and others.  I do not think we should abuse a very good portfolio report by importing esoteric excuses that have no bearing whatsoever to what the lead speaker of the report has said. The purpose of somebody seconding is to support the report and not to provide a counter report.  I thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.

        THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS: I move that the debate

do now adjourn.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume: Wednesday, 13th February, 2013.

MOTION

PRESIDENTIAL SPEECH: DEBATE ON ADDRESS

Second Order read: Adjourned debate on motion in reply to the Presidential Speech.

Question again proposed.

        THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS: I move that the debate

do now adjourn.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume: Wednesday, 13th February, 2012.

ANNOUNCEMENT BY MR. SPEAKER

NON-ADVERSE REPORT RECEIVED FROM THE

PARLIAMENTARY

LEGAL COMMITTEE

  1. SPEAKER:  I have to inform the House that I have received a non-adverse report from the Parliamentary Legal Committee for the Micro-Finance Bill (H.B. 2:2012).

MOTION

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

        THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS:  Mr. Speaker, I move

that Orders of the Day Numbers 3 up to 6 be stood over until Order Number 7 is disposed of.

Motion put and agreed to.

MOTION

MONUMENTAL STATUS FOR HWAHWA,

SIKHOMBELA AND GONAKUDZINGWA PRISONS

  1. KANZAMA:  I move the motion standing in my name that

this House:

RECOGNISING the historical prominence that prisons played during the struggle for our Independence as they accommodated the entire leadership and heroes and heroines of the struggle.

COGNISANT at prisons such as Hwahwa, Sikhombela and

Gonakudzingwa were the most notorious incarceration centres at the disposition of the cruel settler regime.

NOTING that other younger democracies have honoured prisons that housed their leaders during the times of tribulation as evidenced by Robben Island Prison which accommodated veterans  of South African Liberation Struggle against apartheid such as Robert Sobukwe, the former President Nelson Mandela to mention a few.

NOW THEREFORE RESOLVES: That the following Prisons – Hwahwa, Sikhombela and Gonakudzingwa be accorded the recognition of monumental status in honour of our leaders as His Excellency the President R.G. Mugabe, Joshua Mquabuko Nkomo and many others who underwent imprisonment.

         MR. E. MUDZURI:  I second

  1. KANZAMA:  Mr. Speaker Sir, I move the motion standing in my name that this House resolves that the following prisons Hwahwa, Sikhombela and Gonakudzingwa be accorded the recognition of monumental status in honour of the founding fathers of an independent

Zimbabwe.  The likes of Father Zimbabwe, Dr Joshua Mqabuko Nkomo,

President R.G. Mugabe, the late vice presidents, Joseph Msika and John

Nkomo, Comrades Edgar Tekere.  Also, Josiah and Ruth Chinamano,

Leopold Takawira, Maurice Nyagumbo, Naison Ndlovu, Sikhanyiso

Ndlovu, Charakupadenga Hundu, Kissmore Benjamin Kaenda, Jane

Lungile Ngwenya, Tamburai Matshalaga and Christopher Ndlovu to name but a few.  These sites bear a unique or at least exceptional testimony to our national liberation history.

Mr. Speaker Sir, just to mention that even some of our Speakers including yourself, Hon. Minister Mnangagwa, Hon. Didymus Mutasa are also some of the detainees that are on record to maintain the history of Zimbabwe, they should also be respected because they are part of our detainees.

Mr. Speaker Sir, a brief historical background of the life of inmates at these prisons will help us to understand why they would be declared national monuments.  The detainees were kept under armed guard and always in leg irons.  Life was not easy for them and they were allowed to walk about four kilometers to the west of the camp towards the cleared land and almost the same distance eastwards towards uncleared game land.  Trying to escape was an impossible task tantamount to suicide, since the reserves were infested with marauding lions.  Prisoners would be organised into groups of seven and they would prepare food for themselves for fear of being poisoned by the white settler regime authorities.  This is just but a glimpse of the suffering our leaders went through to have this nation freed.

Mr. Speaker Sir, it is a shame to note that, 33 years down the independence lane, these former detention centres have never been given any significant national recognition befitting their historical weight.  Only concrete slabs now remain especially at Gonakudzingwa and as a nation, we should seriously look into ways of rehabilitating such an iconic place into a national monument.  I think we can all agree that the present appearance of the former detention centres and prisons leaves much to be desired.  Very soon we will be celebrating our thirty-third

Independence Anniversary and we can all make a difference as hon.

Members of Parliament if we all support this motion.

  1. D. SIBANDA: On a point of order Mr. Speaker.  Is the Hon. Member doing his maiden speech or he is debating because I can see him reading.
  2. SPEAKER:  Order, certainly he is not doing his maiden speech because he has been here for a while and accordingly, the Member is advised to make reference to his notes.

Order, the Member has requested to read his motion and I have authorised that.  Hon. Kanzama you may continue.

  1. KANZAMA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. My main worry is

that today’s children do not even understand how this freedom we are enjoying came about.  Ignoring this call is tantamount to agreeing to bury the rich history of the emergence of Zimbabwe.  We need to join forces in this journey of remembrance.  These former detention centres and prisons must be fully protected, carefully preserved and perceptively developed as cultural quarters.

Mr. Speaker Sir, this motion is not about gaining or losing political points.  The fact, is we all need to remind ourselves how much we owe those men and women who defied a powerful empire to proclaim the

Republic of Zimbabwe.  We surely cannot leave these former detention camps in a disgraceful condition, that is an insult to the memory of the selfless and gallant men and women whom we should honour.

Mr. Speaker Sir, this motion is neither trying to invent anything out of this world, but to bring home an internationally recognised and celebrated act, which countries like South Africa and USA have implemented.  We should take a leaf from our neighbours in South Africa where some of the notorious prisons like the Robben Island and the Pretoria Central prisons were declared national monuments.  Robben Island, where former South African President, Nelson Mandela and Robert Sobukwe spent years in prison, is now a major attraction world over, with over 300 000 tourists visiting each year thereby generating much tourism revenue for the country.  I believe my fellow Members of Parliament are fully aware of the huge economic potential that the area of cultural tourism continues to hold.  This motion clearly calls on the

Government to invest in cultural tourism.  To the West, is the National

Prisoner of War Museum, a national historic site opened in 1998 as a memorial to the all American prisoners of war.  Many more countries worldwide rightfully honour and remember prisoners of war that way.

Mr. Speaker Sir, ……………

        THE DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Order! Order Hon Kanzama!

  1. KANZAMA: Sorry Madam Speaker, I did not recognize

that the Speaker has left.  Madam Speaker, without further belaboring the importance of national monuments, it suffices to say monumentising these detention camps enhances national identity, whilst serving as significant sources of education, tourism, revenue generation and employment creation.  The former detention camps are rich in history and would act as a fantastic attraction for visitors from home and abroad.  An area of such significance and potential should be restored and protected for the benefit and pride of present and future generation.

At present, much of visiting is left to private individuals.  While that is most commendable, I am certain that if the detention centres and prisons are declared national monuments, the tours to these places will be popular.  There ought to be solid physical evidence of what took place in these camps.  A heritage centre like a museum should be built at one of the former detention centres and Gonakudzingwa would be most ideal.  Such a centre and the creation of such a historical and cultural heritage site will not have to be exclusively devoted to what took place at Gonakudzingwa; but in all prisons across the country.

Gonakudzingwa has been of historical and cultural importance for years and the centre could become the focus of national identity.  The museum would exhibit use of art, photographs, displays and video presentations to focus on the capture, living conditions, hardships and experiences of liberation war prisoners in all periods.

Madam Speaker, the clock is ticking away on this issue.  We should all bear in mind that the events of the 1960s and 1970s were momentous and defining ones for all of the people of this country.  These were the decades of the covenant of the gun, of blood sacrifice and bloody politics, a time of division and war, not only in this country, but across Africa.  This motion therefore presents this august House with a glorious opportunity to further engrave its mark in the history books of Parliament of Zimbabwe.  This can only be done by rebuilding the detention centres to bear eloquent testimony to their somber history and at the same time symbolising the triumph of the human spirit of freedom and of democracy over oppression.

Madam Speaker, I would like to conclude my presentation by urging all hon. members here present to seriously look into the gains the country will realise by declaring the former detention centres and prisons national monuments.  We should strive to leave a legacy of legislators who contributed to the development of this country.  Time is rapidly running out if this goal is to be realised.  So Madam Speaker, may I urge Hon. Members of Parliament to be proud to be Members of Parliament today because of some of the gallant sons whom I have mentioned in my presentation and urge them to support this motion for adoption.  Thank you Madam Speaker.

  1. MUDARIKWA:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  Madam

Speaker, it is my honour and revolutionary duty to rise in this august House to talk about the foundation of our revolution, to talk about the reality of the freedom we have today.

