[featured_image]
Download
Download is available until [expire_date]
  • Version
  • Download 69
  • File Size 688.92 KB
  • File Count 1
  • Create Date May 29, 2024
  • Last Updated May 29, 2024

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD 29 MAY 2024 VOL 50 NO 56

PARLIAMENT OF ZIMBABWE

Wednesday, 29th May, 2024.

The National Assembly met at a Quarter-past Two o’clock p.m.

PRAYERS

(THE HON. SPEAKER in the Chair)

ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE HON. SPEAKER

APOLOGIES RECEIVED FROM MINISTERS

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  I have received the following apologies from the Executive: Hon. Prof. N. Ncube, Minister of Finance, Economic Development and Investment Promotion; Hon. K. D. Mnangagwa, Deputy Minister of Finance, Economic Development and Investment Promotion; Hon. E. Jesaya, Deputy Minister of Sports, Recreation Arts and Culture;  Hon. B. Rwodzi, Minister of Tourism and Hospitality Industry; Hon. T.  Mnangagwa, Deputy Minister of Tourism and Hospitality Industry; Hon. W. Chitando, Minister of Mines and Mining Development; Hon. P. Kambamura, Deputy Minister of Mines and Mining Development; Hon. E. Moyo, Minister of Energy and Power Development; Hon Y. Simbanegavi, Deputy Minister of Energy and Power Development; Hon. Dr. S. N. Nyoni, Minister of Environment, Climate and Wildlife; Hon. R. Modi, Deputy Minister of Industry and Commerce; Hon F. Shava, Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Trade; Hon. S. Chikomo, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs and  International Trade; Hon. M. Mutsvangwa, Minister of Women’s Affairs, Community, Small and Medium Enterprises Development; Hon. D. Garwe, Minister of Local Government and Public Works; Hon. Sanyatwe,  Deputy Minister of Home Affairs and Cultural Heritage; Hon.  Machakaire, Minister of Youth, Empowerment Development and Vocational Training; Minister T. Moyo, Minister of Primary and Secondary Education and finally, Hon. A. Gata, Deputy Minister of Primary and Secondary Education.

          HON. MUTSEYAMI:   I have a point of order Mr. Speaker Sir. Good afternoon.

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Good afternoon.

          HON. MUTSEYAMI:   Very well thank you.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Point of order arising from which debate?

          HON. MUTSEYAMI:   From the announcements that you have just made Mr. Speaker Sir.

          THE HON. SPEAKER:   It is a point of observation.

          HON. MUTSEYAMI:   Well noted.  I have a point of observation Mr. Speaker Sir, and I hope it is granted.  May I go ahead?

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Yes.

          HON. MUTSEYAMI:   Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  God bless you. 

          THE HON. SPEAKER: I am sorry, I do not need that sanctimonious compliment.  You may sit down, it is totally out of order. 

          HON. MUTSEYAMI:   Well noted.  I apologise.

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Can you sit down please? – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] - Behave!

          HON. MUTSEYAMI:   I withdraw that Mr. Speaker Sir, and I apologise.

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Thank you.  You may proceed now.

          HON. MUTSEYAMI:   Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. Mr. Speaker, we fully appreciate, with your indulgence, all the apologies that have been put through by Hon. Cabinet Ministers.   Mr. Speaker, it is important to note that if you check the record of Parliament on Wednesdays, we have Ministers who have put apologies and it is more like now a cast in stone.  They have a consistency of putting apologies.  Whilst we appreciate that Mr. Speaker Sir, you need to raise the Office of the Executive to put this challenge of Ministers who are putting apologies continuously and this culture has been happening for quite some time now. Just take note Mr. Speaker, in this House today, we hardly have five Ministers out of a possible of more than 30 Cabinet Ministers. We actually have four Cabinet Ministers, I think we have two here. 

          So Hon. Speaker, with your indulgence, we appeal to you Mr. Speaker Sir, probably to put note to the attention of Cabinet to address this challenge so that Wednesdays we have a full bench of Cabinet Ministers that we can put our questions to for the good of our country.  You have not raised the House with regards to the attention of the Leader of the House for today because we do not have the Leader of the House.   I thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. 

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Some good observation.  However, there are other Hon. Ministers I know who are on duty outside the country like Hon. Prof. Ncube, Minister of Foreign Affairs Hon. Ambassador Shava.  Hon. Minister T. Moyo tendered his apology yesterday.  He is on national duty.  I am not sure of the others.  What I will do -[AN HON. MEMBER: Inaudible interjection]- Do not interrupt me. I will bring this to the attention of the Executive that wherever possible, where the substantive Minister is away, the deputy should be there to assist in responding to questions.  Yes indeed, the list is rather very long in terms of comparison of the total number of our Cabinet Ministers.  So your point is taken, Hon. Mutseyami.  We will look into it.

          Leader of Government Business, Chief Whip?

          HON. TOGAREPI:  Hon. July Moyo is there – [AN HON. MEMBER:  Anonyepa uyo] –

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Who said that? Where is the Seargent-at-Aarms?  Can the Hon. Member who said that, because I did not see his face, please own up?  If we capture you through the camera you will be in trouble.  Can you own up and withdraw that statement?

          HON. TSVANGIRAI:  I apologise and I withdraw.

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Thank you.  Question for oral answers, again, the Whips have favoured us with the list.  I shall be so directed. 

ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

          *HON. MUNEMO:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  Good afternoon.  My question is directed to the Minister of Lands, Agriculture, Fisheries, Water and Rural Development.  There are two programmes that are being executed effectively and efficiently by the Second Republic.  What measures are being put in place by the Ministry so that these two programmes are also extended to other areas in the country?  I thank you.

          *THE MINISTER OF LANDS, AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES, WATER AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. DR. MASUKA):  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  This question is in line with the boreholes that we are drilling in every province, which is a programme which we are executing in various districts.  It is a Government programme that each village head should have a place where we will drill a borehole.  We put up solar power and Jojo tanks and also have drip irrigation in a one hectare place.  We will also have two fish ponds.  Thereafter, we get a company for that village.  Every villager will be a shareholder in that company and then after that it will be business, going forward.

          We have a programme to have 10 000 boreholes before we reach November this year.  At the present moment, we have about 36 groups which are in the provinces busy implementing the programme.  So far we have created about 429 village units.  Before Friday next week, we will have added 535.  We believe that if we continue with this projectile, most of the villages in regions 4 and 5 will be covered.  We are concentrating on those regions where there is less rain.  They can help by giving me the rightful information about what they are referring to so that we can attend.  I thank you.

          *HON. MUNEMO:  My supplementary question is, in Mt. Darwin, as referred to by the Minister, we have seen the audit team coming to check as to how many boreholes have been drilled.  We were surprised when they came to audit whereas there is nothing that was done.  Minister, if it is possible we have a problem of water and if you may help us. I thank you.

* HON. DR. MASUKA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. The truth is from 1980, there are a lot of groups that went around drilling boreholes in villages. We want to have about 100 drilling machines and each district will have its own drilling machine. We will not go and drill boreholes where they have already been drilled. We will check on some of these boreholes if they have enough water, we will do a capacity test.  I am grateful that there were people who went there to check whether there were any boreholes.  That means that area is likely to get some borehole drillings. 

*HON. KASHAMBE: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  We are grateful for the Government programme. Yes, this programme is now in place but the problem is when they drill, they take their time to come up and set the whole thing such that right now, some of these which have been drilled are now getting dilapidated. So I am asking on what measures Government is putting in place so that we can have these boreholes in place before they are dilapidated or collapse again?

*HON. DR. MASUKA:  Hon. Kashambe. The programme of drilling in your area, there are Presidential developmental plans of about 28.  We have drilled boreholes throughout the country.  So far, we have about 2006 boreholes that have been drilled.  Of these boreholes, 229 have been converted into village units.  Some of the challenges relate to the disbursement of resources.  This is what is affecting these programmes.  Sometimes we think of stopping the drilling up until we have managed to source resources so as to put up the village business units and then realise that no, you cannot wait for that.  It is better if we have some money, then resources and the relevant machinery.  Most of our Members of Parliament are also contributing towards the purchasing of fuel so that we continue with the programme of drilling boreholes. We are grateful for being helped.  Please push so that we may be given the requisite resources in order to push this programme.  I thank you.

*HON. HWENDE: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  My question is what measures have you put in place to repair those boreholes that you have drilled?  What measures have you put in place so that you rectify this problem?

*HON. DR. MASUKA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  Thank you for the question.  I am sorry that some of these boreholes are now falling in, but we are happy that you are giving us feedback that we have such a problem. Once you drill some of these boreholes, they then fall in or get dilapidated.  We are grateful for the feedback. If the machinery is a problem, we will look into it.  If it is manpower issues, then we will get the relevant manpower to attend to that. So give me the rightful information where these boreholes are, so that we can find out as to what exactly is happening on the ground.  I thank you.

*HON. MANGONDO: My supplementary to the Minister of Lands, Agriculture is to do with borehole drilling programme which is being affected by the shortage of fuel and the casings.  We have a situation where some of these rigs are parked in Murehwa. They are saying once they get the necessary resources in terms of fuel and casings, they will be going to the natural regions 4 and 5, yet in Murewa, we have a lot of areas that do not have any boreholes at all. My question to the Hon. Minister, what is he doing about ensuring that the rigs that are on the ground do have…

THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, order. It is not what is he doing… You say, what is the Hon. Minister doing.

HON. MANGONDO: My apologies Hon. Speaker. My question is; what is the Hon. Minister doing in terms of ensuring that the rigs that are on the ground do have adequate resources in terms of fuel, casings as well as ensuring that those areas that may not be in natural regions 4 and 5 also get priority in view of the fact that they do not have any boreholes at all? I thank you.

HON. DR. MASUKA: I thank Hon. Mangondo for the question. The question is in two parts. The first is that there are idle drilling rigs on account of them not having fuel or casings. This is reflective of the constrained resources in terms of financing that we are getting from the Ministry of Finance. Once resources are made available, I can assure the Hon. Member that we will be able to accelerate the programme. When we do our budgets, we estimate that a drilling rig would ordinarily be able to do between 350 and 450 boreholes in a year, and that is the reason for arriving at the 100 that we needed to do and that is why we felt it was a five-year programme. Initially that we would be able to do 25 000 communal villages in that period and the 9 villages in all the resettlement and new resettlement areas thereafter.

So it saddens all of us if the resources, as in the rigs are unavailable, but we are unable to do more. My appeal to Hon. Members is that under those circumstances, the drilling rigs are under the supervision of Ministers of State. In our last monthly meeting with Ministers of State for Provincial Affairs and Devolution, the Ministry gave a go ahead for the Ministers of State to accept requests for Hon. Members and others that have the capacity to fuel these rigs to be able to provide the fuel so that these rigs can do more and if you can do the additional aspect of availing casings, then that is also a very good contribution to a noble call.

          The second aspect of this question relates to the redistribution of rigs to regions four and five, especially given the devastating El Nino-induced drought that we are facing. Remember, the Hon. Member worries that we will be withdrawing, re-distributing rigs from a region that ordinarily should have more rainfall than region four and five – that is the fact.

 We are redistributing the 28 drilling rigs that the Government has from regions 1 to 3 to regions 4 and 5.  This is informed by the amount of rainfall that we received last year which is willfully inadequate in regions four and five.  In many instances, 74% of the wards will not have adequate pastures, only 12% of the wards in rural areas will have adequate pastures, and 45% of the wards will have inadequate water.

          So we have as the Government, responded by redirecting these rigs so that they can go to these distressed wards to drill there as a priority first in regions 4 and 5.  So you will see more drilling rigs in the Midlands and Masvingo. Those are the provinces with the highest number of villages in regions 4 and 5, then of course Matabeleland South and Matabeleland North, parts of Mashonaland Central and parts of Manicaland and less in the other areas where rainfall was higher than in regions 4 and 5.  I thank you.

          HON. MUTOKONYI: My question is directed to the Minister of Youth, Empowerment and Vocational Training. In his absence, I will direct the question to the Leader of Government Business, Hon. Ziyambi.

