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SENATE HANSARD 7 SEPTEMBER 2022 VOL 31 NO 67

PARLIAMENT OF ZIMBABWE

Wednesday, 7th September, 2022

The Senate met at Half-past Two o’clock p.m.

PRAYERS

(THE HON. DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF SENATE in the Chair)

ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE HON. DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF SENATE

SWITCHING OFF OF CELLPHONES

THE HON. DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF SENATE: Hon. Senators are reminded to put your phones on silent or better still switch off their phones. It is not acceptable to have your phones disturb the proceedings in the House.

MOTION

REPORT OF THE 51ST PLENARY ASSEMBLY OF THE SADC PARLIAMENTARY FORUM

          HON. SEN. MOHADI: I move the motion standing in my name that this House takes note of the Report of the 51st Plenary Assembly of the SADC Parliamentary Forum held in Malawi..

          HON. SEN. CHINAKE: I second.

          HON. SEN. MOHADI:

1.0      Introduction:

1.1      The 51st Plenary Assembly Session of the SADC Parliamentary Forum was hosted by the Parliament of Malawi from the 7th to 16th July 2022 under the theme: ‘Towards Energy Sufficiency, Sustainability and Self-Sufficiency in the SADC Region’.

1.2 The Zimbabwe delegation was led by Hon. Advocate Jacob Francis Nzwidamilimo Mudenda, Speaker of the Parliament of Zimbabwe, and it comprised the following Members of Parliament: -

  • Tambudzani Mohadi, Member of the Standing Committee on Food, Agriculture, Natural Resources and Infrastructure;
  • Goodluck Kwaramba, Member of the Standing Committee on Gender Equality, Women Advancement and Youth Development and Chairperson of the Zimbabwe Women’s Parliamentary Caucus (ZWPC);
  • Dought Ndiweni, Executive Committee Member and Chairperson of the Standing Committee on Democratisation, Governance and Human Rights;
  • Anele Ndebele, Member of the Standing Committee on Trade, Industry, Finance and Investment; and,
  • Paurina Mpariwa, Member of the Standing Committee on Human and Social Development and Special Programmes.

2.0      Official Opening Ceremony

2.1      In her welcome remarks, the Secretary-General of the SADC PF, Ms. Boemo Segkoma, stressed the need to heighten Intra-Africa trade through the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA). She also implored Member States to ensure that African women are empowered through entrepreneurship to tap into the envisaged economic gains offered by AfCFTA. She called on the Plenary Assembly to ensure that young girls and women are empowered through opportunities that are offered by an equitable society that does not discriminate based on gender or sex. Furthermore, the Secretary General concluded by tendering credentials of the delegates to the Plenary Assembly and invited the Hon, President of SADC PF to address the Assembly.

2.2      Hon. Christopher Mboso N’kodia Pwanga, the Speaker of the Parliament of DRC and President of the SADC Parliamentary Forum, expressed gratitude to H.E. Dr. Chakwera, President of the Republic of Malawi for the double achievement in the transformation of the SADC PF which was borne in Blantyre, Malawi in 1997, while the 41st SADC Summit resolved unanimously that SADC PF should transform into a Regional Parliament as one of the organs of SADC PF. On that score, the President of SADC PF commended the Chairman, His Excellency, President Dr. Lazarus McCarthy Chakwera, for chairing the 41st SADC Summit which affirmed the Transformation Agenda of the SADC PF. Furthermore, he pleaded with H.E. President of Malawi to canvass his fellow Heads of State and governments during the 42nd Summit to be held in DRC by encouraging that Summit accedes to the amendment of Article 9 (1) of the SADC Treaty which makes it possible for the envisaged Regional Parliament to be one of its organs.

2.3      Solidarity Messages were presented to the SADC PF Plenary Assembly during the Official Opening Ceremony. The Right Honourable Speaker, Dr. Sidie Mohamed Tunis, Speaker of the ECOWAS Parliament, emphasised that private sector engagement is fundamental to achieving energy efficiency at regional level. He gave an example of the West African Power Pool (WAPP), as a clear manifestation of a successful public-private partnership initiative which covers 14 of the 15 ECOWAS countries. The WAPP programme promotes power generation and transmission infrastructure as well as coordinating power exchange among the ECOWAS Member States, thereby providing a regular and reliable energy source at a competitive cost for citizens of that region. 

2.3.1   Dr. Sidie encouraged the SADC Region to leverage on private sector engagement as a powerful force in improving livelihoods, among African countries in search of accelerated socio-economic development.

2.4      The President of the Pan-African Parliament, Hon. Senator Chief Fortune Charumbira, saluted the support given by the SADC Region which propelled him to victory in the PAP Presidential elections held on 29th June 2022. He paid tribute to the region for standing firm and resolute in support of the principle of geographical rotational leadership which is one of the cornerstones of the African Union founding values. The PAP President also expressed gratitude for the support received from the Government of Zimbabwe led by H.E. Dr. President Mnangagwa. Furthermore, he saluted Honourable Advocate Jacob Francis Nzwidamilimo Mudenda, Speaker of Parliament of Zimbabwe, for being a father figure and a pillar of strength throughout the struggle for rotational leadership. He pledged to work hard to ensure that the continent is united under his leadership.            

2.5 In delivering the keynote address, the Guest of Honour, His Excellency, President Dr. Lazarus McCarthy Chakwera, President of the Republic of Malawi, noted that the theme was in tandem with the Maseru 1996 SADC Protocol on Energy that recognizes the criticality of energy in pursuit of the SADC vision of economic well-being and poverty eradication in Southern Africa through industrialisation anchored on adequate energy supply.

2.5.1   The President of Malawi expressed confidence that the deliberations of the Plenary Assembly would be guided by the SADC founding principles and decades-long quest to diversify energy sources and transition to green renewable energy.

2.5.2   The President of Malawi recalled that the Summit of Heads of State and Government had approved at the same venue, a proposal to transform the forum into a SADC Regional Parliament in order to make it a legislative body as opposed to being a mere deliberative body. In this regard, as the current Chairperson of SADC, he pledged his total support and commitment towards the transition of the forum into a Regional Parliament as affirmed during the 41st SADC Summit of Heads of State and Governments.

2.6 His Excellency President Chakwera lauded the inclusion of the SADC Model Law on Public Finance Management (PFM) on the programme as a commendable initiative by the SADC PF, as the PFM promotes prudential management of public finances. H.E. Dr. Chakwera concluded his address by wishing the 51st SADC PF Assembly constructive deliberations.

