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SENATE HANSARD 11 MARCH 2020 29 30

                                                  PARLIAMENT OF ZIMBABWE

Wednesday, 11th March, 2020.

The Senate met at Half-past Two O’clock p.m.

PRAYERS

(THE HON. PRESIDENT OF SENATE in the Chair)

ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE HON. PRESIDENT OF SENATE

BILLS RECEIVED FROM THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

THE HON PRESIDENT OF SENATE: I have to inform the

Senate that the following Bills have been transmitted from the National

Assembly and will be on Second Reading tomorrow, Freedom of Information Bill [H. B. 6A, 2019] and International Treaties Bill [H. B.

10A, 2019].

HON. SEN. B. MPOFU: On a point of order Madam President.  I

wanted to find out what our standards say in terms of Bills.  These Bills that you are talking about were transmitted yesterday and today.  So as Senators, how many days do we have to look at Bills that have been amended by the National Assembly?  I thank you.

THE HON. PRESIDENT OF SENATE: I thought you are

asking because you had not yet gone through the Bills but the Bills were distributed into your pigeon holes the same time they were distributed to the National Assembly.

HON. SEN. B. MPOFU: Yes, another point of order so that I can explain myself.  When Bills are transmitted to the Lower House, they are debated at the Lower House, amended, taken back to the

Parliamentary Legal Committee (PLC), amended, taken back to the Lower House, read secondly and then they are passed.  When they come this side, they come to the Senate after they have been amended.  So as Senators, we need to look at the amended copy and have time to look at the adjustments that have been done in the Lower House and see whether those adjustments are consistent with what was agreed in the Lower House and then have our own debate on the adjusted Bill, not to be given two days to look at Bills that have been amended.  Thank you.        THE HON. PRESIDENT OF SENATE: Since we are Senators,

we should be in a position to understand that  whatever Bill is passed in the National Assembly, it is obvious that it comes to the Senate.  So while you are following up what is happening, already you will be in a position to know what you want to debate, when it comes here.  You will be following the debate; you are allowed to take from the Hansard of the National Assembly if you did not manage to follow the debate, go through because you may need to contribute to whatever came up from the National Assembly.  This is our duty of having these Houses.

MOTION

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

HON. SEN. MUZENDA: I move that Orders of the Day,

Numbers 1 to 5 be stood over, until the rest of the Orders of Day have been disposed of.

HON. SEN. MOHADI: I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

MOTION

PRESIDENTIAL SPEECH: DEBATE ON ADDRESS

Sixth Order read: Adjourn debate on motion in reply to the

Presidential Speech.

Question again proposed.

HON. SEN. MUZENDA: I move that the debate do now adjourn.

HON. SEN. MOHADI: I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume: Thursday, 12th March, 2020.

MOTION

RESUMPTION OF DEBATE ON WOMEN POLITICAL LEADERS

GLOBAL FORUM

Seventh Order read: Resumption of Debate on Motion on the

Report of the Women Political Leaders Global Forum.

Question again proposed.

HON. SEN. TONGOGARA: Thank you Madam President. Hon. Mabel Memory Chinomona, President of the Senate, led a Parliamentary delegation to the Women Political Leaders Global Forum held in Reykjavik, Iceland from 18 to 20 November 2019. The rest of the delegation comprised Hon. Members and Officers of Parliament.

2.0 OFFICIAL OPENING CEREMONY

2.1 Ms. Katrín Jakobsdóttir, Prime Minister of Iceland officially opened the Forum.  

2.2 In her remarks, she highlighted that the Forum was meant for women political leaders to share ideas and thoughts on making the world a better place for women and children.     

2.3 She lamented the fact that no country in the world had managed to achieve full gender equality in line with Sustainable Development Goal Number 5.  

2.4 The Prime Minister called upon all participants to observe the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action whose anniversary is in 2020 and popularise gender equality in their respective countries.   

2.5 She emphasised on education and culture as means to achieve gender equality.

2.6 In his address to the delegates, the Mayor of Reykjavik, Mr. Dagur

Bergþóruson Eggertsson highlighted that gender equality is a

human right and important for all and it should involve all men, women and the youth.

2.7 He made reference to the quota system that is practiced in Iceland whereby positions in the corporate sector are reserved for women. He also referred to the 60 – 40 ratio men to women that exists in their current Parliament.  

           3.0     SETTING THE SCENE

3.1 The Forum opening ceremony was followed by a session meant to brainstorm and share ideas among women political leaders.  

3.2 The main thrust of the session was to explore issues around equal opportunities for women, getting rid of stereotypes against women and correcting various misconceptions regarding women.  

3.3 The session identified the following as the key strategies that women use in leadership:- courage, responsibility, fearlessness and empathy.  

3.4   The women leaders agreed that leadership knows no gender and that all must lobby their respective Governments to have women participate in positions of leadership in both the private and public sector.  

4.0 STRIVE FOR ZERO – ELIMINATE THE GENDER

PAY GAP

4.1 A session on addressing the gender pay gap where most delegates lamented the gender pay gap in their countries was convened.  

4.2 The Zimbabwe delegation took the floor and highlighted that Zimbabwe has no salary or wage discrimination based on gender, much to the applause of the participants.

4.3 The women leaders lamented the fact that most executive positions in both the private and public sector are occupied by men, a scenario that must be addressed with urgency.  

5.0 ACCESS TO FOOD FOR ALL

5.1   Plan International hosted a session that meant to discuss issues around access to food and water globally.  

5.2 It was agreed that access to food and water was a basic human right that is also pronounced in the Sustainable Development Goals.

5.3 All participants hailed the job being done by Plan International whose presence across the world has alleviated poverty and addressed the challenge of school dropouts especially among girl children.  

5.4 Emphasis was placed on female hygiene as well as creating safe spaces for young girls including involvement of young women in decision making.  

6.0 GENERATION EQUALITY

6.1 A session meant to equip the leaders with knowledge on equality between men and women as also convened.   

6.2   Concerns were raised that prior to the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, gender issues were taboo in Africa and most parts of the world.  

6.3 Although a lot is still to be done, the women leaders, observed that sturdy progress had been made in gender legislation mostly pushing for at least 40 % women in positions of leadership.  

6.4 A clarion call was made for men to be involved in gender issues as champions for gender equality, if the gender equality dream is to be realised.

6.5 The women leaders applauded the influence of technology in women empowerment. Mobile money transfers for the small scale businesswomen, technology in the health sector were cited as examples.  

7.0 GENDER BASED VIOLENCE

7.1 Women Parliamentary leaders were encouraged to influence gender sensitive laws to address gender equality and the fight against Gender Based Violence.  

7.2   Concerns were raised over cases of GBV that go unreported, thus the need to raise awareness for victims to break the silence.  

7.3 The meeting implored on all participants to lobby for free services for victims of GBV, including health and psycho – social support.  

7.4 It was also observed that women need to be educated of their rights and to resist harmful practices such as genital mutilation, domestic violence, inheritance malpractices among others.  

8.0 UNIVERSAL HEALTH COVERAGE

8.1 A session on Universal Health Coverage was convened during the meetings where Parliamentarians were reminded of the Universal

Health Coverage commitment by the United Nations Heads of

State.  

8.2 The Inter – Parliamentary Union (IPU) commitment trough the

Belgrade Resolution was also highlighted with Members of Parliament being encouraged to facilitate that the commitment be transformed into action.  

8.3   Concerns were raised that in some countries, women are reluctant to visit clinics to be attended by male nurses. In this regard, there is need to employ more women nurses as a way of empowering them and addressing the concern raised.  

9.0 ADDRESSING MENSTRUAL HEALTH

9.1 A session coordinated by Afripads, a company specialising in manufacturing of reusable pads was convened with the aim to address menstrual health issues.  

9.2 It was agreed that menstrual health is addressed in the SDGs and thus needs attention of Parliamentarians globally. .

9.3 The members agreed on the need to abide by the menstrual health guidelines for girls in schools.  

9.4 Concerns were raised that menstrual health remains missing in funding, advocacy and policy development.  

9.5 Members were urged to lobby their respective governments to remove tax on all sanitary wear and regulate pricing of sanitary

wear so as to improve access of sanitary wear among all communities.  

10.0 CONCLUSION

10.1 Overally, the Forum helped Members to share experiences and learn best practices in improving the welfare of women in their countries so as to alleviate the various challenges that face women in their day to day life. Empowerment of women came out as a key element that needs to be inculcated in various legislation and policy formulation by governments. It is now incumbent upon the Parliament of Zimbabwe to consider the above deliberations from the Reykjavik Forum and debate women empowerment issues in Parliament for Government to consider.

11.0 RECOMMENDATIONS

RECOMMENDATION  ACTION BY
Relentless lobbying for equality between men and women in a bid to rid the society of gender inequality and discrimination Thematic Committee on Gender
Encourage men to act as champions to push the gender agenda All Senators
Lobby Government to provide adequate access to food and education opportunities Thematic Committee on Human Rights and Thematic Committee on Gender
for both boys and girls  
Lobby for Universal Health Coverage for all, without discrimination Thematic Committee on Human Rights
Lobby for tariff free importation of sanitary wear, as well as financial support and incentives for local manufacturers of sanitary wear Thematic Committee on Human Rights

 

  HON. SEN. TONGOGARA: Thematic Committee on Human

Rights to lobby for tariff free importation of sanitary wear as well as financial support and incentives for local manufacturers of sanitary wear. I thank you Madam President.

*HON. SEN. M. R. DUBE:  Thank you Madam President for

giving me this opportunity. I am one of the people who went with the delegation to Iceland, Europe to Women’s Meeting on Global Forum. There were a lot of countries which sent women to this meeting and these women had complaints. The women said that the problem is that they do not support each other, that is why they had called for this meeting that we stress that women support each other. They complained a lot that if men support us even if other women do not support us, we might rise even if we have support from men.

The women complained that they wanted a 50% representation in everything and they said that we cannot keep on being beggars. Our governments must see to it that they have put it into law that we have 50% representation. We saw that women are being abused – gender based violence and others are disabled and are now on wheel-chairs because of violence, but they are not talking about it. All those things are troubling women all over the world. A man can beat a woman until she is disabled. What can we do that we cannot be disabled by the abuse?

A lot of people have been maimed and others do not have hands. Others were thrown from upstairs and some women from other countries were saying women were broken by being thrown out of flats. We went into Committees and the pay gap was discussed. They said a male white person is getting 100% pay while a woman is getting 80%. A black man is getting 60% and a black woman is getting 40%. They said this is very painful. Do not think that coming from these developing countries mean that women are getting good salaries, they are getting very low salaries compared to others. So we wanted to be assisted that we get enough salaries.

We were asked to explain what is happening in terms of pay gaps in our countries. We said in Zimbabwe we do not have a problem of pay gaps. In Zimbabwe they take someone on his/her merit, given his/her qualifications. If someone gets a job, we do a job evaluation to see what we are capable of doing. You are paid according to the work that you are doing. It has nothing to do with being white or black. You are paid on merit. That pay gap was done during Smith’s time.

My husband was a sergeant in the army and he was getting a low salary compared to a white person, but the Government improved that every soldier has to get the same salary. A lot of white soldiers resigned because they did not want to earn same salaries with black soldiers. We are saying as women that is very painful all over the world that we keep on having pay gaps. It is tough for people who will come after us if we do not stop the system. We said we will assist those other countries to stop that pay gap.

There were children who came and were raped from their countries. Some of them are now mentally disturbed but they were asked to talk to make sure that every woman in this world understands that if women are being abused, no one will know but they wanted the whole world to know that women are really being abused. I saw it myself that women are being abused. One of them was saying she was raped when she was young and now her body is not working well.