          I want to applaud the Government for ensuring that the youths are getting empowered by availing the funds with the various banks, particularly the Empower Bank and the Youth Bank.  However, we are still witnessing serious challenges regarding access to these funds, in particular in….

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Please, can you ask your question?

          HON. MUTOKONYI: What is the Government doing to ensure that all places are not left behind, particularly in availing funds for the youths in the district and constituencies because the youths are not accessing such funds?  I thank you.

          THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL, AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. Z. ZIYAMBI): Thank you, Mr. Speaker Sir.  I want to thank the Hon. Member for the question.  Mr. Speaker Sir, the Government policy and thrust is to ensure that there is inclusion of youths in terms of political, economic and social activities.  In that regard, that is the reason why His Excellency decided that we must have youth representation in Parliament, and that culminated in some of the youth quota Members of Parliament here so that they articulate more effectively issues to do with the youths. 

Over and above that, coming to the specific question, His Excellency created a Ministry of Youth and Empowerment to do with issues that specifically will be involved in tackling issues that affect the youths, how they can be empowered and it also resulted in the creation of a bank specifically for the youth.  So, all these programmes are tailor-made to ensure that we do not leave the youths behind in every facet of society. 

However, what then happens is that in any situation, it then becomes subject to the availability of funds in our endeavour to ensure that we take care of every aspect of our society and the economy.  The Treasury then allocates funds that are available depending on the scenario that exists at that particular juncture. 

The Government remains committed to ensuring that issues that deal with youths are tackled, and the youth empowerment programme is tackled, hence you will realise that last week, His Excellency launched the National Youth Service that will inculcate that sense of patriotism in youths and the sense to have that appetite to work for their country.

So the short answer is yes, the Government is very much committed to ensuring that the youths programmes are funded and that they are up and about.  I thank you.

HON. MUTOKONYI: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker Sir.  I am very much aware that the Government is availing the funds to the banks.  I was asking if the relevant Ministry could devolve the funds through these banks to the districts. We have a lot of youths with bankable projects but unfortunately, they cannot get the funds.

 So there can be a structure that can ensure that the funds have been put into the bank and then evenly allocated further down to the districts so that if any project proposals are coming from the districts, they can access the funds.  In particular, the youths from Svosve are very serious about horticulture but if they cannot access the funding, it is a challenge.  I thank you.

HON. Z. ZIYAMBI: Thank you Mr. Speaker.  I want to thank the Hon. Member for the question.  Indeed, the general policy is that we want to ensure that all youths access that particular funding.  The specific question on the modalities, if there are any issues that are arising because of the administrative structure of administering the funds, then the Hon. Member now needs to put it in writing so that the Minister, because he is also not part of the banking sector, Empower Bank is a bank separate from the Ministry,  the Hon. Minster can then request such information on how administratively they are ensuring that all parts of the country can access that particular funding.  So with your permission, the Hon. Member can then put that question in writing so that the Minister can then interrogate and request Empower Bank to provide more specific information in that regard.  I thank you.

HON. TSVANGIRAI: Thank you very much Hon. Speaker.  One of the major challenges that young people are facing in terms of financial inclusion is that banks are lending, the interest rates that the banks are charging to young people are too high.  For example, Empower Bank is lending at 30% interest rate. To young people, that is not sustainable.  My question is, what measures can be put in place to make sure that young people can get access to loans at a cheaper rate?  Thank you.

HON. Z. ZIYAMBI: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  On the contrary, the reason why the Empower Bank was created is to ensure that our youths, because they do not have collateral and we want to empower them, they get funding at a concessionary rate with lower interest rates.  I am not aware Mr. Speaker, of any institution that is segregating interest rates, save for Empower Bank that is specifically targeting youths.  Their thrust is to give money on terms that are favourable compared to other financial institutions because they are targeting, particular code of people that we want to empower.  I thank you.

HON. KUKA:  Thank you Hon. Speaker Sir.  My question is directed the Minister of Primary and Secondary Education.  What is Government’s plan to eliminate hot sittings as well as to reduce teacher to pupil ratio in Government schools?

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Technically, you asked two questions.  Can you stick to one question, because hot sitting does not relate to pupil to teacher ratio?  Which one do you want attended to, Hon. Member?

HON. KUKA:  Thank you Hon. Speaker Sir. I want to know the Government plan concerning the hot sitting.

THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. Z. ZIYAMBI):  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  The aim of Government or the Government policy, is to ensure that no child in Zimbabwe is left out of school.  That is the primary aim.  We want to ensure that all our children are in school and afforded the same opportunities.  What then comes out of that must be anchored on the need to ensure that everyone goes to school.  So if we have a scenario that we still have hot sitting, our endeavour is to ensure that we have adequate schools.  If the schools are inadequate, we ensure that a low learner is not left behind by having hot sitting.  The desire is to ensure that funds are available and we must have schools that cater for all our children.

*HON. MAKUMIRE:  Mr. Speaker Sir, I believe that the issue of hot sitting is because of inadequate resources. My question is, what plans does the Government have regarding the construction of new schools in resettlement areas?

 THE HON. SPEAKER: Are you suggesting that the hot sitting is found in resettlement areas? Is that what you are suggesting because the original question did not go that far?

*HON. MAKUMIRE: I believe that the issue of hot sitting is universal as it affects all provinces, not necessarily one area but it is prevalent in resettlement areas. What does Government plan to do with that?

HON. Z. ZIYAMBI: The Hon. Member is saying especially in rural areas. I come from rural areas, there is no hot sitting. It is not that prevalent. So, the challenge that is facing resettlement and rural areas is that there are areas where people were resettled which had no schools. You find that because Government requires that every child should go to school, there are schools without proper buildings but where children can learn so that children are not left behind.

These are two questions like what you said Hon. Speaker. In rural areas, we want to construct schools, especially in areas where there are no schools. We said that Government is going to construct schools in such areas and Government plans to build many schools. If the responsible line Minister was around, he was going to give you all the statistics as he has the data. From my knowledge, there are so many plans and in other areas there are schools that will be opening soon. The Hon. Minister is saying that we have so many developmental programmes where schools will be built and there will be computers and modern technology so that children are at par with other children. I thank you.

HON. CHINANZVAVANA: My supplementary question to the Hon. Minister is that when we talk of hot sitting, we are talking of crowded schools and when pupils are crowded, it means they are travelling long distances to the school. The situation is that for primary scholars, they should only travel for three kilometres and around five kilometres for secondary scholars. How soon are you to get to the ideal situation so that we have less of the hot sitting and crowding?

HON. Z. ZIYAMBI: Mr. Speaker, the Hon. Member did not grasp the concept of hot sitting appropriately. Hot sitting is not crowing. Hot sitting is where you split classes to say you have a morning class and an afternoon class. That is what is termed hot sitting. Overcrowding is when you now have teacher to pupil ratio that is not ideal. So these are two different issues. When I spoke about resettlement areas, I said these areas did not have infrastructure and therefore, we decided that what is better is to create structures but are temporary, but allow our children to access education.  I have responded and said subject to availability of resources, the desire and policy of Government is exactly to ensure that our learners do not travel long distances. It is exactly to ensure that teacher to pupil ratio is a ratio that will allow the teacher to give full attention to the learners.  However, in a scenario where we cannot do that, where we have competing interest, it is better to have a situation where the learners access education than to deny them. 

          +HON. NKOMO: Good afternoon Hon. Speaker Sir.  My question is directed to the Minister of Environment, Climate and Wildlife.  Since we are facing drought in the country, what is Government’s plan in order to prevent veldfires which affect our wildlife, forest and grass?

          THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. Z. ZIYAMBI): Issues of environment and land are closely related and our Minister of Lands here works closely with the Minister of Environment and have interest in the preservation of our environment.  With your permission Mr. Speaker Sir, he can actually give a better and more practical answer. 

          *THE MINISTER OF LANDS, AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES, WATER AND RURAL RESETTLEMENT (HON. DR. MASUKA): Thank you Hon. Speaker.  I cannot respond in the language the Hon. Member used.  So I will respond in English.

          Veldfires are worrisome, not only for the Ministry of Environment, but also for everyone and especially for farmers and especially in a year such as this where whatever pasture we have, we must preserve so that we can mow the pasture and redistribute that to needy areas.  The analysis of the major areas that are affected by fires are that A1 and A2 farm areas which are more susceptible to fires than any other land category.  The Province with highest number of fires every year is Mashonaland West with between 30 and 40% of the area burnt. Between 500 000 and 1 000 000 hectares are burnt every year to an extent that every Thursday, my Ministry invites the Director General of the Environmental Management Agency, to give an update to farmers on what efforts we can put together to collectively reduce the incidences of fires, including those that are caused by shear incendiarism. 

          Hon. Minister Nyoni – the Minister responsible launched the fire awareness week last week.  This marks the start of the fire season which runs through the dry period until we get to November when we expect some rains and then the fire season gets suppressed.  What we need to do and what we have said within the Ministry is that every AGRITEX Officer must be a surveillance officer for purposes of detecting fires at a local level.  We have 6 000 of these and we have said we want to partner with the Ministry of Environment and Environmental Management Agency to have village-based fire action committees so that we are able to detect and react to the fires.  The biggest impact to any fire is a reaction that takes place within 30 minutes, either households or pastures.  This is why the doors to our garages are fire rated to 45 minutes to enable you to respond to those 30 minutes; otherwise you will not be able to react.  That is the same situation in pastures. 

          My response is Government has activated the machinery for fire awareness and fire suppression, but we need a community approach. We need a whole society approach, especially in a season such as this. 

          HON. KANGAUSARU: My question is directed to the Minister of Health and Child Care.  What initiative are they undertaking to reduce mortality; maternal and infant mortality rate in the rural areas?   

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HEALTH AND CHILD CARE (HON. KWIDINI): Yes, the Ministry and Government at large are very aware that there must be a reduction in the mortality rate in the maternity because what we are expecting now as a Ministry is to increase the number of trained personnel, especially in mid-wifery such that each and every health rural centre must have a qualified midwife nurse to reduce that.  In addition, there is increase in the construction of rural health centres such that our people, especially pregnant mothers, will not travel more distances in search of health facilities.

HON. KANGAUSARU:  Can the Minister provide us with the details on the availability of maternal and child health services in rural areas, especially in Hurungwe.

THE HON. SPEAKER: Now, you have crossed the boundary Hon. Member.

HON. TSHUMA: Supplementary!

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Hon. Member, I am still responding to Hon. Kangausaru. Your question has departed from policy. If you want statistical data, you may put your question in writing.

HON. KANGAUSARU:  Hon. Speaker, can I rephrase the question?

HON. SPEAKER: Sorry, I deal with what is before me. Thank you.

+HON. TSHUMA: Thank you Mr. Speaker for giving me this opportunity. Good afternoon. My follow up question is on the issue of these children that die during birth. What is government doing in order to assist the mothers?

+THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HEALTH AND CHILD CARE (HON. KWIDINI):  What I can say at the moment is that there is nothing that the Government is doing or if there are any ladies who are being asked to pay for delivery, they should let us know which hospitals are charging them because they are not supposed to be paying anything.

HON. MALINGANISO:  The shortage of healthcare centres as alluded to by the Hon. Minister results in these increased maternal mortality rates.  What is Government position in terms of capacitating or remunerating the rural healthcare workers who sort of cover the gap that is left by the shortage of nurses?  I thank you.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  You mean midwives? 

HON. MALINGANISO:   The midwifery is actually being undertaken by these rural healthcare workers.

THE HON. SPEAKER:   They do it through experience?

HON. MALINGANISO:  Yes.

HON. KWIDINI:  Thank you, Mr. Speaker Sir. Yes, it is very true that as I said earlier, the Government has got a shortage of these midwives but as the Ministry, we are targeting to double the health workforce by 2030 such that these challenges that are being faced by our pregnant mothers are reduced.  We now have these village health workers who actually now are encouraged to give health education to the expecting pregnant mothers so that they visit or they book with their antenatal care clinics and when they go to these nearest rural health centres, they are attended to by the nurses who are there to advise them properly.  In the case that their pregnancies require special attention, they will be advised to go to nearby hospitals where they can get specialised treatment. 

