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SENATE HANSARD 10 DECEMBER 2019 29-11

                                                  PARLIAMENT OF ZIMBABWE

Tuesday, 10th December, 2019.

The Senate met at Half-past Two O’clock p.m.

THE HON. PRESIDENT OF SENATE in the Chair)

ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE HON. PRESIDENT OF SENATE

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR THE LATE HON. VIMBAYI JAVA        THE HON. PRESIDENT OF SENATE: I wish to inform the

Senate that all Hon. Senators are invited to the memorial service of the late Hon. Vimbayi Java to be held on Saturday, 14th December, 2019 at

No. 2 Lyndurst Lane, Strathaven, Harare, starting at 0900 hours.

MOTION

PRESIDENTIAL SPEECH: DEBATE ON ADDRESS

First Order read: Adjourned debate on motion in reply to the

Presidential Speech.

Question again proposed.

*HON. SEN. TONGOGARA: Thank you Madam President for

giving me the opportunity to make my contribution on this motion regarding the President’s Speech.  I would like to start by thanking His Excellency because of his kind heartedness, because even before he started delivering his Speech, he asked us to stand up in memory of the late former President of this country, Cde. Robert Gabriel Mugabe.  This cannot be done by anybody who is not considerate but it shows that he is a kind hearted man.

The next topic he touched on was agriculture and I remember that in this august House, we debated two motions, which we thought the Ministers responsible were going to come and respond, but unfortunately, they did not turn up.  However, we did not lose heart because whatever we debate in this House; the President also listens to the debates.  We talked about the importance of small grains and we would now change that name from small grains to traditional grains because we had said as a House that this should be ingrained in the people’s minds because these small grains used to sustain our forefathers and they did not suffer from hunger.

The current situation, the negative impact of the climate change has led to poor agricultural practices and we do not also receive enough rains, either we have little rains or we receive too much rains which come with severe storm and destruction in the process.  This means that when the President was deliberating on this issue, he is somebody who is very considerate; he is a listening President.

At the same time, in this House during our debates, we also talked about teak borne diseases which are affecting our animal husbandry and we all had an input.  It showed that it was important that cattle be taken to dip tanks but unfortunately there is not enough money to buy these chemicals or at times there is no water.  In some instances, people are given wrong chemicals to dip the cattle and this has a negative impact on the cattle population of this country.  We hope that enough chemicals; enough support for the dipping of our cattle will improve and we will have an increase in the number of cattle in the country.  Cattle are a source of wealth amongst us as Africans. Again when we have well fed cattle, we pay lobola and even the mothers are given their quota of the lobola.

The President also talked about the Bill, which talks about the problems faced by the people, regarding health.  When we look at it, people have deductions from their salaries by medical aid societies but when the members go to seek treatment, they are asked to pay shortfalls.  We are hoping this regulatory authority is going to create an atmosphere whereby the beneficiaries of various medical aid societies are going to receive full treatment instead of just being given prescriptions for them to buy medication and also pay shortfalls.

Madam President, the President also talked about pensions.  I am glad that as members of the Senate, we had debated this motion and we had shown that it is a pity that after working and you are supposed to rest after a long time of working and have a good life, it is not happening.  It is unfortunate that people are retiring to poverty and the President had said there is going to be a Pension and Provident Fund Bill.  I hope when that Bill has been introduced and get into this House, we are going to deal with it accordingly so that people who would have come to the end of their working life are going to have a happy life.  The current situation is so sad because we have these elderly people who are supposed to rest at home, but they spend five days and nights at financial institutions five days and five nights at a financial institution and even when they are given their allocation it is not enough to take them back to their homes.  It is all gobbled up by transport.

The President talked about $2.7 million which was allocated for the support of the Small to Medium Enterprises (SMEs).  As we know the SMEs are the backbone of our industry in this country.  When this fund is fully utilized, it is going to improve on the performances of the SMEs because at the moment if we look at the plight of SMEs, some of these SMEs have no proper shelter.  There are no sheds and when it is raining they really have to scurry for cover under shift plastics or whatever they may use. The property which they are manufacturing is destroyed by the rains.

The President also talked about the acquisition of machinery to assist in the manufacturing of the SMEs because these SMEs will be supplied first and foremost with shelter to operate in and secondly, they will be given equipment to ease the way of doing their duties and this  leads to the growth of the economy of the country.

The President talked about democracy in the country and we want to remove some of those environments which create fear amongst the citizens and at times you never know what is creating that fear because at times that is caused by the violence which occurs in the country,  hence we need to have some reforms so that we can live in peace.

Zimbabwe is a peaceful country, Zimbabwe loves peace.

Madam President, the President also showed that he has his people at heart; he is a listening President because he promised that the results of the Mothlante Commission Report instituted to make an enquiry on creating peace in Zimbabwe; he promised to fully implement the recommendations so that there is peace and tranquility in Zimbabwe.   We do not have to live in fear of other people or fear of violence.  So we only hope that these reforms will be implemented fully so that we have peace and tranquility in Zimbabwe.

Madam President, the President also talked about people living with disabilities.  We were told about the problems which are faced by people living with disability and the final result is that some of these people are really looked down upon.  They are made to feel inferior.  We noticed that in some of the buildings they cannot access these buildings.

One typical example is what happened here at the Parliament building.  We had a Committee meeting on the 5th Floor and the lift was out of order.  Consequently, the one Member who was supposed to be coming to that meeting failed to attend the meeting because they could not access the building since the lifts were out of order.

That is why we are saying in any new buildings, it should be made mandatory and compulsory that these buildings are friendly to people living with disability.  They should have easy access so that they can participate fully in all the activities that need their presence, that need their participation because some of these people are marked absent not because of their own liking but because they cannot easily access the places in this building yet they are Members of Parliament who would have been elected by people to represent them.

I will round up my contribution by saying, the President alluded that he was not happy because the Bills which would have been brought to Parliament are not acted upon as they are supposed to be done.  It means Members of Parliament are short changing the people they represent yet these Bills are meant to create peace, order and good governance of Zimbabwe according to the Constitution and above all, protecting the human rights.  We are elected to represent the people.

Thank you Madam President.    

HON. SEN. MOHADI:  I move that the debate do now adjourn.

HON. SEN. HUNGWE:  I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume:  Wednesday, 11 December, 2019.

MOTION

REPORT OF THE DELEGATION TO THE 45TH PLENARY

ASSEMBLY OF THE SADC PARLIAMENTARY FORUM HELD IN

MAPUTO

HON. SEN. MOHADI:  I move the motion standing in my name

that this House takes note of the report of the Delegation to the 45th Plenary Assembly of the SADC Parliamentary Forum, held at the

Joaquim Chissano International Conference Centre, Maputo, Mozambique from 15th to 25th July, 2019.

HON. SEN. KHUPE:  I second.

HON. SEN.  MOHADI:  I am moving a motion on the report of the 45th Plenary Assembly of the SADC Parliamentary Forum held at the Joaquim Chissano International Conference Centre, Maputo,

Mozambique from 15th to 25th July, 2019.  The theme was on ‘Climate change, mitigation and adaptation; the role of Parliament towards the implementation of the Paris Declaration and the Katowice Roadmap.’

Madam President, let me begin by outlining that due to other circumstances, this report is coming to the House belatedly but nevertheless will capture the most important activities that happened in the region.  I will thus give the immediate key points on the report in accordance with Article 11 (10) of the SADC Parliamentary Forum which states that the Plenary Assembly shall meet for the transaction of business at the Headquarters of the Forum or in a Member State on a rotational basis.