2.7  Hon. Catherine Gotani Hara, Speaker of the National Assembly of Malawi, expressed gratitude to the region for assembling in Malawi for a record fourth time in the life of the SADC PF. The Hon. Speaker urged the SADC PF Assembly to come up with robust recommendations on the way forward as she wished all delegates a hospitable stay during the Assembly period.

2.8   Hon. Seioso Joel Mohai, Member of the National Council of Provinces (NCOP) and Chief Whip, representing Speaker of the National Assembly of South Africa and the host of the 52nd SADC PF Plenary Assembly, Hon. Nosiviwe Mapisa Nqakula, graciously thanked Malawi, the Warm Heart of Africa for excellently hosting 51st Plenary Assembly Session of the SADC PF. He pledged South Africa’s readiness to welcome delegates to the 52nd Plenary Assembly Meeting to be held in the last quarter of 2022. 

3.0  Zimbabwe’s Contribution to the Theme and the Key Deliverables During the Symposium

3.1  Hon. Anele Ndebele presented a paper on the theme on behalf of the Hon. Speaker and the delegation and noted that at the continental and global levels, energy was critical to the attainment of the global infrastructural development agenda.

3.2 The Plenary Assembly noted that the SADC region is endowed with abundant and diverse energy sources both renewable (RE) and non-renewable energy resources such as hydro, wind, solar, oil, gas, geothermal, nuclear and coal. There is thus, need to maximize the potential of regional renewable energy resources to ensure energy sustainability, security and self-sufficiency while decarbonising the energy sector.

3.3 Furthermore, it was noted that, despite the abundant energy resources in the     region, access to electricity remains low in Member States notably in Malawi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Zambia, Mozambique and Madagascar. It is imperative that the SADC region exploits fully the sources of energy supply such as coal, hydro electricity and natural gas in countries such as Zimbabwe, DRC, Mozambique and Tanzania in order to circumvent the debilitating energy deficit experienced since 2007.

3.4  One of the main challenges facing the electricity sector was the insignificant capital injection into power generation projects from either the private or the public sector.  Over the past decade, Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe, among others, have had to resort to load shedding as a stop gap measure to conserve energy. This can only be forestalled by capital injection from the private sector and/or through Public Private Partnership (PPPs).

3.5 The Symposium noted that vandalism of energy infrastructure such as transformers and copper wires has negative effects on uninterrupted energy supply in the region. This vandalism was economic sabotage. Member States should guard against this vandalism and ensure that stolen equipment from other Members States is not sold across borders in other countries within the region. Stiff penalties should be employed in all Member States.

3.6 It was also observed that the Russia/Ukraine conflict had created energy imbalance as the prices of gas and oil increased exponentially resulting in imported hyperinflation. It is, therefore, imperative that SADC countries come up with clear Independent   Power Producers (IPPs) policies in order to mitigate against the energy deficit.

3.7 The SADC Region should leverage the Inga Hydropower project for regional benefits. The Southern Africa Power Pool (SAPP) must take interest to unlock the potential of the Inga Hydropower project, as an integrated regional project that would result in no less than 50% electricity being supplied to the rest of Africa.

3.8 In this context, the role of Parliament is to promulgate laws that promote energy supply. In that respect, the Zimbabwean delegation stressed the need for Parliaments to ratify and domesticate the SADC Protocols on energy as well as continental and international energy protocols in order to achieve sustainability in the energy sector within the SADC region.

  4.0 Statement by Hon. Advocate Jacob Francis Nzwidamilimo Mudenda on Decisions of the 144th Assembly of the Ipu and Related Meetings Held in Bali, Indonesia from 18 to 24 March 2022 and the 288th Session of the Executive Committee of the Ipu Held on 28th June, 2022 in Montevideo, Uruguay

4.1 The Speaker of Parliament of Zimbabwe, Hon. Advocate Jacob Francis Nzwidamilimo Mudenda, reported on the outcomes of the 144th Assembly of the IPU and Related Meetings as well as the 288th Session of the Executive Committee Meeting.

4.2 He reported that the Hon. Duarte Pachecco, President of the IPU, had implored Parliaments to exercise their legislative, representative, oversight and budgetary roles to ensure that international agreements on climate change are fully implemented. Parliaments were also challenged to share best practices and proffer global solutions to this global climate change phenomenon.

4.3 The report informed the SADC PF Plenary Assembly that the preparations for the 145th Assembly to be held in Rwanda were well on course. In response, the DRC delegation indicated that their country would not attend the 145th IPU Assembly, because Rwanda had invaded the Eastern part of the DRC region. However, the Hon. Speaker of Zimbabwe advised that the invasion of DRC by Rwanda created an invidious position for the SADC Region because Rwanda was in the SADC Region fighting side by side with the Region under the SADC Mission in Mozambique (SAMIM), repelling insurgency and banditry in Northern Mozambique. Furthermore, the Hon. Speaker appealed to the DRC delegation to embrace the peace efforts which had commenced under the auspices of the Angolan President where both Presidents Félix Tshisekedi and Paul Kagame had been invited to begin the peace process regarding the DRC Eastern Region in the spirit and letter of the 2nd July 2022, Pretoria Agreement and the Sun City Agreement which was signed on 2nd April 2003, all executed in order to find lasting peace in the DRC. The Speaker of the Parliament of Zimbabwe advocated for a diplomatic and peaceful resolution to the conflictual situation.

4.4 Meanwhile, Mr. Ope Pasquet, Acting President of the House of Representatives of Uruguay, applauded the IPU for establishing a Task Force on the Russian Federation/ Ukraine conflict in order to achieve dialogue through mediation between the two sides in the conflict. The region is represented on the Task Force by Speakers of the Parliaments of the Republic of South Africa and Namibia.

4.5 In that regard, the IPU President reported that the Task Force was scheduled to undertake missions to Moscow and Kiev following invitations from both Parliaments of the Russian Federation and Ukraine in July 2022. Hon. Speaker Mudenda emphasized that as the Task Force embarks on its mission, it must be guided by the principle of neutrality and not to be dissuaded by the United States of America’s posture of preventing African States from siding with Russia through its Countering Malign Russian Activities in Africa Act promulgated on 22nd April 2022.

5.0  Adoption of the Report of the Executive Committee and the Treasurer’s Report

5.1 The Executive Committee (EXCO) tabled its report for consideration and adoption by the 51st Plenary Assembly meeting. The EXCO of the SADC Parliamentary Forum (SADC PF) had met virtually via the zoom video conferencing platform on 11th March 2022 and again on 10th June 2022.