In terms of remuneration, yes, the Government is also working towards encompassing each and every health worker or civil servant in Government such that this job is done as a team. So, everyone will be happy with the structures that are being made by the Minister.  I thank you.

*HON. MAKUMIRE:   Thank you Mr. Speaker.  The Hon. Minister shows that Government has plans to increase the health workforce to solve this problem.  My question is, what is Government’s plan to ensure that when these workers are increased they are retained and do not leave the country to create another situation where we have a shortage?  I thank you.

*HON. KWIDINI: I thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  Indeed, as a visionary Government which is well articulated by the President according to Vision 2030 that by 2030, everyone must be content with their country.  We expect that by then, everyone employed in this country will be satisfied with working in this country and serve their nation.  I thank you. 

*HON. TAFANANA ZHOU:  Thank you Mr. Speaker. My supplementary question pertains to payment by expectant mothers who are referred to referral hospitals from clinics and mission hospitals.  What is Government’s plan to ensure that expectant mothers are not charged to pay for fuel from the primary centres to the referral hospitals? I thank you.

*HON. KWIDINI:   Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. I am very sorry that such an incident, an unfortunate incident where primary health institutions or hospital where someone is attended to is charged for fuel. Since it will be an emergency situation whereby we need to resolve that problem quickly, according to our policy, it is not allowed.  They are not supposed to provide that fuel.  They are not supposed to be charged for that fuel.  I thank you.

*HON. MAKUMIRE:   Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker Sir.  Mr. Speaker Sir, we have been experiencing quite a number of cases wherein members of the national military have been involved in heinous crimes such as money heists and armed robberies. – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] -   In light of this Mr. Speaker Sir, I want to direct my question to the Minister of Defence… 

HON. TOGAREPI:  On a point of order Mr. Speaker Sir!  I think the Hon. Member is not asking questions but is trying to dramatise his question.  I think let us - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] -  I think generalising issues about particular sections of our Government is wrong.  Let him just ask his question.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Hon. Member, you cannot start by generalisation because you do not have the data to support yourself - it is a general statement.  Why do you not ask for policy direction? 

HON.  MAKUMIRE:   Thank you very much Mr. Speaker Sir.  Let me go straight to my question without making reference to the facts and data that is available.

It is in light of this Mr. Speaker Sir, that I want to ask the Minister of Defence about Government policy concerning the enhancement of the welfare of military personnel.  Thank you very much. 

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF DEFENCE (HON. RTD. BRIG. MAYIHLOME):  Thank you very much Mr. Speaker Sir.   I would like to thank the Hon. Member for asking that question.  Regarding the welfare of the members of the military and indeed all uniformed forces, the Government does whatever it can within the resources that are available to provide for their welfare.   I do not believe that currently members are really not informed because we debated this even during the budget allocations as to what the situation is like.  We keep discussing with the Ministry of Finance, Economic Development and Investment Promotion to ensure that members of the military are catered for. 

Unlike the other members of society, they cannot fend for themselves but it is really up to us the Hon. Members so that when the budget for the military, or the uniformed forces is discussed, we all put our hands on the deck and speak the same language to ensure that their welfare is taken care of.   As a Government, it is neither our intention nor wish that uniformed forces are neglected.  I thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.

          HON. MAKUMIRE:  My supplementary question is, are the military personnel being paid enough to maintain themselves and their families and what are the Government plans to review their salaries and benefits?  Thank you very much.

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  It is the same question unfortunately, which I thought the Hon. Deputy Minister comprehensively answered.  Now, if you are going to ask for pay slips here, you are no longer talking about policy.  You are talking about pay slips, which is not the issue.

          HON. DHANZI:  Good afternoon Mr. Speaker Sir.  My question is directed to the Minister of Youth Empowerment and Vocational Training.  What is the Government doing to make sure that the youth desks are functional and devout in all districts in every Ministry?  I thank you.

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER YOUTH EMPOWERMENT AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING (HON. MUPAMHANGA): My apologies Hon. Speaker, I did not get the question.

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Hon. Member, kindly repeat your questions.

          Hon. Dhanzi repeated her question.

          HON. MUPAMHANGA:  Thank you Hon. Speaker.  There are youth desks in every Ministry of Government.  They are not in districts but they are in ministries.  What we have done is that as the Ministry of Youth Empowerment and Vocational Training, we coordinate efforts of all youth desk officers within the Government to ensure that we provide entry points for young people in all sectors that are relevant to them in the economy.  Thank you.

          *HON. KASHAMBE:  Thank you Madam President.  My question is directed to the Minister of Primary and Secondary Education.  We would like to thank Government for several programmes meant to assist those that are struggling to pay fees but because of the prevailing drought this year, even those who could afford to pay fees are going to fail to do so.  In addition, some of the children that are going to school are facing starvation.  What is Government policy to ensure that schools are assisted in enrolling those students, continuously accepting them to ensure that they learn even in light of the limited funds that we have been paid?  The other question is, how are they going to avert starvation in schools?  I thank you.

          * THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. Z. ZIYAMBI):  Thank you Madam Speaker.  That question is not for the Ministry of Primary and Secondary Education but for Hon. Moyo who is seated here.  If you can allow me to defer the question to him because I believe he can adequately tackle the question more than myself.  I thank you Madam Speaker.

          THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE, LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE (HON. J. MOYO):  Thank you Madam Speaker.  I would like to thank the Hon. Member for the question.  Helping school children every year, Government using expertise from ZimLAC (Zimbabwe Livelihood Assessment Committee) where we find a percentage of children in need of assistance.

          Two years ago, we assisted 29%.  Last year we were assisting 35%.  Right now, because of El Nino, we will be assisting learners that are more than 35%.  This is because we suspect that it is because of the fact that the parents will not have got any yields from the fields which they sell as surplus to pay fees for their children.  So, Government comes in through BEAM.

          The money may be transferred late to the schools but the Ministry of Primary and Secondary Education as well as Government and the President say that learners should not be turned away from school, but they must be admitted while funds will be sent or paid later.  The second thing is, this year we realise that parents do not have adequate food even if we assist our citizens in the rural areas.  Government realises that it is important that learners or school children should be able to be fed at their respective schools, working in collaboration with the Ministry of Primary and Secondary Education as well as the Ministry of Lands, Agriculture, Fisheries, Water and Rural Development.

          We hope that the children will be assisted.  The agriculture sector will create school business units.  If they will be allocated maize for consumption, they also need to grow vegetables and horticulture meant for nutrition to be provided to the children.  We will be working together as Government ministries so that a learner will go to school and come back satisfied from school.  So, we will assist these learners at school in order for them to continue going to school.  Even if there will be drought like this year, we want them to remember later that they went to school and attained better health and get better results.  I thank you.

*HON. HAMAUSWA:  Thank you Madam Speaker. I understand the Minister says learners should not be turned away from school for not paying school fees. My question is; is it Government policy that all the children that are assisted by Government from primary and secondary education fail to complete university education because of failing to get money? 

May I rephrase my question. In other words, I said I appreciate that Government’s plan is that there should not be any child who fails to go to school for not having school fees. My question is; why does the Government carry that programme all the way to university to allow university students to complete their education and pay later? I thank you.

*THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Hon. Hamauswa, I think you should make a new question and direct it to the Minister of Higher and Tertiary Education.

*HON. TOBAIWA: On a point of Order Madam Speaker Ma’am. If we are here, we are in the House of Assembly and we should not be asking each other debts. May the Hon. Member withdraw the statement directed to Hon. Hamauswa?

*THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Who talked about debts and may we have order in the House? Please specify the Hon. Member so that we ask him to withdraw.

*HON. TOBAIWA: It is Hon. Chokururama.

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Hon. Chokururama, please withdraw?

HON. CHOKURURAMA: I withdraw Madam Speaker.

*HON. MUCHEMWA: Thank you Madam Speaker Ma’am. I would like to applaud Government for assisting learners who cannot afford to pay fees, but my question is; what is Government policy to ensure that those learners that are catered for under BEAM should have their money paid on time? This is because those debts actually disturb the smooth running of schools. I thank you.

*HON. J. MOYO: I would like to thank the Hon. Member. I said learners must not be turned away from school. BEAM funds come from the Ministry of Finance. It depends on the cashflow. So sometimes it delays because Government will have other priorities, but Government says, even if it is found late, no learner must be turned away from school. I remember that last year we started paying for 2022 debts and we cleared them.

Right now, we are in the process of clearing the 2023 debt. I know all schools are aware that learners who are catered for under BEAM, the Government will make sure that they are paid for. Indeed, I am aware that schools will face cashflow problems, but we should all understand that the problem affects the child who is not supposed to be affected in such a way. Let us try to find a way to mitigate that to ensure that the learner continues to go back to school. I thank you.

HON. CUMANZALA: How are you Madam Speaker Ma’am? My question is directed to the Minister of Public Service. Given that Zimbabwe is a member of the United Nations and that United Nations in its resolutions 46.182 and 58.114 outline the major principles of humanitarian assistance. My question therefore is; what measures are in place in Zimbabwe for us to ensure that in observance for example, of humanity and impartiality principles, there is no politicisation of food assistance and that the food that we deliver to the vulnerable communities is delivered in the right condition and right quality, meaning that it is suitable for human consumption? Thank you.

THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE, LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE (HON. J. MOYO): Thank you Hon. Speaker.  I want to thank the Hon. Member for reminding us of our obligations under the United Nations Charter and its Conventions. I am sure that this august House is aware that the President declared a State of Emergency. When he declared that State of Emergency, he did not just ask for assistance from Zimbabweans as they always do when we have a disaster. He also asked for assistance from United Nations Agencies, partners and the NGO communities, both domestic and international.

In doing so, we adhere to UN principles and that is why in our programming, we have said for food, we are going to use the traditional leaderships that we have in this country. My colleague, the Minister of Agriculture has alluded to the fact that we have 35 000 plans and vigilantes. When we did our rapid assessment which ended on the 15th April, we used this traditional leadership. There were others including those who are elected like ourselves because we are concerned that our people should have sustenance and have food.

We are concerned to make sure that those who deserve should be there, but the selection process is led by traditional leaderships. The reason why we are choosing traditional leaderships is because they are apolitical. This is because of the reason that they are traditional and they look after the whole village and the UN works with us. When we did lean period January to March, we allocated the UN system to give food allocations to four of our 60 districts and we were giving in 56 districts.

We jointly programmed the issue of selection process and we went and validated what they were doing. This is because we also want them to follow our traditional leaderships as they select the beneficiaries. We asked them to come and examine and work with us where we were delivering this food. So that validation has given us confidence that working together with UN Agencies in Zimbabwe, and any UN Agency that might want to come and see what we are doing, that we can as Zimbabweans and with the UN system, acquit ourselves that we are giving food to deserving households and to deserving individuals.

When we set up this programme, we have validations where we said wherever you are distributing food, this is the methodology that we are going to use. There is a complaints desk. That complaints desk has the village heads of the area. There are some women who are selected by the community to make sure that they are not left behind. After all, they are the ones who are affected directly in making sure that the household is sustained. We have people with disabilities, they are on the desk, we have old aged people and together with United Nations, we were able to observe how the system works.  If a household or an individual says I was left out, they go to that desk to complain and if the complaint is genuine, then they inform the authorities and those people are included on the list.  If you have taken a person who does not deserve it and somebody wants to make sure that these people should not have been there but instead this person should have been there, that complaints desk will take care of that.   So, wherever we were doing this process, there was this validation process and we will use that same system to make sure we give food to deserving communities. 

          Fortunately, for us, we have disaggregated now the number of people who need food in every rural ward; 1 620, we now know the numbers.  However, knowing the numbers does not give me the right to nominate who is supposed to be given food.  So, the village heads will call everyone in their area and say here in this area, we are supposed to give food to the most needy and the number that has been allocated to us is this one.  As a community, whom do we put as number one up to 100 if 100 people are supposed to be given food?  So, we want to make this as transparent as it is. I invite Members of Parliament in both Houses as well as councillors in every ward, we have asked everyone interested to come and witness this without them interfering.  However, if they think some people have been left out, the complaints desk will be there and I think it can be rectified. 