The 45th Plenary Assembly of the SADC Parliamentary Forum was convened in Mozambique, Maputo from 15th to 25th July 2019 under the theme ‘Climate change, mitigation and adaptation.  The role of

Parliament towards the role of Parliaments towards implementing the Paris Declaration and the Katowice Roadmap.  Thirteen (13) countries were presented at the plenary that included Angola, Botswana,

Democratic Republic of Congo, the Kingdom of Eswatini, Malawi, Mozambique, Lesotho, Namibia, Seychelles, Tanzania, South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Madam President, the delegation …

THE HON. PRESIDENT OF SENATE:  Ummm Hon. Member,

if I may ask that you increase your volume please.  Those who are behind you would like to hear what you are saying.

HON. SEN. MOHADI:  Thank you Madam President, I will try.

The delegation from Zimbabwe led by Hon. Adv. Jacob Francis Mudenda, Speaker of the National Assembly comprised of the following members and officers of Parliament as follows: - Hon. Sen. Tambudzani

Mohadi, a member of the Standing Committee on Food, Agriculture, Natural Resources and Infrastructure; Hon. Goodluck Kwaramba, member of the Standing Committee on Gender Equality, Women Advancement and Youth Development and chairperson of the

Zimbabwe Women’s Parliamentary Caucus; Hon. Dexter Nduna, temporarily replaced the late Hon. Obedingwa Mguni who was also a member of the Standing Committee on Democratization, Governance and Human Rights until a substantive delegate is appointed; Hon. Anele Ndebele, member of the Standing Committee on Trade, Industry,

Finance and Investment and also Hon. Basilia Majaya, member of the

Standing Committee on Human and Social Development and Special Programmes.

Also, we had member of staff attending this plenary Assembly.

We had Mr. Ndamuka Marimo …

  THE HON. PRESIDENT OF SENATE:  Order, order, sorry I

did not understand well on Hon. Majaya.  Did you say that she is a member of the Central Committee?

HON. SEN. MOHADI:  Alright, I will repeat.

THE HON. PRESIDENT OF SENATE:  Yes please.

HON. MOHADI:  Hon. Basilia Majaya, member of the Standing

Committee on Human and Social Development and Special

Programmes…

      THE HON. PRESIDENT OF SENATE:  This is why I am

saying I think that you should be clear enough for the House to hear you.  If I cannot hear you yet you are very close to me, what about those seated behind you?

HON. SEN. MOHADI:  Thank you Madam President.  The

following members of staff attended the plenary Assembly as support staff: - Mr. Ndamuka Marimo, Director in the Clerk’s Office; Mr. Frank

Mike Nyamahowa, Director in the Hon. Speaker’s Office; Mr. Cleophas Gwakwara, Principal External Relations Officer and Secretary to the delegation; Ms. Martha Mushandinga, Principal Executive Assistant; and Mr. Clive Zvimekria Mukushwa, Security Aide to the Speaker.

Madam President, the official opening ceremony of the 45th

Plenary Assembly took place on Sunday, 21st July, 2019 at Joachim

Chissano International Conference Centre (JCICC).  The Plenary

Assembly expressed its profound appreciation to Hon. Veronica

Nataniel Macamo Dlhovo, the Speaker of the National Assembly of

Mozambique, the President of the Forum and the Parliament of Mozambique for graciously hosting the 45th Plenary Assembly Session having previously hosted the 44th Plenary Assembly at the same venue in December 2018.

Madam President, in delivering the keynote address, the guest-ofhonour and President of the host country, His Excellency the President

Filipe Jacinto Nyusi, advocated for the expeditious transformation of the

SADC Parliamentary Forum into a SADC Regional Parliament in response to current challenges including those related to regional integration.

Madam President, in His Excellency the President Nyusi’s view, the SADC Parliament should not limit its activities to political matters but also pay attention to economic and social issues including those related to the environment.  President Nyusi reiterated the need to have a regional Parliament just as any other region in Africa.

Madam President, the Speaker of the National Assembly of

Mozambique, Hon. Veronica Nataniel Macamo Dlhovo, welcomed the delegates to the city of Acacia and re-emphasized the need to transform the forum into a Legislative Assembly noting that the issue had been on the agenda for a long time.  Hon. Dlhovo committed herself to bring the transformation agenda into finality during her presidency.

Madam President, in a solidarity message delivered by the Hon.

Chief Fortune Charumbira, Fourth Vice President of the Pan African Parliament, he reminded the Plenary Assembly of the need to ensure the full participation of African people in the development of the continent and ensuring that there is full economic integration on the African continent.

The Hon. PAP Vice President applauded the Plenary Assembly for choosing a timely topic for deliberation particularly in the aftermath of Cyclone Idai.

Madam President, the symposium – “Climate change, mitigation and adaptation: The role of parliaments, towards the implementation of the Paris Declaration and the Katowice roadmap”.  The symposium received a brief overview of the impact of the climate change in the SADC region.  The region has a population of about 350 million people with 70% of its population living below the poverty datum line.  Again, 70% of the regional populace relies on natural resources for their livelihood mainly on agriculture, fisheries and on forestry.  The dependence on these natural resources rendered SADC countries susceptible to the impact of climate change and in particular food insecurity.  The coastal States suffer from floods and the impact of cyclones while inland States face droughts and are also impacted upon by cyclones.

Madam President, the session was psyched on need to prepare itself for the emerging challenge of climate migration as people move across borders due to the vagaries of nature.

The Speaker of the National Assembly of Zimbabwe, Hon. Advocate Jacob Francis Mudenda made an impassioned plea to his peers for the political will to contrive strategic and concerted mitigatory solutions in order to avert further debilitating climatic environmental consequences.

Hon. Mudenda drew a road map to ensure that National Parliaments approve the Paris Global Climate Change Agreement in view of domesticating it through relevant municipal laws that may need to be crafted and/or reformed.  This would require extreme cooperation with the respective SADC country executives who must continually craft robust climate change policies as the bedrock of attendant sound climate change laws.

Madam President furthermore, national Parliaments working with their respective Cabinets were urged to adopt the Katowice Rule Book as a tool for implementing the Paris Global Climate Change Agreement.  This should be done in the context of promoting investment in renewable energy.

National Parliaments, through their relevant Portfolio Committees and in liaison with the appropriate line ministries that deal with the environment and climate change must prepare the Biennial

Transparency and National Inventory Reports due as from 2024.

Madam President, the SADC PF should encourage its member

Parliaments to ensure that scientifically grounded departments for Disaster Management are established in their countries as centers of mitigatory climatic change impacts.   Ms. Augusta Maita, Director of the Institute for Disaster Management pledged to avail herself to the region to give expert advice on the need to address the challenges of climate change from a technical perspective.

RESOLUTIONS ON THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

REPORT

Pursuant to its mandate, the Executive Committee (EXCO) of the SADC Parliamentary Forum SADC PF) reported for adoption, issues pertaining to the Management of the Forum, the Transformation process and commended the Plenary Assembly for proposing the relevant and timely theme, “Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation: The Role of

Parliaments “Towards Implementing the Paris Declaration and the Katowice Roadmap.” The Plenary Assembly acknowledged that the theme could not have come at a more opportune time, particularly in the aftermath of Cyclone Idai, which left a trail of death and destruction in the region. Cyclone Idai had provided ample evidence of the reality of climate change and the urgent need to come up with concrete strategies to mitigate climate change and build resilience.

On a sad note, the Plenary Assembly, observed a minute of silence and paid tribute to the late Hon. Obedingwa Mguni who passed away on Tuesday 17th  June 2019.  The Plenary Assembly remembered him for his effervescence, incisive contributions and dedication to the Forum. Furthermore, the 45th Plenary Assembly observed a minute of silence in honour of the unfortunate victims of Cyclone Idai in Malawi,

Mozambique and Zimbabwe.