5.2 The Report expressed gratitude to His Excellency, President Dr. Lazarus MacCarthy Chakwera, for officially opening the 51st Plenary Assembly Session and to the Government and People of Malawi for the warm hospitality.

5.3 The Plenary Assembly reaffirmed the clarion call to Speakers/ Presiding Officers of Member Parliaments to continue lobbying Heads of State and Ministers of Foreign Affairs to support the adoption of the amended SADC Treaty at the 42nd SADC Summit to be held in the DRC. The report emphasised and approved the need for further lobbying initiatives by the Strategic Lobbying Team on the Transformation of the SADC PF into a Regional Parliament to ensure that a two-thirds majority of countries is reached when the Amendment to the SADC Treaty is considered by the 42nd Summit.

5.4 The Plenary Assembly validated the results of the elections of the Chairpersons and Vice-Chairpersons of the RWPC and Standing Committees for 2022 to 2024 and wished the Committees a fruitful tenure of office.

5.5  The Plenary Assembly adopted the decision to participate in the collaborative event twinning the G7 Global Initiative and the SADC PF aimed at sensitising Parliamentarians on the production and transit of chemical waste and biohazards in Africa and the potential risks posed to the environment. The event will take place in Windhoek, Namibia, from the 27th to 29th October 2022.

5.6 The Plenary Assembly noted the need for National Parliaments to second staff on full-time basis to the forum, whose employment costs would be borne by Member Parliaments given the prevailing budgetary constraints being faced by the forum.

5.7 The Plenary Assembly adopted the need to incorporate best practices enunciated by the SADC Model Law on Public Finance Management. The Plenary Assembly commended the PFM Model Law as the first normative legislative instrument to ensure that PFM reflects commitments made at the regional level with regards to prudent management of the national purse in Member States.

5.8 The Plenary Assembly adopted the proposal for the Forum to participate in upcoming Election Observation Missions (EOMs), particularly in the SADC Region, to avoid losing observer status with some Electoral Commissions. The Plenary Assembly expressed disquiet over having the Commonwealth and the European Union observing elections in the region whilst the forum is visibly not represented.

5.9 The Plenary Assembly exhorted the Speaker of the National Assembly of Seychelles, Hon. Roger Mancienne, to actively secure an appointment for the High-Level Lobby Team to visit the Parliament of the Union of Comoros to entice them to join the forum.

6.0 MOTIONS ADOPTED DURING THE 51st PLENARY ASSEMBLY MEETINGS

6.1 Motion to Amend the Constitution of the SADC Parliamentary Forum to Provide For The Establishment of The SADC Parliamentary Forum and its Successors Trust

6.1.1   Plenary Assembly adopted the constitutional amendments to incorporate the provision to establish the SADC PF Successor’s Trust as a vehicle for SADC PF resource mobilisation.

6.2 Adoption of the Model Law on Public Finance Management

6.2.1 The Model Law on Public Finance Management seeks to cure a multiplicity of legal and regulatory gaps in the Financial Management Systems across SADC Member States that impede sound public financial management.

6.2.2 The Plenary Assembly Session adopted the Model Law on Public Financial Management (2022), which aims at good governance, accountability and transparency in the deployment of scarce public resources.

6.3 Report of the Standing Committee on Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources

6.3.1 Plenary endorsed the call for SADC governments to strengthen agricultural data collection and management systems to ensure that all Malabo Declarations, goals and targets are met.

6.3.2 The adopted report called on SADC Parliaments to continue capacitating Members of Parliaments with the necessary knowledge to effectively participate in the budget process, and notably contribute on issues relating to public spending in the agriculture sector.

6.3.3 The report implored SADC countries to recognise the critical contribution that women and youths make towards sustainable agriculture in the region. Consequently, a call was made for Member States to set aside a specific quota in their national budgets to ensure food security is achieved in the SADC region.

6.3.4 Plenary Assembly adopted the proposal to leverage on the Inga Dam Project, as a regional intervention which is able to provide electricity to the entire region and facilitate large-scale farming.

6.4 Report of the Standing Committee on Democratisation, Governance and Human Rights

6.4.1 The adopted motion encouraged Member States to finance and participate in Election Observation Missions (EOMs), particularly in the SADC Region.

6.4.2 The report recalled that the SADC PF has been known for producing very incisive electoral documents including the Model Law on Elections and Normative Standards on the Democratic Elections, which aim at facilitating the holding of democratic elections in the region. The Plenary Assembly agreed that it would be remiss for the region’s story on elections to be told by Commonwealth Observer Missions or the EU Observer Missions, especially in its own backyard. 

7.0 Resolutions and Way Forward

7.1 There is need to create conducive legal frameworks, policies and strategies that are key to unlocking the energy potential in the SADC Region. 

7.2 Biomass, oil, gas and coal dominate the current energy sources in the SADC Region, thus Member States are vulnerable to external shocks and climate change. SADC Member States must embrace renewable energy resources for their energy production. Furthermore, Member States can benchmark against the achievements made by Malawi in the removal of VAT and duty taxes on solar technologies and other renewable energy technologies which has resulted in the addition of 80 megawatts of solar power in the last nine months prior to the 51st Plenary Assembly meeting.

7.3 There is need for the integration of the regional electricity supply network to ensure that Member States can take advantage of economies of scale and reduce the cost of electricity infrastructure development.

7.4 The Plenary Assembly resolved to act against vandalism of energy infrastructure such as theft of transformers and copper wires that affects the energy security situation in the region. Such theft of public assets is economic sabotage. Member States should guard against this vandalism and ensure that stolen equipment from other Members States is not sold in their countries. Punitive laws should be enacted to curtail the vandalism of these public assets.

7.5 The SADC bloc needs to work together to ensure that the Inga Dam project is fully implemented as a sustainable intervention towards regional energy self-sufficiency, if not continentally. The Southern Africa Power Pool (SAPP) must therefore, take an interest in unlocking the potential of the Inga Hydro power project.

7.6 Regional Parliaments should organise All Stakeholder Workshops to facilitate the speedy implementation of resolutions from Inter-Parliamentary Organisations, especially on the Model Laws adopted by the Plenary Assemblies of the SADC PF.