          This community means testing; we have to validate it by sending people to go and check whether they have not misused it. There will be some misuse here and there but I can tell you that the United Nations especially the World Food Programme, UNICEF, and other agencies that are dealing with food assistance in this country all agreed.  I thank you.

          HON. CUMANZALA: Hon. Minister, may you talk about the quality of food that is distributed to the vulnerable communities, particularly the maize community.  Are there any measures that are taken to check the quality of the food before it is distributed to the beneficiaries?

          HON. J. MOYO: Madam Speaker, I should have informed you and requested that the issue of quality be undertaken by the Ministry of Lands, Agriculture, Fisheries, Water, and Rural Resettlement.  I am not qualified to say what the quality looks like even when we are getting food from donors, but in some cases, we send it to the Minister of Agriculture so that they can validate it.  I can tell you for sure that when I went to Mangwe, using my own naked eyes, I thought there was something amiss from our partners but if you allow, the Minister of Agriculture can talk about quality.

          THE MINISTER OF LANDS, AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES, WATER AND RURAL RESETTLEMENT (HON. DR. MASUKA): Thank you, Madam Speaker. I thank the Hon. Member for the question.  Quality control is a routine part of the grain value chain, especially that which we grow ourselves and keep within the Grain Marketing Board system for the Strategic Grain Reserve. 

I get a daily report from the Grain Marketing Board regarding the quality of the grain storage.  In that quality check, the aspects could be three; the first could be the physical quality of the grain wholesomeness.  The second is the chemical quality for which the chemistry research institutes conduct very extensive research and the third is the biological side of things that has there been an increase and perhaps contamination by biological agencies such as pests, and diseases. So, there is a very comprehensive way of looking at these things and we share this with the Ministry of Health and Child Care. 

 For the grain that is held by the GMB, the 426 088 metric tonnes as of midnight, the day before yesterday, just under 9000 metric tonnes is unfit for human consumption, largely maize at Lion’s Den and at Murehwa depots constituting 90% of that maize, that has now been condemned and has been redirected for purposes of feeding livestock.  That contamination simply happened because Lion’s Den is more than what it could carry and when it should do the monthly turn because this is a massive silo, so you have to turn the grain and aerate it every month but there was an electricity outage.  So the maize that was at the bottom was consequently affected.

          For the maize that we import, let us start with the maize that we import and then we go to NGOs.  When an import licence application is made, we then request where the maize is coming from and in this case, maize as an example.  We list in terms of the plant quarantine requirements of Zimbabwe.  Certain diseases might be occurring in the jurisdiction that we are importing from and we state that this maize consignment must be free of the following. 

We also state the physical parameters that we want.  We then dispatch a team to go to that factory or the source to do a physical inspection and write a report that this maize in terms of Zimbabwe’s quality control system is fit for human consumption before that maize is shipped to Zimbabwe.

Ordinarily, in that process ,we have confidence, however when the maize goes into private sector storage, we are putting in place a statutory instrument that will enable us as the Ministry of Agriculture to get the statistics of what is still in storage and the condition in which it is stored to assure the nation that indeed when they consume, they will consume safe food.

          Regarding NGO’s, we have had one or two incidences where that quality assurance system has not been strictly followed. Through Minister July Moyo, we agreed that the quality of the grain that is given to a Zimbabwean must be the minimum quality that we as a country want our people to be fed with.  We must not, at any stage, for any expedience, allow substandard grain to be imported and distributed in the country.

 Where members are of the view that based on their thorough examination, not professional examination, have reasonable suspicion that this grain might not be fit for human consumption, we urge you to take a sample and submit this to the Ministry of Lands, Agriculture, Fisheries, Water and Rural Resettlement and we will, just like we did with the samples that Hon. J. Moyo brought, expeditiously analyse, take the appropriate measures to ensure that Zimbabweans consume the right food of the right quality.  Having said so, we must assure the nation that we have sufficient good quality maize,       wheat, rapoko, pearl millet to feed the nation from now until March next year.  Everyone in the rural areas who needs food will be able to get good quality food.  Thank you, Madam Speaker.

                   HON. TSVANGIRAI:   Thank you very much Madam Speaker.  What measures are being put in place to make sure that we deal with unscrupulous legends who intend to distribute the maize through party lines?  Thank you.

                   HON. J. MOYO:  I thank you Madam Speaker.  Let it be a truthful thing what I have said about our traditional leaders in the eyes of everyone who is here. If there is a deviation from the laid out standard operating procedures, then those should be brought in front of us and we deal with those when it occurs.  Thank you.

                   *HON. MALINGANISO:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  My question is directed to the Minister of Agriculture.  What is Government policy on the allocation of A1 farms to villagers who were not allocated land and were left in compounds? – [AN HON. MEMBER: The question was asked last week.]

*THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Is it true that this question was asked last week?  Hon. Malinganiso, you are said to be the person who asked that question last week?

*HON. MALINGANISO:  Yes Madam, but it was not answered.

*THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Why was it not answered? 

*HON. MALINGANISO:  The Minister was not there.

*THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Since that is a policy question, I will allow the Minister of Agriculture to answer that question.

*THE MINISTER OF LANDS, AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES, WATER AND RURAL RESETTLEMENT (HON. DR. MASUKA):  Thank you Madam Speaker and thank you to the Hon. Member who asked the question.  Maybe you really did not quite understand what type of people we issue land to.  We have two models.  We have the A1 Model which we call the Decongestion Model.  What it means is that when we lost our land to our colonisers a hundred years ago, they removed our forefathers from fertile land where there was enough water, we were all placed in the tribal trust lands which are commonly called reserves.  After independence, we then decided to embark on a programme to remove people from the tribal trust lands and place them on farms where they could access water and where there are good soils.

Those who will remain in that place will have enough land.  That is what we call the A1 Model, the Decongestion Model.  Let us continue with the A1 before we get to the A2.  Those people who are placed at A1 farms, you find that there are those who use to work at those places.  As Government policy, we said those should remain at the same compounds but we will get to a stage where we will see where we can take them to. If we see that there are other people who can be accommodated at the same farm, then we will then issue them with land there.

We have a policy, what is called the minimum viable unit where we look at how we allocate land to someone, not only looking at what the law says when it says six hectares. If it is in Matebeleland or Manicaland, we say six hectares looking at the minimum viable unit. We look at the area, land and the water to see how many people it can carry and sustain them properly, that is when we look at who can be allocated. That is how I can answer that since the question was with regards to A1 farms.

*HON. MURINGAZUVA: My question is directed to the Minister of Public Service, Labour and Social Welfare. Before I pose my question, I would like to thank His Excellency the President, Dr. E.D. Mnangagwa. We realise that for his Drought Relief Programme, there are trains and trucks loaded with food relief. We really applaud that. My question is difficult without presenting a background. Last week or previous weeks, we were promised that everyone who was listed by a traditional leader will be given 7,5 kgs per month. Then it was said 22,5 kgs to cover three months. That is very impressive but in some areas for example, there are some 6 209 parents/guardians that look after about 3 044 people who were listed by their traditional leaders. We expect those people to earn 225 tonnes per month, but from the list that I have for the maize that they are supposed to be receiving tomorrow, they are only going to get 100 tonnes. What is Government doing to rectify that mismatch?

*THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Thank you Hon. Muringazuva. May you please put your question in writing so that you get a comprehensive response. I thank you.

          HON. MADZIVANYIKA: My question is directed to the Minister of Finance and Economic Development.  In his absence, I will redirect it to the Leader of the House.  My question relates to the public finance management system, which is a digital payment system being used by the Ministry of Finance all along and has been discontinued from 1 March to date.  The digital system provides for efficient, water tight and devoid of abuse and embezzlement of funds.  Why did we depart from the use of that system? 

          THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS AND CULTURAL HERITAGE (HON. KAZEMBE): The question is on the technical side and more of an operational question but nonetheless, it deserves an answer.  I will ask the Member to put it in writing so that the Hon. Minister of Finance can give a comprehensive answer.

          *HON. NYAKUEDZWA: My question is directed to the Minister of Agriculture.  What is Government plan with regards to preparations for maize and wheat planted during the winter season in view of the existing drought?

          *THE MINISTER OF LANDS, AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES, WATER AND RURAL RESETTLEMNT (HON. DR. MASUKA): On the 3rd of April, His Excellence said according to the Civil Protection, law he declared a state of disaster.  He also pointed out the measures that we are putting in place as a country to ensure that we avert and ameliorate drought.  We look at what we have in our silos,  what we are expecting to harvest here, what we expect to procure outside the country as well as the measures that we are able to take, especially with regards to the crops that we can grow during winter so that we provide adequate food especially to those in the rural areas.  There are supposed to be given some maize, sorghum or wheat every month. 

          Government said 120 000 hectares must be put under winter wheat because wheat gives us a big yield during winter.  We expect five tonnes per hectare.  We are expecting 3200 hectares for maize and sorghum and that is a yield of 9 000 metric tonnes.  These crops are suppressed during winter in terms of output.  We also realise that there are some children who want potatoes as well as rice.  So 6 700 hectares is expected to be put under winter production, especially in Harare where we expect 130 000 metric tonnes.  There are also 7 000 hectares where Delta grows barley to ensure that beer is available.  Altogether, it is 137 000 hectares for our winter production, hence we expect just below 800 000 metric tonnes.   We have adequate water to irrigate 141 000 hectares.  This is Government’s plan to ensure that we get 600 000 metric tonnes from 127 000 metric tonnes.

          As a country, we need 360 000 metric tonnes for consumption.  This means 240 000 metric tonnes will be excess.  That will be put in addition to 236 000 metric tonnes to take us to 650 000 tonnes. As Government, we expect that if we give 6 million from 9.2 million in Harare, we expect to give everyone in the rural areas meaning we need 780 000 metric tonnes to feed.  That is Government’s plan for winter production to ensure adequate food. 

          *HON. NYAKUEDZWA: In this country, we have more than 6 00 dams.  In Makoni South, we have an irrigation facility that has 200 hectares.  We hear that we need only eight pivots and a few other equipment to ensure that irrigation starts functioning.  What is Government plan to ensure that irrigation scheme functions to mitigate drought this season as well as Osborne dam?

          *THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: If it is something to do with your Constituency, the Hon. Minister may not have the response offhand.  You have to put your question inwriting to ensure that the Minister researches and give you an adequate answer.

          HON. JERE: My question is directed to the Minister of Finance, in his absence may be the Leader of Government Business can answer.  Madam Speaker Ma’am, I think you are aware that our National team is playing a home game against Lesotho away on the 7th of June.  What is the Ministry doing to disburse funds for the refurbishment of the National Sports Stadium? 

          As a Committee, we toured the National Sports Stadium this morning.  We could see the commitment from the Ministry of Sports, that is why I will be directing this question to the Ministry of Finance.  Trenches have been dug there, but nothing is happening and they are becoming a danger to people.  What is Ministry of Finance’s plan in making sure that the funds are released for this important project in line with President Dr. E. D. Mnangagwa’s call of image building because if we play a match away from home, it is not good for the image of the country? 

          THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS AND CULTURAL HERITAGE (HON.  KAZEMBE):   Thank you Madam Speaker Ma’am.  Let me thank the Hon. Member, Hon. Jere and I subscribe to his concerns Madam Speaker Ma’am, also being a football fanatic.  I would like to believe that, that particular question is specific to your particular project, that of the National Sports Stadium.

         In that case, I would kindly ask but before I do that, maybe with your indulgence, the question could probably be answered better by the Minister of Sports, Recreation, Arts and Culture who is here, who deals with the Minister of Finance, Economic Development and Investment Promotion on a daily basis; maybe she has a response from the Minister of Finance, Economic Development and Investment Promotion.  Otherwise, I would rather recommend that the question be put in writing because it is specific to a particular project.  Thank you Madam Speaker Ma’am.