As you know our country’s first letter is Z. Ambassadors were being given time to talk and our Madam President was the last person speak because of Z the last letter, but she was able to explain very well. Everyone was like asking is this your President? Whenever the President of the Senate stood up to speak, they would just say she is on the spot and people would be asking where she is from. Hon. Sen. Tongogara would say she is ours and she is from Zimbabwe. So, we say well done.

I was so happy that women were crying with one voice and even other countries from Arab – they say when a woman is going for her periods she is not allowed to go to work. When a girl child/woman is on her menstruation cycle, she cannot go to school. So, they said women in Africa have to speak with one voice that this law is removed. If someone is menstruatind, she is not going to school for seven days. We said it is nature and we should not oppress people to that level.

In Zimbabwe we are in poverty but we have other laws which we do not have which are oppressive. We said we are better organised compared to other countries. We might fail to get all the things but in that area we are organised. We saw other companies which said they wanted to come to Zimbabwe.

Madam President talked about the girl child where she said we wanted sanitary wear.  Other countries said if you talk to your Government, we would come to your country to open companies that will accept the girl child.  What we always say in this Senate and the National of Assembly is going outside overseas whilst we are here.

We were told that Zimbabwe was number one in fighting for the girl child.  We were supposed to be given a medal but our flight was leaving so they said they were going to send the award.  It was not possible for us to wait for that medal up to 10.00 o’clock as we had run out of time.  Our medal is coming. In the whole world, we are number one.

We were asked if there were some Members from Zimbabwe.  We raised our hands including you, Hon. Tongogara and we were asked to stand up.  It was said that we are fighting for the girl child and everyone there praised us.  We said that we are coming from a very small country but we felt proud we were being given as an example.  We felt good to be Zimbabweans.

Lastly, allow me to thank Madam President.  She has a good heart.  When we were travelling, she had her own car and we had our own cars but she would always say I cannot leave this place without my Hon. Members although she had her own car.  She would get cold waiting for our car.  If people would ask her to get into the car she would keep on standing waiting for us to arrive.  We thank you very much Madam President.  You showed us love and you taught me love which I did not have.  If it was me, I would just get into the car and you would find me

in the hotel, but you showed me that if you are travelling with people, even if you are their leader, you make sure that they are taken care of.  With those few words, I thank you Madam President and may God bless you.

*HON. J. D. HUNGWE:  We want to thank our Hon. President.  I want to join those who came from that meeting, the women who are saying you did very well.  It is good to be praised that you are doing something good.

Madam President, I did not go on this trip.  I was not there, but if you listen to what happened there, even if you were not there,you cannot fail to get a word to praise that something good was done by

Zimbabweans.  Although the delegate is saying we were always behind, despite all that, they saw what you are doing and what you said.  I have stood up to say this is a good thing which happened there.  They spoke very well there but I see that, as Zimbabweans, I think we have issues.

If you come to our home area, there are very few people who say

Zimbabwe, they say Zimbahwe.  That does not matter.

The things which I see that you did well because you spoke there -  if it is on salaries we are equal, the difference is just on qualifications.  That is very good.  They heard it and they saw that we are better.  I was thinking, you say that in the whole of Africa we are 95% in terms of literacy rate.  The people who are making us to be 95%, the people who are leading are women.  The highest percentage is of women.  So you were telling them we do not have that discrimination, it is humiliating in our country to have that kind of discrimination.

What I think, Madam President is that, let us talk strongly that in this country we must not have a man who beats up a woman.  I do not know if you beat up your wife what do you say?  Do you really say I beat my wife?  It is so embarrassing.  We must make that point strong.  Maybe you do not know the importance of a woman.  I learnt much from the Bible especially the history of King David.  King David was the second king of the Hebrews.  On the death of King Soul, he asked to talk at that funeral.  He said ‘you the daughters of Israel’.  He did not talk of men at that funeral.  He said ‘you daughters of Israel cry the death of King Soul’ and he was referring to the daughters.  In David’s head and Jehova they put women on the top.

If you go again to the Bible, he was crying for Soul and he was also crying for the death of the son of Soul, Jonathan.  He emphasised the importance of the woman.  He says, ‘to you Jonathan my young brother’.  He is the only person who taught us that a young brother is not only your sibling.  King David and Jehovah refused that a brother is only your sibling.  Everyone younger than you is your young brother because

Jonathan was from Benjamin’s house and David was from the house of

Judah but he said ‘my young brother’.  Listen to his words.  He said that ‘you loved me very much.  What you did to me was good.  Your love to me was more than women’s love’.  Those were King David’s words

showing the importance of a woman.

That is why I say if you hear of a man beating a woman, please deal with that man– [HON. SENATORS: Hear, hear.] – because a woman is very important.  You have not yet seen the importance of a woman.  After God realised that he had created a man alone, his plate was very small because he was alone.  Through God’s knowledge and his thinking, he did not look for Adam a doctor – doctors are very important, is that not so doctors?  He looked for a woman to go and stay with a man.  If it were us, you would find what we were going to look for.  However, God looked for a woman for a man.  In the Bible it says, he who finds a woman finds a good thing.

So, I want us to agree that one who beats a woman must be given a very strong penalty.  We agreed that a person who rapes a woman would have done a very bad thing in our country, that is what we do in our country.  I was not there, but there were some of us who were speaking very well.  If you listen to what the Hon. Senator was saying, I was looking at her, that is my job – [Laughter] – ask Hon. Sekeramayi who the person speaking is or ask Hon. Nyambuya; I worked for 48 years in education in their areas and they understand.  I was looking closely on those things. The importance of the woman; one pastor once prayed in church whilst I was present in 1955 and said, ‘Jehovah, help us on our request to you here at Morgenster because you know what we are lacking.  Here we are lacking educators for our children, but if you have not found them yet Jehovah, keep on looking, you will find them because here at Morgenster, we do not want teachers.’  People opened their eyes; what is the difference between an educator and a teacher?  The Pastor said that there was a difference between that.  The next

Sunday he came back and said ‘I understand you have a problem with what I said last week.’  He said, ‘no, if a teacher gets into the class where children are including girls, he sees girls – I did not say they should be killed but they have to be punished.

If you are an educator, you do not see girl friends when you get into a class, you see kids, if you are an educator like myself, I qualified to be an educator.  If an educator gets into a class, he does not see girls, he sees children.  If someone rapes a child, it is a serious sin in this country and if you beat a wife it is a serious sin.  I thank you.

*HON. SEN. CHABUKA: Thank you Madam President.  I am

debating after a preacher but I want to thank the delegation that went to the Women Political Leaders’ Forum to witness women leaders sharing their challenges.  I just want to add a few words most issues have been spoken by the preacher and the Hon. Senator.  I stood up to support – in English they say, charity begins at home Madam President. In this House, at times we become political.  However, I want to thank you for your good heart, it should remain like that of being a mother.  You should see that when she is driving her Mercedes Benz, she gives you a ride and she is concerned about your welfare, food and where to sleep when things are not alright.  She can get to the extent of sharing a room with you, she really tries very hard.  We want to thank you for your good heart.

Coming to the issue of a girl child, I was really touched that a girl child; when we are growing up as women and we have our menstrual cycles, it is something that is a secret thing to a parent and even to our brothers and the male folks.  When we are growing up, our mothers teach us to be secretive and when they say a girl should not attend school during her menstrual cycle.  Sometimes a woman should not go to work during her menstrual period and it means that everyone would know.  Similarly if one does not go to school, it means everyone will be aware.  I think women should stand up and be strong and talk about it so that those things come to an end. I want to thank you because you articulated our situation as Zimbabweans.  We do not have such things.

We have got our own challenges which are political but for someone looking after our children well especially raping children -it happens here in Zimbabwe where you find a very big man like Chief Charumbira raping a defenceless two year old child – this is just an example. I think we should remove that spirit.  The Lord should help us so that we keep on talking about it.

Thank you Madam President. I just stood to I support your goodness in the work that you are doing in the Senate and also those who are going out when they come back and give reports.

*HON. SEN. RAMBANEPASI:  Thank you very much Madam

President for affording me this opportunity and I would like to say happy New Year. This is my first time to stand up this year.  I stood up to thank you for the journey that you undertook.

When I joined this House in 2018, I was afraid of you but from previous experience seeing you on television, I saw that you were a good person.  You have a good heart because even if we meet you in the corridors, you greet us.  Some bosses do not greet us when we meet them in the corridors but you greet all of us.  I want to thank you Madam President.

*HON. SEN. CHIFAMBA:  I would like to thank you and your delegation for representing us as women although we were not there.  You were our eye together with all the women you went with.  If you had not gone there, we would not know what happened there.

I felt touched on violence against women especially beatings in homes.  There is a story which circulated on social media in the past few days, of a man who killed his wife and tied her, put her in a bucket and dropped that bucket in a well.  That happened here in Zimbabwe.  This really pained me and I cried asking myself – is this how a woman like me is supposed to die?  Her children continuously cried and the husband could not explain what had happened when he was asked.  That woman was later found in the well and people brought her out.  Her husband cried and it was later discovered that she was killed before being thrown in the water.

Water is a problem in this country but you find someone putting a dead body in the water.  No-one can fetch water from that well now.  The children will have to walk long distances to fetch water because of their father.  Maybe in that area, the community was fetching water from that well.  This well could have assisted the community so that they do not walk ten kilometres to get water but now that it is contaminated because this man threw his dead wife in the well, they will have to go that far. This man troubled my heart. If I knew the day he would stand trial in court, I was going to attend.  I do not know where this man is from but I felt touched that a man can kill a woman, tie her and throw her in a well.

I do not know what the law says if you report violence to the police, for example if a woman has been beaten by her husband.  The police tells you to go back and negotiate with him.  How can I negotiate with someone who has beaten me?  How can I go and bring someone who has beaten me to the police?  I will be bleeding but I will be told to go back and bring the person who has beaten me.  Is it that they do not have transport?  Usually women are beaten at night.  You can crawl to the police but you are asked to go back and fetch him.  I thought it could be shortage of transport or there is less manpower that I am asked to go back and collect the man who would have beaten me. This is very painful for women.  If God had given us equal power, I would retaliate and no one would report because we would have fought.

Menses was created by God.  If women do not go through that process, no one would be in this House.  It is because of that natural process that women are able to carry pregnancy.  If you do not go through that process, you cannot bear children.  Men have their own things that they were given by God.  You know that this is natural for men.  You should not oppress us because of the process of menses. If I do not go through that process, I end up consulting my doctor because it will be a problem.  This is a natural process that God created but at the same time people are getting in trouble because of it.

We need to lobby Government to remove taxes on pads so that the price is reasonable prices because at the moment the price of sanitary wear is always increasing.  Some people use two packets and that is very expensive.  Tax on sanitary wear has to be removed.

School children spoil themselves at school.  They end up using leaves because they cannot afford these sanitary pads.  Girls are now using pumpkin leaves during their menstrual cycle and it is very painful because they will not be having anything to use and that is the problem that needs solving by reduction of prices for sanitary pads.

Looking at doctors, I am not saying that all doctors are in the habit but some women are afraid of visiting married doctors.  I know that male doctors cover you up when coming to make check-ups but some doctors see areas that they are not supposed to hence women become humiliated.  You will find some women refusing to be attended to by male nurses through some male nurses surely cover women but other uncover female patients to humiliating levels.  Women want more female nurses in clinics and hospitals because they tend not to be humiliated when they are being attended to by their female counterparts rather than male nurses.  I have not said all male doctors.