 7.7  Through its Standing Committee Reports and submissions from its thematic organs, the Plenary Assembly adopted resolutions aimed at supporting the implementation of regional commitments in view of heightening need for gender equality, youth empowerment, enhanced agriculture, natural resource governance, anti-corruption and the need for pragmatic domestic resource mobilization. It is imperative to have cohesion in tackling the abovementioned subject areas to ensure that they dovetail with broader goals such as the Africa Agenda 2063, Ministerial commitments and the attainment of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

7.8  The 51st Plenary Assembly Session unanimously adopted the SADC Model Law on Public Financial Management (PFM). This constituted the fifth Model Law developed by the forum following those on HIV and AIDS (2008), Child Marriage (2016), Elections (2019) and Gender Based Violence (2021). There is need to scale up momentum towards the domestication of these various Model Laws already adopted by the Plenary Assembly.

7.9 The Plenary Assembly reiterated the need for all stakeholders to join hands to support the transformation of the forum into a Regional Parliament which has already been approved as a matter of policy by the 41st SADC Summit held in Lilongwe, Malawi in August 2021, and to ensure that the remaining legal steps are carried to the ultimate end. In this regard, the Plenary Assembly resolved to intensify lobbying efforts at national and regional levels to ensure that the stipulated majority is obtained at Summit level to adopt the Amendment to the SADC Treaty and the Protocol establishing the SADC Parliament.

7.10 The Plenary Assembly resolved to fully implement its Strategic Plan and ensure that the region becomes a vibrant powerhouse for socio-economic development and democratization through parliamentary initiatives that materially advance the standard of living and quality of lives of SADC citizens.

7.11 The Plenary Assembly stressed the need for Parliaments across the region to continue raising concern on the negative effects of destabilizing forces such as the conflict between DRC and Rwanda in the Eastern DRC as well as the banditry in Northern Mozambique. In respect of the decision by DRC not to attend the 145th Assembly of the IPU to be held in Rwanda, the Plenary Assembly pledged to advocate for dialogue and cessation of hostilities in the Eastern part of DRC, and that Rwanda be persuaded to disengage from further aggression.

7.12  The full dossier of the Plenary Assembly resolutions will be availed by the SADC Parliamentary Forum in due course for consideration by Portfolio and Thematic Committees of the Parliament of Zimbabwe.

8.0 Conclusion

8.1  The Plenary Assembly concluded by calling on Member Parliaments to continue intensifying collaborative efforts that ensure self-sufficiency and sustenance in the energy sector within the SADC region.

8.2   Parliament of Zimbabwe continues to play a highly effective leading role in the Transformation Agenda as the holders of the Chairpersonship of the Strategic Lobby Team of Hon. Speakers on the transformation of the Forum into a SADC Regional Parliament. There is need to continue lobbying Heads of State and governments on the Transformation Agenda, and in particular the Amendment of the Treaty to officially recognise the SADC Parliament as an organ of SADC.

 8.3 Parliament of Zimbabwe commits itself to the full implementation of the resolutions of the Plenary Assembly which shall be shared among all Members of Parliament to facilitate action by different Portfolio and Thematic Committees. 

8.4 Parliament of Zimbabwe commits itself to ensuring that resources are mobilised towards the establishment of the SADC PF and its Successor’s Trust. 

8.5 The 52nd Plenary Assembly of the SADC PF will be hosted by the Republic of South Africa, who have pledged to choreograph a memorable hosting. 

8.6 Finally and notably, the Speaker of the Parliament of Zimbabwe, Hon. Advocate Jacob Francis Nzwidamilimo Mudenda, presented a well-rehearsed infographic treatise on the IPU and all Zimbabwean delegates avidly contributed to the proceedings of the 51st Plenary Assembly Meeting of the SADC PF.  Furthermore, the Plenary Assembly observed a minute of silence on the passing on of former President José Eduardo dos Santos, of the Republic of Angola in recognition of his sterling leadership in the struggle to liberate Angola from the shackles of Portuguese colonialism. I thank you.

HON. SEN. MOHADI: Mr. President, I move that the debate do now adjourn.

HON. SEN. KAMBIZI: I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Date to resume: Thursday, 7th September, 2022.

MOTION

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

HON. SE. MUZENDA: Mr. President, I move that Orders of the Day, Nos. 2 to 3 be stood over until the rest of the Orders of the Day have been disposed of.

HON. SEN. KAMBIZI: I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

MOTION

REPORT OF THE DELEGATION TO THE UNITED NATIONS OFFICE OF COUNTER TERRORISM HIGH LEVEL CONFERENCE HELD IN ITALY

HON. SEN. DR. PARIRENYATWA: Mr. President, I move the motion standing in my name that this House takes note of the delegation to the United Nations Office at Counter Terrorism High Level Conference on Parliamentary Support to victims of terrorism held at Plazzo Mentecitorio-Nuova Aula Dei Gruppi Parliamentari Rome, Italy from 7th to 8th June, 2022.

HON. SEN. MATHUTHU:  I second.

HON. SEN. DR. PARIRENYATWA: Thank you Mr. President. I wish to present a report on the delegation to the United Nations Office of Counter Terrorism to the High Level Conference of Parliamentary support to Victims of Terrorism which was held in Palazzo, Montecitoria in Rome in June this year.

Introduction

The United Nations Office of Counter Terrorism (UNOCT) Programme Office on Parliamentary Engagement, in cooperation with the Parliamentary Assembly of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCEPA), the Parliamentary Assembly of the Mediterranean (PAM), the African Parliamentary Union (APU) and the Shura Council of the State of Qatar, organized a High-Level Conference on Parliamentary support to victims of terrorism. The conference took place at Palazzo Montecitorio - Nuova Aula dei Gruppi Parlamentari in Rome, Italy from 7 to 8 June 2022. The Chairperson of the Thematic Committee on Peace and Security, Hon. Sen. Dr. David P. Parirenyatwa, Member of the African Parliamentary Union (APU) Executive, Hon Tafanana Zhou, MP and Ms. T. Sukuta, Researcher for the Thematic Committee on Peace and Security, attended the conference.

The High-Level Conference brought together various stakeholders, including Parliamentarians, representatives of the United Nations (UN) entities, leading experts, members of regional Parliamentary Assemblies, victims of terrorism, victims’ associations, and civil society organizations, to discuss the best way for Parliamentarians to address the rights and needs of victims of terrorism and to find tangible legislative measures that can be implemented. The 2019 UN Assembly Resolution 73/305 and the Seventh Review Resolution of the UN Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy adopted in June 2021, urges Member States to strengthen their efforts to support victims and this support ranges from advocacy and solidarity to more practical measures such as capacity building and technical assistance.