          THE MINISTER OF SPORTS, RECREATION, ARTS AND CULTURE (HON. DR. COVENTRY):  Thank you Madam Speaker Ma’am.  Thank you to the Hon. Member for his question. As he mentioned, there was a tour done today and also last week by the Hon. Vice President Mohadi.  In terms of how I can proceed to answer, it will be how we shared and what we shared with the Hon. Members today, from the ministries’ point of view, from the Ministry of Sports, Recreation, Arts and Culture, there were tenders that went up last year. These tenders were signed and agreed to.  The Ministry of Finance, Economic Development and Investment Promotion agreed to release money and yet today we still do not have money. 

As the Hon. Member pointed out, the question has been directed to the Ministry of Finance, Economic Development and Investment Promotion. I have had numerous conversations, meetings, letters with the Ministry of Finance, Economic Development and Investment Promotion where the releases have been promised and have yet to date not been released.  Hence the contractors that were on site, January, February and sometime in March, have now stopped all works until they are paid.  

          Hon. Speaker, that is the update that I can give until the Ministry receives adequate funding release from the Ministry of Finance, Economic Development and Investment Promotion.  The Ministry’s responsibilities of tendering, upholding tenders and coming in from a technical expertise, that is open – we now await the releases to ensure that the contractors can fulfil their duties.  Thank you Madam Speaker Ma’am. 

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Thank you Hon. Minister.  Hon. Jere, I advise you to put your question in writing so that the Hon. Minister of Finance, Economic Development and Investment Promotion will come to this House with the answer. 

          Questions Without Notice were interrupted by THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER, in terms of Standing Order Number 68.

ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS WITH NOTICE

MEASURES TO CURB THE SPREAD AND ABUSE OF DRUG AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE IN GLENVIEW

  1. HON. CHIDZIVA asked Minister of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs to apprise the House on the following;

   a) Measures being implemented to curb the spread and abuse of drug and substance abuse in Glen View and in the whole country in general;

  b) Provide statistical information on drug dealers arrested to date;

  c) Outline punitive measures against drug dealers; and

   d) When Parliament can expect amendment to the Criminal Law and Codification Act to include other drugs and impose punitive measures for drug dealers.

          THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. Z. ZIYAMBI):  Thank you Madam Speaker Ma’am.  Madam Speaker, this question was addressed by the Minister of Home Affairs.  It was actually asked twice to both the Minister of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs and Minister of Home affairs. So, it was dealt with by the Minister of Home Affairs whose portfolio takes care of all those issues. I thank you.

          HON. CHIDZIVA:  Point of clarity Madam Speaker Ma’am.  Last time when this question was supposed to be answered, the Minister of Home Affairs indicated that he was going to respond to it. So, the Minister is around. 

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:   The Minister of Home Affairs is around? – [HON. CHIDZIVA: Yes.] – He was around but not anymore. – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] - Hon. Minister, did you bring the answer to Question Number 5? 

          THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS AND CULTURAL HERITAGE (HON.  KAZEMBE):  Madam Speaker Ma’am, if it is the same question that the Leader of Government business is referring to - I submitted the answer some two to three weeks ago, if it is the one on drugs. – [AN HON. MEMBER: Yes!] – Yes, I submitted that response Madam Speaker Ma’am.

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Thank you Hon. Minister of Home Affairs.  The Clerk is also saying the answer was submitted. 

          HON. CHIDZIVA: Thank you Madam Speaker, the answer was not submitted because it was the time when Question Time ended, so they did not submit.   Even if you check in the Hansard, that response is not there. 

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:   The Clerk is saying the answer was submitted. 

          *HON. CHIDZIVA: So they did not put it in the Hansard? -[HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.]It should appear in the Hansard if it was submitted.

          *THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: The Clerk is saying it was submitted.  The error is going to be rectified Hon. Chidziva.

MEASURES TO CURB CRIMINAL ACTIVITIES IN NORTON

 

  1. HON. TSVANGIRAI asked the Minister of Home Affairs and Cultural Heritage to inform the House what measures the Ministry has put in place to curb the spike in criminal activities in Norton.

          THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS AND CULTURAL HERITAGE (HON. KAZEMBE):  Madam Speaker, with your indulgence, can I just quickly check outside.  I had asked someone to bring it, unless if you want me to give the answer off the cuff, but I thought they wanted a comprehensive answer.

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  I will allow you Minister to check outside.

REPAIR OF MEDICAL X-RAY MACHINE AT THE NORTON

HOSPITAL

  1. HON. TSVANGIRAI asked the Minister of Health and Child Care to inform the House the Ministry’s plans to repair the medical X-ray machine at the Norton Hospital which has not been functional for some time.

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HEALTH AND CHILD CARE (HON. KWIDINI):  Thank you Madam Speaker.  Currently, there is no X-ray machine at the hospital. The old one was decommissioned and currently, the Ministry of Health and Child Care is mobilising resources to re-equip our hospitals, including Norton.  Thank you.

PLANS REGARDING EQUIPPING NORTON HOSPITAL WITH A DIALYSIS MACHINE

  1. HON. TSVANGIRAI asked the Minister of Health and Child Care to inform the House what the Ministry’s plans are regarding the equipping of the Norton Hospital with a dialysis machine.

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HEALTH AND CHILD CARE (HON. KWIDINI):  Thank you Madam Speaker.  In response to Hon. Tsvangirai’s question, the dialysis equipment is only placed at tertiary hospitals which have the staff to carry out the dialysis as it is a specialised area.  Specialist doctors and nurses are required.  I thank you.

          *HON. TSVANGIRAI:  Supplementary question, Madam Speaker.  The problem, Hon. Minister, is that Norton residents have to travel almost 40km to access dialysis machines maybe at Parirenyatwa or Harare Hospital.  Forty kilometres Hon. Minister, is a big distance just to get access to dialysis machines.  What sort of plans can you come up with to ensure that we access that dialysis machine nearer?  I thank you.

          *HON. KWIDINI:  I would like to thank you Madam Speaker for the supplementary question.  That question, I am sure affects the whole country outside Norton alone but anyway, as a Government, we have plans.  Just like what we said, these machines are supposed to be operated by specialists.  We are training our health workforce to ensure that we double the workforce by 2030, but the other problem that has affected us is, I am sure Hon. Tsvangirai is aware, sanctions have caused all these problems.  I thank you.

          *HON. MATSUNGA:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  My supplementary question is, what is Government doing with regards to releasing funds to hospitals that is meant to give people who are living with kidney failure ailments?  Patients who are living with kidney failure problem and undergo dialysis are supposed to get funding from Government.   I want to find out what Government is doing to fulfil those plans that they are supposed to access such health facilities for free.  I thank you.

          *HON. KWIDINI:  I thank the Hon. Member for the supplementary question.  As Ministry of Health and Child Care, we do not manage the transactions or the funding part, but all we do is, we treat the patients and we process it to the Social Welfare and Treasury is the one that is responsible for payment.  We only deal with treatment of the patients.

*HON. KARENYI: The question of Hon. Matsunga is that we know that their job is not to handle finances, but what we know is that every ministry requests for funds from the Ministry of Finance during budget allocation. So the question is, people who are undergoing dialysis, the problem is that the money required is too much to ensure that they get access to treatment for their kidneys. What is Government plan to ensure that they are treated for free?

*HON. KWIDINI: Indeed, the money that is required is on the higher side because of limited dialysis machines. Like what I said, as a Ministry, we request for finance to ensure that we procure more machines, but for those who are unable to pay for dialysis, they go to the Ministry of Social Welfare and fill in forms where they declare that they do not have the capacity, and they are referred to the hospital. Right now, Government, through the Ministry of Health, we are running around to ensure that we install dialysis machines from districts as well as provincial hospitals so that we increase their number. So because those machines require some consumables that come as a function, that is what we are referring to that we need the extra funding from Treasury to ensure that we alleviate the access of dialysis machines to the citizens. I thank you.

EXCLUSION OF CRYSTAL METHAMPHETAMINE FROM

THE LIST OF DANGEROUS DRUGS

  1. HON. BAJILA asked the Minister of Health and Child Care to inform the House the Ministry’s plans to ensure that crystal methamphetamine is not listed under schedule of dangerous drugs in Zimbabwe.

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HEALTH AND CHILD CARE (HON. KWIDINI): Crystal methamphetamine is classified as a special restricted preparation under the 8th schedule in medicines and allied substances control, general regulations of 1991. Furthermore, it can only be found and used in designated centres as defined in the same regulations which are named Public Health Institutions unlike dangerous drugs that may be found in private health facilities. These specially restricted preparations can only be found in named public institutions. I thank you.

          HON. BAJILA: Thank you madam Speaker. I want to thank the Hon. Minister for the response. The Minister makes reference to places where crystal methamphetamine is found. Is it the places where it is  found or it should be found because in terms of my understanding, he mentions places where it should be found? Crystal methamphetamine is a dangerous drug and it is being consumed outside the places that he says it has to be found. Does Government have a plan to list it as a dangerous drug so that those who are found distributing, possessing or consuming it outside the places where it should be found are deniable?

          HON. KWIDINI: It is very true as he is saying that the drug must be a drug which is dangerous and supposed to be under Dangerous Drug Act, but we know that these drugs are being used for the other uses which are not recommended for. Unfortunately, the good part of it now as it has been said is that it falls under the Drug Abusers and Substance Abusers, people who are found in possession of such drugs are going to be charged as this is going to be enforced as a law. I thank you.

PROGRESS TOWARDS THE OPENING OF CHARAMBA CLINIC IN WARD 4, CHIMANIMANI

  1. HON. KARENYI asked the Minister of Health and Child Care to inform the House the progress made towards opening Chiramba Clinic in Ward 4, in Chimanimani West which was constructed in 2011 using Community Development Funds.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HEALTH AND CHILD CARE (HON. KWIDINI): The answer to that is Chiramba Clinic located in Chimanimani District has been operational since 2022 with only one seconded nurse. The Ministry of health and Child Care has recognised the need for additional staff establishment for this clinic and has initiated the bidding process. This is significant state towards improvement of the clinic’s capacity to provide comprehensive healthcare services to the community.

In addition to address staff concerns, the District Executive is actively working on creating a waste zone within the clinic premises. The inclusion of the waste zone is crucial for any health institution as it plays a vital role in maintaining hygiene, infection control and environmental safety. By establishing a dedicated waste zone, the clinic will be better equipped to handle the property disposal of medical waste in minimising the risk of contamination and promoting a safe health care’s environment. Chimanimani has eight facilities with seconded staff. Staff bids were made and Treasury is yet to approve the filling of the posts. I thank you.

MEASURES TO PROTECT REGISTERED PUBLIC TRANSPORT SERVICE PROVIDERS

  1. HON. BAJILA asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to inform the House on measures being put in place to protect registered public transport service providers from unregistered private transporters who are operating in the sector

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. SACCO): Thank you Madam Speaker Ma’am.  Allow me to respond to the question raised by Hon. Bajila.

The Hon. Member’s point of interest on the measures being put in place to protect registered public service providers from unregistered private transporters who are operating in the sector is a very pertinent question.  The Ministry frequently undertakes joint traffic law enforcement operations comprised of the Zimbabwe Republic Police, the Vehicle Inspectorate Department (VID), Road Motor Transportation and Traffic Safety Council of Zimbabwe (TFCZ) to impound unregistered transport operators.  These operations also target overloading of vehicles, over-speeding, unroadworthy vehicles, drunk drivers, and other traffic violations that comprise the safety and security of road users.

Joint operations and spot checks are conducted to identify and penalise illegal operations, reckless drivers, and impounding of unroadworthy vehicles.  Just to add to that, we currently have an ongoing operation, and if you noticed, a lot of vehicles have been impounded under this operation to ensure that those who are registered and are compliant are allowed to operate without hindrances.  I so submit.