Amendments to the Administrative Rules and Regulations ofthe Forum on MiscellaneousMatters

The Plenary Assembly adopted a resolution to restrict the Education Allowance payable to Staff to one tertiary qualification per child over and above the age limit of 25 years, to prevent situations where the Forum funds postgraduate qualifications for employees’ children.

Consideration of the Guidelines to Strengthen the

Accountability and Oversight of theOffice of the Secretary-General

The Executive Committee adopted a resolution which will see the implementation of the Guidelines to strengthen the Office of the Secretary -General including annual assessments by the Executive

Committee under the direction of the President of the Forum.

Update on the invitation tendered to the Parliaments of the

Union of Comoros andMadagascar to join the SADC PF

The Plenary Assembly adopted a resolution for the Parliament of

Seychelles to physically visit the Parliaments of Comoros and Madagascar with a view to persuade them to join the SADC PF since they have not yet responded to the written invitations. The initiative is intended to concretise the Forum’s drive towards full regional integration and co-operation.

Update on Transformation of the Forum into a SADC

Regional Parliament

The Plenary Assembly expressed its gratitude to the President of the SADC PF, Hon. Veronica Nataniel Macamo Dlhovo, for taking the initiative to meet the incoming SADC Chairperson, the President of the

United Republic of Tanzania, His Excellency, Dr. John Joseph

Pombe Magufuli to elicit his support on the transformation agenda. 

The SADC PF President had also taken the opportunity to address the thorny issue of the autonomy of the SADC Regional Parliament, by assuring His Excellency, President Magufuli that the Regional Parliament would be guided by the Summit in its mandate and would seek to complement rather than contradict the ideals and aspirations of the Summit.

Hon. Speaker Professor Katjavivi had, in turn, met with the former President of Tanzania and senior statesman, His Excellency, Benjamin Mukapa, on a different mission but took the opportunity to brief H.E. Mukapa, on the transformation agenda. Incidentally, H.E. Mukapa is scheduled to deliver a presentation at the 39th SADC Summit in August during which he promised to voice his support for the transformation agenda. The Plenary Assembly commended the initiative by Hon. Speaker Professor Katjavivi and agreed that the lobbying initiatives towards transformation should not be restricted to Heads of States alone, but should be extended to include opinion leaders and Senior Statesmen in the Region whose voice could be influential in mobilising support for transformation.

The Plenary Assembly resolved that the stratagem should include, but not be limited to the following: -

  1. The SADC PF President and the lobbying team must urgently meet with the outgoing SADC Chairperson, His Excellency, President Hage Geingob, before the onset of the 39th SADC Summit scheduled for August to elicit a reaffirmation of his support as one of the avowed champions of the transformation agenda and encourage him to mobilise support for transformation among other Heads of State.
  2. The lobbying team must identify and approach other potential champions prior to the 39th SADC Summit to assist in eliciting a concrete decision by the Summit on the transformation agenda, including but not limited to, the Presidents of Angola,

Mozambique, South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

  1. The SADC PF President must, without delay, appeal to His Excellency President Filipe Jacinto Nyusi, to facilitate for the lobbying team to be allowed to address the Council of Ministers and the SADC Summit on the transformation agenda.
  2. Speaker Dlhovo and Hon. Speaker Professor Katjavivi should leverage on the impending bilateral visit to Mozambique

by His Excellency President Hage Geingob, to jointly brief their Heads of State on the status of the transformation agenda and appeal for their backing in mobilising support before and during the 39th SADC Summit.

  1. The lobbying team should urgently extend its advocacy efforts to the SADC Secretariat and sensitise them on the transformation agenda in order to dispel any misconceptions and negativity they might have towards transformation.
  2. Speakers must, without delay, seek the support of their respective Ministers of Foreign Affairs while the Clerks/

Secretaries General should engage Secretaries for Foreign Affairs on the transformation drive to garner their support prior to the 39th SADC Council of Ministers Meeting and Summit.

  1. The Forum Secretariat, with the assistance of Clerks/ Secretaries General of National Parliaments, must identify and engage a team of lawyers to assist in developing an indicative Protocol for transformation which resonates with the Forum’s thrust as a complementary organ to the Summit.
  2. The Forum Secretariat and Clerks/Secretaries General must engage the media in their respective countries to lobby for support for transformation of the Forum into a SADC Regional Parliament.

Adoption of the Oath and Affirmation of Adherence for SADC

PF Members of Parliament

The 44th Plenary Assembly adopted an Oath and Affirmation of adherence for SADC PF Members of Parliament, which was commissioned through research by the Secretariat into best practices in other regional and international Parliamentary organisations. It is envisaged that the Oath and Affirmation of Adherence will provide recourse for the Forum in the event that Members exhibit conduct that is likely to undermine the integrity of the Forum.

Engagement of Consultant to Develop Risk Management

Policy

Pursuant to the recommendations of an Organisational Assessment exercise conducted by KPMG (Zambia), the Plenary Assembly approved the Terms of Reference for the engagement of a Consultant to develop a Risk Management Policy for the Forum in line with international best practices.

Update on the Forthcoming SRHR, HIV & AIDS Governance

Project with Sweden

The Plenary Assembly welcomed the impending commencement of the SRHR, HIV and AIDS Governance Project following the signing of the Project Agreement in June 2019. The Project will cover all the 14 Member Parliaments and is expected to commence on 1st August 2019. The development of the Institutional Risk Management Policy flagged under the Organisational Assessment exercise is part of the requirements for the commencement of the SRHR, HIV and AIDS Governance

Project.

 Improvement of Whistle blowing Policy of the Forum

The Plenary Assembly welcomed the development by the Secretariat of a whistle-blowing policy as part of the recommendations of the Organisational Assessment exercise. The development of a whistle-blowing policy resonates with the Forum’s strategic thrust towards enhancing transparency, accountability and upholding the values of honesty and integrity. The Plenary Assembly encouraged the Secretariat to continue exploring ways to improve the complaint system, including introducing a toll-free hotline and suggestion boxes.

TREASURER’S REPORT

The Plenary Assembly noted that Zimbabwe had fully paid its subscriptions up to 2020. This payment has assisted in raising

Zimbabwe’s standing in the regional body since the country is a critical player in most of the initiatives at the Forum.

MOTIONS ADOPTED DURING PLENARY ASSEMBLY

In tandem with its constitutive mandate, as the policy making and deliberative body of   SADC PF, the 45th Plenary Assembly discussed and resolved on various issues of regional importance and concern.

      Motion for the adoption of the Report of the Regional

Parliamentary Model Laws 

     Oversight Committee

The Plenary Assembly adopted the need to prioritise monitoring of the domestication of legal provisions contained in Model Laws developed by the Forum, in view of promoting harmonisation of regional legal norms on SRHR, gender equality and democratic elections across the SADC region. This will ensure the SADC citizenry as a whole, benefit from a standardised legal instruments implemented through sovereign parliamentary processes.

In the ensuing debate, the Plenary Assembly stressed the need to strengthen the monitoring exercise by the Committee to ensure that sound, accurate and reliable information is obtained on domestication of model laws.

The Plenary Assembly emphasised the need to find a lasting and sustainable solution to the funding of the Election Observation Missions, given the strategic role that such missions play in advancing democratisation in SADC Member States.

National Parliaments were encouraged to continue marshalling efforts for domestication of all SADC Model Laws, and for Members of Parliament to support gender mainstreaming by advocating for the domestication of the instruments and protocols relating to Gender, and by infusing gender parity on a 50:50 ratio in electoral systems through progressive reforms.