The Chinese say, a journey of 1 000km begins with a single step.  It was the journey of 1 000 years that Smith used to refuse that not in a thousand years will Zimbabwe be free.  The foundation was laid by the heroic sons and daughters of Zimbabwe.  Madam Speaker, I want to make it clear to the hon. members and the people of Zimbabwe that in Zimbabwe, Gonakudzingwa and Sikhombela Prison centres were not run by the Prison Service.  They were run by the notorious special branch of the Ian Smith regime.  The life of a detainee included 90 days in the hands of the special branch.  Many people died in the hands of the special branch.  Some of those who were lucky became disabled.  Some were beaten to death.

I went this morning to the Prison Headquarters and I was given a list of names which included Comrade Leopold Takawira – Shumba yekwaChirimhanzu who died in prison.  I then went to CID

Headquarters, I could not get anything until  I met an old man who said he was a detainee.  Some of the names here show that most of these documents were destroyed.

Madam Speaker, in the hands of the international committee, the Smith Government presented itself as a clean Government and yet their special branch was running detention centres in Gonakudzingwa and Sikombela.  The Gonakudzingwa prisoners were rounded by hungry elephants and that is where they were put in the hands of the special branch to find out from these people what they were planning.  It was very simple, these people wanted their independence.

When there was the Second World War, there were some Zimbabweans who were taken from here who went to join the British and as they were shouting, the British were saying; “The Germans must get out of all these countries.  Germans must rule Germans.  The British must rule the

British.  Africa for us all”.  It really showed a situation where Africa was declared a no man’s land.  These heroic fighters had to stand up; in a process they had to educate people because the process of colonization involved the washing up of the brains of most of our people.  Many people used to believe that the country belonged to the Rhodesians.

When they were taken from the 90 day period, they were then moved to some detention centre – those with possible criminal records were brought back to jail.  It was a very difficult life; if you go to Gonakudzingwa – all the detainees used to sleep in tin houses, on wire mesh with no mattresses.  All these things were meant to make life very difficult for our people.  There was no running water, they were denied medical treatment.  A simple disease like sugar caused the death of Cde. Leopold Takawira.  This is what our people must know; this is what our people must understand that the process of laying the foundation of the revolution needed brave men.  It needed very brave men not a situation where we now have warlords operating at the University of Zimbabwe, warlords of urinating in refrigerators.  It was a situation which demanded people to stand as one and all these people in detention never asked anyone are you Shona are you Ndebele or are you Karanga?  They all said, ‘We are Zimbabweans’.

I would also want, Madam Speaker, to take this opportunity to salute the World Council of Churches which provided literature to most of the prisoners who had the chance to further their education.  The reason why these people were detained is that they said they wanted their independence.  They had songs they used to sing in prison, one of the songs was, soja rababa sunga utare kana ndozofa usare uine nhaka.  This meant the people who were in detention understood that it was critical now to move to a second stage of our struggle - a struggle of armed struggle, that is why they were saying soja rababa sunga utare kana ndozofa osara uine nhaka.

In the process, some of the prisoners were released.  They then had the chance to sneak out of the country like Cde. Robert Gabriel Mugabe; Cde. Joshua Nkomo.  They then mobilised arms to be used, they moved to friendly countries.  They had the common goal of the enemy of my enemy is my friend.  So, they went to countries like China, Russia,

Yugoslavia – to mobilise arms and these arms were then used to fight in crushing the enemy so that the enemy would agree to move to the Lancaster House Conference.

Madam Speaker, for the record for Hansard, it is critical that I hand-over this information to Hansard and some of these names - I have here the late Cde. Zvobgo; Cde. Tekere; Cde. Malenga; Cde. Mugabe;  Cde Nkomo.  There are many names here but what is important here again, in all these lists of names there are also women’s names that are here.  The women were also detained, suffering for the independence of our motherland.

Madam Speaker as we fulfill the constitutional process, the stage we have reached on the Constitution process now is the finalisation, completing of our armed struggle; completing what all these people laid the foundation. So, I must also take this opportunity to salute the people who were in COPAC that they fulfilled what Mbuya Nehanda died for – the total independence of the people of Zimbabwe whether black, white or coloured everybody in Zimbabwe was freed.  Also, in the

Constitution, the people who were regarded as aliens from Malawi, Mozambique and Zambia – after the constitutional process, they are going to be Zimbabweans.  Our independence, I can talk of the history of ZANU – the first land rover that ZANU got when it was launched in

1964 was a donation from Cde. Hasting Kamuzu Banda.  He is

Malawian and we had a lot of support from Zambia and Mozambique.

So, the element of saying, ‘mubhurandaya, mubwidi, muMoskeni’, is unAfrican.

It is not within the spirit of Pan-Africanism; it is not within the spirit of Kwame Nkrumah; it is not within the spirit of Julius Nyerere;

Amilcar Cabral; Ernesto “Che” Guevara who came to Africa from Latin America to assist the people of Congo to fight against imperialism.  The struggle is in our hands, we are the generation to move Zimbabwe into the land of Canaan; the land of milk and honey.

Madam Speaker, I want to thank you for allowing me to stand and debate in this august House.  Those who were listening, I salute you; those that were not listening, I also salute you for not making noise

 

when I was giving this great lecture.  Madam Speaker, thank you very much.

HARARE REMAND PRISON

1965

NAME                  CHARGE                       AUTHORITY           D.O.A   DATE OF DISPOSAL

                                                                      OF DETENTION                       RELEASE

  1. Zvobgo State of Emergency         Min of L/O            08.11.65
  2. Tekere State of Emergency         Min of L/O            08.11.65
  3. Malenga State of Emergency         Min of L/O            08.11.65
  4. Malowa State of Emergency         Min of L/O            08.11.65
  5. Mugabe State of Emergency         Min of L/O            08.11.65
  6. Mduku State of Emergency         Min of L/O            08.11.65
  7. Shonhiwa Phibion State of Emergency Min of L/O            11.65                           To Restriction

06.05.69

  1. Chigure Shirihuru State of EmergencyMin of L/O             08.11.65
  2. Thomas Ziki F.Kurimwi State of Emergency Min of L/O  11.65                           Released 07.09.68
  • Katungwe State of Emergency         Min of L/O            11.65      13.12.65      To F/E18.11.65

 

  • Peter           State of Emergency         Min of L/O  11.65     13.12.65      Released13.12.65
  • Mapfuo John Masawi State of Emergency Min of L/O  11.65      13.12.65      Released13.12.65
  • Charles Nheweyembwa State of Emergency Min of L/O  11.65      13.12.65      Released13.12.65
  • Efrim           State of Emergency         Min of L/O            11.65      13.12.65      Released13.12.65
  • Naison Disi State of Emergency         Min of L/O            11.65      13.12.65      Released13.12.65
  • Takaendesa           State of Emergency         Min of L/O        11.65      13.12.65

Released13.12.65

  • Saul           State of Emergency         Min of L/O            11.65      16.12.65      24.12.65
  • Solomon Nkomo State of Emergency Min of L/O            11.65
  • Stephen Nhamburo State of Emergency Min of L/O              11.65                          02.12.65
  • Jeffrey Padzakashamba State of Emergency Min of L/O  11.65                          02.12.65
  • Isadore Kumiri State of Emergency Min of L/O            11.65                          02.12.65
  • Reki Mashayamombe State of Emergency Min of L/O  11.65                          02.12.65
  • Mboye Gambi State of Emergency          Min of L/O            11.65                          02.12.65
  • Robert Nhamu Muriri State of Emergency Min of L/O  11.65                          02.12.65
  • Reuben Nyamweda State of Emergency Min of L/O             11.65                          02.12.65
  • Tamayi Vivian Mpofu State of Emergency Min of L/O  11.65                          02.12.65
  • Addas Makaza State of Emergency Min of L/O            11.65                          02.12.65
  • Michael Musembiri State of Emergency Min of L/O   11.65           16.12.65
  • Nicholas Dave Mutero State of Emergency Min of L/O  11.65                          02.12.65
  • Francis John Mutungamiri State of Emergency Min of L/O   11.65                          02.12.65
  • Simon Bepete State of Emergency Min of L/O           11.65                      02.12.65

 

PRISONS WHERE POLITICAL PRISONERS WERE DETAINED DURING COLONIAL ERA

HARARE REMAND PRISON

PRISON                                                                                                  DATE OF             DATE OF

NUMBER             NAME                            OFFENCE                                     ADMISSION     RELEASE

  1.                     Zvobgo                        State of Emergency    08.11.65                                        N/R
  2.                     Tekere                         State of Emergency    08.11.65                              N/R
  3.                     Mugabe                       State of Emergency    08.11.65                                        N/R

Cephas George Musipa State of Emergency    20.12.65                                                                                    03.01.66

Chenjerai Hitler               State of Emergency    18.04.66                                    06.05.66

Enos Nkala                      State of Emergency    04.06.66                                    21.12.66

Mordekai Hamutyi          State of Emergency    04.06.66                                                              04.06.66

Simon Vengai Muzenda State of Emergency    04.06.66                                                                                            N/R

 

Leopold Takawira           State of Emergency   04.06.66                       N/R

Ndabanigni Sithole          State of Emergency    04.06.66                                                             19.02.69

 

PRISON                                                                                                  DATE OF             DATE OF