Background

Terrorism and violent extremism remain an increasing global threat, which cannot be addressed effectively by military operations and security measures alone. They require a collaborative and multi-dimensional approach amongst the entire international community. Over the past few years, the international community has made real progress in upholding the rights and supporting the needs of victims of terrorism through the adoption of key UN General Assembly resolutions, by providing victims with a greater platform to share their experiences, as well as by placing victims at the forefront of United Nations counter-terrorism efforts. Victims of terrorist acts frequently suffer severe, multiple and life-altering injuries and trauma, akin to harm suffered by victims of grave human rights violations and international crimes. In addition to other forms of reparation, compensation for harm suffered, rehabilitation, and provision of adequate services can play an important role in enabling victims to move on with their lives.

The Main Objective of the Conference

The objective of the High-Level Conference was to find ways for Parliamentarians to address the rights and needs of victims of terrorism and to identify tangible and impactful legislative measures that can be implemented to enact positive change and create lasting impact at the national level as well as within communities.

Opening Remarks

Mr. Gennaro Migliore, PAM President, Mr. Ettore Rosato, Vice-President of the Italian Chamber of Deputies, Mr. Mauro Miedico, Deputy Director of the UNOCT, Mr. Mohamed Ali Houmed, President of the African Parliamentary Union, and Mr. Reinhold Lopatka, Vice-President of OSCE PA, addressed the Opening Session of the Conference.

Remarks by H.E Mr. Ettore Rosato, Vice President of the Chamber of Deputies of Italy.

His Excellency, Mr. Rosatto asserted that the threat of terrorism is still present in Italy and in the minds of its citizens. He highlighted that with regards to the latest attack in Nigeria, nations need to do more and assist in the fight against terrorism. On the Ukrainian war, he noted that he did not expect Europe to have such a war which is destabilising Europe and changing international relations. He reiterated that Parliamentarians should take action and focus on appropriate legislative tools to face this hideous act of terrorism. His Excellency, Mr. Rosatto affirmed that it is important to strengthen cooperation between Europe, Africa and the Mediterranean, and that there is need for economic, political and cultural collaborations. He further highlighted the importance to come up with common actions to support the victims of terrorism.

Remarks by Mr. Mauro Miedico, Deputy Director, Chief, Special Projects and Innovation Branch (SPIB), UNOCT.

Mr. Miedico, highlighted that they have developed a number of programmes to assist Member States in the fight against terrorism and to add a parliamentary dimension in the fight against terrorism which is essential in all areas of work, the Model Legislative Provision was developed. He noted that the Model Legislative Provision was developed over the last one and half years and was launched in February 2022 in New York. He described that the purpose of developing model legislative provisions was two-fold. First, to serve as a model for the review of existing laws and procedures related to victims of terrorism in line with recent advances on this subject matter, and to support the development of legislation where legislative gaps exist. Secondly, to systematize and promote the exchange of information regarding existing good practices. He asserted that the development of model legislative provisions was to help Member States draw attention to the urgency of taking concrete steps to protect, assist and support victims of terrorism.

Remarks by H.E. Mr. Gennaro Migliore, President, Parliamentary Assembly of the Mediterranean and Member of the Chamber of Deputies of Italy.

In his remarks, H.E Mr. Migliore highlighted that terrorism is a multi-dimensional challenge, and providing concrete support should be top priority. He noted the need to adopt resolutions so as to harmonize legislation and come up with internal instruments that support victims of terrorism. He further noted that the Nigerian attack affects everybody, hence it was critical to observe that for each victim of terrorism, the sorrow that is felt is the same, and that there is no nationality for victims of horrendous activities. He stated that there is need to rehabilitate and protect women and children. H.E, Mr. Migliore is of the view that civil society should be involved in the repatriation of victims and that there is need to raise awareness on conditions of victims, especially in camps. He emphasized that governments should come up with policies to support victims of terrorism and ensure access to justice. He stated that Parliamentary support is essential and therefore, Parliaments should ensure human rights compliance in the criminal justice system. He also reiterated that they have been several terrorist attacks in Italy and the government had come up with strong legislative measures to protect victims in that country.

Remarks by Hon. Abdellah bin Nacer Alsubaie, Member of the Shura Council of the State of Qatar.

In his remarks, Hon Alsubaie alluded to the fact that every year terrorist attacks kill and injure innocent people. To that end the international community has to get together to counter terrorism and put in place necessary precautions and measures to protect victims of terrorism. He asserted the necessity for parliaments to create legislative provisions to support and protect the needs of victims and share best practices in countering terrorism. He further highlighted the need for Parliamentarians to cooperate in countering terrorism thereby curbing violent extremism. He applauded UNOCT, UN Drugs and Crimes for working very hard in combating terrorism.

Remarks by H.E. Mohamed Ali Houmed, President, African Parliamentary Union and Speaker of the National Assembly of Djibouti.

His Excellency emphasized the need for coordinated efforts in the fight against terrorism and that international and regional support is required in supporting victims of terrorism. He stated that it is important to find the best ways to support victims of terrorism, show solidarity and enact laws to support such victims. He noted that laws did exist but lacked enforcement. He asserted the importance of cherishing memories of the victims and to set platforms that allow for the exchange of their experiences and ideas. Further to that, he emphasized the need to rehabilitate, protect and give assistance to victims.

Remarks by Hon. Reinhold Lopatka, Vice President and Chair of the Ad Hoc Committee on Counter Terrorism, Parliamentary Assembly of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe and Member of the National Council of Austria.

In his remarks, Hon Loptaka emphatically stressed that in the fight against terrorism, it is important to have the victims in mind bearing the fact that terrorism affects their lives forever. He highlighted that involvement of victims in the fight against terrorism is key as they contribute in fighting the impunity of terrorism, assist in developing counter terrorism measures and are powerful and credible messengers and their experiences put a human face to the impact of terrorism. He asserted that a lot has to be done in social media so as to change the narratives of fear and hatred. He elaborated that it is important for Parliaments to work with civil and international organizations in supporting victims of terrorism. He stressed that Parliaments are responsible for shaping legislation and policy frameworks, have influence over the budget, oversee government actions not to use terrorism against the people and therefore are in a position to support the implementation of resolutions that support victims of terrorism.

Keynote Addresses

Among the Keynote Speakers were Mr. Tarek Noseir, Member of the Arab Parliament and Member of the House of Representatives of Egypt, Mr. Gonzalo de Salazar, Deputy Head of Mission of Spain to Italy, Mr. Vittorio Occorsio, Founder of the “Vittorio Occorsio” Foundation, and Ms. Jacqueline Odoul, Chair of the IPU High-Level Advisory Group on Countering Terrorism and Violent Extremism.

Sen. Tarek Noseir, Member of Arab Parliament and Member of the Senate of Egypt.