Motion and debate on the Report of the Joint Session of SADC

PF Standing Committeesin the SADC Region

The Standing Committees and the RWPC met ahead of the 45th  Plenary Assembly Session to reflectively deliberate on various thematic issues of regional interest and concern. In this regard, the Plenary

Assembly adopted the following resolutions with regards to the report: -  

Status of SADC’s Public Health System, Access to Medicine

and Public Health

  • There is need to promote access to medicine by harnessing the creation of an alternative pharmaceutical plant in the region post 2033, which will greatly serve the objectives of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) especially, Goal number 3 which aims at ensuring healthy lives and the promotion of the well-being of the people in the region.  
  • The SADC Region needs to create an enabling environment that will nurture research into the production capacity of the local and regional pharmaceutical industry in terms of generic essential medicines.
  • Africa needs a regional centre of excellence that will promote, monitor and guide the production of diverse medicines and this should be supported by national and regional alignment of trade policies.
  • A database and a databank of traditional medicines should be established and this should be complemented by a purposeful trade in pharmaceuticals within SADC.

        Digital Economy

  • On the digital economy, the Plenary Assembly noted the need to: -
  • Ensure that people in the region have access to internet and the digital economy including those in the hinterland;
  • Take measures that mitigate the high cost of internet to ensure that ordinary people realise the full benefits of the digital economy through affordable access to communication systems;
  • Cyber security should play a role in the management and governance of the digital age.
  • The Fourth (4th) industrial revolution has given rise to a number of services such as cloud, machine learning, drones, block chain and others. These provide enormous potential for legislators and policy makers to exploit the networks of the digital economy for the benefit of the public sector and their constituencies;
  • It was noted that the on-going Huawei trade conflict between the United States of America and China is a potential disservice as it can reduce accessibility to cellphones and the internet and generally the participation in the digital economy;
  • At a policy level, the digital economy may be advanced through the adoption of a Regional technical roadmap, regional model law and the post adoption popularisation and implementation;
  • Laws against cyber-crime appear rather rushed and more driven by political motive than the need to regulate the sector and protect the various internet users. The region should play a facilitatory role with regards to the use of the internet; and
  • There is need for a robust regional data protection framework to allow the movement of data across countries without exposing the identity and security of the users.

Motion and debate for the adoption of the Report of the Standing Committee on Gender Equality, Women Advancement and Youth Development

The Plenary Assembly resolved as follows: -

  • Parliaments should consider recruiting and placing Youth intern/volunteers at each National Parliament, to provide on-thejob training and workplace exposure to youth at national level, while sustaining initiatives and projects of SADC-PF YDP.
  • SADC PF and Parliaments to develop a sustainability strategy to cater for youth development initiatives across all development

Programmes; and

  • Parliaments must consider secondment of Youth Officers to support implementation activities beyond the contract of the current secondment by Parliament of Namibia.

Motion and debate for the adoption of the Report of the

Standing Committee on Democratization, Governance and Human

Rights

The Plenary Assembly resolved as follows: -

  1. The Secretariat should write to all National Parliaments communicating the reputational risk that SADC PF was facing from not participating in Election Missions and therefore, appeal to the Speakers to give the matter favourable consideration.
  2. The Secretariat to facilitate for the Committee, through the Chairperson, to engage the Executive Committee and Speakers to brief them on the matter with a view to finding a collective solution that should see SADC PF deploying Election Observation Missions to the remaining four countries holding elections in 2019, namely Botswana (October), Mozambique (15th October), Namibia

(27th November) and Mauritius (December).

  1. There was need to ensure that Plenary Assembly decisions are implemented, including those on the deployment of

Parliamentarians to observe elections in Member States, as failure to implement Plenary resolutions could undermine the credibility of SADC PF in the eyes of stakeholders. Parliament of Zimbabwe should maintain its presence for activities such as the Plenary

Assembly where robust regional issues are debated.

  1. National Parliaments should be encouraged to prioritise SADC PF activities in the allocation of financial resources to the regional body as compared to International Parliamentary bodies.
  2. The Committee, through the Chairperson, will table a draft resolution to the 46th Plenary Assembly proposing the way forward on the funding of SADC PF election observation missions, taking into consideration consultations with the Executive Committee and

Speakers of National Parliaments.

 

Adoption of the Report of the Standing Committee on Humanand Social Development and Special Programmes

 The Plenary Assembly resolved that:

The Secretariat continues to work with Sweden to finalise Phase 2 of the SRHR, HIV and AIDS Governance Project which will be implemented in 14 countries of the SADC region. The Forum reaffirmed its commitment to prioritise Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH), as part of its human and social development priorities, especially given the known linkages between SRH and the transmission of HIV which still notoriously influences the SADC region;

Furthermore, National Parliaments must continue to work together to share experiences and cross-learn on Sexual Reproductive and Human and Development issues, under the auspices of the Forum, and additionally continue holding Governments to account on their SRH commitments.

Motion and debate for the adoption of the Report of the

Standing Committee on Trade, Industry, Finance and

Infrastructure (TIFI)

The Plenary Assembly acknowledged the devastating effects of

Illicit Financial Flows (IFFs) and Sovereign Debt on the development of Southern Africa and Africa and stressed the need to address these challenges head on.

SADC countries were encouraged to urgently address the debt crisis which is re-emerging in the region. Whilst those facing debt distress should devise strategies to address this undesirable state, the rest of the region should not be complacent.  Sovereign Debt is inadvertently resulting in countries mortgaging the future generations.

The complex issues of Sovereign Debt required all the different stakeholders to work together. Parliament, civil society and the media are important players and should join forces in addressing IFFs and Sovereign Debt.

 

Motion and Debate for the Adoption of the Report of the

Regional Women’s Parliamentary Caucus

The Plenary Assembly resolved as follows: -

  1. SADC Member States must domesticate global, regional and sub-regional instruments that seek to strengthen the rights of women and girls.
  2. SADC-PF should support efforts that seek to promote gender mainstreaming and gender responsive budgeting across the SADC-PF region.
  3. The RWPC should continue to coordinate with stakeholders, especially Civil Society Organisations, to develop a robust multi-stakeholder partnership framework that can act holistically to promote gender equality, SRH and women empowerment.
  4. SADC-PF should support RWPC efforts that seek to promote 50 percent gender parity in political governance.
  5. The RWPC, with the coordination of the Secretariat, should continue to liaise with all institutional organs of the Forum and address cross-cutting issues relating to women which transcends different thematic areas.
  6. SADC-PF should strengthen efforts and initiatives that seek to work with men as development partners, for example, the

HeforShe campaign.

Motion and Debate for the Adoption of the Report of the Food,

Agriculture  Committee

         (FANR)

The Plenary Assembly noted the devastation on the 14th and 15th of March 2019, caused by Cyclone Idai as it made a landfall near Beira city, and in parts of Eastern Zimbabwe and Malawi which led to catastrophic destruction of infrastructure, property and livelihoods.  Usually, cyclones form in the Central Indian Ocean – giving sufficient time for affected countries to prepare to reduce a disaster. On the contrary, Idai started off deceptively weak and then grew incrementally to strike a big blow on the three affected countries.

 

Climate change should be linked to issues of poverty, equity, justice, politics and economics. Both politicians and the ordinary people should come up with mitigatory strategies and building resilience.

Environmental pollution as a result of waste mismanagement including chemicals should be discouraged. Pollution waste, unfortunately, ends up in drainage systems and results in blockages and contamination of water and the environment. Parliaments should enact legislation that imposes deterrent sentences on such would-be polluters.