NUMBER             NAME                            OFFENCE                                     ADMISSION     RELEASE

Edison Sithole                 State of Emergency    04.06.66                                        N/R

Kenneth Manyonda         State of Emergency    04.06.66                                                             21.12.66

Morris Nyagumbo           State of Emergency    28.06.66                                                                  N/R

Emmerson Munangagwa State of Emergency    01.10.66                                                                                            N/R

180/73                   Ndabaningi Sithole          Detainee                              20.03.73                                                        30.04.74

 

WHAWHA PRISON

PRISON                                                                                                  DATE OF             DATE OF

NUMBER             NAME                            OFFENCE                                     ADMISSION     RELEASE

176/64                   R. Mugabe                       Detainee                         NIL                             TxHarare Remand

Prison:15.12.64

74/64                     Munetsi Mark Nziramasanga Trade Unionist         NIL                                                Tx Marondera Prison:05.03.65

444/78                   Richard Ndlovu               Law & Order M/Act              16.11.78                           08.12.79

171/78                   Dzikami Calisto Mavhaire Law & Order M/Act              11.05.78                                                                          03.07.79

416/78 Cephas G. Msipa             Law & Order M/Act 16.1178 11.06.79
186/78 Enos Nkala                      Law & Order M/Act 11.05.78 26.11.79
PRISON                                                                               DATE OF    DATE OF
NUMBER  NAME                            OFFENCE             ADMISSION   RELEASE
424/78 Jethro Dauramanzi           Law & Order M/Act 16.11.78 07.08.79
188/78 Canaan Banana                Law & Order M/Act 11.05.78 26.11.79
157/75 Amos Benard Midzi         Law & Order M/Act 01.10.75 18.04.78
60/76 Sidney Donald Malunga Law & Order M/Act 25.03.76 4 Sept.
211/76 Andrew Langa                 Law & Order M/Act 28.08.76 18.10.77
255/76 Welshmen Mabhena        Law & Order M/Act 14.1076 03.07.79
70/78 Abel  Tabona Swela         Law & Order M/Act 08.05.78 08.01.80
120/78 Chipo Nolan Makombe Law & Order M/Act 09.05.78 26.11.79
615/78

 

Abedinico Ncube             Law & Order M/Act 18.12.78 06.11.79
CONNEMARA PRISON
1326/65                 Enos Nkala                      Law & Order M/Act 15.04.65 28.04.65
1349/65                 Leopold Takawira            Law & Order M/Act 08.04.65 09.04.65

 

 

 

KHAMI  MAXIMUM

PRISON                                                                       DATE OF    DATE OF
NUMBER  NAME                    OFFENCE              ADMISSION   RELEASE
814/65 Shadreck Chipanga Law & Order M/Act 24.09.65 23.05.72
73/75 Kemb Mohadi Law & Order M/Act 18.11.75 22.03.80

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Restrictees at Gonakudzingwa – End of October, 1966

 

Name                                            Period of           No of chn. Or                                                 Restriction                 Dependents

  1. BAKE J.                            3 yrs                                     4
  2. BASOPO S.                        1                                           1
  3. NGONI S.T.                       5                                           5
  4. BHEPE R. M (BYO)         5                                           6
  5. BOBO C.                           3                                           4
  6. BVUNZAWABAYA -     - 7. BWAWA J.    3     11
  7. CABUDA W.                   4                                           7
  8. CHAFACHAROW W. M. 5                                     4
  9. CHAGADAMA M.N. -                                           12
  10. CHAKANYUKA E. 4                                           2
  11. CHAKANYUKA G. 5                                           6
  12. CHANDO T. C.                 3                                           12
  13. CHAMISA D. M.          1                                           16
  14. CHAPARADZA T. -     - 16. CHARLES G.   5     6
  15. CHIBANDA O.                  5                                           11
  16. CHIBUMU P. -                                           9
  17. CHIFAMBA M. (BYO) 1                                           8
  18. CHIGARIRO R. (BYO) 5                                           5
  19. CHIGWIDA G. S.          5                                           9
  20. CHIGUDU S. L.          3                                           1
  21. CHIHATA M.S.          2                                           9
  22. CHIHORO J.D.                  3                                           6
  23. CHIKOMO M.M.          3                                           7
  24. CHIKAKA P. 5     - 27. CHIKWANHA C.D.  1     6
  25. CHILIMANZI M.A.(BYO) -                                     14
  26. CHIMBGWANDA B.B. 3                                           -
  27. CHIMUKOMBE G. 5     - 31. CHINEMBIRI T.H.  3     5
  28. CHINGUWA N.          3                                           7
  29. CHINYERERE C.E. 3                                           9
  30. CHIRENDA H.          2                                           5
  31. CHIRUMEKO T.          -                                           7
  32. CHIRINDA J.            5                                           7
  33. CHIRIPANYANGA 5                                           8
  34. CHITATU S.                   2                                           2
  35. CHITIYO J. 3                                           6
  36. CHITONGO C.          5                                           7
  37. MPOFU (BYO)                  5                                           5
  • MPOFU S. (BYO)         3                                            5
  • MPOFU S.M. (BYO)         5                                           10

MPOFU T. V (Byo)            2                                           4

  • MSIMANGA A. (Byo)        2                                           6
  • MSIMANGA N. (Byo)        5                                           11
  • MSOSO G.                          3                                           5
  • MTENGWA W.                  3                                           5
  • MTINSI S. B. (Byo)          5                                           4
  • MUTONGWERA K.          3                                          4
  • MUCHENJA W.               2                                           1
  • MUDENGE S. I.                 1
  • MUDOKWENYU              3                                           4
  • MUDUMWA S. B.           3                                          7
  • MUGUNI B. M. (Byo)       5                                           7
  • MUDZINGWA M. C.         5
  • MUHWATI               3                                           7
  • NUJAJATI A.                    5                                          6
  • MUKARATI T. G              5                                           3
  • MUNGADZI B.                5                                           12
  • MUKUNGURUTSE         3                                           7
  • MURAPE                          5                                           12 220 MURISI J. W.      1
  • MUNOIWA J. C.                  3
  • MUHUBI B.                    3                                          3
  • MUSANDA J.                    3                                          8
  • MUSAKA S.                    2
  • MUSAKWA B. E. K.         5                                           3
  • MUSEMBURI M.                5                                           1
  • MUSARIRIR M. D.           2                                          1
  • MUSHORE T. E.                  3                                          7

228 MUSHORE J. M. (BYO)      3                                           7

MUSORA N.                        3                                          4

  • MUSONZA K.
  • MUTASA R.                    5                                          2
  • MUTEMBO J. (BYO)        2                                          6
  • MUTANDA T. C. (BYO) 2                                           6
  • MUTETWA N. G.              3                                           14 235 MUTUNGIRA F.                   5                                          11

236 MUTUSWA J.                        2                                          5

 

  1. F. M. SIBANDA: I am persuaded to contribute to this historical motion by my colleagues from ZANU PF – Hon. Kanzama and Hon. Mudarikwa.

I plead with them to allow me to amend/change or to add flesh to their main resolution.  That is cognizant that the prisons such as Hwahwa, Sikhombela and Gonakudzingwa should be noted.  I think they have left something; we have to be representative as liberators.  You see, Gonakudzingwa is in Masvingo, which was very strategic because they wanted those people to be eaten by animals.  Sikhombela is in Midlands, where I come from; Hwahwa is in Midlands.  Smith’s regime was very strategic that it induced terror every inch of Zimbabwe, whether in the sea, in the air or on land.

So, I would plead with the movers that they also include Harare Central Prison where executions of liberators were done.  It is very important that Harare Prison should also be noted for whatever decoration of commemoration.  We come again to Bulawayo, part of the southern region.  There was a very notorious camp where Hon. Mohadi and others survived which called ‘Stomp Camp’, near Rose Camp.  It is so notorious that our people were castrated, murdered or incinerated and we have not seen those people to date.  So, I am saying, this has to be also included in their main resolution.

The fourth but not the least, Khami Prison – if you do not talk about Khami Prison in Zimbabwe you might have forgotten historical perspectives of liberation torture and genocide.  People like Masuku, Dabengwa and myself were tortured in Khami Prison for reasons that we wanted to liberate the people that are in this House. I speak without fear; I am one of those unsung liberators of this country.  Not a war vet, I am still active because I am still an active member of the liberation movement.  The moment I turn 90, I will be a war vet because I would now be a pensioneer.

Hon. Speaker, this is a historical fact. In 1965, when I was at Gloug Ranch Mission doing my Standard 6. We were organised by people who were doing agriculture and then we demonstrated against UDI in 1965 at Gloug Ranch Mission just near Nyathi. I was one of those people who were arrested while I was under 21 and under 18.

After being arrested, we were shifted to Inyathi, a charge office and detained and voted. Shifted at night, blindfolded to Gonakudzingwa but because of my age, I met Martin Nziramasanga and Chenjerai Hunzvi, the former leader of war veterans at Gonakudzingwa. We were then transferred to Hwahwa because of our age. I will leave it there because that is not important but the important thing is that most of the unsung heroes are unsung and unrecognized.