THE HON. PRESIDENT OF SENATE:  Hon. Senator, you are

now digressing a little bit, come back to the report as presented by Hon.

Sen. Tongogara.

*HON. SEN. CHIFAMBA:  I am saying these things so that

doctors will hear it and stop the habit.

THE HON. PRESIDENT OF SENATE:  You may proceed Hon.

Senator.

*HON. SEN. CHIFAMBA:  Then there is the issue of mobile phones.   Today we attended a workshop about mobile phones and we learnt a lot of things that we did not know in terms of mobile phones that we use.

THE HON. PRESIDENT OF SENATE:  Hon. Senator, do not

address your fellow Hon. Members.  Address me and I will reprimand them if they are causing you any distraction at all.

*HON. SEN. CHIFAMBA:  Thank you Mr. President.  The issue of mobile phones, we spent two todays attending an ICT training course and it helped us a lot.  The majority of us did not know how to use these phones …

THE HON. PRESIDENT OF SENATE:  Hon. Senators Shoko

and Wunganai, she is right.  You are distracting her and you are laughing.

HON. SEN. SHOKO:  Mr. President, I am sorry if I distracted

her.

*HON. SEN. CHIFAMBA:  I was talking about mobile phones. It

is very important for us because there are a lot of things that we did not know.  We just knew to use WhatsApp and did not know other applications.  We did not know that people can hack our information through Bluetooth if you keep it.  So it is very crucial that we were taught how to use our mobile phones because these mobile phones can destroy us since information can be taken without our knowledge.

Thank you Mr. President.

HON. SEN. TONGOGARA:  Mr. President, I move that the debate do now adjourn.

HON. SEN. CHIMBUDZI:  I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume: Thursday, 12th March, 2020.

MOTION

REPORT ON THE 74TH SESSION OF THE EXECUTIVE

COMMITTEE OF THE AFRICAN PARLIAMENTARY UNION

(APU) HELD IN BANGUI

HON. SEN. MAKONE:  I move the motion standing in my name

that this House takes note of the report of the 74th Session of the Executive Committee of the African Parliamentary Union (APU) held from 13th to 14th June, 2019 in Bangui, Central African Republic.

HON. SEN. CHIEF CHITANGA:  I second.

HON. SEN. MAKONE:  Thank you Mr. President.

1.0     Introduction

1.1 The 74th Session of the Executive Committee of the African Parliamentary Union (APU) was held in Bangui, Central African Republic on 13 and 14 June 2019.

1.2 Hon. Mabel Memory Chinomona, President of the Senate and Chairperson of the Committee of Women Parliamentarians of the

APU, led a Parliamentary delegation comprising the following

Members and Officers of Parliament to the 74th Session of the

APU:-

  1. Theresa Makone;
  2. Hon Spiwe Mukunyaidze;
  3. Tafanana Zhou;
  4. Califinos K. Guvi, Director in the President of the Senate’s

Office;

  1. Rumbidzai P. Chisango, Principal External Relations Officer; and
  2. Simeon Chifamba, Security Aide to the President of the Senate.

1.3 It should be noted that the above Hon. Members are elected members of the Executive Committee of the APU.

              2.0    Opening Session

2.1 The opening session was held on 13 June 2019, with Hon. Herbert

Djono Ahaba, the Minister for Development, Energy and Water Resources and personal representative of the Prime Minister of the Central African Republic in attendance.

2.2 In his opening remarks, Hon. Laurent Ngon-Baba, the Speaker of the National Assembly of the Central African Republic, applauded the decision to hold the Meeting in the Central African Republic in line with the APU’s principle of geographic rotation of venue of

meetings.

 

2.2.2 Hon. Ngon-Baba briefed the Meeting on the socio-economic and political situation in the Central African Republic, highlighting that the country had restored constitutional democracy through the adoption of a new Constitution, election of a new President and Members of Parliament and the establishment of new government institutions. In this regard, he extended his gratitude to the international community, specifically the African Union, the

Economic Community of  Central African States, the European Union and the United Nations for the central role they played in the signing of the Peace Agreement on 06 February 2019.

2.3 Within the context of fostering regional peace and integration, the Hon. Speaker called on Member Parliaments to play a leading role in advocating for peace and promoting integration among the people of Africa.

2.4 In his address during the official opening ceremony, Hon. Alassane Bala Sekande, Speaker of the National Assembly of Burkina Faso and Chairperson of the Executive Committee of the APU, echoed

the sentiments on the need for Parliaments to collectively work towards achieving democracy, peace and freedom throughout the African continent. In this context, he commended the newly elected leadership of the Central African Republic for their commitment to promoting peace and national unity in the country.

2.5 Turning to the work of the APU, Hon. Sekande reiterated his commitment to ensuring that the APU implements necessary reforms to strengthen its role and solidify its position globally. In this regard, the APU had fruitful discussions with the State of Qatar on possible areas of cooperation. Accordingly, the APU and the State of Qatar signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in March 2019, which covered upgrading of the APU website, renovations to the APU Headquarters and establishment of a department in charge of partnership building and institutional development.

2.6 The Chairperson also indicated that he had undertaken bilateral visits to the People’s Republic of China and the Shura Council of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

2.7 He underscored the importance of effective participation of all Member Parliaments in activities of the APU and timeous payments of subscriptions in order for the APU to effectively execute its mandate.

3.0    Consideration of Agenda Items

3.1 Admissions and Re-admissions: The APU had not received any new applications since the last Executive Committee Meeting. Lobbying missions had been undertaken to Cape Verde and Mozambique. The two countries are still to officially express an interest in joining the APU. It was noted that there was a need to encourage other African countries, particularly from Southern Africa, to join the APU. In this context, it was hoped that the proposed amendments to the Constitution of the APU would encourage other African countries to join the APU. Particular reference was made to the clause of the rotation on the Chairpersonship on a regional basis.

3.2 Implementation of decisions and recommendations of the Conference: In his report to the Executive Committee, Mr. Idi Gado Boubacar, Secretary General of the APU outlined activities he had participated in since the 73rd Executive Committee Meeting held in Abuja, Nigeria in  November 2018. He highlighted the following activities:

  • International Workshop on experiences of national reconciliation held on 17 and 18 January in Rabat, Morocco;
  • 29th Conference of the Arab Inter-Parliamentary Union held on 3 and 4 March 2019 in Amman, Jordan;
  • 14th Session of the Conference of the Parliamentary Union of the OIC Member States held from 11 to 14 March 2019 in

Rabat, Morocco;

  • 140th Assembly of the Inter-Parliamentary Union and Related

Meetings held from 06 to 10 April 2019 in Doha, Qatar;

  • 10th Conference of Speakers’ of Parliament of the

Parliamentary Assembly of La Francophonie held from 25 to

27 April 2019 in Burkina Faso;

  • 1st General Parliamentary Assembly of the G-5 Sahel interParliamentary Committee held on 12 and 13 May 2019 Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

3.2.1 The Secretary General’s participation was within the context of promoting cooperation between the APU and other regional and international Inter-Parliamentary organisations. Accordingly, Parliamentarians called for their inclusion in such missions in future.

3.3 The Chairperson of the APU called on all Member Parliaments to implement resolutions adopted during the 73rd Session of the

Executive Committee and the 41st Conference of the APU held in

November 2018. These were on the following:-

  • The Role of Parliaments in the fight against terrorism, armed gangs and organized crimes in Africa;
  • The promotion of private investment as a major factor in economic development in Africa;
  • Promoting girls’ education as an effective means of combating early marriage in Africa;
  • The motion to support the G5 Sahel countries and other African countries who are victims of terrorism;
  • The recommendation on the establishment of a special court in

Africa to judge cases of terrorism;

  • The recommendation on the creation of an African solidarity

Fund for victims of terrorism.

3.3.1 It should be noted that the Zimbabwe Delegation to 41st Conference of the APU held in Abuja, Nigeria duly submitted the above resolutions to the relevant Portfolio and Thematic

Committees for action. Accordingly, the delegation to the Executive Committee submitted the status of implementation for some of the resolutions to the Secretariat of the APU for their information.

3.4 Consideration of the audited management account for the for the 2018 financial year: The Executive Committee noted with concern that several countries had not honoured their obligation to pay subscriptions to the APU, thereby hampering the implementation of planned activities. Members called on the APU to enforce the provisions of Article 26 of the Statutes of the APU which states that “A National Group which fails to pay its annual contributions for two financial years shall have its rights suspended”.

3.4.1 Parliament of Zimbabwe falls into this category as it owes 107 969 Euros which accumulated over the period from 2015 to date.  The delegation was embarrassed during the heated discussion on outstanding subscriptions, particularly given that the President of the Senate is the Chairperson of the Committee of Women Parliamentarians of the APU. In this regard, the delegation calls upon the Parliament of Zimbabwe to facilitate the urgent

processing of the subscriptions to enable the delegation to effectively participate in future meetings of the APU.

3.5 Proposed Amendments to the APU Statutes: The Executive

Committee considered the proposed amendments to the APU Statutes and Rules of Procedure submitted by the National Group of Burkina Faso. Principally, the proposed amendments relate to issues of inclusion of women and young Parliamentarians in national delegations to the APU, formalization of the rotation of the Chairmanship of the Executive Committee among the subregions of the continent, opening of the observer status within the APU to non-African Parliaments and other Parliamentary institutions in order to expand the partnership network of the APU.

3.5.1 Following lengthy discussions, the amendments were adopted by the Executive Committee and will be duly submitted to the 42nd Conference for adoption in November 2019. The Zimbabwe delegation fully supported the progressive amendments.

3.6 Topics for deliberation during the 42nd Conference of the APU:

The Executive Committee deliberated on the Draft Agenda for the 42nd Conference scheduled for November 2019. The following topics were agreed upon:-

  1. The importance of young people’s contribution to the promotion of democracy, peace, security and the rule of law in African countries (Political Committee)
  2. Promoting a diversified economy and the local processing of basic commodities to create employment for women and young people (Economic and Sustainable Development

Committee)

3.7 Date and Venue of the 75th Session of the Executive Committee: The 75th Session of the Executive Committee will be held in Djibouti in November 2019.

              4.0    Statements endorsed by the Executive Committee

4.1 The Executive Committee endorsed the following statements at the conclusion of the Meeting:

  1. Statement and Support to the Central African Peace Process: Within the context of the Peace Agreement signed on 06 February 2019, between the government and 14 armed groups resulting in the creation of an inclusive government in the Central African Republic, the Executive Committee extended its full support to the peace process and encouraged the parties to the agreement to continue to fully implement the agreement. The Statement calls on the United Nations

Security Council to lift the embargo on arms imposed on the Government. Furthermore, the Statement calls on international financial institutions to provide financial support as part of the ongoing peace process;

  1. Vote of thanks to the authorities and the People of the Central African Republic: The Executive Committee extended their gratitude to the President of the Central

African Republic, the Parliament and the people of the Central African Republic for the warm hospitality and excellent arrangements that contributed to the successful hosting of the 74th Executive Committee of the APU.

               5.0    Recommendations

5.1 The Zimbabwe Delegation notes with concern the underrepresentation of the Southern African Region in the APU. Notably, Angola and Zimbabwe are the only representatives from the region. Accordingly, the Zimbabwe Delegation recommends that Parliament of Zimbabwe informally engages other Parliaments within the SADC region on the possibility of joining the APU. The Presiding Officers can spearhead this process when they interact with their counterparts at regional and international fora.