Climate change, as observed from changed rainfall patterns and other environmental phenomenon, is a reality and not mere theory. It is, therefore, important to give priority to crops like cassava and sorghum which are drought resistant and can survive short and erratic rainfall patterns.

There is a need to resuscitate and appreciate indigenous knowledge systems about the environment and the weather in particular as coastal communities used to anticipate cyclones and other climatic conditions and put the necessary precautions in place.

 

Cyclones are an environmental phenomenon and a reality of climate change and have both negative and positive consequences. Human beings, therefore, have no choice but to embrace the reality of climate change and in particular the phenomenon of cyclones and put in place the necessary mitigatory measures to build resilience.

Regional and National disaster management and coordination through the strengthening of early warning systems and pooling of resources is the best way to deal with the effects of climate change.

SADC Governments must, as a matter of priority, individually and collectively provide funding for disaster management initiatives. SADC Parliaments should exercise oversight over these initiatives and assess their disaster preparedness.

DEBATES ON MOTIONS BY MEMBER PARLIAMENTS

Motion on Beneficiation of the Extractive Sector in the SADC region

The Plenary Assembly noted that the African continent is endowed with mineral resources which are capable of fully sustaining the livelihoods of its citizenry.

 

The meeting recalled that the colonial contact of Africa with the

West was based on and triggered by the mineral wealth of Africa.

The Plenary Assembly urged Member States to prioritise beneficiation and value addition to the region's mineral resources in order to ensure maximisation of their value, thereby enhancing

Governments’ capacity to mobilise revenue for delivery of public services.

Motion on the Promotion of Renewable Energy in the SADC

region   

Plenary Assembly resolved to: -

Urge SADC Governments to urgently diversify from the conventional sources of energy to the more abundant renewable and other non-conventional sources such as solar, wind, gas and minihydros;

  1. Implore SADC to prioritise the development of a regional mechanism to invest in the development of Inga Dam Phase Two which has the potential to make the region and Africa as a whole energy self-sufficient;
  2. Encourage SADC countries to invest in power plants such as the Kafue Gorge Hydropower Station in Zambia, the proposed Batoka Gorge Hydroelectric Power Station, which is a 1,600 megawatts hydroelectric power station, planned to be on the Zambezi River across the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe. This initiative, among others will enhance the capacity of Member States to export and import electricity from each other.
  3. Recommend increased and innovative investment in the region’s energy infrastructure as most of the power plants were commissioned in the 1960s and 1970s and with no significant investment made in recent years, by creating an enabling environment for international investment and public private partnerships.
  4. Suggest the application of the principles of cost reflective electricity tariffs concurrent with pro-poor measures to ensure sustainability of the sector and access by the poor.
  5. Urged National Governments to provide targeted funding for rural and peri-urban electrification initiatives in order to ensure access to electricity by the majority in the hinterland; and, Encouraged SADC Member Parliaments, in particular the Parliamentary Committees on Energy, to ensure effective oversight on the energy sector, the engagement of all role players and the strategic utilisation of legislative and budgetary measures to advance the sector, in particular the renewable energy.

Motion on the Need for a Lasting Solution Regarding Funding for

SADC PF electionObservation Missions

The Plenary Assembly urged the Executive Committee to engage

Speakers of Member Parliaments and the Chairperson of the Democratisation, Governance and Human Rights Standing Committee with a view to finding a collective and lasting solution that should see SADC PF deploying Election Observation Missions to the remaining four countries holding elections in 2019, namely Botswana (October),

Mozambique (15th October), Namibia (27th November) and Mauritius

(December), (This resolution is read with the Resolutions under Item

9.0).

Motion on the Negative Effects of Plastic on the Environment  

The Plenary Assembly endorsed the international campaign

"PRODUCE, USE AND RE-USE"   as opposed to "PRODUCE, USE AND DISPOSE" and urged all stakeholders nationally and regionally, including  industry and business to embrace this approach. The meeting prompted National Governments and other stakeholders to initiate and sustain national and community campaigns to raise awareness about the devastating effects of plastic on the environment and to create incentives which will promote positive action in this regard.

Member Parliaments and their Executive arms were encouraged to urgently take legislative measures to regulate and eliminate plastic usage in order to protect the   environment and to ensure effective implementation of such legislation and monitoring of the same.

Member States were encouraged to fully support SADC’s environmental management and sustainable development objectives through the promotion of pollution control, waste management and environmental education.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

Recommendation Action Timeline
Transformation of SADC PF into a Regional Parliament. -The Hon. Speaker to lead the local mobilisation of support for the Transformation agenda.

 

-Lobbying process with the Executive to continue formally and informally.

 

October  2019

 

 

 

Resolution on the Paris Global

Climate Change Agreement and Katowice Roadmap with a in view to domesticate and make follow-up action through relevant municipal laws

-Line Ministry to meet with

Portfolio Committee on

Lands, Agriculture, Climate and Water and Rural Resettlement to report on preparations of the

Biennial Transparency and National Inventory Reports due as from 2024.

- Parliament of Zimbabwe to play its oversight role by ensuring that the Civil Protection Unit of Zimbabwe is scientifically

October 2019

 

grounded for Disaster

Management

Harnessing the full benefits of the digital economy and mitigating the harmful effects of Cyber -crime -The Committee to include in its work plan the role of the Fourth (4th) industrial revolution and its attendant benefits. The Ministry of Science and Technology to unpack the related benefits such as cloud computing, machine learning, drones, block chain and others.

 

-The Committee on ICT, Postal and Courier Services to conduct oversight on progress in the establishment of internet services in rural areas

 

October  2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 2020

 

Parliament to domesticate global, regional and subregional instruments that seek to strengthen the rights of women and girls.

 

The Institution to strengthen synergies with men in mainstreaming gender issues.

 

-The ZWPC to strengthen efforts and initiatives that seek to work with men as partners on issues related to Gender, e.g. the HeforShe campaign.

 

October 2019
Portfolio Committees to take active interest in Climate Change issues as they relate to poverty, equity, justice, humanitarian, politics and economics.

 

 

-Liaison with the Ministry of Energy and Power Development for the development of clean methods of energy production.

 

 

October 2019
Beneficiation of the extractive sector -The Mines and Mining

Development Ministry to be engaged to prioritise beneficiation and value

October 2019

 

addition to the country’s mineral resources, including lithium, chrome ore, gold in order to ensure maximisation of their value, thereby enhancing

Government’s ‘capacity to mobilise revenue for delivery of public services.

Ban on the Use of Plastic in the country -Parliament of Zimbabwe, through the Portfolio Committee on Environment, to urgently undertake legislative measures to regulate and eliminate plastic usage in order to protect the environment and to ensure effective implementation of such legislation and monitoring of the same.

 

October 2019
Enhancement of Election

Observation Missions

-The Plenary Assembly urged the

Executive Committee to engage Speakers of Member Parliaments and the Chairperson of the Democratisation Governance and

Human Rights Standing

Committee with a view to finding a collective and lasting solution that should see SADC PF deploying Election Observation Missions to the remaining four countries holding elections in 2019, namely Botswana

(October), Mozambique (15th

October), Namibia (27th

November) and Mauritius

(December)

Ongoing
Harnessing the importance of

Indigenous Medicinal

Knowledge Systems

-Promotion, monitoring and guidance on the production of diverse medicines which should be supported by national and regional alignment of trade policies. The oversight role to be championed by the Portfolio Committee on Health and Child Welfare.

 

September

2019

 

CONCLUSION

The Plenary Assembly appreciated the excellent hosting arrangements made by the National Assembly of Mozambique noting that the country hosted the 44th Plenary Assembly and is still recovering from the effects of Cyclone Idai and Cyclone Kenneth. Parliament of

Zimbabwe stands to benefit by adopting resolutions of the 45th Plenary Assembly as they summarise the collective concerns of citizens in the region.