This motion pleases me because it touches who is a hero and who is a heroin of Zimbabwe. In 2008, I moved a motion, ‘A by-partisan selection of heroes’. Today people are talking about these people. We accept that we have to recognise prisons but what of the inmates who died there. Who are those? I have some who have never been sung in this country; Henry Hamadziripi, Crispen Mandizvidza, Charles Chikerema Dambudzo, Charles Chikerema, a friend of George Nyandoro Bonzo but Bonzo is lying at our National Heroes Acre but Chikerema has never been sung. Kenneth Mano and many others.

Jane Ngwenya is one of the heroes of the struggles who is not even recognised today. We have Jim Nthutha who has been posthumously made a hero. Joseph Masuku Commander but what I am saying is that, this motion is right and relevant this time. God has inspired the movers so that we augument this equation of who is a hero and which prisons should be honoured. It will be unreasonable, Madam Speaker, that we honour and decorate prisons historically so that we recognise them for their work and alas, do not recognise the prisoners. I am saying this is very strategic. It has to be non-political and non-partisan so that the future generation when they talk of who is a hero and heroine, they take this history as Hon. Mudarikwa and Hon Kanzama have put it correctly that these prisons were to torture and eliminate the so-called trouble shooters.

Ian Smith is recognised as one of the persons who engineered genocide but was never brought to the International Court of Justice. In this case we should start afresh. Look at all the people who eliminated our heroes and consequently, also go further to say brother to brother who eliminated them should be brought to justice. However, I am happy that our Constitution, the one that we are going to adopt says anyone who is above 70 is not going to be hung and I pray that the younger generation should desist from torture and inhumane degradation of other people by people.

Lastly, I am challenging the mover before they wind it up to amend the sections that I have referred thereafter. I thank you.

  1. HLONGWANE: Thank you for affording me this

opportunity to briefly add my voice to this very important motion. I want to thank the mover of the motion Hon. Kanzama for bringing this very important reminder to the House of Assembly for discussion.

Let me state at the outset that I do support the motion as moved. I also do support the amendments as proposed by the recent Speaker, Hon Sibanda that maybe the motion must reflect, not necessarily be representative. When our heroes were being detained, I do not think there was any representation about it but that they were being detained at various centres across the country. In an important motion as this one, it may very well do us a good favour to then state all the detention centres that our heroes went through or were detained in as a way of trying to extract them out of the liberation struggle.

One of the most important things or debates in this country is the intersection of the entirety of our population in celebrating the liberation struggle. There is no one in their right sense of mind in this country who does not only allude to the importance of the liberation struggle but celebrate that struggle. That is why during Independence Day, we all come together in a by-partisan format and do celebrate the achievement of that hard won independence.

It will be remiss, Madam Speaker, if on the one hand, we celebrate our liberation history in the manner that we do in this country, especially since the formation of the Inclusive Government, without going back to also honour, not only the people that suffered so much for this country, by way of them being detained at the detention centres like Sikhombela, Khami and so forth as mentioned in the motion. But we also need to honor those places, to recognise the importance of those places as part of the historical footprint that led to the achievement of our independence.

Let me also talk about the suffering that our heroes, dead and alive went through, the pain that they suffered during the detention that they experienced. Hon. Sibanda has already referred to one painful experience of castration. When a man is castrated, he is rendered impotent and he is then not able to perform another important physical and emotional function in his life. Beyond that, it is the pain that goes with that. When someone is castrated, they feel very isolated in society. They do not feel like they are equal to other people. They feel like they are an outcast. That psychological trauma that gathers as a result of that and the difficult emotional experiences that accumulate as a result of that cannot be stated or quantified in any manner.

This was a very painful process and a lot of these our heroes, some of them that are still alive or died in these detention centres went through this very painful process. I wonder how many of us today, if you were to be subjected or even threatened with castration, will be able to stand

your ground in terms of remaining resolute in defending your objectives or the national objectives of this country. This is a point that we must all reflect upon and say what it is that our heroes went through.

The other aspect, Madam Speaker, is the issue of isolation from family, friends and the greater national community of Zimbabwe. This was another very painful experience which has its own psychological challenges. Obviously, when you are isolated from your family, it obviously leads to the destruction of the social fabric, starting within your family and it has a ripple effect because we are talking of several of these heroes that went through this kind of process.

Others were threatened with death. The Minister of Defence here, Hon Mnangagwa, was supposed to be sentenced to the gallows. He was supposed to have his head cut off. He was saved by his age at that time. He was young and therefore rendering him not to qualify for the death penalty. He served 10 years in prison. All that together with several other heroes that are living – our President, of course, chief among them suffered at the hands of the Smith regime. This is something that we need to note as Parliament.

Beyond that, it is important to note that the detention centres that they went through must be recognised as a very important footprint of our liberation history. The debate about who is a hero and who is not, unfortunately Hon. Sibanda has left the House. When it comes to this important motion that has been raised, I want to bring something to the attention of the House that by honouring these detention centres in the manner that the mover of the motion requested. It will help us to move away from declaring dead people heroes and not recognising those that are alive as heroes as well.

It is important that we need to evolve as a community and begin to recognise the liberation work that has been done by heroes that are living today and we begin to honour them whilst they are still alive. There is no point in honouring them when they are dead all the time as if we are saying they should not enjoy seeing us celebrating the work that they did whilst they are still alive.

In that sense, I support categorically in every sense the debate as moved that we name the detention centres national historical monuments.

  1. CROSS:  I am one of the generations that went through the detention centres and I was detained in 1969 by the Smith Government. I want to say that I to support this motion this afternoon.

I think it is important for a nation to identify the people who contributed to the struggle for freedom. I think that the men and women who were detained by the Smith Government over many years made enormous sacrifices for ordinary men and women of this country. I was a personal friend of Ndabaningi Sithole  and Joshua Nkomo. In fact, I got to know Joshua Nkomo very well after his release from detention.

One of the things that I really celebrate with the old man was his absolute absence of any kind of sense of bitterness or hatred. He was absolutely forgiving, much in the same way as Mandela in South Africa. We need to pay tribute to these men and women. It is a great shame that places like Gonakudzingwa have not been protected up to now. This is a great opportunity to recognise the sacrifices these men and women made to the history of this country and the freedom of our people.

We should definitely highlight and I want to highlight Gonakudzingwa – this is one centre that perhaps needs specific attention. For the rest, what I would like to suggest is that we ask the Monuments Commissioner to establish in museums of our country, a facility which will record the role played by our prisons in the suppression of our people during their struggle for liberation.

I am a white Zimbabwean and I hope my black colleagues will accept this from me, that I am proud to be one of the generation that played a small role in the fight for freedom.

*MRS ZINYEMBA:  I would like to thank hon. members who

have spoken before me so that we can create our own history of where we came from and where we are going. We need to identify particular places and areas which have a bearing on our history so that these places are accordingly named.

We say this is an appropriate time because it comes at a time when we have just concluded our constitution making process. I remember when I made my contribution on the Constitution, I started by thanking the Lord and I said the Lord has brought down the Holy Spirit  so that as people of Zimbabwe we may find guidance.

I would like to tell you about my experiences when I visited my siblings in England. Before I got to England, when you look at history, it is very essential and you will find that when you look at all the names which were given by the people who colonised our area, you will find that they named the places after their areas. A good example is Salisbury. Even the area where I come from, Glendale - you will find that all these names came from Britain. So, when I visited England I came across a place called Glendale.

You will notice that these people, wherever they came from, they always wanted to remember where they came from. You will find that these people whenever there was something like a war fought at some place, there is always a shrine which was erected. When I go to England, I am not very much interested in their shops, but I am talking about their history.

My siblings did not go to England because of the problems faced by the people who want to seek refuge but they went there legally. When

I was there, my children took me to St Paul’s Cathedral. You will find that the people of my contemporaries like Hon F. Sibanda, who talked about the river Thames and all those areas – I toured that area in the evening and when I got to St Paul’s, I noticed that it was really a holy church.

My child promised to take me to the church the following day at 1100 am.  Upon arriving, we paid some money because that place is now regarded as a tourist attraction.  As he paid that money, he warned me that when I get in and come out, I will be hurt. That surprised me why my son should tell me that when I get into the holy place I will come out an angry person. As a result, I entered that place and I am pleading with those people who might have a chance to go to England, may you please pass through St Paul’s and you will find how our colleagues appreciate their history.

You will find that they deny us the opportunity to change the names of our areas especially places like Joshua Nkomo. What they say is that we will be wasting our resources changing the names. To my surprise, when I got into the St Paul’s Cathedral, I saw statues of their saints and these included our very own Bernard Mizeki. I was very glad to find that Bernard Mizeki of our country is also in this area. When I was somewhere in the middle of the church, I started seeing statues of their heroes who fought in these countries. I kindly ask anyone of you that when you get to these areas, you will find that I continued to view all this and I noticed that they respect the people who fought for their country, their heroes.  When I was nearing the altar,  I saw that they also had statues of people like the late Josiah Magama Tongogara in their church and yet in our country, we feel that it is taboo to put the statue of

Tongogara in our churches.  My child also took me around the place and one of the places looked similar to the Anglican Cathedral adjacent to our Parliament building.