Sen Nosier elaborated the importance of reflecting on the role that can be played by Parliaments in combating terrorism, and that is of creating national policies. He therefore called upon nations to show their commitment to support victims through the enactment of legislation.  He emphasized that victim voices should be heard, and protected and the need for Parliaments to come up with best practices and adopt a comprehensive vision to deal with the needs of the victims.          

Mr. Gonzalo de Salazar, Deputy Head of Mission of Spain to Italy (on behalf of the Group of Friend of Victims of Terrorism).

Mr. Salazar emphasized the need of putting victims of terrorism at the forefront as they are vulnerable targets. He further stated that the Group of Friends seeks to promote a comprehensive approach towards the promotion and protection of human rights of the victims of terrorism and to advocate their diverse needs in the short, medium and long-term. The group also ensures that victims voices are heard, their rights protected, and their recovery and rehabilitation needs addressed.

Mr. Vittorio Occorsio, Vittorio Occorsio Foundation, Italy

In his address, Mr. Occorsio highlighted the importance of the memory of victims and stated that the Parliament of Italy approved a law for the commemoration of victims of terrorism and a National Day of Terrorism was established.

Hon. Professor Jacqueline Odoul, Chair, IPU High Level Advisory Group on Countering Terrorism and Violent Extremism and Member of the National Assembly of Kenya.

Hon. Odoul, spoke about the importance of systematizing and promoting the exchange of existing good practices amongst parliaments. She highlighted the need to take necessary steps to protect and promote the interests of the victims of terrorism, especially championing the needs of women and girls. She asserted the need of coming up with a clear mechanism to deal with compensation to victims.

The Model Legislative Provisions (MLPs) to Support and Protect the Rights and Needs of Victims of Terrorism

The High-level conference included a presentation of the Model Legislative Provisions, to support and protect the rights and needs of Victims of Terrorism, which is a tool for parliamentarians jointly developed by United Nations Office of Counter-Terrorism/United Nations Counter-Terrorism Centre (UNOCT/UNCCT), United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), and the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU). It was launched virtually on 4 February 2022.

The provisions are comprehensive and underline the need for States to follow a victim-centric approach in addressing the rights and needs of victims. The Model Legislative Provisions are intended to assist Member States in protecting the rights and supporting the needs of victims of terrorism in their national laws. Their purpose is twofold:

  • First, to serve as a model for the review and modernisation of existing laws and procedures related to victims of terrorism and the drafting of legislation where legislative exists;
  • Secondly, to systematise existing good practices and promote the harmonisation of legislation to support and protect victims of terrorism internationally, in line with recent advances on this topic.

The Model Legislative Provisions are based on the existing international normative frameworks pertaining to victims of crimes, gross human rights violations and serious violations of international humanitarian law. They aim at ensuring equal treatment among all victims and are geared towards addressing their needs as a result of the harm suffered, without distinction as to the root causes of their harm.

The provisions include fundamental rights of victims which must be observed by nations. These include inter alia:

  • The right to necessary assistance and support (medical, psychological, social, and material);
  • The right to adequate, effective, and prompt reparation (including restitution, compensation, satisfaction, and truth), cessation, and guarantees of non-repetition;
  • The right to protection of physical and psychological integrity, privacy and reputation; the right to access to justice in all criminal, civil and administrative proceedings and processes related to being a victim;
  • The right to access to information about the above rights and remedies.

Session I: The Role of Parliamentarians in Ensuring a Tailored Response to Address Large Scale Displacement and Violations of Rights to Livelihood, Shelter, Education, Healthcare and Liberty of Victims of Terrorism.

          During the first session, panellists discussed the role of parliamentarians in ensuring a tailored response to address large scale displacement and violations of rights to livelihood, shelter, education, healthcare, and liberty. These included:

  • Quick responses after a terrorist attack-timely action can prevent traumatic stress and disability effectively.
  • Immediate psychological support-rehabilitation services.
  • Removal of barriers within the government in accessing important documentation for victims.
  • Mechanisms to facilitate the life of a victim by reducing bureaucratic channels.
  • Establishment of one stop centres for victims of terrorism.
  • Awareness of the mental damage caused by terrorism, this can be attained through education.
  • Reconciliation with religious groups and the society.
  • Protection and respect of human rights.
  • Development of a legislative process.
  • Establishment of associations of victims for support services and victim protection units.
  • Social recognition.
  • National Day of Remembrance of victims of terrorism-preservation of memory.
  • Compensation and reparation to victims of terrorism including their families.

Session II: The Role of Civil Society Groups and Organisations in Complementing State and Parliamentary Efforts in Supporting Victims of terrorism and Ensuring Access to Justice.

The second session focused on the role of civil society groups and organizations in complementing state and parliamentary efforts in supporting victims of terrorism and ensuring access to justice. It was discussed that civil society organisations are the cornerstone of upholding the rule of law and implementing fundamental rights. It was stated that they are an integral part of victim support as they ensure that victims’ rights are exercised. They play an important role in oversight, carry out important advocacy work, bring strategic cases to courts, and ensure that national and international judgments create a legal framework for victims’ rights. It was highlighted that civil society organizations are better placed to provide the representation and inclusion of vulnerable victims, children, women or the disabled, and work to ensure that decision-makers take all victims of all crimes into account when developing and adopting laws or policies. Fundamentally, civil society organizations provide psycho-social support to victims.

The Work Done and New Initiatives by UNOCT and Parliamentary Assemblies to Enhance Parliamentary Response in Supporting Victims of Terrorism and the Role They Can Play in Reviewing and Reformulating New Legislation Based on MLPs.

The work done to enhance Parliamentary response in supporting victims of terrorism was highlighted. The Draft Resolution on Victims of Terrorism that would be discussed at the upcoming OSCE PA’s Annual Session was introduced. The resolution calls upon OSCE participating States to adopt comprehensive assistance plans and to establish a permanent co-ordination body for victims of terrorism. It is hoped that this resolution will further advance the international counter-terrorism framework, providing clear guidance and heightened standards for participating States in supporting and upholding the rights of victims.

Session III: Incorporating Protection and National Support, Including Material and Social Needs, For Victims of Terrorism in State Counter Terrorism Strategies and Legislation.

Session three focused on incorporating protection and national support, including material and social needs, for victims of terrorism in counter-terrorism strategies and legislation. These included nations ensuring inter alia adequate budget allocation for victims, critical psycho-social support, procedures that facilitate immediate access to medical services, strengthening victim support services, access to education, justice and information.