HON. BAJILA:  Thank you, Madam Speaker.  Let me start by thanking the Hon. Deputy Minister that I sent this question on Monday, today it is Wednesday, they have a response.  There are Ministers that we sent questions to in February and they are yet to respond to date.  I want to thank the Minister for the speedy response to the question.

My supplementary question in that regard is to say, we now have digital platforms for looking for clients in the transport sector and we have some companies and some operators that we see who do not have the red plate and are operating in this sector.  The challenge is that those who are registered are now resorting to hiring people to barricade the road so that anyone who is carrying passengers without a red plate is blocked by private citizens who would have been hired by registered transport operators. This subjects the public to a lot of violence in the process.

The question therefore is whether the Ministry has plans which it can use to regulate and enforce registration even for those who are in the online and digital spheres of transport operations.  I thank you.

HON. SACCO: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir and thank you Hon. Bajila for your words of commendation.  I understand what your concern is, about members of the public obstructing certain vehicles and the eruption of violence in the transport sector.  What we would recommend as the Ministry of Transport is for even those online operators to approach the Ministry of Transport and Infrastructural Development, road motor transportation, and become compliant so that they can then get the red plates and be in compliance with the law. However, it is an issue that we have taken note of and that is of utter importance to look into issues around the obstruction of operators resulting in violence.  I so submit.

PLANS TO REHABILITATE MHONDORO-MUBAIRA ROAD VIA CHIRUNDAZI AND MHONDORO ROAD FROM HARARE TO MUBAIRA VIA NYAMWEDA

  1. HON. MUROMBEDZI asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to inform the House on plans being put in place to rehabilitate the following; a) Mhondoro-Mubaira to Chegutu Road via Chirundazi; and b) Mhondoro Road from Harare to Mubaira via Nyamweda.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON. SACCO): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir and thank you Hon. Murombedzi for your question.

These roads are under the purview of the recently extended Emergency Road Rehabilitation Programme (ERRP2).  As you may be aware, His Excellency, Dr. E.D Mnangagwa has extended ERRP2 up until the end of 2026, which means that all roads that have not been attended to now fall under ERRP. 

We will look at these roads and see what is required so that we can do the relevant costing of the roads and put them on the list of priorities going forward.  However, this also depends on the availability of funds released to the Ministry by the Ministry of Finance. 

Under routine maintenance, one shelvet was constructed under this road, and grading works were done to increase trafficability.  However, I would like to assure the Hon. Member that we will look into this request and work on it to the best of our capacity.  I so submit.

*HON. MUROMBEDZI:  My supplementary question to the Minister is that the roads that we are talking about, there are very big stones like the size of his shoe that are sharp that can damage all the tyres and we cannot wait for 2026.  In Mhondoro, we will be left behind which is contrary to National Development Strategy (NDS1) of this country.  So, we want to hear from the Hon. Minister as we are facing rain season very soon.  Along the Mubaira Road and along Mupfure River, there is a very small low bridge which is located between Bulawayo and Beatrice Roads.  That is our main road yet during the rainy season, we cannot cross to Chegutu from Nyamweda, Mubaira to Chegutu.  May the Hon. Minister give us a time-frame and even send a grader to remove those sharp stones as we wait for arrival of the funds.  Also, I wanted to ask if there is also a possibility of Government engaging with the private public partnerships so that the roads are rehabilitated before the rains season.  I thank you.

          *HON. SACCO:  Thank you Hon. Speaker Sir.  I also would like to thank Hon. Murombedzi with that supplementary question.  When I referred to 2026, I had not said the road will be repaired in 2026.  I was referring to the ERRP programme  to last up to 2026 but as you know Hon. Member, our country and all these projects that you are seeing such as the maintenance or repairing of roads in Mhondoro or Beitbridge, even the road that is being worked on coming to Parliament, it is funded by local resources.  Funds from the Treasury, no date because our country, - [AN. HON. MEMBER: Inaudible interjections] -

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: There is someone who is shouting which money did you want to be used for the road to be repaired.  Who is that Hon. Member? May that Hon. Member who is shouting which money did you want to use for the repairing of that road withdraw that.  May that Hon. Member stand up.  Do not do that Hon. Member.

*HON. SACCO:  What I was explaining is that our country is locally mobilising resources from Treasury which is coming from the tax.  We are not getting any loan from any other country especially because of the sanctions that are imposed on our country.  So it is very painful and I am surprised when some people say please repair our roads very fast.  Yet they know very well that they are the ones who invited for the sanctions up on our country.  In English it is called hypocrisy. 

          You know very well that you called for hunger but may I wind up by saying - [HON. MUROMBEDZI: On a point of order.] -

*HON. MUROMBEDZI:   Thank you Mr. Speaker, my point of order is that the Minister wants to apportion blame on non-existing things.  We are talking about 44 years and that road has not been worked on and the people are struggling to travel.  Pregnant women are failing to get assistance because the road is not usable.

*THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Hon. Member, please state your case.

*HON. MUROMBEDZI:   He is talking about sanctions.  The sanctions were removed a long time ago.  That road was made in 1980 before …

*THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Hon. Murombedzi, you asked that question to the Hon. Minister and he is explaining his answer.  Why do you not allow him to finish and then ask a supplementary question but you stopped him whilst he was in the middle of responding. 

*HON. SACCO:  I am coming back to my issue…

*HON. TSVANGIRAI: On a point of Order. My point of order is that the Hon. Minister has accused us of bringing starvation to this country.

*THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: We said the Hon. Minister should respond to Hon. Murombedzi’s question then you can now come in with your supplementary question. 

*HON. SACCO:  Mr. Speaker Sir, may I continue and say the Mhondoro-Mubaira as well as the Mhondoro to Harare roads will be repaired.  As you know, the President is concerned about everyone in this country and he has said no one and no place should be left behind.  So as Ministry of Transport that is our job that we will look into through PPPs that were referred to. Unfortunately, as Ministry of Transport, we are supposed to procure equipment to put in our maintenance units in provinces and districts. 

We are procuring that equipment this year so that we do not subcontract because it is very expensive to us.  We also have plans to give fuel to local authorities so that the graders and other equipment may repair such roads.  We have Maintenance Units Programme in conjunction with RIDA that is also procuring equipment for road maintenance and repairs.  You will see a lot of things and development that will take place in due course.  However, I promise you Hon. Murombedzi that you will see progress in accordance with the promise by His Excellency, of leaving no one no place behind. 

          *HON. MUROMBEDZI: What is Government’s plan to ensure that there is public private partnership to ensure speed repairing of such roads?  I heard the Hon. Minister saying your suggestion will be taken into consideration. 

          * HON. SACCO: As Ministry of Transport and Infrastructural Development, we realise that BOT and public-private partnerships will be very helpful to us.  We will look into such areas to ensure that there be someone interested in that because when they work on the roads, they consider all things of how they will recover their funds, how will they be able to recoup their fund, if they are able to put tollgates on those roads.  If we cannot get such partners as Government, we will do that work.

          On the expected timelines to work on the road, we are going to sit down and review what is needed in those particular roads.  The Hon. Member can ask after a month and we will be having a clear answer.

          THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. Z. ZIYAMBI): I would like to clarify certain issues so that Hon. Members do not leave this august House under a false impression. There is no country in world that can-do capital developments without loans.  This country has survived for over 30 years on a cash budget.  So it is very difficult for my Minister to answer a question of timelines when we do not have lines of credit. 

          When we have a line of credit, you will be able to predict definitively when you can complete a project because the funding is secure.  Now, we collect taxes and we now have to appropriate those taxes depending on a need basis.  This year, we have a drought.  It would be very difficult for someone to say give me a specific date, but the commitment that was made by His Excellence is we are going to build our country whether we have lines of credit or not.  We even went further and said we will continue engaging.  The Hon. Member who said there are no sanctions, I do not know which country he is living in.  We are in the middle of negotiating an arrears clearance programme and a re-engagement programme and negotiating with those countries that put us under sanctions.  My colleague Minister here – we participate in those meetings to ensure that those restrictive measures are removed and those that imposed sanctions, acknowledge that those sanctions are affecting the poorest in our community. 

          The United Nations sent in a rapporteur to enquire on the effects of restrictive measures onto the enjoyment of human rights and they concluded that indeed, the poorest are being affected.  It is not a secret.  That evidence is there, if need be to bring it that the opposition in this country lobbied for the imposition of sanctions.  We do not want to say what the Minister said was wrong, but the commitment that the Second Republic has is – we will proceed with or without sanctions, but we know the pain of building a country without a line of credit because you cannot fix a specific date to say I can complete this project in this particular date.

MEASURES TO CURB CRIMINAL ACTIVITIES IN NORTON

  1. HON. TSVANGIRAI asked the Minister Home Affairs and Cultural Heritage to inform the House what measures the Ministry has put in place to curb the spike in criminal activity in Norton.

THE MINISTER HOME AFFAIRS AND CULTURAL HERITAGE (HON. KAZEMBE):  Mr. Speaker Sir, may I start by thanking the Hon. Member for the question.  I wish to inform the House that statistics from the Zimbabwe Republic Police indicate that between January and May 2024, crimes of concern that is murder, rape, robbery, unlawful entry and theft as well as assault have been on a gradual decline.  Aggregate figures show that in January, a total 275 cases were received while 258 were recorded in February, indicating a 6.18% decline.  In March, 239 cases were received, leading to a 13.9% decline.  In April, there was a slight increase of 1.25% and 242 cases have not been recorded.  In May, 180 cases have been received by Saturday the 25th, indicating 25.6 decline.  A total of 588 accused persons were arrested for these offences during the same period, four for murder, 15 for rape, 21 for robbery, 40 for unlawful entry, 297 for theft and 211 for assault. 

The Zimbabwe Republic Police has been continuously implementing various measures to suffocate the growth of crime in Norton.  These include foot and motorised night patrols targeting night clubs; deployment of crack teams comprising CID and duty uniform police officers for stop and search operations as well as awareness campaigns in collaborations with the business community, church leaders and schools.  These efforts have addressed previous issues to do with armed robbery and murder cases.

In addition, the police have strengthened community policing initiatives in the form of neighborhood watch at community liaison committees to assist the police in this regard.  I wish to assure the House and the Hon. Member that the police are seized with delivering their constitutional mandate enshrined in Section 219 (1) of the Constitution of Zimbabwe.  I am happy to say that there is no fear of crime in Norton.  The police however stand ready to work with all stakeholders in their various policing areas to ensure crime free society for our citizens. 

CAPACITATION OF THE NORTON REGISTRY OFFICE WITH REQUISITE TOOLS OF TRADE

  1. HON. TSVANGIRAI asked the Minister of Home Affairs and Cultural Heritage to inform the House what measures has the Ministry put in place to equip and capacitate the Norton Registry Office with requisite tools of trade like computers.

THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS AND CULTURAL HERITAGE (HON. KAZEMBE): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. The Civil Registry Department in my Ministry, in collaboration with the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), is working towards computerisation of 20 Registry Offices information and communication technology equipment, solar equipment and office furniture. These have already been procured and Norton is one of the sub-offices earmarked for the project and works are currently underway, with IT support infrastructure already installed. Computerisation of Norton sub-office is expected to be completed by end of June 2024. I thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.

WRITTEN SUBMISSIONS TO QUESTIONS WITH NOTICE

MEASURES TO CURB DRUG AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE

  1. HON. CHIDZIVA asked Minister of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs to apprise the House on the following;

   a) Measures being implemented to curb the spread and abuse of drug and substance abuse in Glen View and in the whole country in general;

   b) Provide statistical information on drug dealers arrested to date;

    c) Outline punitive measures against drug dealers; and

   d) When Parliament can expect amendment to the Criminal Law and Codification Act to include other drugs and impose punitive measures for drug dealers.

    THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS AND CULTURALHERITAGE (HON. KAZEMBE): In a bid to curb drug and substance abuse scourge, the country established National Elimination Committee on Drug and Substance Abuse (NECDSA) which has the mandate to come up with systematic and sustainable responses that will assist in ensuring that society is free of drug and substance abuse. National Elimination Committee on Drug and Substance Abuse aimed at soliciting involvement of all citizens to participate in eradicating the drug and substance abuse menace.