The delegation led by Hon. Speaker Advocate Jacob Francis.

Mudenda, must be commended for raising the country’s flag high by participating actively and making incisive contributions during deliberations on reports and motions before the Plenary Assembly. The President of the SADC PF, Hon. Speaker Dlhovo, and the SADC PF Secretariat, through the Secretary General, Ms Boemo Sekgoma, acknowledged the high standard of debate set by the Zimbabwean delegates which fostered lively interface and positive interaction during the Plenary Assembly.

         HON. SEN. KHUPE: Thank you very much Mr. President. I will deal with the resolutions of the Executive Committee Report.

  THE HON. DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF SENATE: If you can

just highlight the main issues as the report is going to be distributed to the Hon. Senators. You may proceed.

HON. SEN. KHUPE: The highlights for the key points on the recommendations were amendments to the administrative rules and regulations of the forum on miscellaneous matters. There was also a resolution of consideration of guidelines to strengthen the accountability and oversight of the office of the Secretary General, update on the invitation tendered to the Parliament of the Union of Comoros and Madagascar to join the SADC PF and transformation of the forum into a

SADC Regional Parliament.

The Plenary Assembly resolved that the strengthened should include but not be limited to the following:

  • SADC PF President and the lobbying team must urgently meet with on-going SADC PF Chairperson.
  • Adoption of the affirmation of adherence to the SADC PF Members of Parliament.
  • Engagement of the consultant to develop risk management policy.

In addition to that, there was a resolution on the update of the forth coming SRHR/HIV and AIDS governance project with Sweden. There was also improvement of the whistle blowing policy on the forum. There are a number of resolutions which are on this paper but let me also read the last but one - status of the SADC public health system, access to medicine and public health. Finally, there was a resolution on motion and debate for the adoption of the Report of the Standing Committee on Gender Quality, Women Advancement and Youth Development. I think

I have to put a full stop Mr. President. Thank you.

*HON. SEN. HUNGWE: Thank you Mr. President. May I please

be given an opportunity to make my contribution in Shona on this motion raised by Hon. Mohadi and seconded by Hon. Sen. Khupe regarding the climate change in the world.  I am going to interpret what climate change will mean to the people. We are now being encouraged to grow small grains because they quickly mature even if we have very little rains. This is the result of the climate change. What happens is, when we go back to our farming areas we start growing those small grains because we will be following what is recommended in this time of climate change.

There are some things which I think we should create awareness on and this is what I am going to dwell on. I researched on some of these things and some of them I know. I remember reading some report of FAWE which was done in 1964. The explanation was - when we are talking of climate change, there are two kinds of lives. When we have two people who are born on the same day and one person is fed on small grains like millet, wheat and soghurm and all those small grains - the other person is going to be fed on one type and that is surviving on maize meal because it is prepared using machines. What will be observed on these two people is that the person who will be eating small grains which will be planted in the soil and as it grows up to be a plant, there are sort of chemicals and other nutrients that get into the grain...

THE HON. DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF SENATE: Order Hon.

Sen., stick to the motion.   

*HON. SEN. HUNGWE: Okay Mr. President. This person who

will be feeding on maize – it has a different set up. There are some chemicals and nutrients which are wanted such as iron. If we lack iron in our bodies, we will not have a healthy life and that means our food should include nutrients such as iron. If you lack iron, you may not live up to 83 years of age. If you are eating these traditional foods, they give you a long life because of the way the small grains are grown and prepared. That is why I have managed to live so long because when we talk of the way this mealie-meal was prepared, there was a stone and a grinding stone.

You will notice that when this meal was prepared, the way that stone was rolling over the big stone there is now covertures; it is indented because that stone is worked out. When that stone is worn out we are also getting some nutrients from that stone such as iron. Mr. President, I am a teacher by profession and whenever I am making a discussion, I look at the things which may be of some benefit to us so that I contribute to my fellow Members. I thank you.

         HON. SEN. MOHADI: Thank you Mr. President. I move that the debate do now adjourn.

         HON. SEN. HUNGWE: I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume: Wednesday, 11th December, 2019.

ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE HON. DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF

THE SENATE

NON-ADVERSE REPORT RECEIVED FROM THE

PARLIAMENTARY LEGAL COMMITTEE

       THE HON. DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF SENATE: I have

received a Non-Adverse Report from the Parliamentary Legal Committee on the following:

  1. All Statutory Instruments published in the Gazette during the month of November 2019.
  2. The Money Laundering and Proceeds of Crime Amendment

Bill [H. B. 4 B, 2019].

CONSIDERATION STAGE

MONEY LAUNDERING AND PROCEEDS OF CRIME

AMENDMENT BILL [H. B. 4 B, 2019]

Amendments to Clause 2 put and agreed to.

Bill, as amended, adopted.

Third Reading: With leave, forthwith.

THIRD READING

MONEY LAUNDERING AND PROCEEDS OF CRIME

AMENDMENT BILL [H. B. 4 B, 2019]

THE MINISTER OF JUSTICE, LEGAL AND

PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS (HON. ZIYAMBI): Mr. Speaker Sir,

I now move that the Bill be read the third time.

Motion put and agreed to.

Bill read the third time.

MOTION

REPORT OF THE DELEGATION TO THE PAN-AFRICAN

PARLIAMENT HIGH LEVEL SUMMIT ON HIV AND HEALTH

FINANCING IN AFRICA

Third Order read:  Adjourned debate on motion on the Report of the Delegation to the Pan-African Parliament High Level Summit on HIV and Health Financing in Africa.

Question again proposed.

HON. SEN. FEMAI:  I move that the debate do now adjourn.

HON. SEN. NCUBE:  I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume: Wednesday, 11th December, 2019.

MOTION

REPORT OF THE THEMATIC COMMITTEE ON GENDER AND

DEVELOPMENT ON THE PLIGHT OF PEOPLE WITH

DISABILITIES AND CHALLENGES FACED BY WOMEN AND

GIRLS WITH DISABILITIES IN ZIMBABWE

Fourth Order read:  Adjourned debate on motion on the Report of the Thematic Committee on Gender and Development on the plight of people with disabilities in Zimbabwe.

Question again proposed.

*HON. SEN. CHABUKA:  Thank you Mr. President for giving me this opportunity to contribute on this motion which was raised by Hon. Sen. Ncube  who is the Chairperson of the Thematic Committee on Gender and Development.  The Committee moved around the country on a fact finding mission on problems faced by women and girls living with disabilities.  I thank you Hon. Sen. Ncube for leading such a delegation.

It is quite painful because as human beings, we have our own ways of living which we are supposed to be following.  We notice that despite the fact that disability affects both men and women, women are the ones who suffer more.  I am full of praise for the Committee for undertaking such a task of moving around the country on fact finding. I remember clearly when this motion was moved, I had watched a ZTV programme where a woman living with disability was testifying her experiences in life.  I remember very well that she said when she wants to board a commuter omnibus to town; the taxi operators would tell her that they do not have space because what they think of is the time they will take in accommodating her and her wheel chair would be a waste of time.  That wheel chair would also occupy space which should be occupied by another passenger.

At times these people living with disability just like any other illegal vendor in town have to run when chased away from the pavements by law enforcement agents.  They even grab some of the wares they will be selling or even abuse their wheel chairs.  This really touches me.  I know that people living with disability need to have that special care.