Session IV: Good Practices and Lessons Learnt on Support to Victims of Terrorism on the Local and National Levels and Importance of Systematising and Promoting the Exchange of Information Regarding Existing Good Practices.

In Session Four, panelists shared good practices and lessons learnt on support to victims of terrorism on the local and national levels and the importance of systematizing and promoting the exchange of information regarding existing good practice. It was discussed that in order to play a crucial role in efforts to counter terrorism, nations needed to adopt good practices that meet international obligations while ensuring the protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms. These good practices inter alia are, enacting a legal framework, access to justice, the right to reparation, education, prompt and efficient assistance, recognition through medals, protection of the physical and psychological well-being of the victim, relationship between the victim and media to avoid secondary victimisation and setting up of hotlines and websites to keep the victims up to date. It was highlighted that good practices are therefore aimed at assisting nations to establish and enhance policies, laws and institutional capacity to provide improved outcomes for victims, while fully respecting the rule of law and rights of victims.

Victims of Terrorism.

Victims of terrorism have a central role to play in ensuring effective investigation and prosecution of terrorist cases and contribute to collecting evidence. Therefore, one of the aims of the conference was to make the victims voices heard and disseminate their shared experiences. It was also to enable their positive values to be understood and their role empowered to use as an effective tool to make people aware of the dangers of terrorism and violent extremism. Victims have become representatives of what a terrorist act implies for the lives of ordinary citizens and victims of terrorism are considered credible voices on the painful and human consequences of violent extremism and terrorism. Victims are therefore the representatives of and ambassadors for public memory. This voice can offer a strong narrative for the purpose of creating awareness of radicalisation and preventing violent extremism.

Expectations Raised by Victims of Terrorism.

  • Victims’ voices initiative programmes that show victims’ stories as they are most impactful when shared directly by victims, in their own words. This can be done through a global platform that amplifies victim voices, for example handbooks and documentary series. Ultimately, the stories aim to raise a collective consciousness and to create awareness about the importance of preventing terrorist attacks and the ensuing emergence of new victims.
  • Honouring of Remembrance Day of victims and commemoration campaigns that share the intimate memories of the victims of terrorism.
  • Establishment of a centre for victims of terrorism that provides education and training.
  • Immediate access to medical and rehabilitative services.
  • Empowerment of victims of terrorism.

Outcomes.

  • The Conference gave the opportunity to Parliamentarians and victims to contribute to global efforts to combat terrorism and prevent violent extremism through decisive action and practical assistance to people who have become victims of terrorist attacks.
  • One of the main topics of the conference was the discussion of the role of various non-governmental structures and civil society organizations in complementing State and parliamentary efforts to support victims of terrorism and ensure access to justice.
  • The participants shared best practices in supporting victims of terrorism at the local and national levels and recognized the importance of systematizing and encouraging the exchange of information on existing best practices in this area.
  • The conference recorded rich exchanges of experiences and good practices in terms of administrative, financial, legal, social and moral assistance as well as memorial duty towards the victims of terrorism.
  • A follow up congress on support to victims of terrorism to be held in September 2022, on how parliamentarians can further the rights and needs of the victims of terrorism.

Measures Aimed at Supporting Victims of Terrorism Suggested by Parliamentarians.

The following pragmatic interventions and recommendations were suggested regarding the victims:

  • There is need for the promotion of resolutions specifically dedicated to victims.
  • There is need for the creation of national systems of assistance which would promote the needs of victims of terrorism and their families and facilitate the normalization of their lives.
  • Member States are encouraged to strengthen the implementation of national legislation and policies that support and protect victims of acts of terrorism and this can be done in close partnership with governments, victims’ organizations and civil society groups.
  • There is need to enhance the capacity of governments and other stakeholders to increase support for victims of terrorism.
  • There is need to promote a specific mechanism in the assemblies, that is, a detailed questionnaire prepared by each assembly that can be used to gather information.
  • There is need to support the work of requesting parliaments.
  • Member States were encouraged to hold dialogues with civil society organizations so as to enable parliamentary action to put voices of the victims on the platform.
  • There is need to extend broader protection to victims.
  • Coordination of all law enforcement and criminal justice agencies involved at all stages of victim’s interaction with the criminal justice system is required.
  • There is need is need for victim sensitive approaches when dealing with victims.
  • Member States were urged to ensure that procedures regulating victims’ status, participation and protection in court proceedings are in place.
  • There is need for timely and fair restitution, reparation and compensation of victims.
  • There is need for the media to play an active role in raising awareness on the vulnerability of victims, especially in avoiding secondary victimization.

Recommendations by the Zimbabwe Delegation.

  • Perceiving that Zimbabwe may currently not be directly experiencing terrorist threats, the Cabo Delgado case is a cause for serious concern. The Ministry of Home Affairs and Cultural Heritage and the Ministry of Defence and War Veterans Affairs by 31 August 2022, need to adopt an inclusive, whole-of-government and holistic approach that includes cooperation with various stakeholders such as civil society organisations in countering terrorism and support victims of terrorism. Strong emphasis should therefore be placed on strengthening and implementing counter terrorism legislation and policies that support victims of terrorism.
  • The Ministry of Defence and War Veterans Affairs and the Ministry of Home Affairs and Cultural Heritage should introduce border guards and strengthen border patrols by 31 August 2022, especially at the Zimbabwe – Mozambique border.
  • The Zimbabwean Government, by 31 August 2022 should aim at strengthening its relations with other regional and international bodies in fighting terrorism together and supporting victims of terrorism as well as enhancing collaboration on border management
  • The Ministry of Finance and Economic Development must allocate adequate funds to the Ministry of Defence and War Veterans Affairs and the Ministry of Home Affairs and Cultural Heritage to enable the ministries to strengthen surveillance mechanisms at border posts by 31 December 2022.

Closing Remarks.

It was affirmed that there is need to promote the role of civil society groups and organizations in complementing State and parliamentary efforts in supporting victims of terrorism and ensuring access to justice. It was further alluded that we must not forget that Parliamentarians not only hold the power of legislation, but of oversight as well. It is therefore up to Parliamentarians to make sure that there are laws and policies that promote the rights of the victims in countering terrorism. Concerns around the war in Ukraine were also raised, and how the resulting instability could stimulate local crises, creating conditions for radicalization.

Conclusion.