Committees are at national, provincial, district and village levels and heir composition.

The Committee comprises of seven pillars of the drug and substance abuse management i.e demand reduction, supply reduction, harm treatment and rehabilitation, communication, psycho- social support and community reintegration, legal policing pillar, resources mobilization pillar.

Each pillar was assigned roles to play in curbing drug and substance abuse and the Supply Reduction Pillar has already put in place the following strategies:-

Police, as mandated by Section 219 of the Constitution of Zimbabwe is carrying out activities as well as joint operations with other Security Services in an endeavour to curtail the supply side.

Disruptive raids are being done to all residential places of known drug dealers and all tip offs which are received concerning those who are implicated in selling drugs are being actioned within 24 hours.

Operational teams are being deployed in various places countrywide with the intention to Conduct Surveillance in all areas monitoring those who are involved in drug dealing activities and make sure they are apprehended.

In Exit and Entry Points the police is deploying its members who work with other agencies such as ZIMRA, Immigration, and those from other Services zeroing in on monitoring, surveillance and law enforcement.

Anti – Drug and Substance Abuse Awareness Campaigns.

The police are joining hands with community members and other stakeholders to promote drug demand reduction principles and raising awareness of the consequences of drug and substance abuse.  These campaigns are being done in Government Institutions, Private Institutions, and all public places where gatherings takes place, for example bus termini.

Passenger Profiling

Police Officers are also conducting passenger profiling at all Airports.  This Drug Interdiction effort can successfully assist to identify potential drug traffickers through intelligence and analysing travel history of those passengers.

Cargo Profiling

To preserve peace, controlled objects, substances and drugs need to be monitored.  The Police are monitoring drugs in cargo and all cargo profiled according to its source, consignee or receipt and the flight it comes aboard.  Cargo from known source countries may contain contraband and alert Police Officers can pick it.  This can lead to seizure of big contrabands.

Conducting Impromptu/snap roadblocks along Beitbridge- Harare Road, Chirundu – Harare road, Nyamapanda – Harare road, Victoria Falls  Bulawayo road and Mutare Harare rood targeting cross boarder vehicles and travelers among others.

Police officers are conducting controlled delivery of identified drugs and substance s with a view of apprehending owners of identified drugs, this is done to try and eliminate the whole chain.

ACHIEVEMENTS MADE BY THE POLICE FROM 01 JANUARY TO 31 DECEMBER 2023

Total accused persons arrested                                                      9291

Total Male                                                                    7762

Total Female                                                                1529

Total Accused Persons Referred to Court                                   1439

          Male                                                                    1122

          Female                                                                 317

Total Accused Persons Paid Deposit Fine                                   7852

          Male                                                                    6640

          Female                                                                 1212

Total Accused Persons over 35 years                                           1687

          Male                                                                    1302

          Female                                                                 385

Total Accused Persons under 35 Years                                        7604

          Male                                                                    6460

          Female                                                                 1144

Total Number of Suppliers                                                            1171

          Male                                                                    867

          Female                                                                 304

Total number of End Users                                                           8120

          Male                                                                    6895

          Female                                                                 1225

Bases Destroyed                                                                             119

Total Awareness Campaign                                                           321

A total of 874 accused persons were convicted at court whilst a total of 7852 deposited fines at the stations.

CID DRUGS AND NARCORTICS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OF ARRESTS MADE AS FROM 01 JANUARY 2024 TO 28 MARCH 2024

Total Accused Persons Arrested                                                   5364

          Total Male                                                          4506

          Total Female                                                       858

Total Accused Persons Referred to Court                                     402

          Male                                                                    294

          Female                                                                 108

Total Accused persons paid Deposit Fine                                   4962

          Male                                                                    4212

          Female                                                                 750

Total Accused Persons over 35 years                                           1037

          Male                                                                    697

          Female                                                                 340

Total Accused persons under 35 Years                                        4327

          Male                                                                    3809

          Female                                                                 518

Total number of Suppliers                                                             525

          Male                                                                    285

          Female                                                                 240

Total Number of End Users                                                          4839

          Male                                                                    4221

          Female                                                                 618

Total Number of Convicted at Court                                             83

          Male                                                                      55

          Female                                                                   28

Bases Destroyed                                                                               91

Total Awareness Campaign carried out                                       153

This Office recommends custodial sentences in all issues to do with drug and substance as a deterrent measure to the scourge.  However, our recommendations have been referred to the Attorney General’s Office who have the duty to amend the existing laws.

Recommendations by this office for amendment of all the existing laws to deal with drug and substance abuse are being worked on by the Policy and Legal Pillar to the National Elimination Committee on drug and substance abuse.

MEASURES TO ENSURE ACCESS TO RADIO AND TELEVISION TRANSMISSION FOR AREAS ALONG MOZAMBIQUE BORDER

  1. HON. C. HLATYWAYO asked the Minister of Information and Publicity and Broadcasting Services to inform the House measures being implemented to ensure that areas in Chipinge South such as Mabee, Chinyamukwakwa, Garawa, Mashubi and Maparadza that are along the Mozambique border have access to radio and television transmission as they are currently relying on transmission from Mozambique.

         THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF INFORMATION, PUBLICITY AND BRODCASTING SERVICES (HON. MARUPI):  Transmedia erected a Transmission site at Garawa which would cater for television and telecom services for those border areas. Transmedia is working with the Zimbabwe Electricity Supply Authority to bring power to the tower for it to be operational. However, I am glad to inform the House that a community radio station’ Ndau FM, was operationalised for the Garahwa and surrounding communities. The radio station is currently housed at Garahwa Primary School and its coverage will be expanded once the large tower is powered.

MEASURES TO UPGRADE AND MODERNISE MPILO REFERRAL HOSPITAL

  1. HON. GUMEDE asked the Minister of Health and Child Care to inform the House what measures the Minister is putting in place to upgrade and modernise Mpilo Hospital in Bulawayo taking into account the increase in the Matebeleland region.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HEALTH AND CHILD CARE (HON. KWIDINI): Mpilo Central Hospital has made significant improvements in its diagnostic capabilities with the installation of a new MRI machine, allowing for faster and more accurate diagnostics. The Ministry is also installing a solar system as a back-power solution to ensure uninterrupted healthcare services. An upgrade of tree laboratory is underway to enhance accessibility for patients needing laboratory services.

Efforts to increase the intake of trainees and healthcare professionals are being made, but the challenge of skills migration persists. The Ministry is committed in addressing this issue and exploring strategies to retain skilled professionals within the healthcare system.

Due to the age of the hospital, a new purpose-built facility is needed to meet current and future healthcare needs. While ongoing efforts are being made to repair and maintain machines at the Radiology and Radiotherapy Centre, replacement of these aging machines is not immediate.

More doctors, interns, and specialists have been deployed to Mpilo Hospital, contributing to improved healthcare services and patient care. The Ministry remains committed to addressing infrastructure needs, attracting and retaining healthcare professionals, and continuously improving healthcare services.

Mpilo Central Hospital offers specialist services in various areas, including obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, general surgery, anesthesiology, radiology, oncology, internal medicine, orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, ear, noes and throat, hematology, and nephrology. The Maternity Department has received additional equipment, ensuring quality services for pregnant mothers. Results based financing provides funding specifically for pregnant mothers, offering them free services at hospitals.

The Health Services Commission is actively filling critical posts to reduce vacancy rates. To relieve pressure on Mpilo Central Hospital, efforts are being made to strengthen lower-level healthcare facilities, such as the speedy completion of Lupane Provincial Hospital.

In summary, Mpilo Central Hospital has made improvements in diagnostics and power backup solutions. Efforts are being made to address skills migration, upgrade facilities, and deploy more health care professionals. Strengthening lower-level facilities will help alleviate pressure on Mpilo Central Hospital, and the Ministry remains committed to improving healthcare services for the community.

MEASURES TO IMPROVE SERVICES FOR CANCER PATIENTS AT MPILO AND PARIRENYATWA HOSPITALS  

     33. GUMEDE asked the Minister of Health and Child Care to inform the House on the following: a) What measures are being put in place to improve services for cancer patients?

   b) When the radiotherapy cancer treatment and diagnostic machines at Mpilo and Parirenyatwa hospitals will be repaired?

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HEALTH AND CHILD CARE (HON. KWIDINI): The Ministry is developing a National Cancer Control Plan that will guide cancer services in the country in the next five years;

The Ministry of Health is undertaking International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, cancer projects that will train cancer healthcare workers such as oncologists, medical physicists, radiation therapists, et cetera, through fellowships, et cetera;

The Ministry is in the process of applying to the IAEA Rays of Hope Initiative that has been assisting other countries in Africa repairing cancer machines or providing new cancer machines or setting up radiotherapy centres;

The Ministry of Health and Childcare and its partners such as CHAI is quantifying cancer medicines so that it helps in procuring essential medicines to increase access to cancer medicines;

Trainings of health works are ongoing in collaboration with partners to help in early detection of childhood and adult cancer;

The Ministry of Health and Childcare is working with the Ministry of Finance to repair cancer machines at both Mpilo and Parirenyatwa hospitals and the repairs are forex intense. The earlier funds are made available, the earlier all repairs are done and the centres become functional;

The Ministry has taken proactive measures to address the repair of the cancer machines at Parirenyatwa and Mpilo Hospitals by engaging VARIAN, the equipment supplier.  I am pleased to inform you that the repair process is currently underway, with VARIAN engineers working diligently to restore the functionality of these crucial machines;

Recognising the importance of ongoing maintenance and support for these machines, the Ministry has established a three-year maintenance contract with VARIAN.  This contract ensures regular inspections, preventive, maintenance and prompt repairs, if necessary to sustain the functionality of the cancer machines in the long term.

By partnering with VARIAN and implementing a maintenance contract, the Ministry is demonstrating its commitment to providing continuous and improved cancer care services.  Having properly functioning equipment is essential for accurate diagnosis and effective treatment, ultimately leading to better outcomes for cancer patients;

The Ministry will closely monitor the repair progress and implementation of the maintenance contract to ensure that the cancer machines at Parirenyatwa and Mpilo Hospitals are fully restored and maintained to the highest standards.  This commitment aims to enhance the quality of healthcare services and support the well-being of patients in need of cancer treatments;

In the comprehensive treatment cancers, early detection plays a crucial role.  It is imperative to raise awareness among the population about the importance of regular medical check-ups for early detection and successful treatment of cancers;

Surgical intervention is another treatment option for cancers and this service is available at all referral centres including PGH and Mpilo Central Hospital, providing patients with access to this vital service.

It is worth mentioning that a combination of the treatment methods may be prescribed by doctors based on individual patient needs and the specific characteristics of their cancer; and

The Ministry remains committed to providing comprehensive and accessible cancer care services and efforts are underway to address the challenges faced in delivering radiation treatment options.  The well-being of cancer patients is top priority and the Ministry will be working towards ensuring the availability of diverse and effective treatment options.  

UTILISATION OF THE MABVAZUVA SATELLITE CLINIC IN

WARD 7, EPWORTH

  1. 34. MHETU asked the Minister of Health and Child Care to inform the House when the Ministry will utilise the Mabvazuva Satellite Clinic in Ward 7, Epworth North which was commissioned in 2022 with fully stocked medical equipment and medical supplies, which unfortunately may expire in due course if not utilised.

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HEALTH AND CHILD CARE (HON. KWIDINI):  Madam Speaker, let me inform the House that the Ministry of Health and Child Care is aware of the importance of effective utilisation of healthcare facilities and ensuring that medical equipment and supplies are put to use in a timely manner. 

          To address the issue, the Ministry is committed in taking the necessary steps to operationalise the Mabvazuva Satellite Clinic at the earliest possible time.  The Ministry is seriously considering the allocation of adequate staffing, ensuring the availability of essential support services, and addressing any infrastructural requirements that may be necessary for the clinic’s functionality. 