People with disability share toilets with able-bodied people.  When I look at the problems that they face when they get into the toilets, I cry for mercy from the God above.  As a country, we need to be respectful.  We need to craft laws which are aimed at easing the burden of people living with disability.  Let us not make them feel inferior – they should feel equal to everybody else. I am also calling upon the Minister of Finance and Economic Development that when he is crafting his budget he should also put more money or emphasis on easing the plight of people living with a disability. I am begging for the powers that be whenever there is any construction project which is going on like constructing a school, it should be able to accommodate easy access for people living with disabilities.  Some of these are hard of hearing, some of them have problems in walking, some of them cannot talk and hence the Minister of Finance and Economic Development should put more money for easing the life of its people living with disabilities.

I am also calling upon the Minister to put some funds aside which are aimed at supporting the families of these people living with disability and have children moving around begging for money.  The streets are dangerous with both cars and people as they can be abused.  Also these people living with disabilities sit along street corners and beg for money which I think is not supposed to be like that.  Hon. Ncube, thank you very much for that initiative which you took on a fact finding mission.  At times people living with disability have problems in that they cannot be able to go through normal life like what people who are able bodied are able to do.

I will look at people who are visually impaired.  If you are a boy you want to see the features of the woman you are marrying and if you are a lady, also you want to look at the physical features of the man you are supposed to marry, but you cannot do so because you are visually impaired.  Therefore Hon. Ncube thank you very much for the initiative you took for taking care of people living with disabilities.

*HON. SEN. CHIEF GOROMONZI CHIKWAKA:  Thank you

Mr. President.  I am very grateful for being given this opportunity to make my contribution on a motion raised by Hon. Ncube and seconded and debated by other Members of Parliament.  This is quite a sympathetic and sad story of these people living with disability.

In my culture we say when somebody is in problems they cry out for assistance because those people can support themselves and are able to go wherever they want.  I am a very big man physically and I used to be proud of who I am. I had that feeling of superiority complex but Hon. President, I have now come to a point whereby I am now disabled despite being an able bodied person.  What happened was I was involved in an accident and I had a permanent injury to my hand.  Therefore when I am talking to my fellow Parliamentarians let us not look at a case as saying it is them who are disabled, it will never happen to me, but disability can come at any time when you are least expecting, just like what I have said.  I cannot even handle a cell phone to communicate because of my disability.

I was a member of that committee which went on a fact finding mission on people living with disabilities and I am saying as the people of Zimbabwe, it is our obligation to take care of people living with disabilities.  The problem we face is that some of the families are ashamed of their members who are living with disabilities and they hide them from the public glare.  At times even us, other people, we are not able to assist these people in their times of problems.  I say that because when you look at some of the building construction projects which you undertake, people live upstairs with no access for people living with disabilities.  My worry is supposed you have constructed your house with bedrooms in the upper floors and when you are either aged or you become disabled how are you going to access those rooms, how are you going to access the facilities?  It only shows that we are people who are very short sighted.  That is why I am calling upon people to take into account and think of the people who are living with disabilities.

The Bible encourages men to take care of women because they need our support, but what we have noticed is that some of the able bodied men approach these women living with disabilities and they impregnate them.  When they impregnate them, they deny paternity and they do not even take care of those children, yet what happens when that child has been taken to school and they are educated, we find that at times the Government neglected the mother.

At times that child that would have resulted from the pregnancy that would have been denied by the responsible man, the Government does not even take care of the children of these people living with disability or women who were abused and yet it is of prime importance that as Government, we should create a fund or a system where we take care of children of parents who are living with disability so that these children can live a better life and take care of their parents.

We have also noticed that we discriminate people living with disabilities, especially in the distribution of goods for use either in farming or even machinery we discriminate against them.  It is my call that these people should be assisted so that they can live a blessed life.  Let us not make them feel inferior, but they should feel superior because of the way they will be helped by Government.

I am so glad because Government has taken another step further to help people including even those living with disabilities through the free distribution of sanitary pads.  We have noticed those living with disabilities need assistance.  When this disabled child goes on her monthly periods, she wants to move out of the class and go to ablution blocks to go and prepare herself, but the problem is some of them are inaccessible.  Some of these Blair toilets do not have proper doors and when these people get into those places, they need that privacy so that they clean themselves up and then go back to the class and join others without feeling ashamed of having spoiled themselves because of poor ablution blocks at schools.

Therefore I am calling upon Government to craft a law which makes it mandatory for these ablution blocks, especially in rural areas, to be properly crafted and be user friendly for people living with disabilities.  This is my small contribution on the welfare of people living with a disability.

HON. SEN. TIMVEOS:  Thank you Madam President for this opportunity to add my voice.  I want to thank Hon. Ncube and her Committee for doing such a great job by going around the country to assess and really look at the situation and the plight that is being faced by people with disabilities in this country.

Madam President, for sure we have a lot of laws on disability and our Constitution is clear that they have rights but at this moment in time,

Zimbabwe is crying and bleeding - a lot of people are crying.  As

Government, we seem to have forgotten our disabled people.

Our disabled people are suffering at this moment in time; especially children – you can only imagine and the women.  I have seen them on the streets and a lot has been said.  I am sure that all of us have seen them.  Most of these people can actually look after themselves if they are given opportunities – [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] – Madam President, our culture really needs to change because in most cases people with disabilities are as if they are cursed, because some families hide their children in the houses and they do not want to show them to the world.  In that regard, those children will suffer in there and if there is hunger, they will be suffering in there and the communities will not take heed of these children.  So, as Government, we actually need to go down as well to the communities and educate our people.

Madam President, there is a lot that needs to be done.  I heard an Hon. Member bemoaning a budget to be set aside – there is a lot that needs to be done.  Unfortunately, when I looked at the welfare side of things in terms of the budget – it is really not enough.  It looks like even in 2020 they are still going to be suffering.  I think that as Senate we should agree that next year we should fight very hard – in unison for our people who live with disability to get a portion.  The welfare side should get enough budgetary allocation so that they can be on the lookout for our people to educate them.

I just want to highlight a few issues - we may think at this moment in time, because the way that Zimbabwe is acting is as if we feel that possibly they have no rights.  You are aware that even when buildings are being constructed there should be a law to say, ‘If you are constructing a big building for business, make sure that you are catering for disability, because they are everywhere’.  You also heard that they are even having challenges just to board a kombi with their wheelchair – that is very painful, just a simple action that you can do.  We can easily board kombis but they cannot.  So, I just want to highlight a few of these rights and I know that Zimbabwe is a signatory to the African Protocol on Persons with Disability and Inclusion in Education – we are a signatory.

The other problem that I see is that we have signed as a country, so many protocols but we do not domesticate them – that is where the problem is.  The moment that a country signs a protocol – we must ratify it and then domesticate it.  The moment we do that, it then becomes a law.  So, I know that we are a signatory to this one – African Protocol on Persons with Disabilities and Inclusion in Education.  The African Protocol on Persons with Disabilities recognizes disability rights.  What does it say?  Every person with disability has a right to education but our children are at the robots begging, walking around with their blind mothers and no one is worried as to what is happening.  It is actually a community – you know, I always pass through near the Crown Plaza Hotel.  Have you noticed that it is now like a community?  It is like another village with thousands of people out there.  The Government has to self- introspect and see what we are doing about our children and women.  I have seen little girls begging and you can imagine a 12 year old begging.  What about during the night when it is 1900 hrs or 2000 hours in the evening?  These girls are being abused.