The delegation received pointed capacity building on counter-terrorism strategy and legislation to support the victims of terrorism, including the recent measures adopted to prevent radicalization. Prevention was identified as the key measure, with recent efforts focusing on combating cyber terrorism and online radicalization as new and pressing threats. The need to ensure memory, dignity and justice to all victims was repeatedly stressed. The conference concluded with a call for increased joint and multilateral action at regional and international levels to address global terrorist threats and a call for concrete recommendations and regional plans of action through the Parliamentary Assemblies, and lastly a follow up Congress to be held in September 2022 on the resolutions for the support of victims of terrorism.  I thank you.

HON. SEN. DR. PARIRENYATWA: I move that the debate do now adjourn.

          HON. SEN. MATHUTHU: I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume: Thursday, 8th September, 2022.

MOTION

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

          HON. SEN. MUZENDA: I move that Order of the Day, Number 5 be stood over until Order of the Day, Number 6 has been disposed of.

          HON. SEN. KAMBIZI: I second.

          Motion put and agreed to.

MOTION

PROVISION OF FUNDS FOR COMPLETION OF DAM CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

          Sixth Order read: Adjourned debate on motion on the need for Government to provide adequate funds for the completion of dam projects.

          Question again proposed.

          HON. SEN. MABIKA: I move that the debate do now adjourn.

          HON. SEN. CHIRONGOMA: I second.

          Motion put and agreed to.

          Debate to resume: Thursday, 8th September, 2022.

MOTION

PARENTING AND EMBRACING A RECEPTIVE CULTURE FOR CHILDREN LIVING IN THE STREETS

          Seventh Order read: Adjourned debate on motion on the vulnerable children living in the streets.

          Question again proposed.

          HON. SEN. S. MPOFU: I move that the debate do now adjourn.

          HON. SEN. NKOMO: I second.

          Motion put and agreed to.

          Debate to resume: Thursday, 8th September, 2022.

ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE HON. DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF SENATE

RECOMMITAL OF THE FINANCE BILL [H. B. 9A, 2022]

          THE HON. DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF SENATE: It has just been brought to our attention by our legal experts that yesterday when the Hon. Minister of Finance and Economic Development made the proposed amendments to Clauses 2 and 3, it was done after the Committee Stage.  Therefore, it was not recorded in the Hansard during the Committee Stage.  In terms of Standing Orders and our law, it has to be done in the Committee Stage and we will have to recommit the Finance Bill.  The Minister will then present the amendments and we will have met the full legal requirements of Parliamentary procedures in terms of passing the Bills.  We are waiting for the notes, so you can have copies of the amendments.

          Senate business temporarily suspended awaiting copies of amendments.

          THE MINISTER OF FINANCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (HON. PROF. M. NCUBE):  Mr. President, following the approval of the Finance Bill, [H. B. 9A, 2022] by the Senate yesterday.  It has become necessary to recommit Clauses 2 and 3 for reconsideration by the whole House.

          The reason is to make sure that there is no confusion in the interpretation by our tax practitioners at ZIMRA and other institutions.  I therefore move that Clauses 2 and 3 that had been put and agreed to be recommitted for consideration by the Committee of the whole House.

RECOMMITAL STAGE

FINANCE BILL [H. B.9A, 2022]

          House in Committee

          On Clause 2:

          THE MINISTER OF FINANCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (HON. PROF. M. NCUBE):  Mr. Chairman, Clause 2 which is linked to Clause 3 and to an extent Clause 8 seeks to review the local tax free threshold on employee income from ZWL25 000.00 to ZWL75 000.00 per month or ZWL300 000.00 to ZWL900 000.00 per annum which cumulatively translates to ZWL375 000.00 for the last five months of the year of assessment beginning 1st August, 2022.  The amendment to ZWL75 000.00 per month for the remaining five months is in response to representations by Members of Parliament. 

          Notwithstanding the above, the monetary amounts in Clause 2 and also on Table 3 which is linked to the Clause which indicates a tax free threshold of ZWL900 000.00 are not consistent with the interpretation of the tax law which distinguishes between the tax year of assessment and the fiscal year.  Clauses 2 and 3 should read concurrently with Clause 8 which provides for tax periods of assessment during the fiscal year 2022.  The first year of assessment begins 1st January, 2022 and ends on 31st July, 2022; while the second tax year of assessment covers the period 1st August to 31st December, 2022.

          Accordingly, the proposed local currency tax free threshold of ZWL75 000.00 per month, as approved by the National Assembly, should cover the period commencing 1st August to 31st December, 2022.  In aggregate terms, the tax free threshold for the five months period should thus be ZWL375 000.00 instead of ZWL900 000.00 as it appears in the Bill approved by the House of Assembly.  Therefore, the other tax bands on both Clauses 2 and 3 should accordingly be adjusted in line with the revised tax free threshold to end at ZWL5million for the remaining five months of the year, above which the marginal tax rate of 40% applies.

          The revised table on, I know Mr. Chairman, we are considering clause by clause, Clause 2 but maybe you will allow me to read the remainder of my statement as follows – which is the revised tax table on Clause 3, which is linked to Clause 2 should thus be as follows, given that Hon. Members have the document in front of them …

          THE TEMPORARY CHAIRPERSON (HON. SEN. CHIEF CHARUMBIRA):  Order, order Hon. Minister, we do it clause by clause.  We have just taken a break by the Hon. Minister to ensure that we consider clause by clause, not omnibus.  So we are only dealing with Clause 2, then we go to Clause 3.

          Amendments to Clause 2 recommended to the National Assembly.

          Clause 2, as amended, recommended to the National Assembly.

          On Clause 3:

          THE MINISTER OF FINANCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (HON. PROF. M. NCUBE): The revised tax table on Clause 3 should read as follows; the 1st band of up to 300 000 to ZWL500 000 with a tax rate of 0%.  The 2nd band of ZWL375 001 to 715 000 with a specific percentage of 20%; the 3rd band of ZWL715 801 to 1, 3 million with a tax band of 25%; 4th band of 1 300 001 to 2, 4 million with a tax rate of 30%, the 5th band of ZWL2 400 001 up to 5 million with a tax rate of 35% and finally, ZWL5 000 001 with a tax rate of 40%.

          Amendments to Clause 3 recommended to the National Assembly.

          Clause 3, as amended, recommended to the National Assembly.

          Bill, as amended, adopted.

          Third Reading: With leave, forthwith.

THIRD READING

FINANCE BILL [H. B. 9A, 2022]

          THE MINISTER OF FINANCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (HON. PROF. M. NCUBE): I move that the Bill be now read the third time.

          Motion put and agreed to.

          Bill read the third time

On the motion of THE MINISTER OF FINANCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (HON. PROF. M. NCUBE), the House adjourned at Eighteen Minutes past Four o’clock p.m.

 

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