I was shown graves which were inside the church, they do not suffer from the inclement weather, because they are inside church buildings.  The inscriptions on these graves talk about the contributions which were made by these heroes in advancing the British Empire.  Therefore you find that the Roman Catholic and the Anglican churches used to bury their people inside the church grounds or inside the churches because of their heroic performances, religiously or otherwise.

This is very special to the people of Zimbabwe, let us not be confused by these colonialists who are denying us the right to know where we are going and recognizing the role played by our heroes and heroines in the liberation of our country.

Madam Speaker, we have started our current session well.   We made that agreement when we accepted our draft Constitution as legislators.  We all broke into song and dance when we approved the report of the Constitution.  This shows that we have laid down a good foundation.  Yes, we may differ in our beliefs and political ideologies, but as stated by His Excellency, President Mugabe, Zimbabwe is our first priority and everything else plays second fiddle.  He said we should develop our country first.

The Lord intervened by making us successfully go through our Constitution making process.  Therefore, let us forge ahead on this noble cause.  If we differ in our political ideologies, let us look at our differences and compromise and congratulate each other on developmental ideas submitted by our opponents.    First and foremost, Zimbabwe is important.  We have many heroes who died, some of them laid in unknown tombs.  Therefore, we need to strive for the prosperity of our country.

  1. MNKANDLA:  I would like to extend my gratitude to the colleagues that came up with such a noble idea which indeed should be national in character.  These kinds of motions would go a long way in unifying this polarised country if they are well constructed.  A people without a history are just as good as phantoms that have shape and form but no substance.

Madam Speaker, to those who crafted this motion, I believe they want to propagate the importance of our history that this nation like many other nations, underwent crucial times to be where they are today.  Those who contributed and were detained at the various detention centres across the country had, as we all of us would like to believe, noble intentions.  It is very important to honour those men and women who were detained, never mind what their original intentions were.  Just like when we went to the liberation war, it is known there are some people who found themselves amongst the liberation forces.  Some of them rose to high ranks even though initially they left Rhodesia running away from certain crimes.  Those who were detained should be treated as such; they should be recognised for the role that they played.

Madam Speaker, my suggestion would be, after the recognition of these places as shrines or monuments, let them reflect the history as it was then.  If there is a roll of honour, that should be established or erected at each of these places.  Let everyone who passed through those gates be included, for they are the heroes.  I do not understand that those people, some of the names have been mentioned here, who spent so many years at Gonakudzingwa, Hwahwa,  Khami, Skhombula – after independence, we turn around and try to obliterate their contribution to the liberation of this country.  If we want to be nationalistic, really super refined patriots, let us chuck out this partisan feeling that there are better heroes than others.  A hero is a hero.

If the colonial regime arrested the late Vice President, Hon. Joshua Nkomo on one hand and Rev. Ndabaningi Sithole on the other hand, they did not care whether Nkomo and Sithole were in one political party.

All they considered is that those men were enemies to their regime.  Why is it therefore, after independence, we do not want to recognize our own people who stood shoulder to shoulder with others to liberate this country?  No matter how much you say it or shout, those men and women are known in the records of Gonakudzingwa, Skhombula and

Khami that they were inmates at those bases.  In the process of acknowledging these places as our monuments, let us also accept everyone that was there in their own way, they are heroes.  No sane man or woman would have wasted his or her life to go as a visitor to those detention centres, they did not like it.  It was not easy, it was terrible.  Therefore, when those monuments come up, some of us would like to see everyone, including Hon. Eddie Cross who was once detained.

The idea and the philosophy of liberation is based on various ideologies.  It does not necessarily mean that everyone must agree on every political ideology.  I think that is very dangerous.  No-one is a zombie here.  We may have been together in the trenches, but when we get out of the trenches, I may have seen a better life than what you have.  So do not blame me, accept the role that I played during that time.  That is my contribution Madam Speaker.  If you do not want to recognise the role of those ‘other people’, this whole exercise may be an exercise in futility.

We will be cheating ourselves as a nation.  Let us recognise the roles of everyone, whether we like them or not.  Do you like each other in your political parties here – [ HON MEMBERS: No] -  Some of you may go groping and groveling on your stomachs, to find favour with the leadership of the parties but the truth of the matter is that you do not like them.  When they see you they tell you that you are a faithful party cadre.  Let us not look for things that do not exist, let us accept the reality as it is.  When people see you here, they call you Honorable Members of Parliament (MPs), some of you there is no honour to talk about outside Parliament.

MR MADZIMURE:  I want to thank the mover and the seconder

of this motion.  Madam Speaker, over a period of time, people tend to forget history.  The memories of some of them become problems as they grow older.  They lose their memories and some of these issues.  Madam Speaker, the problem that we have is that we take too long to recognise some of the things that we should have recognised long, long back.  The issue of Gonakudzingwa, Sikhombela  and Hwahwa does not require us to move a motion in this House.  We have Ministries that are responsible for some of these things.  These are the things they must be thinking about as they perform their duties.  We have got a department of Monuments.  If that department has never thought about us establishing monuments at these places, then it means we do not have even whom we call the technocrats in those departments.  This issue does not require the whole House to sit down and debate because it is known that people were detained in these areas.  When we campaign we always refer to some of these things.

So, Madam Speaker, I thank the movers because they have reminded those who had chosen not to think.  Madam Speaker, the other unfortunate thing is that some of these things when we start talking about them, we have to recognise the fact that there is a lot of polarisation.  What Hon. Mnkandhla was referring to is a situation where we apply even our history selectively.

Madam Speaker, we have got a lot of people who contributed to the liberation of this country in a very, very big way.  The most unfortunate thing is that even those people are afraid to write their own history whilst they are still living.  I remember one day I was talking to Hon. J Tungamirai before he passed on.  We were in the dining hall there.  When I asked him about what I had heard, who actually conducted the bombing of the petrol tanks.  He narrated exactly what happened.  He got to an extent where he said he was actually slapped by the late General Tongogara when they were talking about the same mission.  He was very clear about who did it and how it was done.

Madam Speaker, today he is late, the history is not written.  The opportunists are going to write and include their names.  That is exactly the same situation we are going to be confronted with as we erect the monuments.  The role of honour will have certain names as the founders whilst prisoners of those detention camps, the actual people who were first detained there are not even included.

Madam Speaker, as a country, we have a serious problem.  We politicised everything.  We always try to make sure that we honour those that we see in an effort to please them not because they will have done the best but just to please them.  Even those who write history, choose to omit.  Madam Speaker, we have got so many video clips and interviews from people like the late General Tongogara. Madam Speaker, on television what you see are small clips. The words that are chosen to be broadcast will have been carefully looked at so that it will not be misinterpreted.

We always do this for our own selfish reasons.  Even if we are going to do what we are supposed to do, which we all agree  that Gonakudzingwa, Hwahwa and Sikhombela, can not be omitted from the history of this country.  If we leave out the imprisonment of those fighters, we would not have completed the history of this country.  As we agree, let us then be serious and say history is history, it is like if you go to Monomutapa today there is that statue, I do not know whose statue

is that.

The reason for it to be kept there is because it is part of history.  Why we have Livingston at the Victoria Falls, whatever the interpretation we can give to the reason, but we have it.  Some people went there with picks and axes and tried to demolish it. The Zambians said it is part of history can you bring it to us or we can even come and lift it if you do not like it because it is part of history.

So, whether you hate someone or you like someone, when it comes to history, it is history, so all those people who were detained - [HON.

F.M. SIBANDA: Like myself] – he is now MDC but when Hwahwa,

Sikhombela and Gonakunzingwa were built, there was no MDC at all.  When someone then decides to join the MDC, he then has to be omitted on the role of honour because avekunzi mutengesi, atengesa kunaani, unotengesa chaunachoka.

As a nation, we are regarded as one of the most educated nation in Africa.  It is unfortunate that we are going down on a steep descent as far as education is concerned.  This is because we have agreed to barter our education system, beating up our teachers, force march our children to rallies and so forth.  So that is part of history and people should not ignore this.  How many teachers have fled the country, good history teachers?  Who is going to teach your children, it builds up to what we are talking about?

If we want to chose to ignore it, yes, you can ignore it but at your own peril.  The results are now there for you to count, 18% is not something which you must be proud of and you ask how many people passed history.  Do we still have people who can teach history even depending on their own memories, even the institutional memories like how did this school started?  So, we are also Madam Speaker, not good writers as Zimbabweans, we do not want to write.  We used to depend a lot from one man call Dzvova, now if Governor Chigwedere goes, no one knows where the likes of Hon. Hlongwane come from.  Even if you ask Hon. Hlongwane, where did he come from, he does not know.  We do not document things even in this House Madam Speaker, you now walk through the corridors and there is nothing.  There is nothing that reminds you how this Parliament came about, how did we come in as Zimbabweans in 1980 and who were there?  We do not have any pictures and now we are talking of Gonakunzingwa out there without talking about here where we are.  So we have got serious deficiency Madam Speaker and I implore my colleagues to be serious about our history.  When we talk about some of these things, we must also realise that when it happened, it happened together as a people. We were all fighting for independence.  How I participated might be different but we were all fighting for the same objective, to free ourselves.  Whoever participated at that time, must be recognized for the effort he puts in the dismantling of the regime that was oppressing the blacks.  So I strongly support the motion and hope that it will be a beginning of recognizing the places and the people who participated irrespective of their political affiliation.