State parties shall ensure, to persons with disabilities, the right to education on all equal basis with others, State parties shall take reasonable, appropriate and effective measures to ensure that inclusive quality education and skills training for persons with disabilities is realised fully.  Do we have them in these educational institutions?  We have to look at ourselves as Government – what are we doing?  Are we giving our children with disabilities this opportunity?  Government may look at this as a cost but the moment you educate these people then it does not become a cost to Government because they can then look after themselves - it is not a cost.  Yes, as we start initially to put this into practice because we signed into it, then they can improve themselves and help in developing the nation. Ensuring that person with disabilities are able to access general tertiary education, vocational training, adult education and lifelong learning without discrimination and on equal basis with others including ensuring the literacy of persons with disabilities.  In this regard, I am sorry to say we have not achieved this as a country and we really need to look at it closely.

Ensuring reasonable accommodation of the individual requirement is provided and that persons with disabilities receive the support required to facilitate their effective education; providing reasonable progressive and effective individualised support measures and environments that maximize academic and social development, consistence with the goal of inclusion.

Ensuring appropriate schools are available to persons with disabilities who may prefer to learn in particular environment.  Ensuring that persons with disabilities learn life and social...

THE TEMPORARY PRESIDENT OF SENATE (HON. SEN.

MOHADI): Order Hon. Senator, you seem to be reading, I thought it is a debate, just read the points and debate.

HON. SEN. TIMVEOS: Thank you very much Madam President,

I am actually highlighting their rights and the protocol that we are a signatory to.  This is what I am referring to, if you can allow me Madam

President.

THE TEMPORARY PRESIDENT OF SENATE: Okay go

ahead.

HON. SEN. TIMVEOS: Thank you.

     THE TEMPORARY PRESIDENT OF SENATE: But you must

not take long reading; if you highlight, you just highlight then debate.

HON. SEN. TIMVEOS: Thank you very much Madam President,

you are also a member of the Standing Rules and Orders Committee, I think we actually made a resolution that everyone is now allowed to read but I hear you, thank you.

Ensuring that persons with disabilities learn life and social development skills to facilitate their full and equal participation in education and as members of the community; ensuring that multidisciplinary assessments are undertaken to determine appropriate reasonable accommodation and support measures for learners with disability.  Early intervention, regular assessment and certification of learners are undertaken regardless of their disability.  Ensuring educational institutions are equipped with teaching aids, materials and equipment to support the education of students with disabilities and their specific needs.

Training education professionals including persons with disabilities on how to educate and interact with children with specific learning needs and facilitating respect, recognition, promotion preservation and development of fine languages.

Madam President, I think as a country, if we domestic this protocol, we will never have a problem and our people that live with disability are going to actually help this nation develop and live better life.  I thank you.

*HON. SEN. FEMAI: Thank you Madam President for giving me

the opportunity to make my contribution on this motion. I am very grateful to this Committee which is chaired by Hon. Ncube because they undertook this great task on a fact finding on the welfare of people living with disability, I want to thank them very much.

Madam President, let me start by saying this, as Hon Senators, when we are moving around this country we are proud being called Hon.

Member and even if you are introducing yourself to the people, you tell them that I am an Hon. Member.  An honourable member is somebody who is very trustworthy and somebody who lives an honest life and therefore, I am asking amongst us Hon. Senators in this Senate.  Is there anyone of us who has a friend who is living with disability?  Is there anyone who can raise their hand and say they have a friend living with disability?  I think this is where we must start from.  As Hon. Senators, if we do not have friends living with disability, what do we expect from the ordinary people? I hope that in this report we should have received something that tells us that each of the members who visited those homes should have created friendship with them because people living with disability are lonely people.  They need people who keep them company but just like everybody else we discriminate against them and we look for friends who are able bodied.

Even in the homes where we come from, most of us will share their social life – just like drinking beer they will brag about beer and yet we know that at times beer can be a problem and can cause ill health.  At the same time, some will be bragging that they are heavy smokers but we know smoking has its disadvantages.  At home they will never talk about their children who are disabled who they have put in closets in their homes so that they are not seen by members of the public.

This Committee has dedicated its time to visiting people living with disability because we know in most of the homes, we are hiding people living with disability and when they do it, they took it as if it is protective custody, as if, if this person goes to bask in the sun, they may melt or die which is wrong.

Therefore, I am making the following recommendations. Government and other non-governmental organisation such as pressure groups should really work hard in advocating to the Government that it takes proper measures for carrying on people living with disability especially in areas that include shelter, food, transport and anything which is needed by people living with disability.   We are calling upon Government to register all people living with disability from birth so that they take 100% care of these people.  People who are aged are getting some benefits. When they go to the banks, shops et ceterea, they are given preference.  The same welfare status should be extended to people living with disability, that is their right which they must enjoy.

Women during pregnancy will never know whether they are carrying a disabled child or not but when they give birth to disabled children, they are the ones who will take care of these children.  I am calling upon women that before they cry out for their rights as women they should start by calling for the welfare of people living with disability.  Before they form a group on women’s rights, they should form a group aimed at taking care of people living with disability.

I think if these women lead, there will be progress.  At the moment women are talking of 50:50 representation in all areas of life and yet they should be talking of 50:50 for people living with disability.  I think in that way, I will understand and support them.  I am begging women Members of Parliament to think of the welfare of the children living with disability whom you natured and cared for nine months. I thank you.

*HON. SEN. CHIMBUDZI: Thank you Madam President, I am

thankful for the great job done by this Committee and I am also grateful for giving me the opportunity to make my contribution on this motion. Yes, indeed we moved around on this fact finding mission and we saw this problem.  Yes, the previous speaker has talked about 50:50 representation for women. We know the home is made up of men and women we also had the experience of women when we talked about this disability, women complained that when they gave birth to a child with disability, the husband ran away.  There were a lot of testimonies of men disserting families because they disowned children born with disabilities and claim that in their generation, in their family tree, there is nobody who ever lived with disability therefore, the disabled child is a woman’s problem.

When debating this Bill, let us make contributions that will support people living with disability so that we may help them because they face lots of problems.  I noticed that some of these people are also very intelligent like people who communicate in sign language.  The problem they face is that when they fall sick and visit the health institutions, especially those people who communicate in sign language, they have problems because there will be nobody who is able to communicate with them in sign language.

It is also sad that when they are sexually abused or raped and they report at police stations, the police do not have people who are able to communicate in sign language.  Since they have problems in expressing themselves, this affects the resolution of rape cases.  We are the people who represent these people and therefore should craft laws which are aimed at bringing peace, order and good governance in the country.

I am also calling upon this House to craft a law which will criminalise deserting a family because of the birth of a disabled child, this is especially amongst men.  It is also noticed that when a woman gives birth to a child with albinism, the father deserts the family and the claim is similar that their ancestry does not have such a condition of albinism and he runs away from his home.  Let us craft a law which will make it a punishable offence with a mandatory heavy sentence for anybody who deserts a family.  I am also calling upon us to craft a law that will allow for a quota system when allocating housing stands for people living with disabilities.  We want them to benefit so that they can live a normal life like what we are doing because we are all God’s creation and we need to live a happy life.  I thank you.

HON. SEN. S. NCUBE: I move that the debate do now adjourn.

HON. SEN. SHOKO: I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume: Wednesday, 11th December, 2019.

MOTION

REMOVAL OF ILLEGAL SANCTIONS IMPOSED ON ZIMBABWE

Fifth Order read: Adjourned debate on motion on the unconditional and immediate removal of the illegal economic sanctions imposed on Zimbabwe.

Question again proposed.

HON. SEN. MBOWA: I move that the debate do now adjourn.

HON. SEN. SHOKO: I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume: Wednesday, 11th December, 2019.

On the motion of HON. SEN. MUZENDA seconded by HON. SEN. SHOKO, the Senate adjourned at Seventeen Minutes Past Four o’clock p.m.

 

 

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