8.2 The delegation strongly recommends that the Administration of Parliament makes an undertaking to clear the outstanding subscription arrears to enable the delegation to effectively participate in future Meetings of the APU.

    HON. SEN. CHIEF CHITANGA: Thank you Mr. President for

giving me this opportunity to second the motion by Hon. Sen. Makone on the 74th Executive Committee on African Parliamentary Union held Bangui, Central African Republic on the 13th to the 14th of June, 2019.

Madam President Hon. Chinomona is the Chairperson of the Women Committee on all parliamentarians in the APU and also the leader of the delegation. The delegation comprised of following Hon. Members: Hon. Sen. T. Makone from the Senate, Hon. Mukunyaidze and Hon. T. Zhou from the National Assembly.

I was not part of the delegation but I want to echo my sentiments on the report. Mr. President, the issue of rotation on the chairmanship of the APU is a noble idea because it gives opportunities to all member states within the African Union to chair the Executive Committee. How it comes about the chairmanship is that you volunteer to hold the Executive Committee. The member country that has volunteered takes over the chairmanship and the coming year, they move again to another country because of the rotation and because of the voluntary issue, it also gives preparedness to the nation because you only volunteer and you have the funds to run the issue. We are also looking forward for Zimbabwe to hold such an important event. We have not yet held that event.

There is also need for Southern Africa, I think you heard from

Southern Africa to join the APU. We have Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Angola from Southern Africa. So, we are looking forward that through our Parliaments, we would lobby for other members to join this APU. I would like to thank the Zimbabwe delegation for representing us on this forum and at the same time they made a noble contribution towards the 40th Conference held in Abuja, Nigeria. They made very good contributions towards the resolutions that were to be used on the 75th Conference.

It is equally embarrassing for our nation. It is one of the members in the group that has a debt of 107 969 Euros. So, as Madam President chairs the Women Committee, they say if you have a debt that has gone for two years without being cleared, they say your rights to contribute towards the meeting would be removed because you have a debt that you have not cleared. In actual fact they are saying your membership is hampered when you do not pay the debts. On our part I think it is an issue that we should take forward because we have one of the leaders in that Executive Committee and at the same time the Members who attend will not freely contribute.

The APU is also advocating for the education of the girl child. They say it is equally embedded that when the girl child goes on learning, it delays the issue of marriage. It is another way of delaying the issue of early marriages because they will be occupied to doing some studies and all that and they will also be able to sustain their living. They also said that when you educate a girl child, it is like you are educating the nation. So, I think as Zimbabweans we must take this seriously – [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] - so that we get to educate all our girl child and in the event of educating them, they also delay their marriages to such an extent that they will be mature and have a profession whereby they will sustain their families.

I think we have an issue to mobilise Southern Africa to join the

APU and encourage even through the international countries and even SADC using those forums and talk about it in those meetings so that as Southern Africa, we join the APU. I thank you Mr. President.

ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE HON. PRESIDENT OF SENATE

COLLECTION OF 2020 DIARIES

THE DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE: There is a

belated announcement that all Senators are being reminded to go and collect their 2020 diaries at Pax House, 5th Floor, Room 520.

HON. SEN. MAKONE: Thank you Mr. President, I move that the debate do now adjourn.

HON. SEN. TSOMONDO:  I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume: Thursday 12th March, 2020.

MOTION

REPORT OF THE 2019 ST. PETERSBURG INTERNATION

ECONOMIC FORUM (SPIEFG) HELD IN RUSSIA

HON. SEN. DR. MAVETERA:  I move the motion standing in my name that this House takes note of the Report of the 74th Session of the Executive Committee of the African Parliamentary Union (APU) held from 13th to 14th June, 2019, in Bangui, Central African Republic.

HON. SEN. TSOMONDO:  I second.

HON. SEN. DR. MAVETERA:  The annual St. Petersburg

International Economic Forum for 2019 was held in St. Petersburg,

Russia, from 6 to 8 June, 2019. Honourable Mabel Chinomona, President of the Senate of Zimbabwe, led a delegation to the Forum which comprised the following Members and Officers of Parliament:-

Honourable Senator Bybit Tsomondo;

Honourable Senator Tichinani Mavetera;

Honourable Senator Chigwajara Chinheza (Chief Matsivo);

Mr Califinos Kudakwashe Guvi – Director in the Office of the

President of the Senate; and

Mr Flavian Mutigwa – Security Aide to the President of the

Senate.

The Forum was attended by over 19,000 people from 145 countries, including Heads of State, Vice Presidents, Prime Ministers, Ministers, Speakers and Presidents of parliaments from 110 governments. 1,300 guests were representing heads of leading companies.  Over 1,700 best, graduate and post-graduate students, young scientists and politicians, attended the Youth Economic Forum. The

Forum was also attended by over 3,500 Russian and foreign companies.

The Russian government officials present at the Forum included: the President of the Russian Federation, Vladimir Putin; 6 Presidential

Plenipotentiary Envoys of the Russian Federation to federal districts; 8

Deputy Prime Ministers of the Russian Federation; 16 Ministers of the Russian Federation; 32 heads of federal services and agencies; 84 subjects of the Russian Federation, 79 of which were represented by their heads.

FORUM OPENING CEREMONY

The opening ceremony officially commenced the Forum and was moderated by Mr Keir Simmons of NBC News. There were 6 high level panellists, including Antonio Guterres, the Secretary-General of the United Nations and Tigran Sargsyan, Chairman of the Board of the Eurasian Economic Commission (EAEC). The prominent issue that was discussed was whether the Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU) was a political bloc or an economic union.  Mr. Sargsyan reiterated and maintained that the Union is a purely economic union.  It was also stated that whilst emphasis of the Eurasian Union is on economic integration, it was unavoidable that some of its elements would extend into the political and security realms, but this was only to the most minimal and unavoidable extent.

It was also highlighted during the ceremony that there are obvious tensions between the European Union (EU) and the EAEU, and there have been accusations that the EAEU is a political bloc, in the sense that it is an attempt by Russia to re-establish the Soviet Union (USSR), albeit disguised as an economic union. However, Mr Sargsyan defended the authenticity of the union and pointed out that any neutral party looking into EAEU would be satisfied that its primary business was economic and not political, evidenced by the several economic and business agreements involving EAEU and other partners and countries such as

China, India, Pakistan and Iran.

PLENARY SESSION

The main event of the Forum was the plenary session, with the participation of President of the Russian Federation Vladimir Putin,

President of the People's Republic of China Xi Jinping, President of the

Republic of Bulgaria Rumen Radev, Prime Minister of the Republic of

Armenia Nikol Pashinyan, Prime Minister of the Slovak Republic Peter

Pellegrini, and the Secretary-General of the United Nations António Guterres.

The leaders commented on a range of issues, including the major problems of global economy today, current globalisation model, energy, international trade, and financial systems. The session covered the questions of malicious competition between states, protectionism, trade wars, unilateral sanctions and limitations.

During his address to the participants of the Forum, President Vladimir Putin talked about the tasks that this country is facing, as well as the importance of national projects as a driver of economic growth.

The Russian president said Russia made a decision to identify development priorities and goals and planned their work within the socalled national projects, which presume combined efforts of the state, the regions of the Russian Federation, society and the business community, to work on the shared tasks. He emphasised that the projects require concentrating considerable resources to achieve the set goals. He stated that the overall budget of the national projects would total around

25.7 trillion roubles, which is about 400 billion United States dollars.

According to President Putin, Russia’s priorities are healthcare, education, research and development, and support for entrepreneurship. He also said considerable funds would be allocated to develop major infrastructure, transport and the energy industry.

President Putin said Russia was open to work with any leader from any country, who seeks to develop relations with Russia and help build a more secure world. He said Russia was working to put its economy on a growth trajectory; they were open to all new partners who have the same conviction as their own.

In his speech during the plenary session, President of PRC Xi Jinping said in the global dimension, sustainable development is the maximum common denominator for global cooperation. The United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, in the spirit of harmonious coexistence of man and nature, taking into account the needs of today's generation and future generations, provides the agenda for growth in three interdependent areas: economic growth, social development, and the environment.

OTHER EVENTS

The Forum featured over 230 events, including various panel discussions, roundtables, business breakfasts, televised debates, and business dialogues between countries. Most of the events were running concurrently and the Zimbabwean Delegation attended the following:

Russia-Africa

This session was moderated by Charles Robertson, the Global

Chief Economist for Renaissance Capital.

The crux of the session was to assess the extent of relations between Russia and Africa, and how to improve them. It was established that while Russia was interested in new raw materials and establishing international alliances, Africa had solidified its position as one of the centers of global economic growth. In that regard, Russia is determined to strengthen political alliances and economic partnerships with African countries. Russia is taking advantage of America’s lethargy when it comes to real investment in Africa. They are also taking advantage of western sanctions on several African countries, which tends to break relations instead of develop them.

Russia already has interests and investments across Africa, and Russia-Africa trade has risen by 26% to US$18 Billion in the last 5 years. They have interests in several areas, including mining (particularly Uranium and Platinum), agriculture, energy, ICT and infrastructure development.

President Putin believes that for Africa to be fully capacitated as a trade partner, there is need to develop its energy infrastructure.  This has seen Russia investing heavily into Africa’s energy sector.

Russia has invested in gas and oil in Algeria, Egypt, Ghana,

Nigeria and Mozambique. It is mining uranium in Nigeria. Russia has constructed hydro-stations in Angola, Namibia and Botswana, while also setting up nuclear plants in Egypt, Nigeria and Algeria.

Several African countries acquire their arms from Russia, including Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Libya and Angola.

Russia provides US$400 worth of aid to Africa every year. 60% of that goes to Africa through international organisations such as the World Food Programme and the UN Refugee Agency. The remaining 40% goes to Africa through bilateral cooperation. Their aid supports education, health care, agriculture, environmental causes and energy.

It was announced during the session that going forward, Russia intends to significantly increase trade and cooperation with Africa and bring more African Countries into the fold. This has seen Russia organising the Russia-Africa Parliamentary Conference which was held in Moscow from 1 to 3 July 2019, and which was attended by a Zimbabwean Parliamentary delegation led by the Honorable Speaker of the National Assembly, Advocate Jacob Mudenda.

Russia also organised and hosted the Russia-Africa Summit from

23 – 24 October 2019 in Sochi, Russian Federation. The Summit was attended by over 50 African Heads of State and governments, including His Excellency, Hon. Emmerson D. Mnangagwa the President of the Republic of Zimbabwe, with the combined objective of establishing and enhancing trade and economic relations between the African continent and the Russian Federation, in accordance with SDG number 17 which encourages the formation of partnerships.

The Russian Economy: Seeking Ways to Boost Growth

The following were the key conclusions of the event:

Russian economy’s dependency on oil prices is going down. In 2011, Russia needed the oil prices to be at 110 USD per barrel, but in the past five years, the price has settled around 40 USD per barrel, and this means their focus needs to shift to other sectors.

Russia realised that growth should not come from oil alone, it should come from other sectors including the service industry, agriculture and new technologies. In 2018, the processing industry attracted more than 7% of investment to Russia, meaning there is room for growth. The agriculture sector attracted more than 5% of investment.

Macroeconomic stability is an important economic growth factor. Russia managed to survive the crisis period and create an image of a stable economy. Among the healthy elements that help attract investment is the federal budget surplus that results from highly disciplined implementation of budget policy and monetary policy. Conservative policy that is aimed towards stability is a serious advantage compared to other growing countries.