The biggest challenge Madam Speaker is that if we do it in a polarized situation with a polarized mind and recognise those you would want to recognize; when certain changes happen again, we will go in circles.  These other people will also be trying to remove and rewrite the history and the history will become distorted.  So as we do this, if it is going to be implemented, we must ensure that we recognise the people who participated.

  1. DIRUTWE:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  I rise to give

support to the mover of the motion with one tiny adjustment.  It is a very good idea that we rename these institutions but the way I see it, we tend to do what sometimes is called overkill in naming these many places.  With due respect, Your Excellence is an excellent leader and the late Joshua Nkomo, we say rest in peace.  He was a tremendous leader but we cannot have everything named after these two.  There are others who deserve to have these monuments named after them.  We have got an airport, we have roads in every single major town in Zimbabwe named after the President, that is enough.  Let us look for the other leaders that we do not know who were incarcerated in places like these so that it does not become tedious to say Joshua Nkomo this, Joshua Nkomo that.  There are other leaders who perished too.  So whilst it is a very good motion, let the other people who were there share in the glory of the names of these institutions.  I thank you.

  1. MATSHALAGA:  I too would like to support the motion.  I believe it has come up too late in 32 years after independence.  Some of us have been thinking about it but as mentioned by one speaker, we are not sure whether it is the right thing particularly in a polarized House.

What is most inevitable is that this motion has gotten the support of all members and it is very pleasing and encouraging that it is better late than never.  The suggested monuments, I think we need to epitomize institutions that were used by the regime to fight for maintaining unfair and unjust system.  However, you will find these systems….

[I am sorry Madam Speaker I was not on the system].

I said I would like to strongly support the motion which has come late but I would want to emphasise that you have places of torture which are identifiable.  You have places where there were incidents of antiimperialism and you then have areas which have now been identified as monuments particularly in Zambia, Botswana and Mozambique.  I think these will then form some footprints of where we came from.  Currently, I think we over-emphasized the way people were massacred in Mozambique, Zambia and Botswana but the proposal being put by the honourable members is that let us identify areas where our leaders were incarcerated for years.

In addition to that, I have always said wherever you come from, like what Hon. Zinyemba was saying, there are areas where there were small battles.  So my proposal is that you should also recommend for the creation of small shrines where our comrades died fighting for the liberation of this country.  These are very well known and you will have to ensure that you make this a national issue because you do not have to travel to other places.  You can see monuments which will at least describe why people died at that particular scene.  Where, how and what were they fighting for and who were their leaders.  I quite agree that it is better documented so that we do not have people who are going to have situational editorials like as been mentioned by other colleagues.

Madam Speaker, I rise to support the motion and I am sure I am also pleased with this.  I have been associated with the struggle but I have a few or one unkind word to this Parliament.  In other countries, Madam Speaker, Parliament takes the lead in these areas of historic monuments.  They organize trips to go and see those places.  Like the

Parliament of US Senate, they will go and try to see what happened at Hiroshima or the battles in the Second World War.  I have never in the history of this country, ever heard of our Parliament going to even Zambia to see the graves of those who perished in Mozambique.  I would, under this same spirit, urge the Parliamentarians to see whether they can now reunite with their unchangeable historical events and recognise them as they are and not for partisan reasons.

Madam Speaker, I thank you.

  1. MATIMBA: Thank you Madam Speaker. I want to thank

you for the opportunity to discuss this matter under consideration at the moment, more so as it relates to our history as a country and as a nation.  Whereas I acknowledge the contributions made by other speakers who spoke before me, there could be one or two areas where I would want to beg to differ with them as a person because as we are here, we have the independence to differ I suppose.

Firstly, I do agree with Hon. Kanzama as to the need to have the monuments and recognition of those who were in those areas of detention and those who were also tortured there in the prisons.  Further to that, I would like to say, in as much as we take recognition of whatever happened in those areas, it is quite important that as a nation, we would like to honour the people that were in those areas than the areas/detentions themselves.

It is a pity that as we debate right now, the detainees and the war collaborators have nothing on their hands to say they participated in the struggle.  Now, we want to honour these detention places whereas the people who were detained there have nothing to take home.   It is quite a paradox to me.  Let me also say in recognition that these are historical monuments, as a nation, let us come to the age that we do not limit history.

Yes, there was Gonakudzingwa and so many places that are historical.  We have gone through those places but history does not stop as one writer would say, “It flows like a river as it gets to the sea and it continues to flow under the sea”.  Now we have come to a point where in our history, we also have people who have been fighting for the second dimension of freedoms.  They have been detained at Chikurubi Maximum Prison, Matapi Police Station and all those notorious places.  Now, if we are saying we want to be consistent with the history, I think we also need rolls of honour for those who have been detained for just causes like Hon. Minister Biti, Hon. Mahlangu here, Hon. Madzore and even the junior Madzore.

We would also want places like Chikurubi Maximum Prison where more than 29 activists of a particular party had been detained for more than two years.  I think it is consistent with history and consistent with the spirit of this topic as well.  Let me also say as Hon. Madzimure rightfully said, the problem that we have as a nation is that we are a bit slow in making these recognitions and taking action.

I for one would have thought that after independence, the likes of Kumbirai Kangai, Mr Rugare Gumbo and the others should have been given farms and retired and not get into Government because they had seen a lot.  One could not have expected them to make meaningful contributions after more than ten years under hardships.  They should just have been given farms and retired and not to be made part of the Government because they really had nothing residual in them to move the country on.

Madam Speaker, I think as a nation, even right now, we have to take note that these people, who participated in the liberation war, did an immense job and what they need now is retirement.  They do not have any utility anymore to add.  There is no more contribution that they can do.  They have done what Caesar could not do, they were in the trenches for so long and we thank them for that and now is time for retirement.

Thank you Madam Speaker.

  1. C.C. SIBANDA: Thank you Madam Speaker. I rise to support this motion which has been put forward to this House.  That is in realising that the contribution that was done by these icons and the areas that have been mentioned to be considered as monuments for that cause.  Madam Speaker, it goes without saying that this country went through a bitter war and it was fought hence to be liberated.

The people that contributed to this noble cause should be recognised.  I agree with other speakers that it is a bit too late, but it is better late than never, because as we can see, most of the people that are mentioned are the founding fathers of this country and of the nation.

In any country, even in America, they always talk about their founding fathers, even if we know that they had to aggressively remove the Red Indians from that area who have nothing to say now because the nation was invaded and taken over by the foreigners.  But, they still recognise the founding fathers.  They will find them in all their notes and the big cities like Washington D.C are mentioned in their names and that is in recognition of the history of founding a nation.

So, Zimbabwe also went through almost the same process.  So, we need also to recognise as other speakers alluded to, without discrimination or without some people being labeled as having not worked.  When they were fighting at that particular time, they were fighting for their nation or country.  I am looking at it in this way, like in a house.  A house is divided into different sections.  There is a lounge where everybody can be found and there are bedrooms.  In bedrooms, you do not expect to find visitors and everybody there but at the same time it is a house.  The recognition differs from one person to the other in accordance to the contribution that was given by each one of them.

But, at the end of the day, all must be recognised.

Talking about history and the writing of history, we have no one to blame about the history of this country, because in issues of the history, you must write and when you write there is intellectual criticism on what you have written.  What we are criticizing here is at least those who have written even if they have omitted certain issues that you want in Mozambique.  I would, under this same spirit, urge the Parliamentarians to see whether they can now reunite with their unchangeable historical events and recognise them as they are and not for partisan reasons.

Madam Speaker, I thank you.

  1. MATIMBA: Thank you Madam Speaker. I want to thank

you for the opportunity to discuss this matter under consideration at the moment, more so as it relates to our history as a country and as a nation.  Whereas I acknowledge the contributions made by other speakers who spoke before me, there could be one or two areas where I would want to beg to differ with them as a person because as we are here, we have the independence to differ I suppose.

Firstly, I do agree with Hon. Kanzama as to the need to have the monuments and recognition of those who were in those areas of detention and those who were also tortured there in the prisons.  Further to that, I would like to say, in as much as we take recognition of whatever happened in those areas, it is quite important that as a nation, we would like to honour the people that were in those areas than the areas/detentions themselves.

It is a pity that as we debate right now, the detainees and the war collaborators have nothing on their hands to say they participated in the struggle.  Now, we want to honour these detention places whereas the people who were detained there have nothing to take home.   It is quite a paradox to me.  Let me also say in recognition that these are historical monuments, as a nation, let us come to the age that we do not limit history.