          Madam Speaker, I want to emphasise that the Ministry acknowledges the urgency of the situation and is actively working on a plan to operationalise the clinic.  Efforts are being made to mobilise the necessary human resources, including healthcare professionals to ensure that the clinic can provide quality healthcare services to the community.  You might all be aware that we now have a functional Health Services Commission which was sworn in early this year and is mandated to deal with our human resources issues.  

EMPLOYMENT TERMS AND BENEFITS FOR PRIMARY COUNSELLORS

  1. HON. JAMES asked the Minister of Health and Child Care to explain to the House;
  2. a) What the employment terms and benefits of the primary counsellors employed by the Ministry but funded by the Global Fund are;
  1. What the number of primary counsellors employed is and where they are stationed; and
  2. To further give a breakdown of the funding received from Global Fund and how it is disbursed to the beneficiaries.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HEALTH AND CHILD CARE (HON. KWIDINI): The following is my response to his question 35 (a);

  •    Three yearly contracts renewable on annual basis.
  •    Basic remuneration of US $292.00 per month
  •    30 days’ vacation leave
  •    12 days annual leave
  •    90 days sick leave on full pay
  •     90 days sick leave on half pay
  •    Eight hour (8) working days Monday to Friday
  •    Detailed terms and conditions as per attached contract

35 (b) A total of 1 098 primary counsellors are on board against an establishment of 1200 and the detailed distribution list is as per attachment.

Province

No. of PC’s

Harare

200

Manicaland

178

Mash. Central

117

Mash. East

134

Mash. West

101

Masvingo

93

Mat. South

89

Midlands

88

Mat. North

53

Bulawayo

45

Total

1098

 

35c) Funding received from GF and how it is disbursed to beneficiaries

Funding received for the HIV grant (1 January 2023 to 31 December 2023), total $ 14, 618, 073.51. For PC allowances, total funding received for 2023 amounts to $4,102,110.00 and is included in total funding received for 2023.

GF 2023 FINANCIAL YEAR

MODULE

APPROVED BUDGET 2023

DISBURSEMENT 2023

COVID – 19

1,581,812.58

584, 167.55

Differentiated HIV Services

4, 205,244,80

4,115,049.39

Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission

117,000.00

498,167.60

Prevention

110,271,00

109.664.60

Programme Management

2,774,638.40

3,170.486.19

Resilient and Sustainable Systems for Health (RSSH) Community Systems Strengthening

160,116.00

261,910.65

RSSH; Health Management Information Systems and M&E

2,619,924.72

3,317,681.65

RSSH: Health Products Management Systems

2,048,629,50

2,119,081,36

RSSH: Human Resources for Health, including Community Health Workers. 

1,371,600.00

6,867.15

RSSH: Laboratory Systems

95,876.16

33,773.60

Treatment, Care and Support

680, 748.00

400, 863.52

Grand Total

15,765,861,16

14.618,073.51

 

The funds are disbursed to provinces PMD Bank accounts following decentralisation. 

Provinces have dedicated GF accounts for processing all GF related activities.

Salaries are paid direct into individual Nostro bank accounts.

Suppliers of goods and services are paid directly upon presentation of invoices. 

Allowances are paid directly into individual bank accounts. 

MEASURES IN PLACE TO OPEN MABVAZUVA CLINIC IN EPWORTH NORTH

  1. 36. MHETU asked the Minister of Health and Child Care to explain to the House why the Mabvazuva Clinic in Epworth North is not functioning despite that it was officially commissioned two years ago by His Excellency, the President of the Republic of Zimbabwe; and further elucidate the measures the Ministry is putting in place to have the clinic opened.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HEALTH AND CHILD CARE (HON. KWIDINI): Mr. Speaker, let me inform the House that the Ministry of Health and Child Care is aware of the importance of effective utilisation of healthcare facilities and ensuring that medical equipment and supplies are put to use in a timely manner.

To address this issue, the Ministry is committed in taking the necessary steps to operationalise the Mabvazuva Satellite Clinic at the earliest possible time. The Ministry is seriously considering the allocation of adequate staffing, ensuring the availability of essential support services, and addressing any infrastructural requirements that may be necessary for the clinic’s functionality.

I want to emphasize that the Ministry acknowledges the urgency of the situation and is actively working on a plan to operationalise the clinic. Efforts are being made to mobilise the necessary human resources, including healthcare professionals to ensure that the clinic can provide quality healthcare services to the community. You might all be aware that we now have a functional Health Services Commission which was sworn in early this year and is mandated to deal with our human resources issues.

COMPLETION OF THE CIVIL REGISTRATION BUILDING OFFICES IN INSIZA SOUTH COSTITUENCY

  1. HON. S. SITHOLE: asked the Minister of Home Affairs and Cultural Heritage to inform the House when the Civil Registration Building Offices in the Insiza South Constituency will be completed.

THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS AND CULTURAL HERITAGE (HON. KAZEMBE): Mr. Speaker Sir, the department has planned to complete construction of Insiza Registry Building by December 2024. The project was allocated a total of ZWL$ 2 300 000 000 in the 2024 Budget, which was equivalent to US$ 383 000. However, to date, the funds have not yet been released by Treasury and there is no activity on the site. The Department is therefore, not in a position to give definite time frames for the completion of the building.

MEASURES TO CONSTRUCT THE PROPOSED GWABALANDA POLICE BASE IN BULAWAYO WARD 16

  1. HON. BAJILA asked the Minister of Home Affairs and Cultural Heritage to inform the House the progress made towards the construction of the proposed Gwabalanda Police Base in Bulawayo’s Ward 16.

THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS AND CULTURAL HERITAGE (HON. KAZEMBE): Mr. Speaker Sir, may I start by thanking the Hon. Member for the question. I wish to inform the House that the construction of Gwabalanda Police Base in Bulawayo’s Ward 16 was being spearheaded by the local Member of National Assembly through the Constituency Development Fund (CDF). However, the construction could not progress since funding was later diverted to address other community issues. In an effort to address criminal activities in Gwabalanda and surrounding areas, the ZRP established a fully-fledged police station in Cowdry Park.

Mr. Speaker Sir, I wish to inform the House that at present, residents in Gwabalanda can easily access both Cowdry Park and Luveve Police Stations. May I also take this opportunity to highlight that the ZRP will remain committed to partnering different stakeholders to improve access to police services to members of the public. I thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.

MEASURES TO CAPACITATE POLICE OFFICERS IN KWEKWE

  1. HON. MADZIVANYIKA asked the Minister of Home Affairs and Cultural Heritage to inform the House what measures the Ministry is taking to capacitate police officers, particularly in Kwekwe where armed robberies are on the increase.

THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS AND CULTURAL HERITAGE (HON. KAZEMBE): Mr. Speaker Sir, I wish to thank the Hon. Member for the question as it speaks to legitimate concerns over the security of our citizens. The Ministry of Home Affairs and Cultural Heritage wishes to inform the House that, indeed cases of armed robbery have been on the increase countrywide. As the police, we have intensified efforts to account for the perpetrators behind most of these cases. Information on hand shows that we have moving groups of armed robbers that are terrorising people. The recent arrest of some of these groups and recovery of firearms attests to ongoing efforts by the police towards riding the country of these criminals. The Zimbabwe Republic Police (ZRP) continuously builds the capacity of all police officers for them to be able to respond to criminal activities. More so, our specialised units that respond to cases such as armed robbery receive regular training as part of capacity building. In addition, the ZRP always ensures that these units are well equipped so that they are well prepared to effectively respond to cases of armed robberies countrywide.

Mr. Speaker Sir, I wish to also inform the House that in each of the country’s ten provinces, there are designated special response teams who are well trained and equipped to respond to cases of armed robbery. Our plea to all Zimbabweans is that they should always avoid keeping large sums of money at their homes, offices or school as this is what is attracting armed robbers. We will continue conducting awareness campaigns through our popular crime watch programme amongst other platforms. As law abiding citizens, let us also play our part in supporting the police in policing ourselves. I thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.

COMPLETION OF THE NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

  1. HON. GUMEDE asked the Minister of Higher and Tertiary Education, Innovation, Science and Technology Development to explain to the House when the National University of Science and Technology construction will be completed given that it has taken over 32 years to date.

THE MINISTER OF HIGHER AND TERTIARY EDUCATION, INNOVATION, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT (HON. PROF. MURWIRA): The National University of Science and Technology (NUST) has made significant progress on infrastructural development projects. Riding on His Excellency the President, Dr. Emmerson Mnangagwa’s philosophy, “Nyika inovakwa nevene vayo! Ilizwe lakhiwa ngabanikazi balo!” and with financial support from the Government and guidance from the Ministry, the University adopted a new model which has seen NUST taking over all construction projects. The new model of construction adopted saw NUST realising savings of over US$200,000 through the substitution of excessively designed finishes with simple top-class designs. In a space of two years, the University has almost finished constructing the state-of-the-art Prof Phinias-Mogorosi Makhurane Technovation Centre, which took independent contractors 15 years to reach 60% completion before they abandoned the project. Working together with Bulawayo Polytechnic and other sister institutions, NUST has reached 76% completion of the Tech Centre building, which will be finished in time for commissioning by His Excellency, President Dr. Mnangagwa during the University’s graduation on 15 November 2024. Already, Block B of the building is at 95% completion.

Construction of the Central Library stopped when the building was at 30% completion. A Structural Integrity Assessment of the building was conducted by independent assessors in 2023 and it was certified fit for continuing with construction works. Construction is expected to start in 2025 and the building will be completed within 36 months.

Other infrastructural works are at various levels of completion: These are Applied Chemistry Building at 70% completion, the Chemical Engineering Building (75%), and the Students Accommodation (10%). Outstanding works for Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering buildings are balustrading, laboratory and fittings, elevator systems, completion of electrical works and fume cupboards. At the Students Accommodation, 10 blocks had foundation completed while brickwork is at 10%. Once construction resumes, these buildings will be completed between 9 and 18 months.

MEASURES TO EDUCATE AND SENSITISE DRIVERS AND OTHER ROAD USERS

  1. HON. N. MGUNI asked the Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development to inform the House on the measures that have been put in place by the Ministry to educate and sensitise drivers and other road users on accidents.

        THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (HON.  MHONA):  The Hon. Member’s point of interest is particularly on the measures that have been put in place by the Ministry to educate and sensitise drivers and other road users on accidents. The Ministry’s lead road safety agency, the Traffic Safety Council of Zimbabwe (TSCZ) conducts targeted public awareness campaigns to educate drivers, transport operators and the general public about the dangers of overloading vehicles, over-speeding, drunk driving, distracted driving, etc. These campaigns emphasise on the negative impact of such practices on issues such as vehicle stability, braking distances and road infrastructure.

          The TSCZ also conducts public education through various channels, including social media, radio and television, to educate drivers and other road users about the dangers of distracted driving. It emphasises the importance of focusing on the road and avoiding distractions such as mobile phones, eating, grooming or using in-car technologies while driving.

Furthermore, Government through TSCZ, is working with Total Energies Zimbabwe in promoting the use of crush helmets. To date, the project has been rolled out in Nyamapanda, Karoi and Plumtree.

It involves engaging motor cyclists and the communities where motor cycles are mainly used and raising awareness on the need to use the crush helmets. Hon. Members, let me hasten to say the road safety is everyone’s responsibility and all stakeholders in the road traffic ecosystem, including motorists, operators and passengers must be more vigilant against road traffic violations. As such, our TSCZ will continue to educate road users to adopt and implement integrated road transport management solutions anchored on all road safety pillars. I want to thank Hon. Mguni who has requested that I come and make this statement.

Questions With Notice were interrupted by THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER, in terms of Standing Order Number 68.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: I will allow the Minister to submit written answers to questions 52 and 53.

FIRST READING

PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES BILL [H. B. 2, 2023]

THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY presented the Persons with Disabilities Bill [H. B. 2, 2023].

Bill read the first time.

Bill referred to the Parliamentary Legal Committee.

On the motion of THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. Z. ZIYAMBI), the House adjourned at Twenty Minutes past Five o’clock p.m.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Post comment