Russia is keen on making environmental policy part of its economy. Russia is more active in reducing CO2 emissions than most other countries in the world. Russia will play its role so that the economic growth is as environmentally friendly as possible. Business needs help in raising its environmental standards. As a regulator, Bank of Russia is working to make green financing tools more accessible.

Despite alternative growth targets identified for Russia, economic growth remains slow due to a number of factors which include but are not limited to the following:

  1. Business does not trust the judicial system;
  2. Lack of unquestionable rule of law;
  3. Business lacks confidence that it will be protected;
  4. Russia has week institutions;
  5. State regulation is not efficient; and

There is urgent need to instigate structural reform. There is need to assure investors and entrepreneurs’ protection of their rights and property. The Russian Government has already put in place legislation that will protect and stimulate capital investment by providing stable conditions throughout the entire investment project.

The Russian Federation must roll out a conservative fiscal policy that will encumber inflation and financial instability. Stable low inflation is one of the factors leading to the investment type of growth. There is also need to accumulate more foreign currency reserves. These reserves have saved Russia before and the help ensure their security.

The Role of Women Executives in Building Successful Business

Models

This session was hosted by the United Nations Industrial

Development Organisation (UNIDO) and the Council of the Eurasian Women’s Forum (CEAWF). It was moderated by Mr. Jacek Cukrowski, Chief of the Europe and Asia Division of UNIDO.

It was agreed that women’s economic empowerment constitutes an important driving force of economic development and growth, as well as a key component of inclusive and sustainable industrial development (ISID) as reflected in the Agenda for 2030 for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals.

However, although women’s empowerment has been high on the global development agenda in recent years, consolidation of efforts on all levels is much needed. With women all over the world increasingly launching their own businesses and gaining more economic independence, they are still notably underrepresented in leadership and managerial positions in both the public and the private sector. This anomaly needs to be corrected expeditiously. Women have a story to tell and a way of doing business that has proved to be effective and successful.

Against this backdrop, there is need to gear up on efforts to achieve women’s economic empowerment from the standpoint of women-executives in large enterprises. There is need for the consolidation of a set of business practices and models that will help women attain leading positions in the industry. Parliaments have a role to play by enacting legislation that addresses the imbalances that hinder women’s progression. Laws must be in place which make it illegal to have anything less than gender equity within leadership structures. Governments and policy-makers, as well as the business community need to come together and come up with the prerequisites for the creation of an enabling environment for women’s leadership in economic and industrial development.

Russia holds the number one place in the world for women in leading industry positions. The topic of women entrepreneurship is vital for the development of Russia and the rest of the world because women are the most significant resource of economic development. Allowing gender barriers to keep women out of leadership positions will only negate efforts for economic growth.

It is on record that women are more successful as CEOs and investment bankers, than men. They have proven their mettle in industry and infrastructure development. It is time women are given the opportunity to build successful businesses. Unfortunately, for instance in Russia, although 54% of the employable population are women, they make up only 30% of entrepreneurs. This is unfortunate because economists and academics agree that women entrepreneurs are the under-tapped force that can rekindle and invigorate economic growth. Business in National Development Projects: Ways to Succeed The following were the key conclusions of the event:

Infrastructure projects serve as a foundation for attracting private investment and economic development. By implementing important infrastructure projects, we set off a whole cycle of other projects that become possible in different sectors of the economy. How effective national projects are depends on how many business projects are then implemented based on them.

The Public-Private Partnership (PPP) model can be very useful for mobilising public and private sector resources to build infrastructure.

This is an innovative approach and now it is in use in many countries.

National projects are key. They lead to a different pace of development and a jump in the economy.

The challenges facing this model include:

  1. An imperfect legal framework.
  2. The working framework for PPPs in Russia is very narrow.
  3. A lack of experience and coordination when implementing

PPP projects.

There is need for an investment support law so that major investment projects can receive support for a return on investments in infrastructure. The Russian government has this pending Bill. Its adoption will kick-start many projects that have the potential to boost the Russian economy.

There is need to improve the framework and ensure consistence so that the business community stops worrying and starts working. This can be done by creating the necessary conditions for national development projects at all levels of government. The idea is not for businesses to participate in national projects but for national projects to create platforms upon which businesses are able to implement development and growth projects. The state must participate and make the first contributions and capital grants for projects of this kind.

Protection of Investor Rights as a Catalyst for Economic

Development

The Prosecutor General of the Russian Federation indicated that an active process of modernising the legal regulation is underway in Russia. The prosecution body is fully involved in the process of its modernisation. In 2018, at least 30,000 illegal acts that created administrative barriers for entrepreneurs and investors were annulled or changed at the request of prosecutors. Disciplinary or administrative penalties were applied to nearly 35,000 officials last year.

With regards to Russian Private Law, over the past 7 years, many necessary aspects were added to the Civil Code including: inheritance funds, warranties and representations, and compensation for losses.  Favourable legal environment is the most important condition for business development. If the laws are fair and consistent, the investors are happy to comply. Many investors are closely following the changes in the Russian national legislation concerning securities so that they are better informed on whether or not to invest.

In Russia, administrative and criminal procedural pressure on business remains high. The number of fines has increased. Liability and financial responsibility of entrepreneurs has increased dramatically, and today it is nearly 150 Billion Roubles. This has the sum effect of repelling investors.

Many risks are directly related to the rule of law. This is a big restriction for international investors. Many clients do not want to trade in countries, including Russia, which have questionable rule of law.

There is need for legislative uncertainty.  According to Aleksandr

Savenkov, the Deputy Minister of Internal Affairs of the Russian Federation, every single time the Federation Council of Russia has met during the past 4 years, the Criminal Code, the Criminal Procedure Code, the Administrative Offences Code and the Tax Code have been amended. For any business entity, the most important thing is the predictability of the legal environment, business climate and government resolutions. The law should evolve, but its provisions should not change constantly, as is the case in Russia, particularly, with the Tax Code.

Russia needs a systematic approach to the development of legal environment. There is need to create a legal state planning system, because there are many different types of problems which require a more systemic solution.

There is also a need to consider international experiences. This can be done by providing investment law that provides legal framework for improving the investment climate. The law would provide for the establishment of the Economic Development Council, which would be tasked with, among other things, observing how other countries have improved the climate for investment and established guarantees for investors.

To attract and protect foreign investors, the following are some of the important factors that need to be ensured:

  1. Microeconomic stability;
  2. Rule of law;
  3. Zero tolerance to corruption; and
  4. Guarantee of personal security.

Global Energy Sector: Challenges and Opportunities

Increasing energy prices – especially for oil and gas – and recent geopolitical conflicts have reminded us of the essential role affordable energy plays in economic growth and human development and of the vulnerability of the global energy system to supply disruptions.

To secure energy supplies is once again at the top of the international policy agenda. Yet the current pattern of energy supply carries the threat of severe and irreversible environmental damage – including changes in global climate. Reconciling the goals of energy security and environmental protection requires strong and coordinated government action and public support.

As a consequence, the decoupling of energy use and economic growth, a diversification of energy supply, and the mitigation of climate change causing emissions are more urgent than ever.

Governments must seriously and genuinely begin investing in green energy. There is need to finding lasting alternatives to oil. Solar, natural gas and hydro-power remain the world’s best bet.

AGREEMENTS

As is the norm at the Forum, businesses from countries across the globe enter into varying sorts of agreements. This year, the Forum saw 745 agreements signed.  Those agreements signed, whose monetary sum were not a trade secrets, totaled 3.271 Trillion Roubles (about 50 billion

United States dollars).

The largest agreements included:

Leningrad Region and RusChem Alliance Limited. signed an Agreement on social and economic cooperation during implementation of the project worth 750 Billion Roubles. The complex for processing ethane-containing gas and producing liquefied natural gas (LNG) will be built near Ust-Luga, Kingisepp District.

Rostov Region and YUG-Energo signed an agreement to implement a set of projects totalling 177 Billion Roubles using the capacities of Novoshakhtinsk Refinery.

Leningrad Region and EuroChem Group AG signed a memorandum of intent for signing special investment contracts during project implementation under EuroChem-Northwest-2 worth 163 Billion

Roubles (USD 2.5 billion).

VEB.RF and Rockwell Capital Investment Company signed an agreement on constructing a new pulp and paper mill in Krasnoyarsk Territory worth 140 Billion Roubles.

VEB.RF, Gazprombank, Sberbank and Acron Group signed an agreement of allocating 110.5 Billion Roubles (USD 1.7 billion) as a syndicated loan for 15 years for developing the Verkhnekamsk potassium-magnesium salt deposit’s Talitsa area (Perm Territory).

Ministry of Natural Resources and the Environment of the Russian

Federation, Gazprom Neft, the Federal Supervisory Natural Resources Management Service, Omsk Region and Omsk Refinery signed a cooperation agreement to implement the Fresh Air federal project (part of the Ecology National Project) worth 100 Billion Roubles.

Murmansk Region and NOVATEK signed a cooperation agreement worth 100 Billion Roubles. NOVATEK will invest in constructing a shipyard in Belokamenka, create approximately 15,000 new jobs in the Region and take part in Murmansk Region’s social projects.

Setl Group and Sberbank signed an agreement on strategic cooperation worth 100 Billion Roubles. The agreement provides for

Sberbank’s intent to be Setl Group’s financial partner and extend credits for its existing and future projects.

OBSERVATIONS

Businesses from across the globe use the forum to exhibit and market their products and services to potential clients. They also use the forum to learn new technologies that are influencing global economics.

Apart from being a leading expert, discussion and exhibition platform, the Forum is a practical field for negotiating and signing business contracts for major international projects and agreements. The Russian Government uses the Forum to attract substantial investment and create partnerships worth billions of dollars, annually.

The Government of Russia uses the forum to demonstrate the strides that Russia has taken towards economic and political reform, and to show investors its willingness to do business with everyone and anyone.

RECOMMENDATIONS

  ITEM ACTION RESPONSIBILITY TIMELINE
1. Strengthen state institutions

 

-        Realigning alllaws that establish and govern state institutions to ensure their authority, transparency and accountability.

-        Provide adequate capitalisation funding to state institutions

-      Parliament of

Zimbabwe 

-      Office of the President and Cabinet

-      Ministry of Finance and Economic development

On – going process

 

 

2.

 

Establish authentic and unalterable rule of law -          Enactment and

realignment of laws in order to ensure justice and protection of the law for all

-          Complete

implementation of Section 164 of the

Constitution of Zimbabwe which ensures total independence of the

Judiciary

-      Parliament of

Zimbabwe

-      Judicial Service Commission

On – going process

 

3. Ensure absolute anticorruption -    Amend the Criminal Law (Codification and Reform) Act [Chapter 9:23] and -    Parliament of

Zimbabwe

-    Zimbabwe Anti-

June 2020

 

    - other relevant Acts to ensure stringent and tougher punitive measures, (such as confiscation of all unexplained and illgotten wealth) for people convicted of corruption

Ensure improved transparency, efficiency and effectiveness in the handling of corruption cases.

Corruption

Commission

- Zimbabwe National

Prosecution

Authority

 
4. Improve policy consistency, efficiency

and economic competitiveness

-

-

-

-

Improve state regulation efficiency by improving quality and scope of

policies and Statutory

Instruments

Guarantee policy consistencies and ensure microeconomic stability

Improve the ease of doing business to international standards.