Yes, there was Gonakudzingwa and so many places that are historical.  We have gone through those places but history does not stop as one writer would say, “It flows like a river as it gets to the sea and it continues to flow under the sea”.  Now we have come to a point where in our history, we also have people who have been fighting for the second dimension of freedoms.  They have been detained at Chikurubi

Maximum Prison, Matapi Police Station and all those notorious places.  Now, if we are saying we want to be consistent with the history, I think we also need rolls of honour for those who have been detained for just causes like Hon. Minister Biti, Hon. Mahlangu here, Hon. Madzore and even the junior Madzore.

We would also want places like Chikurubi Maximum Prison where more than 29 activists of a particular party had been detained for more than two years.  I think it is consistent with history and consistent with the spirit of this topic as well.  Let me also say as Hon. Madzimure rightfully said, the problem that we have as a nation is that we are a bit slow in making these recognitions and taking action.

I for one would have thought that after independence, the likes of Kumbirai Kangai, Mr Rugare Gumbo and the others should have been given farms and retired and not get into Government because they had seen a lot.  One could not have expected them to make meaningful contributions after more than ten years under hardships.  They should just have been given farms and retired and not to be made part of the Government because they really had nothing residual in them to move the country on.

Madam Speaker, I think as a nation, even right now, we have to take note that these people, who participated in the liberation war, did an immense job and what they need now is retirement.  They do not have any utility anymore to add.  There is no more contribution that they can do.  They have done what Caesar could not do, they were in the trenches for so long and we thank them for that and now is time for retirement.

Thank you Madam Speaker.

  1. C.C. SIBANDA: Thank you Madam Speaker. I rise to support this motion which has been put forward to this House.  That is in realising that the contribution that was done by these icons and the areas that have been mentioned to be considered as monuments for that cause.  Madam Speaker, it goes without saying that this country went through a bitter war and it was fought hence to be liberated.

The people that contributed to this noble cause should be recognised.  I agree with other speakers that it is a bit too late, but it is better late than never, because as we can see, most of the people that are mentioned are the founding fathers of this country and of the nation.

In any country, even in America, they always talk about their founding fathers, even if we know that they had to aggressively remove the Red Indians from that area who have nothing to say now because the nation was invaded and taken over by the foreigners.  But, they still recognise the founding fathers.  They will find them in all their notes and the big cities like Washington D.C are mentioned in their names and that is in recognition of the history of founding a nation.

So, Zimbabwe also went through almost the same process.  So, we need also to recognise as other speakers alluded to, without discrimination or without some people being labeled as having not worked.  When they were fighting at that particular time, they were fighting for their nation or country.  I am looking at it in this way, like in a house.  A house is divided into different sections.  There is a lounge where everybody can be found and there are bedrooms.  In bedrooms, you do not expect to find visitors and everybody there but at the same time it is a house.  The recognition differs from one person to the other in accordance to the contribution that was given by each one of them.

But, at the end of the day, all must be recognised.

Talking about history and the writing of history, we have no one to blame about the history of this country, because in issues of the history, you must write and when you write there is intellectual criticism on what you have written.  What we are criticising here is at least those who have written even if they have omitted certain issues that you want, why not write our own.  We should write the history of this country.  I say so Madam Speaker because I participated in the liberation of this country and up to now, there is nothing I have written.  So who do I blame?

There are a lot of things that I went through and there is a lot that I can write but the fact that I have not written; who then do I blame for not writing what I know?  I think we should encourage ourselves and the nation to write the history.  They should sit down and make sure that they document everything that happened.

When we look at the things that appear on television, I do not think we should blame the one who has done his documentary.  I think everybody has the chance to come up with a documentary and document what transpired.  I have not seen much about ZIPRA but who do you blame?  We should rise up as ZIPRAs and document what we went through   because this country was fought for by two major forces ZIPRA and ZANLA – they both fought for this country.  Most wars that took place in Zambia – serious wars that went for days and a lot of lives were lost but it all goes back to us for not documenting and not writing what we went through.

Madam Speaker, the Gonakudzingwa Prison was a notorious prison during the days where Hon. Vice President Joshua stayed for many years.  There were many other small areas which were small detention camps dotted around the country.  All those are not documented.  Even the late Vice President John Landa Nkomo was talking about one area in Lupane which was used as a detention camp and he wanted something to be constructed there and I would encourage the department in the Ministry of Home Affairs that deals with the monuments to look closely into that and start constructing monuments all over the country so that we keep our history.

History is a way of encouraging tourists to come to a country.  When you go abroad, they ask you about Zimbabwe.  There are some people who know more about our history from other countries.  About two months ago, two old ladies from Sweden visited my Constituent – they were talking about the history of this country.  They were talking about how they housed some of the liberation fighters in their country during the time of war.  They have a keen interest – some of the questions they were asking me were difficult to answer because I had less information than them.  It all goes down to lack of documentation of the events that we went through.

As I alluded to Madam Speaker, I support this motion and would like to thank the mover of the motion and hope that from now on, something will be done so that we can have our history documented properly.

  1. HOVE:    Madam Speaker, I would also like to air my views on this motion raised by Hon. Kanzama.  Having heard several speakers commenting, there are issues of concern to me with regard to how the motion has been structured and I would like to just highlight some of these within the few moments that are before me.

It is true that we have places of detention or imprisonment that some of our elders then were incarcerated in.  Now we raise a motion in recognizing such places – we seem to be diluting the efforts of the people who got incarcerated in those places.  We are supposed to merely focus on the individuals who made the contribution that earned them the stay in such places and not the prisons.  I want to believe that what got them into the prison is more important than the place they were taken to.  When we want to attach historical prominence to prisons, especially particular prisons; I find it problematic because whichever person or name you want to mention here were not born or created in prisons.  The values and beliefs that brought them there are much more important than the place they were taken to.

Madam Speaker, I believe that we need not recognize the prison.

In any case, some of the prisons are no longer there.  For example, Gonakudzingwa, it is now just a ruin.  It is no longer in existence and I think the same applies to Sikhombela again and I am saying as a country we do not have resources.  If we are to build monuments, what it means is that we are going to commit resources to places that are no longer in existence.  Of what benefit will we derive as a nation in reconstruction of Gonakudzingwa and Sikhombela?   I know Hwahwa is still up there.

This issue of singling out specific prisons to the exclusion of others – I also find it problematic because nationalists or political prisoners of that time were not just confined to three prisons.  There is Khami; which also had its fair share of nationalists.  There are also other smaller police cells that also had a significant lot.  Right here in Harare, there are some prisons in Mbare, Highfield in the area I stay and represent, the Mbizi and Machipisa.  Those places also need recognition in our history books if at all we were going to be fair and just.

I know some speakers were talking of examples of what is happening in other countries.  What is outstanding in those examples is that those places are still in use today.  They have not been maintained because they are just objects of appreciation.  Those places are in a good state because they are still being used today.  My question now would be; what is the state of prisons in our countries if we were to rewind and take back the nationalists into our prisons today, would they still come out and still be nationalists? Would they still serve or would they still be visitors or would they still stay in those places for weeks if not years and still be able to come out and fight? If at all we are recognising that prisons as correctional service institutions, they are not meant to destroy the spirit of a human being.

I think having noticed the role the prisons played, we also need to improve the prison conditions in our country to ensure that anyone who gets into a prison for whatever belief will come out with his spirit uplifted. That to me, will be sufficient recognition. Right now, we have people who are serving sentences, some for weeks or a month but when we talk or hear the testimonies of the people we have visited in those places, they tell you it is just as good as a death sentence, yet we have nationalists who went in with no education but they came out with degrees.

It is my humble submission, Madam Speaker, that we need to improve the conditions in our prisons such that people who go in without academic qualifications should come out with sufficient academic qualifications or those who have ailments in those prisons are well taken care of. They have access to medication. They have access to medical staff to treat their conditions.

The other point I want to make with regard to this issue of recognising prisons such as Whawha, Sikhombela and Gonakudzingwa are that, when we begin to recognise institutions, what of the people? What of other places? What of the people themselves? I want to believe that prisons were not the only significant places that contributed or that had a bearing to our fight for independence. What of freedom fighters who actually took up arms who will tell you of battles that they went at particular places? Who will recognise such places?

When you look at our world history, the World War II, recently I was watching some ceremonies that were being done in Russia. They will tell you that there is a battle that defined the direction which the World War II was going to take. At least they recognise other places but the problem with us Zimbabweans is, we come up with noble ideas but those noble ideas tend to neglect the valiant efforts of other heroes’ who will have contributed to our liberation.

I am of the opinion that we equally need to respect the battle fields or battles that were fought at various places and also construct shrines on those places rather than prisons. Prisons were never battle fields.

  1. HLONGWANE: Point of Order.

THE DEPUTY SPEAKER: Order, what is your point of Order?

  1. HLONGWANE: My point of Order is that the Hon. Member

is misleading this august House. The issue that he raises that detention centres are not front lines of the struggle is in fact not correct.

THE DEPUTY SPEAKER: Hon. Hlongwane, if you want to

make that argument I think you can debate. That cannot be a point of Order.