Efficient regulation of tariffs and the business trading environment

-      Office of the President and Cabinet

-      Ministry of Finance and

Economic

Development

-      Zimbabwe Investment Authority

-      Competition and

Tariffs Commission

On – going process
5. Research how other - Increase attendance - Office of the On – going
  countries have overcome similar economic challenges of the St. Petersburg International

Economic Forum and other economic forums by encouraging local business and industry leaders to attend

President and Cabinet

-     Ministry of

Finance and

Economic

Development

-     Zimbabwe Investment 

Authority

-     Zimbabwe

Chamber of

Commerce

process

 

In conclusion, I must say that this trip to Russia was very beneficial to the delegates as representatives of the country because we saw that we almost experienced the same economic environment like what Russia has been experiencing. I think there are opportunities and lessons which we need to learn as a nation to see how Russia has managed to overcome them especially in manufacturing and the energy sector and also strengthening State institutions to combat corruption which is an anathema to the foreign direct investment.  I thank you Mr.

President.

HON. SEN. TSOMONDO: Thank you Mr. President for allowing me to debate this motion which was moved by Hon. Dr. Mavetera.  The issue of women’s economic empowerment was also a major topic at St. Petersburg International Economic Forum (SPIEF) Russia, in particular as it pertains to their taking senior management positions at large companies and public office is becoming increasingly important as is the need to develop business standards to enhance the contribution of women executives for sustainable economic development.  The economic forum outlined the role of politicians and business leaders in engaging more women in economic activity.

Specific measures on what should be taken to promote women’s leadership in manufacturing and the public sector were also discussed.  The prospects for women executives in the era of digitalisation and the fourth industrial revolution were part of the discussion.  Measures to improve labour legislation gradually increase wages and payment opportunities were called for; equal pay for equal work and improve parent level programmes for work place and other measures to achieve economic and social parity in work environment.  This would enhance equal grounds and starting points for women and men in their contribution to the economic and their business endeavours.

Another hot discussion at the economic forum was about the paradigm shift in the global economic order.  The structure of the world economy is undergoing changes owing to technological progress and digitalisation.  The transition from a mono-centric model to fragmentation into platforms has been aggravated by the crisis in the world trade systems and growth of protectionism in various forms.

Against this background, the share of intermediate goods in global trade is growing rapidly.  At the same time, industries are shifting to high-tech, knowledge-based application with a growing share of services value and the effective participation by economies in value chains as drives of economic growth and integration into global trade is increasing.  There were components that were looked at in the discussion of paradigm shift in the Global Economic Order.

Digitalisation and openness were said to be important tools in contribution to the current global economic trends.  The introduction of IT has seen the emergence of E-governance that has almost eliminated paper conducting business by various private and public entities.

The technological revolution is leading to dramatic changes in society.  Digitalisation is emerging as the key trend across all industries  yet the great opportunities that it is creating are accompanies by major cyber threats.  States should become an information platform that gradually delegates the execution of its functions to the private sector.  Companies and Government agencies are supposed to transform into ecosystems that deliver a one-stop-shop experience to their customers.

This will save time and reduce red tape and corruption in the Government.

Also, a focus on public health is key to improving quality of life and life expectancy, the promotion of health in general and encouraging people to lead healthy lifestyles.  Investment in healthcare boosts economic growth overally.  It was discussed that spending on health cannot be seen any more as just plain expenditure.  It is a major investment in human capital.  Public health and health in general is a key aspect of economic growth and investing in child health care brings substantial rewards.  Public and private investment in health care must begin with child health care.

UNICEF is calling for far greater investment in children’s health.

We see it not only as a moral imperative but an economic one as well.

The highest economic returns comes from investments in a child’s earliest moments.  Primary care is the cornerstone of health care.  It was discussed that universal health coverage cannot be achieved without a consortium of stakeholders and a better informed public for which the media is key.  Universal health coverage has to be an integral part of the sustainable economic growth agenda of countries and international organisations.  There is need for urgent increase in funding for the system.  The systems in Russia are currently working at the post of maximum efficiency where they have managed to squeeze everything to their rates.  More resources are needed but then again there is a lot of inefficiency and waste in health systems right now. Adoption of efficient health systems and practices can go a long way in the improvement of the economy.

It was also discussed that national projects are key.  The PPP model can be very useful for mobilising public and private sector resources to build infrastructure.   This is an innovative approach and it is now in use in many countries.  If they are carried out, there will be achievement of a different pace of development and a jump in the economy – it is very important to carry them out.  There is supposed to be a present investment support law so that major investment projects can receive support for a return on investments in infrastructure.

It was also outlined that governments are supposed to have a Bill to be adopted that will facilitate the kick start.  When implementing public private partnership projects, there are a lot of development institutions especially in the area of innovation, it is proposed creating horizontal management lines and supporting each other with skills and capital will assist.  Creating the necessary conditions in the Government, attracting small, medium business and attracting foreign partners are possible solutions to building national development.  I thank you Madam

President. – [HON. SENATORS:  Hear, hear.] –

HON. SEN. DR. MAVETERA:  Madam President, I move that

the debate do now adjourn.

HON. MKHWEBU: I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume: Thursday, 12th March, 2020.

MOTION

REPORT OF THE THIRD WORLD PARLIAMENTARY FORUM ON

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS HELD IN BALI

HON. SEN. CHIEF MTSHANE:  Madam President, I move the

motion standing in my name that this House takes note of the report of the 3rd World Parliamentary Forum on Sustainable Development Goals held in Bali, Indonesia.

HON. SEN. CHIEF MAKUMBE:  I second.

HON. SEN. CHIEF MTSHANE: 

1.0     INTRODUCTION

1.1 Hon. Sen. Chief L. Mtshane Khumalo, Member of Parliament, led a Parliamentary delegation to attend the 3rd World Parliamentary Forum on Sustainable Development which was held in Bali,

Indonesia from 4 to 5 September 2019. The forum was attended by

30 countries and 55 organisations. The theme of the forum was; -

“Combating inequality through social and financial inclusion”. Hon. Sen. Chief Mtshane Khumalo was accompanied by the following Members of Parliament and Officer of Parliament:-

Hon. Consillia Chinanzvavana, Member of Parliament;

Hon. Priscilla Moyo, Member of Parliament;

Hon. Marian Chombo, Member of Parliament

Hon Joel Gabbuza, Member of Parliament;

Mrs. Chiwoneso Mataruka, Committee Clerk and Secretary to the

Delegation.  

  2.0  REPORT OF THE CHAIR OF INDONESIAN HOUSE

STEERING COMMITTEE

2.1   The Steering Committee held a series of focus group discussions   where rising inequalities is a major set back to attaining sustainable development. Economic instability undermines social cohesion. Inequality is a global phenomenon which needs address and 11 years remain to attain Sustainable Development Goals targets. This requires strong leadership of Members of Parliament who are expected to provide enabling legislation, noting that Parliament is the cornerstone of democracy to hold the executive into account.

2.2    Social and financial inclusion is key to ensure inclusivity. The           World Parliamentary Forum on Sustainable Development should           be a strong partner on attainment of sustainable development and   ensure accountability and oversight of the parliamentarians effort and commitment in attainment and mainstreaming of SDGs.

2.0   OPENING REMARKS BY MR BAMBANG SOESATYA,

SPEAKER OF THE  HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE

REPUBLIC OF INDONESIA

2.1   The Speaker of the House of Representatives welcomed the delegates to the forum under the theme, “Combating Inequality through Social and Financial Inclusion.” He stressed that;

2.1.1 With the adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable

Development, combating inequality and applying social protection has become the centre of policy agenda in all countries. Financial inclusion should be at the forefront of Government policies to reduce income inequality. Governments must protect the people and promote more social inclusion by distributing resources more

fairly.

2.1.2 He noted that disparities are taking place around the world and require urgent attention. Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are meant to attend to global challenges to attain a wealth of justice, prosperity and peace. Despite all progress and efforts, inequality still remains a challenge. There is need for stronger focus in decreasing inequality in income and skills. Poverty has fatal consequences in perpetuating inequality leading to conflict;

2.1.3 There is therefore need for a deliberate move by Parliaments to capacitate the vulnerable and leave no one behind for the achievement of the 2030 Agenda.

3.0    SPECIAL REMARKS BY H.E. DR MUHAMMAD JUSUF

KALLA, VICE PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF

INDONESIA

3.1    His Excellency Kalla noted that since the adoption of SDGs in

2015 ultimately ending in 2030, much progress has been made.  Before were the MDGs with their own progress and challenges and the same applies to SDGs but these require working together or collective efforts. He stressed the following;

3.1.1 That nations seem to be lagging behind in many areas and this  requires SDG17, that of partnering of developed and developing  nations. SDGs are inter-connected and interrelated; that is economic development, social development and environmental sustainability.

3.1.2 The 2019 theme encourages nations to think on how to reduce  inequality in this world through social and economic growth without discrimination where, “no one should be left behind.” Inclusiveness is the central theme of SDGs.  Social development can only be achieved through social and economic growth. Countries are at different levels of development and as such, there is need for a global concerted effort to achieve development. Greater efforts must be made to achieve equality in gender, health, clean energy and addressing climate change. A developed country should have good hygiene and sanitation and these are fundamentals for the status of one’s country.

3.1.3 Planning and budgeting are key to overseeing SDGs in different  governments. Parliament with its authority to legislate and scrutinise budgets is important. Parliamentarians should participate effectively on how industry and infrastructure should create opportunities to do away with inequality and ensure equal opportunities. Tax rates should be discussed so that they benefit citizens of the nations.

3.1.4  His Excellency summed up by emphasising that partnership is key  among world countries in the implementation of SDGs. No one  country can grow without financial support. Thus, there is need for access to financing for livelihoods and communities.

4.0 PLENARY SESSION ON “HOW INFRASTRUCTURE AND

INDUSTRIAL INNOVATION CAN FOSTER EQUAL

OPPORTUNITIES

4.1 The session was moderated by Ms Andini Effendi, and the following issues were discussed:

4.1.1 That the  topic of combating inequality through social and financial inclusion and more specifically on how infrastructure and industrial innovation can foster equal opportunities, bearing in mind that we are experiencing a new industrial revolution is key. Knowledge, interconnectedness and mobility are key and industrial revolution does not mean necessarily neither equity nor fairness. New dynamics go hand in hand with new in-balances. It is the duty of nations to ensure that progress leaves no-one behind.

4.1.2 The Agenda 2030 for Sustainable Development provides us with guiding principles and targets: people, planet, prosperity, peace and partnership. Infrastructure and industrial innovation impacts on several of the 17 goals and in implementing these goals, countries have to bear in mind that infrastructure is no longer synonymous with physical infrastructure. The lack of access to formal education will prevent us from combating inequalities, from creating new jobs, decent jobs and enhance social mobility; and without education the gender gap will persist harming our social and economic progress.

4.1.3 Industrial innovation has the potential of enhancing our means of combating the environmental, economic and social consequences of climate change; however, political willingness is imperative.

4.1.4 That education and awareness on the effects of climate change must be embraced by all stakeholders including civil society.

5.0    PLENARY SESSION ON “ENSURING RURAL ACCESS TO

CLEAN WATER SUPPLY, SANITATION AND HYGIENE”

5.1 The session was chaired by Mr Putri Ayuningtyas and the following issues were discussed as solutions to reach the poorest

and the marginalised in improving their health, nutrition and productivity;

5.1.1   That 785 million people lack even a basic drinking-water  services, including 144 million people who are dependent on  surface water and 2.0 billion people still do not have basic sanitation facilities such as toilets or latrines.

5.1.2 The fact that water, hygiene and sanitation (WASH) is the subject  of dedicated targets within the Sustainable Development Goals,

SDG No. 6 is proof to its fundamental role in public health and therefore in the future of sustainable development. Access to safe water and sanitation are human rights as recognised in 2010 by the

United Nations General Assembly. Below are key issues

Parliaments may convince their governments to deliberate on:

5.1.2 That integrated water management can provide important cobenefits for sustainable development, climate change mitigation & adaptation, and disaster risk management especially as countries

begin to review and implement their national plans in the context of the Paris Agreement. There is a unique opportunity to improve and enhance water management practices;

5.1.3 That WASH, as part of the achievement of SDG 6 as a whole, be higher on countries political agenda, and that it is mainstreamed into national, sub-national, and community-level planning;

5.1.4 That there be predictable and sufficient finance for WASH; and

5.1.5 That there be greater mutual accountability and coordination among the developing countries, development partners, supporting governments, and their citizens on WASH issues.

6.0   PLENARY ON “ENHANCING PARTNERSHIP TOWARDS

INCLUSIVE FINANCING

6.1 Ms Masyitoh Annisa Ramadhani chaired the session on ways and means of ensuring the creation of accountable, accessible and sustainable financial services for all and the following issues were raised:

6.1.1 That the key issues in financing development projects include: improving the ability of countries to generate permanent and stable

tax revenues and improve resource management; focusing aid on sectors to be served by private finance; using aid to leverage and attract more private sector financing to projects that support development (for example infrastructure) through public-private partnerships and investment risk mitigation;

6.1.2 That domestic resources (public and private) and international/external resources (public and private), as well as blended finance are the key pillars of inclusive financing for development;

6.1.3 That there is a need to address some global public goods and efforts to mobilise diaspora financing for the development and building a more robust private sector by improving access to finance for micro, small, and medium-enterprises;

6.1.4 That countries achieve the goal of universal access at a reasonable cost to a wide range of financial services for everyone who needs them, provided by sustainable institutions for sustainable projects;

6.1.5  That one important aspect is that, “Leave no one behind” and this means put sustainable development at the core; transform

economies for jobs and inclusive growth; build effective peace and open trusted and accountable institutions for all; and forge a new global partnership;

6.1.6 That realising this goal will require a committed alliance between business, Government and civil society and will determine needed and sustainable investments. Countries should work on how to mobilise financial services to deliver the needed investments for the opportunities and secure a sustainable economic future and how to leverage technologies that boost production.

7.0   CONCLUSION

        In the wake of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, many countries continue to face significant challenges in an increasingly unequal world while the most vulnerable groups remain marginalised from social and economic participation. Sustainable Development Goals

(SDGs) are still perceived as executives’ domain, but the core Parliamentary functions in law-making, budgeting, oversight and representation of the people’s interests are critical in building peoplecentred, inclusive, peaceful and prosperous societies, and ending all poverty everywhere in all its dimensions. Therefore, the formulation of a Parliamentary Roadmap on SDGs shall transform our shared perspective into more tangible efforts under the principles of inclusion, partnership, and participation, where “no one left behind. 

In 2017, the First World Parliamentary Forum on Sustainable Development (WPFSD) adopted the Bali Declaration, which emphasizes the critical involvement of Parliaments in ensuring the effective implementation and timely realisation of the SDGs. The Bali

Declaration encourages Parliaments to strengthen national ownership by mainstreaming and implementing SDGs into enforceable National Development Plan, ensuring sufficient legal frameworks and budgetary requirements to support national policy on SDGs, scaling up efforts to end violence and sustaining peace, and enhancing climate action.

In 2018, the Second WPFSD adopted the Bali Commitment which draws attention to the significance of partnership towards sustainable energy for all.

The Bali Commitment promotes;

  • the big potential of renewable energy resources for producing sustainable energy; and
  • the prospect of blue economy, green industry and sustainable development to achieve energy security and diversification. This outcome document endorses Parliaments to establish the necessary mechanism to work closely with the governments and other stakeholders.

Parliamentarians gathered at the Third WPFSD in Bali, Indonesia, on 4-5th September 2019 adopted the Bali Roadmap which consists of a number of forward-looking recommendations that represent various dimensions in addressing challenges of SDGs implementation. By referring to the Bali Roadmap, we agree to:

  1. Safeguard efforts towards the achievement of SDGs, particularly on achieving equality in all social and financial aspects as emphasised in the Resolution 2010/12 adopted by the UN

Economic and Social Council on Promoting Social Integration and

UN General Assembly Resolution 72/206 on Financial Inclusion;

  1. Urge our respective governments to formulate National Action Plan and establish effective, accountable and inclusive institutions in supporting SDGs implementation;
  2. Call upon governments to renew their commitment and give more attention in delivering the SDGs timely through tangible actions and accelerating policy implementations as asserted in the 2019

High-Level Political Forum (HLPF) in New York;

  1. Advocate the delivery of sustainable social protection measures, resilient infrastructure and public services for all, including for those living below the poverty line, people in rural and remote areas, the vulnerable, persons with disabilities, children and older persons and indigenous peoples, particularly through the fulfilment of their fundamental human rights, which consist of no less than the following aspects:
    • Quality education;
    • Health care;
    • Decent and affordable housing; and
    • Access to clean water, sanitation and hygiene.
  2. Urge governments and local governments as well as national and regional parliaments to mainstreaming and localising the SDGs, based on the cultures, local languages and conditions, or uniqueness of a respective country;
  3. Strengthen legal frameworks and promote the development of an enabling environment to diversify financial resources and scale up funding from multiple sources to reduce financing gap in infrastructure, and to achieve an inclusive and sustainable development through innovative SDGs financing such as blended finance, Green Financing for Financial Institution, Social Impact Fund, religious-based philanthropy for SDGs, and crowd funding through digital philanthropy;
  4. Underpin multi-stakeholders partnerships in ensuring the creation of inclusive financial services which opens up access for the marginalised to fully participating in the economy and benefit from development;
  5. Strengthen the multilateral system for effective global

coordination, responses and solutions to address the multifaceted crises and challenges arise from interconnectedness, interdependency and complex global governance;

  1. Invite business sector and other relevant stakeholders to utilise their innovation and promote creative economy to contribute in addressing sustainable development challenges through the implementation of more sustainable consumption for Sustainable Development; Production patterns, and to engage with Parliaments as strategic partners in development process.

We extend our appreciation to the House of Representatives of the Republic of Indonesia as the founder of the WPFSD for its relentless efforts in promoting the achievement of SDGs while we express our gratitude to the IPU President for continuously supporting the WPFSD. We call upon all Parliamentarians to continue to engage actively in substantiating and holding the regular events of the WPFSD.

MOTION

REPORT OF THE THIRD WORLD PARLIAMENTARY FORUM ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS HELD IN BALI

HON. SEN. CHIEF. MTSHANE: I move the motion in my name

that this House takes note of the Report of the 3rd World Parliamentary Forum on Sustainable Development Goals held in Bali, Indonesia.

HON. SEN. CHIEF SIANSALI: I second.

HON. SEN. CHIEF. MTSHANE:

1.0     INTRODUCTION

1.1 Hon. Sen. Chief L. Mtshane Khumalo, Member of Parliament, led a Parliamentary delegation to attend the 3rd World Parliamentary Forum on Sustainable Development which was held in Bali, Indonesia, from 4 to 5 September 2019. The Forum was attended by 30 countries and 55 organisations. The theme of the forum was,

“Combating inequality through social and financial inclusion”. Hon. Sen. Chief Mtshane Khumalo was accompanied by the following Members of Parliament and Officer of Parliament:-

Hon. Consillia Chinanzvavana, Member of Parliament;

Hon. Priscilla Moyo, Member of Parliament;

Hon. Marian Chombo, Member of Parliament

Hon Joel Gabbuza, Member of Parliament and

Mrs. Chiwoneso Mataruka, Committee Clerk and Secretary to the Delegation.

  2.0  REPORT OF THE CHAIR OF INDONESIAN HOUSE

STEERING COMMITTEE

2.1   The Steering Committee held a series of focus group discussions where rising inequalities is a major setback to attaining sustainable development. Economic instability undermines social cohesion. Inequality is a global phenomenon which needs address and 11 years remain to attain Sustainable Development Goals targets. This requires strong leadership of Members of Parliament who are expected to provide enabling legislation, noting that Parliament is the cornerstone of democracy to hold the Eexecutive to account.

2.2    Social and financial inclusion is key to ensure inclusivity. The World Parliamentary Forum on Sustainable Development should be a strong partner on attainment of sustainable development and ensure accountability and oversight of the parliamentarians effort and commitment in attainment and mainstreaming of SDGs.

                   2.0   OPENING REMARKS BY MR BAMBANG SOESATYA,

SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE

REPUBLIC OF INDONESIA

2.1   The Speaker of the House of Representatives welcomed the delegates to the forum under the theme “Combating Inequality through Social and Financial Inclusion.” He stressed that;

2.1.1 With the adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable

Development, combating inequality and applying social protection has become the centre of policy agenda in all countries. Financial inclusion should be at the forefront of government policies to reduce income inequality. Governments must protect the people and promote more social inclusion by distributing resources more

fairly.

2.1.2 He noted that disparities are taking place around the world and require urgent attention. Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are meant to attend to global challenges to attain a wealth of

justice, prosperity and peace. Despite all progress and efforts, inequality still remains a challenge. There is need for stronger focus in decreasing inequality in income and skills. Poverty has fatal consequences in perpetuating inequality leading to conflict;

2.1.3 There is therefore, need for a deliberate move by Parliaments to capacitate the vulnerable and leave no one behind for the achievement of the 2030 agenda.

3.0    SPECIAL REMARKS BY H.E. DR MUHAMMAD

JUSUF KALLA, VICE PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF

NDONESIA

3.1    His Excellency Kalla noted that since the adoption of SDGs in 2015 ultimately ending in 2030, much progress had been made. Before were the MDGs with  their own progress and challenges and the same applies to SDGs but these require working together or collective efforts.

He stressed the following;

3.1.1 That nations seem to be lagging behind in many areas and this requires SDG 17 that of partnering of developed and developing nations.

SDGs are Inter-connected and interrelated that is economic development, social development and environmental sustainability.

3.1.2 The 2019 theme encourages nations to think on how to reduce inequality in this world through social and economic growth without discrimination where, “noone should be left behind.” Inclusiveness is the central theme of SDGs.  Social development can only be achieved through social and economic growth. Countries are at different levels of development and as such there is need for a global concerted effort to achieve development. Greater efforts must be made to achieve equality in gender, health, clean energy and addressing climate change. A developed country should have good hygiene and sanitation and these are fundamentals for the status of one’s country.

3.1.3 Planning and budgeting are key to overseeing SDGs in different governments. Parliament with its authority to legislate and scrutinise budgets is important. Parliamentarians should participate effectively in how industry and infrastructure should create opportunities to do away with inequality and ensure equal opportunities. Tax rates should be discussed so that they benefit citizens of the nations.

3.1.4  His Excellency summed up by emphasising that partnership is key among world countries in the implementation of SDGs. No one country can grow without financial support. Thus there is need for access to financing for livelihoods and communities.

        4.0                      PLENARY SESSION ON “HOW INFRASTRUCTURE

AND INDUSTRIAL INNOVATION CAN FOSTER EQUAL

OPPORTUNITIES

4.1 The session was moderated by Ms Andini Effendi, and the following issues were discussed:

4.1.1 The  topic on combating inequality through social and financial inclusion, and more specifically, on how infrastructure and industrial innovation can foster equal opportunities, bearing in mind that we are experiencing a new industrial revolution being key.  Knowledge, interconnectedness and mobility are key and industrial revolution does mean necessarily neither equity nor fairness. New dynamics go hand in hand with new in-balances. It is the duty of nations to ensure that progress leaves no-one behind.