  1. HOVE: Thank you Madam Speaker, I want to start where I had left off. Our prisons are not the only places we should recognise in our country. There are wells, mining shafts, dams, hills or caves and we would want to see monuments constructed at such places. Before we even start talking of the construction of these monuments or shrines, we need also to come up with what we are going to put up on such places to ensure that every contribution made towards the liberation of this country into the future is always obeyed and adhered to. We do not want a situation whereby there are lesser heroes.

I believe everyone when he or she commits himself or herself will not be committing himself or herself for a smaller reward but it is for a bigger reward. It is incumbent upon us to equally recognise each and every effort and recognise it in a manner that inspires future generations to continuously defend this country knowing that there is a reward.

Hon. Dzirutwe put across a very sound point that we do not need to continuously rename these institutions after the same people. It becomes confusing to people like ZIMPOST should someone forget to mention which town or which suburb as if we have a shortage of role models or heroes in our nation. If it has to become our culture of naming places or monuments after our own locals, there are many of them. Therefore, one name, one monument not to have several different monuments named after one individual to the exclusion of others.

I want to even extend the point and say, we do not need to rename institutions when at the point of the contribution or at the point of contact with history they were known as Hwahwa. The moment we allow such a thing to happen, the renaming of a place at the point of contact with history, then we are rewriting history. If a place such as

Hwahwa could accommodate a nationalist, be it Robert Mugabe, Joshua Nkomo, Leopold Takawira or whoever for that matter, did not kill his spirit there, there is no reason for us right now, in our wisdom or lack of it, renaming such places. This is because our future generations are going to miss those places on our map. They will ask you where is this place?

The idea of recognising places should not be tantamount to renaming all these institutions. Let them have or maintain their original names. After all, our prisons are overcrowded. Therefore, common wisdom demands that we construct more prisons. In light of or in honour of such heroes then probably we can now name those new prisons after our own heroes and say because such and such a person went into a prison in 1960 and came out in 1976 a better person, therefore, we want all people who go into this institution to come out better people because our prisons are not meant for killing people but they are meant to rehabilitate people. I believe with that mindset, then we are advancing our history as a nation. We are building our pride as a nation. We are esteeming our ethics as a nation, rather than renaming institutions.

It is my humble submission to you Madam Speaker, we need to build, be it new roads or even new institutions or new towns and rename them after our local people that we are deriving this inspiration from what was started by our ancestors. In that way, I believe we will have advanced our course and that name we will say, it was derived out of recognising such and such a person.

I know they are parallels, you know, that the motion tries to draw. Robben Island has not been renamed, it is still Robben Island. The history behind the naming of that Island Robben, is still there. The fact that Mandela spent over 27 years there, did not give that place the right to be renamed Mandela Island. It is still Robben Island.  So, this motion opens up, according to me, the need for further dialogue on who, what constitutes a hero and who is not a hero. It also opens up an opportunity for us to engage on how we should name places in our country be it hospitals or prisons themselves or any other place.

According to me, this motion also demands that we search our conscience. There are things I have not wanted to divulge or touch on during my debate, but I know of people who were greater heroes, like during the liberation war, whose names now, have been obliterated in our history.  I know of people whose presence would inspire a lot of action or activity in an area just by their mere presence and those people are long forgotten.

Madam Speaker, in conclusion, I believe that heroes’ was not just a frozen time of a frozen period. We continue to have heroes up to now and they are going to come even after our own time all of us here present. However, if we are wise enough, let us clear the way. Let us set the form in which places are to be named, not just of dead people but of even those who are alive. Heroes should not be celebrated when they are dead. They should be celebrated when even they are alive.

We should be focusing more on what they have contributed when they are alive such that we draw inspiration even from the living legends rather than to wait for someone to die then we consult mediums. Then we claim Zimbabwe is a Christian country or we prophecy to be a Christian country. Again I see a contradiction there.

I therefore, propose that this motion be amended, if not, may be withdrawn because as it is, it does not solve our problems. I heard some speakers talking of the issue of polarisation. It is such kind of motions that perpetuate polarisation and I ask to whose advantage? Who is benefitting? Probably it is the two individuals who have moved this motion, the mover and the seconder, who are trying to carry favour with the powers that be. Thank you.

THE MINISTER OF SMALL AND MEDIUM

ENTERPRISES AND CO-OPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT: I want

to support the motion. Let me read it in order to remind the Honourable that has just finished speaking. The motion says at the end, “NOW

THEREFORE RESOLVES: That the following Prisons Hwahwa, Sikhombela and Gonakudzingwa be accorded the recognition of monumental status in honour of our leaders such as His Excellency the

President R.G. Mugabe, the late Vice President Joshua Mqabuko Nkomo and many others who underwent imprisonment in these prisons”.  It does not say that we need to rename the prisons. It says we need to recognise and turn them into monumentals and I want to support that. Like the motion is saying, other countries have done it in South Africa and so forth.

Madam Speaker, if we really look at what our leaders went through, without them we would not have got our independence. They were imprisoned and they were humiliated and put under very difficult conditions in these prisons. It does not say ….

  1. MAHLANGU: On a point of order.

THE DEPUTY SPEAKER: Hon Mahlangu, I have not

recognised you.

MRS. NYONI: It does not mention any political party. It mentioned our heroes’ and our heroes are those men and women who went to fight for this country. Who were detained and restricted for this country and when things did not change through detentions and restrictions, they took up arms and went out of the country to wedge a war of liberation. Therefore, they deserve to be recognised and those paths they walked through deserve to be recognised.

I am also very happy that we are not just recognising the people who went to war. We are recognising the war collaborators, restrictees, detainees and by doing so we are saying we are recognising people who made a significant contribution to our history. Wherever they walked or were detained, - [MR. MAHLANGU: Order!]- We need to recognise that path. …

THE DEPUTY SPEAKER: Minister, Order! Hon. Mahlangu

what is your point of order?

  1. MAHLANGU: My point of order, with due respect to the Minister whom I respect so much but I think that the mover of the motion or the seconder of the motion are the ones that should actually correct the House about their motion. I think the Hon. Minister is now trying to tell us what the motion means and explain the motion to this

House.  I think that is not her duty. What she was supposed to just do is to come here and debate the motion. After all, do the ministers have the right to debate in this House because you seem to have given favour to other ministers? If they have that right, then they must be told because other ministers have not been given that right.

THE DEPUTY SPEAKER: Your Point of Order is overruled.

May I say you do not talk on behalf of other ministers. They must know their rights. If they must debate then they can. If they do not know their rights, it is no one’s fault.

         THE MINISTER OF SMALL AND MEDIUM

ENTERPRISES AND COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT (MRS.

NYONI):  I am debating and I am a Member of Parliament as well as being a minister. I have a right to debate. I have a right to put my point of view.

  1. HOVE:  On a Point of Order. The Chair has already made a ruling and therefore it requires that the hon. member who is debating should just go into her speech rather than making a second ruling.

THE DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Hon. Minister, may you just talk to

the motion please.

MRS NYONI:  I want to support the motion that we honour these men. You will remember that we now have Township Tourism and we are honouring our heroes through making their houses monuments. It is the same thing when they were detained, when the struggle started, I think we need to do that from where the struggle started to where they lived after the struggle.  All these monuments are important for our nation and children to remind them of where we came from, who our heroes were.

It is very important for us to recognise each other. It is also very important to be grateful to each other and to recognise each other when other people sacrifice. For instance, if you come to my constituency in Nkayi North, there is a place in Gwelutshena where the people who came from Lusaka, the War Veterans rested. We want to recognise them as our children and as sons and daughters who fought for us. When they came back, they rested under that tree and they were addressed by the late Joshua Nkomo under that tree. We want to recognise that tree so that our children will remember that their grandfathers and grandmothers went to fight for them and this is what happened.  There are so many places apart from these places of detention that I think we need to recognise.

Having said that, I am also happy that the way that our prisons are being organised today is much different from the way they were organised during the colonial days. I want to admit that we are short of resources despite the fact that we are now calling them Correctional Service Centres. When you look at what is happening in there, it is really correcting the behaviour of our people. It offers them skills such as music, arts and crafts. All that should be commendable.

What this motion is reminding us is that, whatever we do as Zimbabweans, for our country, we do not need to throw out of the window. We need to remember, recognise, and also live landmarks for our children to remember what other people did for them to bring the peace that we are now enjoying in this country.

THE MINISTER OF SMALL AND MEDIUM

ENTERPRISES AND COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT:   I move

that the debate do now adjourn.     Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume: Wednesday, 13th February, 2013.

ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE DEPUTY SPEAKER

AMENDMENTS TO MOTIONS

THE DEPUTY SPEAKER:  I wish to advise hon. members that

if they would like to make amendments to this or any other motion, they are supposed to submit a signed copy to the Clerks-at-the-Table, hon. members will then have the option to debate both the original and the amendment.

On the motion of THE MINISTER OF SMALL AND MEDIUM

ENTERPRISES AND COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT, the

House adjourned at Fourteen Minutes past Five o’clock p.m.

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