4.1.2 The Agenda 2030 for Sustainable Development provides us with guiding principles and targets: people, planet, prosperity, peace and partnership. Infrastructure and industrial innovation impacts on several of the 17 goals and in implementing these goals, countries have to bear in mind that infrastructure is no longer synonymous with physical infrastructure. The lack of access to formal education will prevent us from combating inequalities, from creating new jobs decent jobs and enhance social mobility; and without education the gender gap will persist harming our social and economic progress.

4.1.3. Industrial innovation has the potential of enhancing our means of combating the environmental, economic and social consequences of climate change; however, political willingness is imperative.

4.1.4 That education and awareness on the effects of climate change be embraced by all stakeholders including civil society.

         5.0    PLENARY SESSION ON “ENSURING RURAL ACCESS TO CLEAN WATER SUPPLY, SANITATION AND

HYGIENE”

5.1 The session was chaired by Mr. Putri Ayuningtyas and the following issues were discussed as solutions to reach the poorest and the marginalized in improving their health, nutrition and productivity;

5.1.1   That 785 million people lack even basic drinking-water services, including 144 million people who are dependent on surface water and 2.0 billion people still do not have basic sanitation facilities such as toilets or latrines.

5.1.2 The fact that water, hygiene and sanitation (WASH) is the subject of dedicated targets within the Sustainable Development Goals, SDG No. 6 is proof to its fundamental role in public health and therefore in the future of sustainable development. Access to safe water and sanitation are human rights, as recognized in 2010 by the United Nations General Assembly. Below are key issues Parliaments may convince their governments to deliberate on:

5.1.6 That integrated water management can provide important co- benefits for sustainable development, climate change mitigation & adaptation, and disaster risk management especially as countries begin to review and implement their national plans in the context of the Paris Agreement. There is a unique opportunity to improve and enhance water management practices;

5.1.7 That WASH, as part of the achievement of SDG 6 as a whole, be higher on countries political agenda, and that it is mainstreamed into national, sub-national, and community-level planning;

5.1.8 That there be predictable and sufficient finance for WASH; and

5.1.9 That there be greater mutual accountability and coordination among the developing countries, development partners, supporting governments, and their citizens on WASH issues.

         6.0   PLENARY ON “ENHANCING PARTNERSHIP

TOWARDS INCLUSIVE FINANCING

 

6.1 Ms Masyitoh Annisa Ramadhani, chaired the session on ways and means of ensuring the creation of accountable, accessible and sustainable financial services for all and the following issues were raised:

6.1.1 That the key issues in financing development projects include: improving the ability of countries to generate permanent and stable tax revenues and improve resource management; focusing aid on sectors to be served by private finance; using aid to leverage and attract more private sector financing to projects that support development (for example, infrastructure) through public-private partnerships and investment risk mitigation;

6.1.2 That domestic resources (public and private) and international/external resources (public and private), as well as blended finance are the key pillars of inclusive financing for development;

6.1.3 That there is a need to address some global public goods and efforts to mobilize diaspora financing for the development and building of a more robust private sector by improving access to finance for micro, small, and medium-enterprises;

6.1.3 That countries achieve the goal of universal access, at a reasonable cost, to a wide range of financial services for everyone who needs them, provided by sustainable institutions for sustainable projects;

 

6.1.4  That one important aspect is, “Leave no one behind” and this means put sustainable development at the core; transform economies for jobs and inclusive growth; build effective peace and open trusted and accountable institutions for all; and forge a new global partnership;

6.1.5 That realising this goal will require a committed alliance between business, government and civil society and will determine needed and sustainable investments. Countries should work on how to mobilize financial services to deliver the needed investments for the opportunities and secure a sustainable economic future and how to leverage technologies that boost production.

        7.0   CONCLUSION

        In the wake of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, many countries continue to face significant challenges in an increasingly unequal world, while the most vulnerable groups remain marginalized from social and economic participation. Sustainable Development Goals

(SDGs) are still perceived as executives’ domain, but the core Parliamentary functions in law-making, budgeting, oversight and representation of the peoples’ interests, are critical in building peoplecentred, inclusive, peaceful, and prosperous societies, and ending all poverty everywhere in all its dimensions. Therefore, the formulation of a Parliamentary Roadmap on SDGs shall transform our shared perspective into more tangible efforts, under the principles of inclusion, partnership, and participation, where “no one is left behind.” 

In 2017, the First World Parliamentary Forum on Sustainable Development (WPFSD) adopted the Bali Declaration, which emphasizes the critical involvement of Parliaments in ensuring the effective implementation and timely realization of the SDGs. The Bali

Declaration encourages Parliaments to strengthen national ownership by mainstreaming and implementing SDGs into  enforceable National

Development Plans, ensuring sufficient legal frameworks and budgetary requirements to support national policy on SDGs, scaling up efforts to end violence and sustaining peace, and enhancing climate action.       In 2018, the Second WPFSD adopted the Bali Commitment, which draws attention to the significance of partnership towards sustainable energy for all. The Bali Commitment promotes;

  • the big potential of renewable energy resources for producing sustainable energy; and
  • the prospect of blue economy, green industry and sustainable development to achieve energy security and diversification. This outcome document endorses Parliaments to establish the necessary mechanism to work closely with the governments and other stakeholders.

Parliamentarians gathered at the Third WPFSD in Bali, Indonesia, on 4-5 September 2019, adopted the Bali Roadmap, which consists of a number of forward-looking recommendations that represent various dimensions in addressing challenges of SDGs implementation. By referring to the Bali Roadmap, we agree to:

  1. Safeguard efforts towards the achievement of SDGs, particularly on achieving equality in all social and financial aspects, as emphasised in the Resolution 2010/12 adopted by the UN Economic and Social Council on Promoting Social Integration and UN General Assembly Resolution 72/206 on Financial

Inclusion;

  1. Urge our respective governments to formulate national action plan and establish effective, accountable, and inclusive institutions in supporting SDGs implementation;

 

  1. Call upon Governments to renew their commitment and give more attention in delivering the SDGs timely through tangible actions and accelerating policy implementations, as asserted in the

2019 High-Level Political Forum (HLPF) in New York;

  1. Advocate the delivery of sustainable social protection measures, resilient infrastructure, and public services for all, including for those living below the poverty datum line, people in rural and remote areas, the vulnerable, persons with disabilities, children and older persons, and indigenous peoples, particularly through the fulfilment of their fundamental human rights, which consist of no less than the following aspects:
    • Quality education;
    • Health care;
    • Decent and affordable housing; and
    • Access to clean water, sanitation and hygiene.
  2. Urge governments and local governments, as well as national and regional parliaments to mainstream and localize the SDGs, based on the cultures, local languages and conditions, or uniqueness of a respective country;
  3. Strengthen legal frameworks and promote the development of an enabling environment to diversify financial resources and scale up funding from multiple sources to reduce financing gaps in infrastructure, to achieve an inclusive and sustainable development through innovative SDGs financing, such as blended finance, Green Financing for Financial Institutions, Social Impact Fund, religious-based philanthropy for SDGs, and crowd funding through digital philanthropy;

 

  1. Underpin multi-stakeholders partnerships in ensuring the creation of inclusive financial services which open up access for the marginalized to fully participating in the economy and benefit from development;
  2. Strengthen the multilateral system for effective global coordination, responses and solutions to address the multifaceted crisis and challenges arising from interconnectedness, interdependency and complex global governance;
  3. Invite business sector and other relevant stakeholders to utilize their innovation and promote a creative economy to contribute in addressing sustainable development challenges through the implementation of more sustainable consumption for Sustainable Development; Production patterns, and to engage with parliaments as strategic partners in development process.

We extend our appreciation to the House of Representatives of the Republic of Indonesia, as the founder of the WPFSD, for its relentless efforts in promoting the achievement of SDGs, while expressing our gratitude to the IPU President for continuously supporting the WPFSD. We call upon all Parliamentarians to continue to engage actively in substantiating and holding the regular events of the WPFSD.     I thank you.

           HON. SEN. CHIEF MTSHANE:  I move that the debate do now adjourn.

           HON. SEN. SHOKO:  I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume:  Thursday 12 March. 2020.

      HON. SEN. CHIEF MTSHANE: I move that the debate do now

adjourn.

        HON. SEN. SHOKO: I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume: Thursday, 12th March, 2020.

HON. SEN. SHOKO: On a point of order Madam President. I am

just looking at the Bills that have been pushed through and I am seeing that the Freedom of Information was pushed through to Parliament on the 10th   March, 2020 and also the International Treaties was pushed through to Senate on the 10th of March, 2020. When we checked in the pegion holes, we did not get anything because I suspect that tomorrow we might debate those Bills that I am talking about. I thank you Madam President.

THE TEMPORARY PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE (HON.

SEN. MOHADI): Hon. Senator, the request that  you are talking about all the information was put in your pegion holes during the time when the same information was also distributed to the National Assembly and it is some time now. Maybe you have forgotten or you did not see them.

HON. SEN. B. MPOFU: Madam President, if you may allow me

to speak. Previously when we tried to debate similar Bills when they have been amended in the Lower House extensively, we have found ourselves in sixes and sevens because the Minister will come with an amended Bill. We have the Bill that was originally made which has gone to the Lower House and gone back to the Parliamentary Legal

Committee and that Bill will be different. So, we cannot be debating and contributing to a Bill that has been changed and amended. Why can we not just get the amended copies and after the amended copies, we debate the amended copies?

THE TEMPORARY PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE (HON.

SEN. MOHADI): Your request has been heard Hon. Sen. If you feel that you have been given short time, can you just request that when the motions are brought in the House tomorrow and then you request for more time, but we should not just hide saying that we did not see the papers. I do not think that is fair.

HON. SEN. DR. MAVETERA: Thank you Madam President.

When it has been amended, it means it is new. So, we cannot be asked to debate on a first generation when there is a fourth generation. I stand to be guided through you Madam President that if a Bill originates from the

National Assembly, we debate an approved Bill from the National Assembly not the first generation which was amended and amended and it comes to us when we have got the first generation. I think there must be a problem because what we are discussing is not what has been amended. Thank you Madam President.

THE TEMPORARY PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE

(HON. SEN. MOHADI): Thank you so much. I think you are hitting on the same point, all of you - which I said that the Second Reading will be done tomorrow. It is up to you to raise the issue to the Minister here present tomorrow.

HON. SEN. B. MPOFU: Sorry Madam President, we have had a

similar situation and I do not know why we debate it all the time because last time I think the Deputy President said that in future they are going to handle things differently, but it seems like every other Bill we go through the motions as if our duty is to rubber stamp rather than to look at these laws in a very intensive and proper way.

THE TEMPORARY PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE (HON.

SEN. MOHADI): Thank you Hon. Member, I think we have heard your

plea. I will refer this matter to the Minister. I thank you.

Hon. Sen. Makone having been asked to move her motion.

HON. SEN. MAKONE: Madam President, I think because of

time and now that it is 5.00 o’clock, will I be able to read the report and finish because it seems the Hon. Senators are tired.

THE TEMPORARY PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE (HON.

SEN. MOHADI): The closing time of Senate is 7.00 o’clock, if you feel like you want to move it you can do so but if you do not feel like doing so, you can as well do it tomorrow.

On the motion of HON. SEN. MUZENDA, seconded by HON.

SEN. KHUPHE, the Senate adjourned at Five o’clock p.m.

 

 

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